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Thread: pumping/storing questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Default pumping/storing questions

    I am having trouble pumping/producing. I have tried to pump a couple of times after feedings and I am barely getting a half an ounce on each side. How many times a day should I be pumping? I am getting frustrated and a little dperessed because I so desperately want this to work out. I am letting my newborn sleep 4 hours once a night and a couple of times I let him wake him up around three hours. Has my milk supply gone down because of this?

    Is there a better time to be pumping?

    Also, what is the best way to strore breastmilk?
    I plan on giving my newborn a bottle after week 3 and currently we are a couple of days away from my newborn being 2 weeks old. Should I be pumping into bottles and then combine them to go into the freezer?


    Thanks for the advice..I really appreciate it!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    I am getting frustrated and a little dperessed because I so desperately want this to work out. I am letting my newborn sleep 4 hours once a night and a couple of times I let him wake him up around three hours. Has my milk supply gone down because of this?
    As long as baby is gaining appropriately and having good output, you have enough milk. Is this happening? See this article for more: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing.html

    Some moms make lots of extra milk, some moms do not, some moms produce well for pumps and some moms do not. But all a mom is 'supposed' to make is enough milk for her baby. If your baby is exclusively breastfed, pumping is extra and if you are nursing throughout the entire day/night (as presumably you are at this age) then being able to pump a half ounce after nursing is certainly in the normal range.

    A baby this age should usually nurse a minimum of 10-12 times in 24 hours. This can be on an erratic schedule, with baby nursing very frequently part of the time. If baby is nursing this much, the occasional longer sleep stretch is fine.

    Are you introducing bottles in anticipation of returning to work, and if so, when are you going back to work? Or are bottles being introduced for another reason? Do you plan to keep nursing too? When breastfeeding, the longer you can wait until introducing bottles the better, usually, for many reasons. Many moms choose to introduce practice bottles a couple of weeks before returning to work. Also pumping when it is not necessary (or not necessary yet) can cause undue stress during the very intense early weeks. So if you do not need to introduce bottles or pump yet, I would suggest holding off a bit.

    Generally, if a mom is pumping to build up a stash, or for the occasional bottle, I suggest she pump when it is most convenient for her. A newborn keeps a mom very busy and fitting pumping in can be a challenge.
    Here is info on milk handling and storage, plus tips of how to feed the breastfed baby a bottle when bottles are needed. http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...fyour_milk.pdf

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    429

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    How come you need to be pumping? Pumping too early can really throw off your milk supply and make it hard f or baby to keep up. Are you going back to work soon?
    Melissa

    Young SAHM of
    Afton (A1) (1/24/09) and
    Autumn (A2) (8/29/11)

    Sealed in the SLC Temple

    and and now CDing!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    23

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    I was told to start pumping right away to start storing and to get my milk supply up...is that not ok? I would like to introduce a bottle so my husband can help a little with feedings.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    21,386

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    Pumping has a place in some breastfeeding journeys, but not all. Pumping for a mom who is returning to work or who has a supply problem can be vital. Pumping for a mom who is staying home with her baby, not so much. Lots of moms nurse and never use pumps or bottles.

    Downsides of pumping:
    - can make you doubt the adequacy of your supply if you don't immediately yield large amounts of milk
    - can induce you to introduce a bottle too early, before breastfeeding has been mastered by both baby and mom (most recommendations are to delay bottle introduction until 4-6 weeks)
    - if you pump too much, you can end up with oversupply (and yes, that is a problem!)

    So, basically, before we say whether or not pumping is something we think you should be doing, it would help to know the following:
    - How is breastfeeding going? Is baby satisfied at the breast, is nursing painless, is anything else going on that might indicate a problem?
    - Are you going to be staying home or are you planning to return to work?
    - What sort of pump are you using?
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    In the normal course of breastfeeding, there is no need to pump or to have bottles given. (except for in the case of separations such as when mom is at work) The vast majority of the time, a baby is quite capable of bringing in/getting enough milk to meet babies needs, which is why breastfeeding has worked so well for all of humanity for thousands of years, long before there were pumps or bottles.

    Whether it is OK or not, depends on the situation. In your pp, you said you are frustrated and depressed because you feel you cannot pump enough. This is a common feeling moms have when unnecessary pumping is brought into the picture too early, when mom is still figuring out life with a new baby and breastfeeding. There are other issues that may arise as well, including nipple damage from the pump and oversupply, not to mention increasing a new moms fatique. And a baby introduced to bottles too early may develop 'nipple confusion" or "flow confusion" and those can lead to baby having difficulty nursing or even refusing to nurse. This does not always happen, but it is common, and we know that statistically, too early and/or unnecessary introduction of bottles and/or pacifiers leads to an earlier end to breastfeeding.

    That said, if you really want your husband to give your baby a bottle, you can try that, it is fine if the bottle only holds a very small amount, so don’t stress yourself out trying to pump lots! The last thing a new mom needs is extra stress and this sounds like it is causing you extra, and totally unnecessary, stress.

    Here are some nice ideas for the dad of a breastfed baby-babies need lots of love and comfort that goes way beyond feeding: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...t_partners.pdf

    And here are tips for bottlefeeding the breastfed baby. These may help somewhat in avoiding flow confusion, but again, best to avoid unnecessary bottles as long as you can, for at least the first 6 weeks if possible. http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; February 19th, 2012 at 11:50 AM. Reason: for clarity

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    I do plan on planning on going back to work around 8 weeks and I have a medela electric pump. I think it is the on the go tote medela pump.

    nursing does seem to be going well although sometimes he only wants to nurse on one breast for maybe 11 minutes. I try to wake him around 2 1/2 hours during the day but sometimes he is so sleepy he isnt ready until 3 hours. He has around 2 BW a day and probably has wet diapers around 10-12 times a day.

    I guess I should wait as long as possible to introduce a bottle but(and I know this sounds horrible) how do you manage life outside your home? If I want to be out of the house longer than a couple of hours how do I manage that?

    I also have a question about exercising...I am a long distance runner and I want to get back into training. I read if you exercise to exhaustion that could effect the taste of your milk. Is that true?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    There is a forum all about nursing in public. If you want to be covered up there are plenty of great covers out there. Utter covers does promos all the time for free covers and you just have to pay the shipping. Sometimes if there is no other place for me to be I'll nurse in my car. If you do a bottle you'd have to pump anyway unless you want your supply to drop.
    Melissa

    Young SAHM of
    Afton (A1) (1/24/09) and
    Autumn (A2) (8/29/11)

    Sealed in the SLC Temple

    and and now CDing!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,386

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    If you want to get out of the house, the best thing you can possibly do is to take the baby with you and nurse on the go. I know it's tough to make the adjustment from being a woman who is almost always free to go where she wants when she wants for as long as she wants, to being a mom who is tethered to her baby! But if you want to give yourself the best possible chance of having a breastfeeding relationship that is in good shape when you go back to work, it makes sense to delay bottle introduction until you and baby have both mastered breastfeeding.

    Is there something that scares you about bringing the baby to- I don't know- the grocery store or the hair salon or wherever? I know a lot of new moms get freaked out about nursing in public. But think about it this way: it is so much easier to nurse in public than to pump in public! And with a baby who is just a few weeks old, you would need to pump if you skipped a nursing session. To do otherwise is to risk getting engorged or having your milk supply decrease.

    WRT long distance running, don't worry about running changing the taste of your milk. Your milk changes taste all the time based on what you're eating, and babies adjust to milk with varied flavors. The one thing you probably should be careful about when taking up excersizing again is your bra. You don't want to wear something that compresses your breasts, as that can lead to lowered supply. (Back in the day when a woman wantshe to stop producing milk, she would be advised to bind her breasts tightly to her chest). You also want to watch out for underwire bras, which can cause problems with plugged ducts for some moms.

    I personally suggest bras from Title Nine: http://www.titlenine.com/. I've had good luck with their "3+ barbells" bras.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,943

    Default Re: pumping/storing questions

    Here are some articles on exercising when breastfeeding: http://www.llli.org/nb/nbexercise.html

    For your nursing frequency concern, again, look at the entire day to get the best idea of if baby is nursing frequently enough. Babies tend to nurse in an erratic pattern at this age, so best to let them do so while making sure baby is nursing frequently enough, overall. Short feedings can be fine if baby is nursing with good frequency, and the occasional 3 or even 4 hour break is fine if baby is nursing more frequently at other times. At this age (this will change in the coming months) but at this age, you want nursing to add up to at least 10-12 times per 24 hour day. 2 poops a day is a bit less than the minimum you ideally want to see, but are they big? The minimum you want to see at this age is 3 poops per 24 hour day, each one at least the size of the circle you make with your thumb and pointer finger when making an “OK” sign. Small, “streaky’ poops are normal but, when counting poop diapers, they do not count, but if baby is making two larger poops a day that may be just fine. Weight gain will tell you anything the poops do not.

    Some moms find it helpful to first nurse in public among other nursing moms, and you can find that situation at a La Leche League meeting or any breastfeeding supportive new mommy group, many hospitals host such gatherings. I think once you see how some other moms do it, and do it yourself, you will find it is much less awkward & revealing than you may imagine.

    Perhaps you meant, how do you get a break away from baby, which is a different concern. I think an occasional foray to the outside world without baby can be good for a new mom, but again, just to avoid unnecessary issues, this can wait for at least a few weeks until breastfeeding is well established, or can be short until then.

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