Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 97

Thread: Mom/baby separation after csection

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    371

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mumtothomas View Post
    I just wanted to add something, and I'm not trying to stir the pot. If you give birth in a hospital, you're subject to abiding by their policies. It's absolutely your baby, but if their setup/liability/staffing/etc policies necessitate their following certain procedures, you can pretty well expect that that's how they're going to operate. If you don't want to abide by them, you don't have to, but you can't necessarily not abide by them and stay there, KWIM? I thought many of the policies at the hospital where Thomas was born were ridiculous, but they were what there was. My option was either going someplace else to begin with, or leaving AMA, which would have brought a multitude of other issues with it. I think it's wonderful to be able to have what you want, but in the hospitals where I live anyway, you don't necessarily get to order off the menu of what you want; you get what's served or you don't eat, you know?

    That also doesn't mean not questioning or not asking for what you want, but in my experience that works better by explaining what you want/need and not going in with the "this is my baby and we do this my way" mindset. The hospital where I was had its own procedures, but their goal was not to somehow disempower me or to take away my decision-making abilities, but to be able to provide care with the resources at their disposal.
    I find this interesting because it was a mother who refused to allow her CS-born twins to be taken away from her that finally pushed our hospital to start keeping healthy CS-born newborns in the OR with mum, and then with her to recovery. The only catch is that her care provider was willing to remain with them for the few hours to be responsible for the infants rather than just rush back to his/her office. Its been nearly a year since then and they're continuing to cooperate with this, even allowing BFing on the OR table with assistance. Even prior to this rule change, they happily brought DD down to recovery and helped her try to latch (it ended up being a spoon-feeding in the end, but she never was given a bottle or paci!).

    Food wise, its eat what you're served or you don't eat... thankfully the food was good


    What april said:
    That is why I would keep baby with me at all times. To keep my child away from hospitals, manned by people, who make mistakes and follow policies that may not be applicable to me. Next best...have one person delegated to stay with baby at all times and ready to question what the doctor is about to do to that baby.
    I totally agree with. DH went with DD when she was separated from me, but both DH and I really felt the stress of our tiny family being separated so abruptly in those few hours. To each their own, and what works for them and all that. I just sure found myself feeling that something really was unjust with being separated right then.
    Last edited by @llli*barnheartbabe; February 6th, 2012 at 04:17 PM.
    Proud Wife to my Kyler 10/02/08
    Proud Mum to our Sarah 07/03/10 and Laura 02/03/12

    Btdt: CS & VBAC
    Enjoying BFing- so much better the 2nd time (thanks lll ladies!)
    I love to with my Beco butterfly 2 and enjoying
    Happy SAHM, & Backyard farmer (I <3 chickens! [hoping to raise sheep for my budding fibre art passion, maybe a cow for a growing cheese habit ])

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    419

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    First of all, yes my recovery room was on the L&D all recovering from L&D
    type surgeries.

    That being said, I understand policies, but sometimes policies must change. As was said you are the customer. Think if you went to a restaurant, and ordered and paid for steak but they brought you a hot dog. And then when you complained they said well that's just restaurant policy. I wouldn't keep going to that restaurant even if it was the only one in town!

    Here in Kansas where I live it used to be policy that husbands couldn't be in the delivery rooms, one husband handcuffed himself to his wife.....policies have changed! Husbands can now be in the rooms! However, do you think if no one ever questioned them, or ever pushed it they would of ever been changed?

    ~Heather~
    Wife to
    Vincent since 2001
    SAHMommy to
    Lela 2006 EPed 2 1/2 Years
    ~Donavon & Jeremy~ 2009
    Belle 2010 Nursed over a year
    Raphael 2011 Nursing like a champ
    Raphael & Hubs

    My Blog
    ~Heather's Prairie~

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,330

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    I totally support policies being changed. But I also think of how it works in my line of work--if you come to me and want treatment for a specific issue, but you're only willing to do it one way, that may not work for me. I have to be mindful of working within the scope of my training and, though for many people this is a bad word, my assessment of liability in doing so. If you want me to treat you on an outpatient basis for something that medically requires inpatient treatment/medical supervision, I'm not going to be able to do it. You can want it, but that doesn't mean that the provider can or is willing to provide it, for a variety of reasons. I am absolutely not saying policies shouldn't be reviewed/considered/changed if reasonable and possible, not at all. I am saying that I am more than my doctor's customer, and I'm not paying him to do what I want if for some reason it may not be in my best interest; I'm paying him for expertise, not accommodation. There's a way to go about having policies changed, and I will say (and this is based on my own experience) that going in with a me vs them mentality rarely accomplishes that.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Its not just about mom needing to "wake up" physically from anesthesia. Baby's that don't pass vaginally are at a higher risk of breathing complications and aspiration issues because they didn't get all that fluid passed out of their lungs coming down the birth canal...which is why they are observed closely in the immediate period following birth. Policies, while frustrating and annoying, are not always put in place to make everyone miserable.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,475

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    There's also something to be said about simply asking first. Sometimes, policies are presented as matter-of-fact. However if questioned about them, you'll find that there are ways around them / concessions to be made. I think I would go in asking first. Trying honey rather than vinegar first. Escalate from there if you need to. Only you can define what battles you want to fight.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,269

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mumtothomas View Post
    But I also think of how it works in my line of work--if you come to me and want treatment for a specific issue, but you're only willing to do it one way, that may not work for me.
    I hear you. But isn't there a difference between trying to make change just to get your way, and trying to make change that results in best practices being followed? Even if it means busting people out of their comfort zone?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mumtothomas View Post
    There's a way to go about having policies changed, and I will say (and this is based on my own experience) that going in with a me vs them mentality rarely accomplishes that.
    Still, IMO there's a time and a place to go in willing to assert yourself all the way to the end. I think that on average, women are too compliant when it comes to challenging medical authority, not too confrontational.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,330

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    I agree that assertiveness is probably the most useful tool. But. (There's always one, right? ) There's a difference between asserting your personal authority by expressing a preference within the operational limits of a facility, and saying "I'm using your facility, but I'm not willing to abide by your policies." I don't see people's compliance as a problem if it works for them. When I'm having a baby/going to a hospital for another reason, I'm going to deal with what I need, kwim? What I want may be completely different from what someone else prefers. I saw a proposal not long ago that every woman have a midwife on her prenatal care team. I absolutely do not want a midwife under any circumstances. That doesn't mean I don't want others to have that option (I don't think it's any of my business, nor theirs what I choose). I know lots of women who, when I was furious about the policies at the hospital where I was delivering Thomas, thought I was crazy and overwrought. They may have been right , but I didn't have to go with their preferences, and they didn't have to go with mine. If someone wants to assert herself, I'm all for it, but sometimes there's this "stick it to The Man" mentality about this that bugs me. I guess it also depends on how you define "too compliant" or "too confrontational."

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*Leslie View Post
    Its not just about mom needing to "wake up" physically from anesthesia. Baby's that don't pass vaginally are at a higher risk of breathing complications and aspiration issues because they didn't get all that fluid passed out of their lungs coming down the birth canal...which is why they are observed closely in the immediate period following birth. Policies, while frustrating and annoying, are not always put in place to make everyone miserable.
    About that...the mom I know who had rooming in right after her section said there was a nurse who came in and out to check baby for all of that. Apparently they had a nurse who did that for every 2-3 section babies at this hospital, and that was all that nurse did until the baby was discharged. It meant yet another person was in and out, but there was just one person focused on the baby's medical care. I think it is probably better....mom and dad were with baby while mom was recovering, and if any problems cropped up, they could page a nurse right away instead of a baby going to a NICU where there are many babies and maybe not as many nurses.

    After all the time I spent in the hospital before and after Gav, I really don't trust them. There are too few nurses, too many patients. They are kind and caring, but the system isn't working. Hospital policies are there to protect the hospital. I actually crossed out things I didn't agree with allowing (vaccines were one of them) when we went in for each surgery. I'll do so again when we go in for his next surgery.

    For the OP, there was a how to have a baby-friendly c-section thing going around Facebook a month ago, perhaps. I'll see if I can find it, as maybe there is something you will find useful in there.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    371

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*Leslie View Post
    Its not just about mom needing to "wake up" physically from anesthesia. Baby's that don't pass vaginally are at a higher risk of breathing complications and aspiration issues because they didn't get all that fluid passed out of their lungs coming down the birth canal...which is why they are observed closely in the immediate period following birth. Policies, while frustrating and annoying, are not always put in place to make everyone miserable.
    For sure, and that's why with our hospital if baby is not healthy, as confirmed by a pediatrician in the OR while placenta/stitching/etc is being done, then no way will that baby be released. It's IF baby is healthy and only then in a GP/midwife is willing to be 1-on-1 responsible for observing baby during the recovery timeframe. It just seems like a sensible compromise, without risking anyone's health, atleast for the parent(s) who want the option and the GP/midwife who is willing to accommodate.

    I think a big part of this is that it's hard to tell what regulations are for patient safety, which ones are not, and if they accomplish what they were set out to do. We can see well enough in the more recent history of medicine how old ideas, based on what they thought was in patients best interests, we're wrong and have adapted accordingly. Why should childbirth be any different?
    Last edited by @llli*barnheartbabe; February 7th, 2012 at 09:11 AM.
    Proud Wife to my Kyler 10/02/08
    Proud Mum to our Sarah 07/03/10 and Laura 02/03/12

    Btdt: CS & VBAC
    Enjoying BFing- so much better the 2nd time (thanks lll ladies!)
    I love to with my Beco butterfly 2 and enjoying
    Happy SAHM, & Backyard farmer (I <3 chickens! [hoping to raise sheep for my budding fibre art passion, maybe a cow for a growing cheese habit ])

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Mom/baby separation after csection

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    There are too few nurses, too many patients.
    Exactly!!! Which is why there are times that nurses just can't drop what they're doing, leave the nursery, and have to take vitals every 15mins on a baby for the first hours of life.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*barnheartbabe View Post
    For sure, and that's why with our hospital if baby is not healthy, as confirmed by a pediatrician in the OR while placenta/stitching/etc is being done, then no way will that baby be released.
    And what about 20mins after birth, then mom is doped up on duramorph or hydromorphone and baby begin's aspirating, retracting, or having apnea spells? There's a reason that my MW will stay with me for 4 hours post-partum before leaving. And there's a reason that for most birthing center births, moms stay for approximately 4hrs. Because if something is going to go wrong, it USUALLY will happen in that time period.

    In an ideal and perfect world, we'd have 1 nurse for every baby and she could just come every 15 minutes to take vitals on her 1 patient. But that isn't the world we live in. The reality of the matter is that most nurses have 3-4 patients at a time and need to be able to effectively attend to ALL of those patients. And that can most effectively be done with all the patients in 1 place.

    I bet a lot of people didn't know that if Paula's baby was my patient, and that baby started choking, aspirating, or something bad happened while he was my patient - that I'd LOSE my license. My years and years of schooling gone. So I'm going to do everything that I can to take the best care of my patient, meet the needs of the mom, AND protect my license. Those are ALL priorities and may be in a different order depending on if you're the nurse or the mom, but they are important. So there has to be a common ground. At our hospital here, daddy's get to go into the nursery, bathe the baby, weigh the baby, and take care in all parts of the labor and delivery and post-partum care. And as soon as that time is up, the baby NEVER has to go back to the nursery.

    But that policy is put in place to protect all parties involved.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •