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Thread: Introducing formula

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Spain
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    Default Introducing formula

    My baby is currently 10 weeks old and ebf. We have had absolutely no problems so far. I will be going back to work in 7 weeks and it will not be possible for me to pump during work. I'm trying to put a plan in place now so that I can ease him into it. I plan to continue breastfeeding exclusively when I am at home and I think that two bottles of formula a day should be sufficient. I will only be working for 2.5 hours in the mornings and 3 in the afternoons, and going home at lunch to breastfeed. Will it be possible to cut two breastfeeding sessions per day and still have enough milk to breastfeed fulltime outside working hours and at weekends (i.e. can my breasts adjust to this change)? Also, how much formula would he require at each feed if supplementing only twice a day?
    Any advice would be great!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    20,944

    Default Re: Introducing formula

    Can you tell us more about your job- the type of work you do, and why you will be unable to pump? Often moms think they cannot pump and do not realize that they have a legal right to breaks and a legal right to pump.

    You will not be at work that long, so you probably don't need to use much formula. Maybe an oz or two during each work period, just to tide baby over until you can nurse on your lunch break or after work. If you wanted, you would probably be able to express enough milk outside of work hours, enabling you to cover your baby's needs during the workday without you needing to use formula.

    Introducing formula: if baby will take it plain, offer it plain. If baby rejects it based on taste, you may have to mix it with breastmilk and gradually taper the percentage of breastmilk until baby is willing to take plain formula. Remember that the storage guidelines for expressed milk and formula are different: expressed milk can be re-refrigerated if baby doesn't finish the bottle, but formula or formula mixed with breastmilk cannot. That's why it's best to offer formula and breastmilk separately, so that only formula gets wasted if baby does not finish a bottle.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,440

    Default Re: Introducing formula

    Maybe it will be OK and maybe not. You are in a much better postion than many moms who try to not pump during the day as you will be able to nurse at lunch. But some moms find their supply is sensitive and dropping nursing sessions causes a loss of supply. You don't know until you try. I worked with a mom who could only pump once during her work day, and she struggled on weekends.

    Looking at that schedule, though, you may be able to get away with no bottles if you nurse right before you leave and right ehen you come home after work. A 20 week old child might be going 3 hour between feeds. Some do. Some don't. I guess I would make sure he would take formula, in case, but so much is going to change in 7 weeks that I would not rely on what baby is doing now to guide me with what to do then. Does that make sense?

    Your right to pump at work is protected by law. Are you sure you can't work a pumping session in? And some moms pump while driving the car, and that session can be very productive.

    I have no idea how much formula is needed. I have never used it; fortunately, I never needed it, even with EPing for a cleft baby.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    18,063

    Default Re: Introducing formula

    you might think about using a spoon or cup to feed suppliments so baby gets all sucking needs met at the breast.
    Lots of babies will nurse alot more when your together and then sleep while your gone. Hang in there you guys can work this out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Spain
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    Thanks for all the advice. I work in an office and I am legally entitled to 2 hours per day for breastfeeding, hence the short 5.5 hour work day. Since I live within a 5 minute drive from my office, rather than pumping at work, I plan to use this time to go home and breastfeed so that I can maximise the time spent with my little boy. I prefer this option instead of him getting bottled breastmilk/formula from a stranger over the course of a full working day. I'm happy to sit at home nursing for as long as he needs once I finish work.
    I like the suggestion of using a cup and think I will try this. I would be very disappointed if he took to the bottle and rejected the breast afterwards. I will try to see if I can pump enough to get him through the work periods. I have never used a pump yet but can start trying a few weeks before returning to work. I just don't want to leave him hungry and upset when I'm not there so I need a backup option to make sure he gets enough to eat.
    Thanks again for the advice!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    with that schedule I think pumping wouldn't work AT work anyway... as you'll be nursing basically every three hours. I'm guessing that you will find that if you nurse right before you leave and as soon as you get home, you wont need much formula/pumped milk at all. Actually, if you pump/express after your morning nursing session you may get enough for two small supplements during the day. At that age baby will likely be going 2 hours, possibly 3 between nursing sessions anyway, ya know?

    I think your job situation is quite ideal. 5 minutes from home and short intervals - you are very lucky

    And if you do supplement while at work, I would also recommend a cup. I found it easier to introduce the cup early and get rid of the bottles and all of their extra work
    ~Jenn~


    mother of 2 boys!
    08/14/98~~03/20/08

    Birth: 7lbs 12oz, 1 year: 22lbs 11oz
    until he self-weaned 4 days before his third birthday ... still on occasion ... and happily

    ************************************************** ************************************************** *****************
    People need to understand that when they're deciding between breastmilk and formula, they're not deciding between Coke and Pepsi.... They're choosing between a live, pure substance and a dead substance made with the cheapest oils available. ~Chele Marmet

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    But rather than leave bottles of formula, why not leave bottles of pumped milk? Are you working on a freezer stash? Could you get one going so you are supplementing with your own milk instead?

    Way too lazy for formula

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    middle of IA
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    yep, this sounds like an ideal setup! good for you for getting your work schedule to work for you (and lucky you for living so close). i second what others have said - your baby will likely/maybe be going almost that long in between feeds, anyway. pump once while you're home and get a couple oz to tide him over. i bet you'll settle into an easy routine.

    also - what a fabulous job that lets you take 2 hours for pumping and then allocate it how you want!!!
    DS1 6/7/11
    DS2 10/29/13

    Nursing, pumping, cloth-diapering, babywearing, working professor mama with the awesomest SAHD ever.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    Sounds like the ladies are right. Your little one may not even need a bottle. If they do, you can pump after your morning feedings (your supply is typically highest in the mornings) and start to build up a stash in the freezer. That way if he does need to be topped off while you're away, he'll still be on breast milk.

    I know at 10 weeks (my daughter is 11 weeks) my production was / is very sensitive to various triggers. I leak when a baby cries, I think of her or if there's pressure on my breast (picking up my older girls will often trigger it). You could probably get away with a manual pump just to help you take the pressure off, IF you start to have a problem. You want to encourage your body to continue to respond. Also if you get stuck at work for longer, 10 minutes can make a big difference. So catching that in the pump rather than down your shirt will be a big plus. It's always better to be prepared, just in case.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
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  10. #10
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    Jun 2006
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    Default Re: Introducing formula

    What a great situation! I had a very similar set up when my daughter was born. I worked from home most of the time but went in the office for 3 hours 3 days a week. And I agree, tryin to fit a pump session in that short of a time is nearly impossible. Not to mention a lot to ask of your employer on top of everything else. I would pump before I went to bed, after my daughter had been asleep for a few hours. I found the 3-4 ounces I would get was just enough of a snack to hold her until I got home. I personally didn't want to give formula at all and that was an easy solution for me.
    If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun. - Katharine Hepburn

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