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Thread: How To begin pumping?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default How To begin pumping?

    Hi ladies! My newborn is 5 weeks now, and I wanted to think about pumping so dad can have some feeding bonding, and I can have a tad bit of freedom. Can anyone suggest how to begin this process, how much to pump, when, etc.?

    Also, is it ok to introduce a pacifier when she is comfort nursing and dad wants to hold her? If she's just flutter feeding and I hand her over in REM, she wakes up and starts whimpering and licking her lips - sometimes she'll settle down, other times she'll get more upset, but if he hands her back, she'll continue to flutter feed.

    Thanks!
    Laura

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    Pacifier is totally ok! And for the pumping - what kind of pump do you have? I would pump in the morning and just plan to pump for 15 or 20 minutes and not worry about how much you get.
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    418

    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    With PP. The morning is when most moms have the most milk. I pump between 10-20 min depending on the time pf day. I just check periodically and when the flow has stopped I pump for another min or two then stop.

    My LO would never take a paci but DH could let him suck on a finger and he would stay calm and let daddy hold him.
    I am Klisti, I married my best friend Kris two years ago.

    The love of my life, Wyatt 8-28-11 AKA the little dude

  4. #4
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    Jan 2012
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    Do you have to worry about taking too much the first time, or will baby still get enough if she wants to nurse right after I pump? She's not on a very set schedule just now, every day is different, and she'll go through cluster feeding sessions frequently!

    I have a sleeping baby on my chest, so I can't go check, but I believe I have some sort of Medela with dual boob action

    Does it feel weird the first time?

    Thanks!
    Laura

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,440

    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    No, don't worry about taking too much. Just keep switching baby side to side, and she will get enough eventually.

    Or pump one side and nurse the other, once you get used to how it feels.

    It does feel different than a baby nursing. It should not hurt though.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  6. #6
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    First off, I would suggest you consider other options for your concerns than pumping, bottles and pacifiers. Dad has many many ways to bond with baby, and as far as freedom goes, a baby is not much more portable and easy to take along basically anywhere than at a few weeks old, especially if mom is breastfeeding as then there is no need to lug around bottles etc. If you have discomfort nursing in public and that is making you feel homebound, I am sure many here would have suggestions for that.

    That said, if you want to begin pumping and to use bottles and pacifiers, just remember that pumping and bottles and pacifiers are not benign interventions. Their use carries potential risks, form the tangible like nipple/flow confusion, oversupply from pumping, and poor weight gain due to paci overuse, to the more psychological/confidence destroying aspects (for example-mom can't pump "enough" milk, and starts thinking that means she does not make enough milk, and starts supplementing, which actually will reduce her supply, and so on and so on until baby is prematurely weaned.)

    So first off, is breastfeeding going great at this point? No supply issues, baby gaining well, no latch pain? if so, then I would suggest that if you want, it is OK to then proceed slowly with the occasional bottle. If you then hit any roadblocks (latch pain, not being able to pump much, etc,) get the facts and proceed with or back off bottles as you like.

    Here is a nice short article for dads about bonding with the breastfed baby: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...t_partners.pdf

    and here is one about bottle feeding the breastfed baby: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; January 18th, 2012 at 03:47 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    Thanks for the warnings! I go back to work mid-march, so she will have to be bottlefed, then I was thinking of starting with one bottle per day for now so she can get acclimated to a scheduled bottle feed. Hopefully by then she will be a more scheduled feeder, because I teach and will only have 2 opportunities during the day to pump! If she is still cluster feeding, DH and my mom may have to supplement, no? My mom did that with my sisters and I back in the 80s using Dr. Spock's recipe - I don't know how that's looked upon, now - mom said some pediatricians like it, some don't. Thoughts?

    As far as breastfeeding we are having zero problems (thank goodness!) Just the unpredictability of feeding times - I of course feed on demand.

    Thanks, I will look at those links!

  8. #8
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    First, if you end up having to supplement, please use commercial formula. I don't think it's wise to make your own.

    My babies have both nursed on demand and I pumped enough milk for both of them (2 or 3 times a day depending on the day). They had a different type of schedule at the babysitter's house, but adapted to that. My first daughter actually needed to be bottle fed on demand because she wouldn't drink more than 2 ounces at a time. The second one was a little more willing to drink more. I nurse my 12 month old way more times in a day on the weekend than I was pumping for her at work.
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    After reading the low-supply thread...

    When I return to work, my schedule will be as follows:
    Leave for work at 6:50
    Pump at 10:00 (only 25 min break)
    Pump again at 1:50 (and anytime after that, as my two off periods at school are at the end of the day)
    Get home at 3:15 to feed on demand until morning.

    So, my questions are: will my supply adjust to this, and will baby adjust? I'm *so* concerned about this...which is why I'm assuming baby will need supplementing. Suggestions?

    Thanks again!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: How To begin pumping?

    How a mom's supply responds to the return to work and thus pumping part time is a bit unknowable. So I would not worry about that at this point. Prepare as best you can and try to relax.

    It sounds like you will be able to pump at least 2 and possibly 3 times in a 8 hour day. That is a perfectly reasonable frequency for pumping once back to work. Also you want to have a good, new pump. Most moms respond best with electric double sided pumps. Also the single best way to help your supply during this transition is to make sure it is in great shape when you start work (by feeding frequently/cue feeding, as you are doing) and, once back at work, by nursing baby lots when with baby, even overnight.

    To avoid having to give formula, I would suggest not worrying so much about giving daily bottles now and instead concentrate your 'extra' (ha ha) energy on stocking up a freezer stash of your pumped milk. (you may want to test a batch first to make sure you don't have an excess lipase issue-freeze some expressed milk for a few days or a week or more, whatever works for your schedule, and defrost it to make sure it does not have a soapy taste or odor.)

    Baby can have occasional practice bottles of small amounts, say an ounce or so, not as a meal replacement but as a practice bottle. I think moms sweat this whole 'baby needs to learn to take a bottle' thing a bit too much, in general. Some babies refuse bottles initially, some don't. If they do, of course it is very stressful for everyone but I have never heard of a mom having to stop going to work because her baby would never take a bottle. Within a few days baby, mom and caregiver usually figure these situations out.

    You do not need to teach baby to take 'sceduled' feedings. Rather, train your caregiver to feed baby small amounts, on cue, and also train your caregiver in the many other ways your baby can be comforted. A big issue when moms return to work is the caregiver inadvertently overfeeds the baby, causing mom to be unable to keep up with the demand when she would have been fine otherwise. This is covered in the "bottle feeding the breastfed baby" handout I linked above.

    The book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition, 2010) devotes two chapters entirely to pumping and dealing with separations. I strongly recommend this book to all breastfeeding moms. Also www.kellymom.com has great articles on pumping, and this website has some good articles on what to do if baby refuses a bottle.

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