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Thread: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,595

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    How frequently has baby been nursing? This is very strange, that she gained 4 ounces in 2 days (which would be more than average) 2 weeks ago and since then only 2 ounces total. Weight gain is seldom steady-it would normally come in fits and starts to some degree, but that seems extreme. Scale error?

    Remember that if weight gain told the whole story you would never need to bring baby in to see a doctor for a well baby check, instead there would just be baby weigh-in stations like with trucks. The doctor should (and hopefully will) assess the overall health picture. If everything else looks good there is likely little need for alarm. If supplementing is suggested and you would prefer not to do that, you can suggest alterrnatives, like seeing your IBCLC again to have breastfeeding re-assessed, and/or to have another weight check after upping nursing frequncy for a week or two, and/or start pumping again and supplement with your own milk and do another weigh in a week or two, whatever.

  2. #22

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    I honestly don't know. The IBCLC told me to relax so I did. They told me I wasn't following her cues enough. I *think* she nurses at least 8 times a day. But I quit being obsessive about it and writing everything down because it was making me a nervous wreck. I quit pumping too at their suggestion. She's 3 months old now. She sucks her thumb lots and chews on her fingers alot too. My 1st LO was an early teether. Got her 1st ones at 4.5 mos. But I try not to swoop her up and offer to nurse every time she's chomping on her hand. Even tho that's my instinct and to ME is her cue.

    The pedi's scale said 1.5 oz. more. And the pedi is not concerned!! Her chart shows she has gained almost 8 oz. since Feb 10. But I know she only gained 2 oz. in almost two weeks. They don't want to see her for 6 more weeks. BUT I AM CONCERNED! My breasts feel so soft and my letdown is slower too. Baby still fusses a little bit until my milk lets down.

    I'm going to try hard to log everything without flipping out. I am worried about my supply again.

    Is it wrong to equate the quickness of letdown with supply? My breasts don't get hard anymore, and I know that's good. But I also don't feel that kinda heavy fullness anymore. After she nurses, I can usu spray milk with manual expression so there's still some in there after a feeding.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,440

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    Yes, supply and quickness of letdown are not always linked. In the days of oversupply, they are. But to me, it sounds like your supply is evening out, which means that heavy feeling isn't there, but you still have plenty of milk, and you still let down. She might be fussy if she was given any bottles and wants that fast reward.

    Some babies grow in spurts.

    From what you write, I think your ped is right You could always stop in and weigh her in a couple weeks if you want to at your doc's office, can't you? Mine offers that.

    If you worry about your supply, the best solution....nurse more
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  4. #24
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    She sucks her thumb lots and chews on her fingers alot too. My 1st LO was an early teether. Got her 1st ones at 4.5 mos. But I try not to swoop her up and offer to nurse every time she's chomping on her hand. Even tho that's my instinct and to ME is her cue.
    Those are nursing cues and I always think moms should follow thier instincts. This does not mean there is a problem-your doctor is happy and it is certainly normal to have soft breasts by this point, this is normal and on it's own does NOT indicate low supply. However, when you were counseled to 'relax' Did the LC mean you should not cue feed or to just to stop worrying so much and writing down/timing feeds & pumping? Very different. Cue feeding usually ALLOWS mom to relax, as, after the first two weeks or so, if not before, most healthy babies will cue enough and mom need not worry about recording nursing sessions (rarely a baby won't cue enough but that becomes obvious-babies usually sleeping very long stretches, regular long intervals between feedings etc.)

    Cue feeding remains important throughout breastfeeding & while nursing approximately 8 times a day would be plenty for some babies it may not be enough for this baby.

    Swooping down and nursing at every cue is not going to hurt anything, if baby is not interested baby won't nurse. But you cannot overfeed at the breast or spoil a baby by offering to nurse. It is also fine to offer to nurse whenever you want as well.

  5. #25

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    Yes, supply and quickness of letdown are not always linked. In the days of oversupply, they are. But to me, it sounds like your supply is evening out, which means that heavy feeling isn't there, but you still have plenty of milk, and you still let down. She might be fussy if she was given any bottles and wants that fast reward.

    Some babies grow in spurts.
    She hasn't had any bottles. I can't get my milk to letdown with manual expression. I wish I could. But I can with a pump and then latch her to give that instant reward. She only needs the instant reward to stay latched during the day. Eventually, all of her bobbing around and popping off gets a letdown and hopefully, I can get her latched on after that and most times she stays on. It's a fine line between trying to latch her repeatedly and making her so mad she won't nurse at all.

    And yes, I can weigh her at my local health dept where I've been seeing the IBCLC. Our plan is to do that once a week until she goes back to the pedi, six weeks from now. I don't want any surprises!

    Nursing more is great, but I'm trying not to offer too much to put too much pressure on her. Like I said, I feel like I'm walking on eggshells with her trying to nurse her often enough but not make her mad. My LLL leader said she still should nurse every two hours during the day if she's only going to nurse like once a night. Like she was doing BEFORE all of this began.
    Last edited by @llli*midwestmama2010; March 1st, 2012 at 10:45 PM. Reason: to fix my quoting goof!

  6. #26

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    Those are nursing cues and I always think moms should follow thier instincts. This does not mean there is a problem-your doctor is happy and it is certainly normal to have soft breasts by this point, this is normal and on it's own does NOT indicate low supply. However, when you were counseled to 'relax' Did the LC mean you should not cue feed or to just to stop worrying so much and writing down/timing feeds & pumping? Very different. Cue feeding usually ALLOWS mom to relax, as, after the first two weeks or so, if not before, most healthy babies will cue enough and mom need not worry about recording nursing sessions (rarely a baby won't cue enough but that becomes obvious-babies usually sleeping very long stretches, regular long intervals between feedings etc.)

    Cue feeding remains important throughout breastfeeding & while nursing approximately 8 times a day would be plenty for some babies it may not be enough for this baby.

    Swooping down and nursing at every cue is not going to hurt anything, if baby is not interested baby won't nurse. But you cannot overfeed at the breast or spoil a baby by offering to nurse. It is also fine to offer to nurse whenever you want as well.
    Thank you. This is really helpful. The IBCLC was saying that since she's 3 months, the chomping is not always a cue. Could just be a developmental thing. i'm not worried about overfeeding or spoiling. I'm worried about offering too much and her getting mad enough to start refusing all together again. Also the IBCLC told me that she's old enough to go longer between feedings. I feel like at this point, I've had so much advice and it's all been just a smidge different, kinda overlapping, but not always. My 1st baby was not this difficult to figure out and LOVED to nurse all day!

    She's just not a very demanding baby either. I feel like a brand new mom again.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    278

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    with my son, I just offered every couple of hours till he was about 6 months old. mostly because he was the type of baby who wouldn't "cue" to be fed till he was starving. I wasn't rigid about it, didn't write everything down, and didn't stress if he didn't take the breast. but his weight gain was great and he is still nursing at 13 months about 10 times in 24 hours, so it worked for us. I think I'd just casually offer, and if she refuses don't make a big thing out of it. That might stress her, but I don't think simply offering the breast in a happy way would.
    Mama to five beautiful kids- 9, 8, 3, 2 and currently nursing our new baby girl born 1/20/2013


    "It should not be necessary to tell reasonably intelligent mammals to suckle and not dismember their neonates." ~Susan Blustein

  8. #28

    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    okay, Ima try offering every couple of hours and see how it goes. THanks! My 1st LO nursed every two hours for like 6 months too and she gained great and I never questioned my supply. That's what I was doing with new baby until she go the sore throat and freaked out on me!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: 10 day nursing strike: what now?

    You have gotten lots of advice but I think at its core everyone is saying pretty much the same thing-your baby is OK & much of what you are experiencing is normal, so no need to be too stressed. It's in the details we may conflict. When I feel confused about conflicting advice I remember I am with my child every day and know him best. In other words, you are the expert on your baby, so trust your instincts and remember even as an expert it is common to get thrown for a loop sometimes! I think you have handled a difficult time really well. Nursing strikes are scary & difficult at any age but this young especially.

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