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Thread: Newbie Question

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
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    8

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*goldentoes View Post
    I think using such high settings is a big part of the problem. I was advised to use the lowest setting that gets milk going, and I definitely notice a point at which it hurts if I turn it up too much. You may need to experiment a little bit to find the settings that are most comfortable for you while also being efficient. I think if it's hurting you and you're anticipating that, it can have an effect on how much you are able to produce at that time - anxiety is the enemy. Do your best to relax, and empty your mind of any worry about how much you're getting, and such.

    It sounds like you've been through the wringer with all this, so no matter what happens don't beat yourself up.

    Also, is the LC you talked to associated with the hospital or did you find someone to come to you? It may be you need some better hands on help than you've already gotten?
    It's someone from the hospital. One of my friends has hooked me up with someone who is going to come over to help me though, so maybe that'll be better! I think it's a LLL volunteer person :-)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
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    8

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    If pumping at the highest setting is hurting you, don't use the highest setting. Better to use a lower setting and pump more often!

    Can you describe the pain you're in? Does it come on after the pumping session or during it? Is it a burning pain? Any sensations of itching or tingling? Any cracking of the nipple skin? Does the nipple appear white or pale after using the pump?
    Hmmm...it comes during, and stops immediately when I stop pumping. No burning, itching, or tingling. No cracking that I can see, other than the small amount of normal cracking that I have from living in such a dry climate (we live in the desert and generally have less than 10% humidity here). No white or paleness. I think it's just from the high setting on the pump. It sorta feels like it's squeezing and pulling the heck out of my nipples LOL! I tried the bigger flanges initially, but was told they were too big (my areola basically had space all around it, so it was never being stimulated). I wish they had an in-betweeny size!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
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    Default Re: Newbie Question

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*rakoonz View Post
    with pps. Sounds like you've been through so much on top of the normal new-baby adjustments, but I just wanted to chime in on encouragement.

    Are you seeing an endocrinologist for the hypothroidism? Levothyroxine is totally safe while BF, since it's basically just replacing what your body would be making anyway, if your thyroid was working normally. Being on the meds (and at the right dose--it may take some bloodwork and trial-and-error to figure that all out) will make the difference between night and day on your energy levels. I'm on levothyroxine and fortunately have had ok thyroid levels since being pg, and bf, but before that, I was on and off the synthroid, and my life was wack-o. So I don't have any personal experience with low milk supply problems, but I just thought I'd throw that out there in case you didn't know about the safety of thyroid-replacement medications.
    Yep! I'm seeing an endocrinologist (I have been since I was 15 for the PCOS). I was put on levothyroxine in October of 2010, and I can't even tell you how much of a difference that made. I never understood why everyone else never needed to take a six-eight hour nap (or mini coma) during the day sometime. Thank you for the chime in! I'm really hoping this all starts to fall together :-D

  4. #14

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    It's someone from the hospital. One of my friends has hooked me up with someone who is going to come over to help me though, so maybe that'll be better! I think it's a LLL volunteer person :-)
    I am glad you are seeing a LLL Leader, that should be very helpful, but (just in case you need more help) I will just remind you and anyone else that LLL Leaders are not lacatation consultants. Well, some are, just as some are doctors, nurses, lawyers, chefs, and dog walkers, iykwim. But as LLL volunteers, we are trained to help moms dealing with issues that come up "in the normal course of breastfeeding." What you are experiencing is outside that norm so seeing a professional, clinically trained and educated IBCLC may be needed.

    Some WIC offices have a lactation help dept. Some have only peer counselors, but some also have free appointments with IBCLCs. Have you asked them? You can also ask the LLL Leader for names of private practice IBCLC's.

    As far as flange size-Hmmm. Is your nipple rubbing when drawn into the tunnel, or moving freely and easily? If your nipple is rubbing, you likely need a larger size. Also I think there are companies that make odd sizes or special "comfort" flanges. Pumpin pals is the only one that comes to mind right this second.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,632

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    As far as flange size-Hmmm. Is your nipple rubbing when drawn into the tunnel, or moving freely and easily? If your nipple is rubbing, you likely need a larger size. Also I think there are companies that make odd sizes or special "comfort" flanges. Pumpin pals is the only one that comes to mind right this second.
    I was thinking the same thing, since based on your description of your pain it doesn't sound like you have thrush or vasospasms. If your flange size is marginally too small, you might try lubing your nipples with some olive oil. That can allow the nipple to slide more freely, without chafing/rubbing.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    I am glad you are seeing a LLL Leader, that should be very helpful, but (just in case you need more help) I will just remind you and anyone else that LLL Leaders are not lacatation consultants. Well, some are, just as some are doctors, nurses, lawyers, chefs, and dog walkers, iykwim. But as LLL volunteers, we are trained to help moms dealing with issues that come up "in the normal course of breastfeeding." What you are experiencing is outside that norm so seeing a professional, clinically trained and educated IBCLC may be needed.

    Some WIC offices have a lactation help dept. Some have only peer counselors, but some also have free appointments with IBCLCs. Have you asked them? You can also ask the LLL Leader for names of private practice IBCLC's.

    As far as flange size-Hmmm. Is your nipple rubbing when drawn into the tunnel, or moving freely and easily? If your nipple is rubbing, you likely need a larger size. Also I think there are companies that make odd sizes or special "comfort" flanges. Pumpin pals is the only one that comes to mind right this second.
    It seems to be moving pretty easily, but I also put lanolin on. If I didn't have that, it may rub, I'm not sure. I will look up pumpin pals and see what they have though! I'm not sure what IBCLC is, so I'll look that up as well and ask the LLL Leader about that as well. I'm not sure what's in our WIC office, but I have an appointment with them on Monday :-) Thank you so much, btw, you have been VERY helpful throughout this post!

  7. #17

    Default Re: Newbie Question

    An IBCLC is a board certified lactation consultant. They are professionals who have been trained to work with mom & babies who are having breastfeeding issues. Some Lactation consultants are not board certified and are still excellent, but with an IBCLC you know they have had a certain level of education and clinical training and have to regularly be re-certified via testing and continuing education. Personally I think if you find an IBCLC who is also or who used to be a LLL Leader then you are in really good shape.

    I am worried lanolin would make the pumping more sticky? If not, then fine, but you could also try olive oil. However, if the flange is the correct size you should not need any 'lube."

    Info on IBCLC’s: Find local ibclc: www.ilca.org

    IBLCE International: http://www.iblce.org/

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