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Thread: When to be concerned?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Default When to be concerned?

    Almost 4 weeks and still struggling with OS. It just seems to be getting worse. I am still always engorged. Now my little guy is having watery, more green than yellow stools several times a day. He's not losing weight and seems mostly satisfied when he eats. He is eating every 2-3 hrs during the day and 3-4 at night for 10-15 mins on one side only. I'm really worried about the stools. They have all but lost that yellow, seedy look. When do I need to be worried?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    If your baby does not seem distressed, I wouldn't really worry about it. If you are certain that you have an oversupply, then you can block feed to reduce supply if you are not already doing so. If you are already block feeding, keep at it and be patient because it can take awhile to work.

    Illness can change stools too, so you can look out for a fever and other signs of infection if you have reason to be concerned about that.

    But if stool color/consistency is the only problem, I don't see any reason for concern. I would start to worry if the oversupply starts causing you or your baby excessive discomfort.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  3. #3
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    DS had a few green poops that scared the crap out of me! : haha no pun intended...seriously though, from all I gathered green poo is rarely a cause for concern. And as for the wateriness, BF poo is often watery; I could be wrong---in which case there's something terribly wrong with DS---but I think it's normal.
    Daniel Keith + Rachel Joy = Leonel Dante [4/13/2012]

  4. #4
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    We were having some frothy stools a few days ago (my guy is 5 weeks). I spoke to my friend's mom, who's an IBCLC, and she said as long as he's gaining weight there isn't anything to be worried about (I know that's easier said than done). I have some OS/OALD issues (not sure exactly what but my milk sprays like crazy), so I let the let down run into a diaper first, and I stick to one side while he's nursing. It's frustrating for sure.
    Becky

    Mommy to Owen b. 4/20/12

  5. #5
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*brogers View Post
    I have some OS/OALD issues (not sure exactly what but my milk sprays like crazy), so I let the let down run into a diaper first, and I stick to one side while he's nursing. It's frustrating for sure.
    This can be very helpful if you are struggling with OALD in addition to the OS. Unfortunately, my baby did not have the patience for this and would start shrieking as soon as I unlatched him. I've heard that hand expressing a bit before nursing can be helpful too, but this also did not work for me. Nursing while reclined was my personal lifesaver. I would lean back on a few pillows, put my baby on my chest, and let him latch himself. The uphill nursing allows gravity to slow the flow of the milk. I'm not sure we would have made it without discovering that!

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*raejoy View Post
    And as for the wateriness, BF poo is often watery; I could be wrong---in which case there's something terribly wrong with DS---but I think it's normal.
    I don't think I would say terribly wrong. Very minor illnesses can cause watey stools, and mama's milk and lots of cuddles are often the best cure. But as I said previously, I would keep an eye out for fever if there is reason to suspect illness (more serious illnesses may require a slightly more sophisticated treatment).
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  6. #6
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*phi View Post
    I don't think I would say terribly wrong. Very minor illnesses can cause watey stools, and mama's milk and lots of cuddles are often the best cure. But as I said previously, I would keep an eye out for fever if there is reason to suspect illness (more serious illnesses may require a slightly more sophisticated treatment).
    uh-oh...now I'm worried! His poops have never been very solid. Or really, solid at all. At his 2-week check-up he was declared healthy, and he hasn't had a fever or anything. Could there still be something wrong? How solid are their poops supposed to be?
    Daniel Keith + Rachel Joy = Leonel Dante [4/13/2012]

  7. #7
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    I'm sure your baby is fine. You are correct that breastfed baby stools are very runny.

    All I'm saying is that if stools are more runny than usual, there could be a very minor illness (thus it's not just a case of normal vs. terribly wrong). Usually stools are also foul smelling when there is an illness. Only worry about this if you have reason to suspect an illness (e.g. contact with a sick person, fever, etc.). It sounds like everything is smooth sailing in your case.

    So sorry, I didn't mean to freak you out!

    ETA: I reread your post and I think I misunderstood. I was referring to excessively watery stools in a general sense, not in your specific case. My son never had a solid poop until after starting solids. Please don't worry about it! Honestly, I truly doubt the OP has anything to worry about either. I just wanted to be thorough.
    Last edited by @llli*phi; May 28th, 2012 at 11:51 AM.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  8. #8
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    My fourth kid never had yellow seedy stools, and he was fine.

    Are you block feeding? You could try longer blocks.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    Seedy is only one normal consistency in a variety of normal exclusively breastmilk poop consistencies. Mustard yellow is one normal color in a variety of normal breastmilk poop colors. And breastmilk poops will always be very liquidy & often frequent and copious because baby is on a liquid diet. A baby who is ill, distressed or in pain will usually act ill, distressed, or in pain. Oversupply is not usually a medical problem. Sometimes it causes a breastfeeding problem, (baby unhappy with the flow, or mom feels engorged, gets plugged ducts, etc,) and in those cases taking simple steps to lower supply or lessen letdown makes sense. Sometimes it can cause gastrointestinal distress in baby, which will be obvious from baby’s behavior, and again in those cases taking simple steps to lower supply and/or lessen letdown makes sense. If not, it is nothing to worry about.

    The simplest and easiest first step in dealing with oversupply or forceful letdown when/if it is causing a problem is to not limit nursing sessions or delay feedings in any way. Even if you are block feeding, do not limit how many times baby comes to the breast.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: When to be concerned?

    Have you tried block feeding?? I had to do this with my first...and it worked really well. I would nurse him only on the right side for 3-4 feedings in a row. Then I would switch and do the left side for 3-4 feedings in a row. After a few days, I started producing less milk and we were able to return to switching sides every 1-2 feedings instead. It helped him get his yellow, seedy poops back
    Proud mama to Matthew Rory, born naturally 10/29/10, and mama to Callie Elisabeth, born naturally 5/15/12.

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