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Thread: New here and have a couple questions!

  1. #1

    Default New here and have a couple questions!

    Hello everyone!

    I am new here to LLL. I am a second-time mommy to my 3 year old son and 7 day old daughter. I am also a second time exclusive pumper. I pumped for my son for 5 months before deciding to switch him to formula. He would just never latch when I tried to breastfeed. I have flat/inverted nipples, so it was a bit difficult. The same thing happened with my new daughter. I am experienced with exclusive pumping so it just was easier for me to go ahead and get out the 'ol pump. I do regret not trying harder with breastfeeding my daughter, as she seemed to be doing somewhat well when I used a nipple shield. But the unknown scared me and my husband and I worried about her not getting enough milk to fullfill our needs. So again, even though EPing is so difficult, it just seems easier for us and works for us.

    With my son, I was a great milk producer. Towards the end of my pumping days I was producing up to 9 ounces per breast at each session. I had so much milk I didn't know what to do with it all. I am on my way to doing the same thing this time. At only 7 days PP I am already producing up to 4 ounces per breast per session. I have a several bags of milk in the freezer and in the fridge. Lots of great back up! I am very, very blessed and thankful for my ability to produce plenty of milk for my babies.

    I had a couple questions regarding milk storage and feeding. When my son was a baby, we had a deep chest freezer that was kept at 0 degrees, so I was able to store his milk for the recommended 6 months. This time around, we do not have that freezer anymore. But we do have a side-by-side fridge. I am so sad to learn that my frozen milk may only be good for 2 weeks at a time since it's not a deep freezer... So I put a digital thermometer inside it for several minutes to see just how cold it actually got. It said -1 degrees! I am really crossing my fingers that this will allow me to keep the milk for at least 3 months if not the full 6 since the temp gets so low. Would it be safe to do this? Or would it be best to only keep the milk for 2 weeks? Fingers crossed!!

    My other question is this: I've heard of some pumping mommies giving their babies chilled milk in order to avoid having to warm it up while out and about. During the hot summer months here in Oklahoma, keeping milk cold will be no problem with the proper ice packs and storage bags while out shopping or anything else away from the house. But figuring out how to warm the milk in a timely manner and not allowing it to spoil is tough to do. We didn't really have to worry about it with my son since I weaned from pumping before the hot summer months hit. So... once my newborn daughter is maybe a bit older, is it safe to teach her to take chilled milk or must it always be room temp or warmer?

    Thank you so much for any advice. I appreciate it!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,564

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    Are you sure that you don't want to try nursing? Your daughter is still so young that it could be possible. As you know from last time, exclusive pumping may be easy to do in the short term, and really, I don't think it's easier than nursing, but anyway - it's going to be much harder for you this time with a 3 year old running around as well. And also, what are your breastfeeding goals? When you stopped pumping at 5 months last time, was it because you were sick of pumping? Or because you had reached your goal?

    I'm only asking those questions because I pumped at work for both of my children for their first year and really hated the pumping. But I love nursing them. It's actually a relief to me to NOT worry about how many ounces are needed for a bottle - my baby can just nurse when I'm with her and she'll have however much she needs. And I don't have to worry about taking bottles out and about and keeping it cold, etc.

    To answer your questions - I think your milk will be fine in your fridge freezer for at least 3 months. But if you're really going to EP, you should probably get a single dedicated freezer. It sounds like you have an oversupply right now so you'll want to take advantage of that. Also, I don't know why it wouldn't be safe to give your daughter chilled milk. It should be fine. It doesn't need to be room temperature or warmer, it's just nicer (in my opinion).
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    1,626

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*baron View Post

    I had a couple questions regarding milk storage and feeding. When my son was a baby, we had a deep chest freezer that was kept at 0 degrees, so I was able to store his milk for the recommended 6 months. This time around, we do not have that freezer anymore. But we do have a side-by-side fridge. I am so sad to learn that my frozen milk may only be good for 2 weeks at a time since it's not a deep freezer... So I put a digital thermometer inside it for several minutes to see just how cold it actually got. It said -1 degrees! I am really crossing my fingers that this will allow me to keep the milk for at least 3 months if not the full 6 since the temp gets so low. Would it be safe to do this? Or would it be best to only keep the milk for 2 weeks? Fingers crossed!!
    According to the information I refer to, the two week limit applies to freezer compartments inside of a refrigerator. If it is a self-contained freezer unit of a refrigerator, it is safe for the 3-4 months. I think your milk is safe. That said, I do agree with Tracie's suggestion to look into a separate freezer dedicated to your milk only, if possible. I had to EP for my second baby because of his heart defect, and I filled our small deep freezer up pretty fast, and it sounds like you are on your way to doing the same!

    My other question is this: I've heard of some pumping mommies giving their babies chilled milk in order to avoid having to warm it up while out and about. During the hot summer months here in Oklahoma, keeping milk cold will be no problem with the proper ice packs and storage bags while out shopping or anything else away from the house. But figuring out how to warm the milk in a timely manner and not allowing it to spoil is tough to do. We didn't really have to worry about it with my son since I weaned from pumping before the hot summer months hit. So... once my newborn daughter is maybe a bit older, is it safe to teach her to take chilled milk or must it always be room temp or warmer?

    Thank you so much for any advice. I appreciate it!
    Totally okay to feed your LO chilled milk. Warmed milk just seems to be more palatable.
    JoEllen married to Jason 10-29-2005.

    Mama to Logan 12-26-2007
    Breastfed for 2 years and weaned on his own terms


    Our Lincoln 6-11-2011 to 9-12-2011
    my homebirthed-water baby, who was born with a broken heart




    And our special blessing, Leonidas 9-5-2012. A toddler who loves his "boops!"

    Come visit our blog here!

    SURPRISE!!! We caught the first PP egg and are currently baking #4! Due to arrive late-Jan/early-Feb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    Mama, I have EPed and breastfed both. And I will be blunt.

    It is MUCH easier to EP for an only child. Your first. It is exponentially harder when you have an older child. We were chained home for the first year of my fourth child's life, born unable to nurse, because it's very hard to control your kids when you are pumping. I don't have help. I have to go places alone, and when I had to pump, I couldn't do both. Then the older wants to play or get into things while you are pumping. Baby starts crying while you are pumping. It was horrible. Breastfeeding, once you get past the first 6-8 weeks, is much, much easier, and it's easier to provide milk for a longer period of time when you breastfeed; I noticed you quit pumping at 5 months.

    Yes, you are more experienced with pumping, but with practice, you can nurse your second baby. Everybody finds breastfeeding bard at first!!! I had inverted nipples with my first child and kept at it, and I wanted to quit and just pump every day for 8 weeks, but it worked out.

    But if you are determined to do this, I never heat the milk. It was bad enough listening to my newborn crying to be held, to eat, for comfort while I was pumping, I was not about to make him wait to eat. And he is fine. Half the time, I don't even pack it to stay cold because I knew we could only be gone for a few hours before I had to pump again, and it was fine.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  5. #5

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    Isn't it too late to breastfeed her? She's already used to the bottle... Plus I have to use a nipple shield if I were to nurse her. I would like to try to nurse her, but I just figured it was already too late now that she has been on bottles since we got home from the hospital. It's certainly something I will think on though.

    So my side-by-side fridge/freezer should be okay for 3 months then? What a relief. Woohoo!

    Also great to know about feeding chilled milk. I think we will introduce cold milk in a couple weeks. Right now it does seem a little harsh to me to feed my newborn a cold meal, but I think she will really enjoy it when she is a little bit older, especially when it gets so hot during the summer.

    Thank you all so very much for the great replies. I will do some thinking on the breastfeeding. How on earth would I go about introducing the breast after she has been on the bottle? She's only a week old but I'm sure the habit is already going to be hard to break- for both of us lol.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    No, it is NEVER too late. I'm still trying to nurse my 15 month old! He was 10 months before we could even try.

    There are adoptive mothers who breastfeed their infant

    I answered your other thread on the how-to, and I'm sure Mommal will have some links as well. There are many moms here who have BTDT what you are contemplating. There is one around here who had a baby who had to have surgery in his first week and went on to nurse for years.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  7. #7

    Default Re: New here and have a couple questions!

    Oh my gosh - a week is not too late at all!! I wish the lactation ladies at my hospital would have offered me more appointments - they were completely covered by insurance after birth. I truly wish I had never given her a bottle, but even more I wish someone had encouraged me to keep trying! I gave up far too soon and just concentrated on building my pumping supply without realizing that I could have kept her at the breast and done both until she was able to express the milk from my flat nipples. I know EP seems like something you can just fall back on, but after doing it for 19 months, I can't imagine what it would be like with a toddler AND a baby.

    At 11 weeks, Emily still had the instinct to suckle, but she wasn't very patient waiting for a let-down if she was hungry. I recommend looking into a Lact-Aid, Medela SNS or even a feeding syringe that you can get from an LC so that you can get a little milk for her right away (the way the bottle does) and then when you have a let down she should be fine with that.

    Don't think about it, mama! Time's wasting - give that baby girl some booby!

    I promise, I'm rarely so "preachy", but it's my mission to keep people form EPing if they can help it...
    Marley & Emily 9-24-10
    (Done as of 5-23-12)

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