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Thread: On a breastfeeding ledge...

  1. #11
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    100% with mommal. I had an oversupply and my son was chubby to the point where he had rolls covering rolls that were covering yet more rolls around his neck, arms, and legs. There is no doubt in my mind that he was getting plenty of "creamy goodness" even though he didn't usually "empty" the breast.

    I recall reading somewhere that the thinner milk at the beginning of the feed also has the highest concentration of immunological elements. I can't source that right now, so I don't know how reliable that info is. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  2. #12
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Even if she isn't eating much (how do you know for sure?) it has to go in to come out. I think having days where you eat less or more are normal for life. My four year old does that and so do I. I understand your concern, I understand that it's hard to relax. If she is meeting her milestones and having the rich number of wets and dirties, she is probably fine.

  3. #13
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    Mar 2006
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*larkface View Post
    Her latch is great and she transfers fine in other positions, it's just side-lying where she struggles. And I don't know if it's because she gets too super snuggly and just comfort nurses, or if we just don't have the positioning right yet. She has been evaluated for tongue tie and she doesn't have one, but she did have a lip tie and we got that fixed.

    She wets 6-8 diapers in 24 hours, and usually has at least one super poop blowout a day. Sometimes I wonder though how accurate this is as a measurement tool for milk intake, because she has had some days where she barely eats (like today) but she is outputting just fine.

    Bah, now I feel like I am just whining. But this being my first time as mom, with a preemie, with my fair share of nursing struggles, and now going back to work...I am overwhelmed.
    Mama, sounds like baby is doing GREAT. Stop worrying (yeah, easier said than done, I know) Instead, think about how to make pumping work for you. Like plan this a bit. What kind of pump do you have? Do you have spare parts? Have you thought about how you don't have to wash everything between pumps at work? Where are you going to pump? Do you have a hands free bra? That sort of thing. Pumping is a tool to maximize your breastfeeding time. I guarantee you will be counting the days down until you pump wean, but you can do this. We have a lot of RNs here who make it work.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  4. #14
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Well, the tentative plan is to try and pump 3 times during my shift, at 9ish, 1ish, and 5ish, but we'll see how that goes. I have a PISA that works pretty well for me, and I also have access to the Medela hospital grade at work ...the Symphony I think. If I can get away to use the fancy one I will, but if not I'll be bringing my own pump with me so I can pump on the unit (somewhere) just to get the session in. My LO usually nurses every two hours but there's no way I'd be able to pump that frequently.

    I respond pretty well to the pump even when my supply sucks, like now. I just did a power-hour pump, 10 on 10 off and got 3.5 ounces. When my supply is strong, I can get 4 ounces in 5 minutes without even trying. I guess since I started off pumping for my babe when she was in the NICU I got pretty adept at it. I have lots of spare parts and typically only wash the equipment at the end of the day, as long as it went into the fridge right after pumping.

    Thanks for the encouragement everyone. I'm backing down off the ledge. I just worry so much about my LO growing and developing well that it's so hard to handle days when she doesn't eat well or my supply is low. I am committed to thos out of love, but geez does it stress me out.
    I'm Erin, mommy to Ella, born at 33 weeks 4 days, and Addison, born at 35 weeks and 5 days.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    it sounds like you actually do already have a pretty good plan in place, then! it's okay to freak out occasionally and get support, though. this all is tough.
    DS1 6/7/11
    DS2 10/29/13

    Nursing, pumping, cloth-diapering, babywearing, working professor mama with the awesomest SAHD ever.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*larkface View Post
    I respond pretty well to the pump even when my supply sucks, like now. I just did a power-hour pump, 10 on 10 off and got 3.5 ounces. When my supply is strong, I can get 4 ounces in 5 minutes without even trying.
    Based on those pumping amounts, It sounds to me like you're making a common new mama error: mistaking normal supply for low supply. 4 oz in 5 minutes is on the high side. 3.5 oz in 10 minutes is closer to normal, but still a bit above average. Most moms whose supplies are well-matched to their babies' needs produce around 1.5 oz per hour because most babies need about 1.5 oz per hour. (This goes for bottles, too, once you return to work.)
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #17
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    It was actually 3.5 ounces in 30 minutes of pumping, I did 10 on 10 off for an hour, and the baby hadn't eaten well before then, I don't think my previous post was clear. Next time I pumped it was after an OK feeding and I only got 1 ounce total after 20 minutes of pumping.

    The main issue, even if this is a "normal" supply and not an actual low supply, my baby hates it and undereats due to frustration. I would say that 95% of the time if I weighed her before and after a feed she would take 2.1 ounces morning, noon, or night, and she ate 12-14 times a day. Now, she's eating maybe 8-10 times, and she has yet to take more than 1.7 ounces. And she's more tired. Her diaper output is what it usually is though, so I'm stumped and frustrated, and sad.

    But I'm not still thinking of quitting, so that's good.
    Last edited by @llli*larkface; May 26th, 2012 at 01:12 PM.
    I'm Erin, mommy to Ella, born at 33 weeks 4 days, and Addison, born at 35 weeks and 5 days.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    What you are describing sounds normal, and not an indication of low supply. When I had oversupply, I could easily pump 8-10 ounces in addition to nursing. Once my supply regulated, while at work I produced just enough to provide milk for the next day. When at home and nursing, I could barely pump anything at all - which is how it is supposed to be. Supply = demand.

    You don't want oversupply. Engorgement and plugged ducts are not only uncomfortable, but can lead to infection and become a real health hazard.

    Do you have enough milk socked away for your first day of work (plus maybe a few extra "just in case" bottles)? If so, you should consider putting the pump away for a little while and just enjoy nursing your baby. It sounds like you may be stressing yourself out for no real reason.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  9. #19
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Unfortunately it looks like things are getting worse. She is starting to refuse the breast, actively sucking for maybe 2 minutes then pushing herself off and starting to cry. I'll switch her to the other one where she does the same thing, and then is just done. I can not get her back on, even to comfort nurse. I don't think there's any way she is getting enough to eat, especially since she's only nursed 3 times in the last 9 hours.

    I keep pumping, but even that output is going down. My husband tried to give her a bottle of EBM after she wouldnt take the breast but was showing hunger cues, but she refused that too! It's not even like formula would even help tright now. Why is she hunger striking?! And she is hasn't wet her diaper in 4 hours.

    This is a nightmare. Why is she doing this now, right beforr I go back to work? What should we do? I'm starting to panic.
    I'm Erin, mommy to Ella, born at 33 weeks 4 days, and Addison, born at 35 weeks and 5 days.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: On a breastfeeding ledge...

    Have you tried nursing her while walking around with her either in a sling or just in your arms. That was the only way I could get my on to stop screaming and nurse for about to weeks. You can also try rocking or gently bouncing while nursing her. The motion can be very helpful to calm her down enough to nurse. You can also try nursing her in a nice warm bath.

    Also, do you think it is possible that she could have an ear infection? Those often bring about nursing strikes.

    ETA: And try not to panic (yes, much easier said than done). Your baby picks up on your stress, and it only makes things worse (at least that's how it has been for me). Get out for a quick walk or take a nice long shower or whatever will help you decompress - then try again.
    Last edited by @llli*phi; May 27th, 2012 at 12:23 PM.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

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