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Thread: Should I still have hope?

  1. #1

    Default Should I still have hope?

    I have a 5 weeks old already and have not been successful with breastfeeding. My daughter was born at 36 weeks; but with a great weight 6.11 and no complications at all. She did great with breastfeesing the first three days.She started having trouble eating the day we were coming home. The day after we got home, I scheduled and went to see the doctor because I was very worried that she wasn't eating. My poor baby tried so hard and would get frustrated that she could not eat. She dropped down to 5.4 had no wet or dirty diapers and that was when I started her on the formula. At that point, I was just worried that she would not continue losing weight that fast. We were told that it was the medication I was talking for the pain was making her drowsy and tired; therefore, she would easily fall asleep and feel weaker. I was very tired and frustrated as most moms because of everything. All I wanted was to offer her the best, and during the first two to three weeks I was extremely down. As a result, I did not continue doing all of the great things such as skin to skin, still put her on the breast, pump and so far. All I was focused was to make sure that she was eating. After my little one started looking much better and gained some weight, I started trying again. I have almost quit trying two times already; but something tells me that I could still try until I go back to work at least. I am not totally dry. I still have something but it is very little. I don't even pass half an ounce when I pump. Any tips? Is it still worth trying? My daughter is doing great (she loves the bottle, don't them all?). She is 7.15lbs and looks very healthy. Mom here, still feels sad that I am not breastfeeding.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Keep trying to pump....but even better...try to nurse. Put the bottles away and nurse.

    There is always hope. My baby is almost 12 months old, and he was born with a birth defect that prevented him from effectively nursing. I'm STILL trying to convert him to a breastfed baby.

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/...to-breast.html
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,321

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Yes, you should definitely have hope. 5 weeks is still very early, so certainly there is hope. My first question is what kind of a pump are you using? while I agree with pp that the best way to get your milk supply going is to have baby nurse nurse nurse, if baby is still an inefficient nurser it will be important to pump as well, and for this you need a very very good pump, preferably a hospital grade rented pump.

    Are you able to hire a Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) to advise you? you will want to find one versed in relactation and encouraging a baby back to the breast. IBCLC are not very expensive, even several sessions (not usually necc) would be much, much cheaper than buying formula for a whole year. Also if you have a local LLL group, or even not that local, contact them for free info and support.

    The book Making More Milk (West, Marasco) is THE book on this subject and a must have for moms with low supply or who are trying to relactate. Get it! Also the website kellymom.com has many great articles on this subject.

    Is baby able to nurse and is it comfortable for you? Then you might want to consider offering supplements with an at the breast supplementer. That way, your baby can eat and stimulate your supply at the same time!

    Even if you are not able to fully breastfeed, (and we don't know that at all at this point but even if) every drop of your milk and every minute spent at the breast is precious and so important for baby and you. It's worth fighting for.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Thank you for the replies. It is very encouraging. I have the Medela pump in style advance at home, but I also rented the Symphony two days ago because I wasn't sure if mine was working properly. I can look into getting a IBCLC.Should I just google to find someone local? I also have recently contact the local leader for LLL and I felt very supported. I will be attending a meeting this coming Monday for the first time. I will start trying nursing too. I will also look for the book. Before she latched pretty well, but now she does not last more than a minute.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,858

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Getting a baby back to the breast can take some time and effort! This link has useful tips on how to lure a baby back: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/...to-breast.html. In particular, the instant reward and skin-to-skin techniques are supposed to be helpful.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Ok, from what you write, I would suggest the following:

    Check out the link
    Get the book
    Pumping: pump every 2 hours during the day. Pump every three from like 11 to 5, with at least one session between midnight and 5 am. Two is even better. Offer to nurse too, and do the finish as the breast method (if you google that, you'll find the how-to), as baby may be more willing to try if she isnt starving. Make sure your horns are the right size so you can pump well without being sore. Do breast compressions while you pump. A hands free bra, either purchased or homemade is practically a necessity for a FT pumping mom.

    Look into an SNS system. This gives baby any needed supplements and helps prevent nipple preference and allows you to give baby that instant reward needed to help baby decide to nurse.

    For an IBCLC, contact your midwife or OB for a suggestion, or your ped. Ask the LLL leader. Or google and see who comes up.

    Dnt give up hope. Dr. Jack Newman has an article out there where he says that all babies who can will nurse by the time they are 8 weeks if mom doesn't quit trying. The odds are with you, barring a physical problem preventing nursing with baby or with you.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    The Armpit of the Universe
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    PPs all have good advice.

    I think you can also find IBCLCs via ilca.org under the tab "directories".

    Good luck mama!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,321

    Default Re: Should I still have hope?

    Yes you can find local IBCLC's here: http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3337

    I agree it's a good idea to get a referal if you can, I also usually suggest to moms they call at least two or three LC's and chat a bit on the phone because you want someone who you feel comfortable with and confident in. Plus you will want to discuss cost, payment options, etc. Also it does not hurt to ask you insurer or healthcare provider if they provide lactation services or if they would cover any of the expenses of the pump or the IBCLC.

    One thing I always remind moms is to not take a babies lack of interest in nursing personally. Your baby is not in any way rejecting you or your breasts. Due to your early circumstances, baby has learned to get food and likely even some comfort with a bottle. So when encouraging her to nurse, you are reteaching her or reintroducing her to what comes natural for babies. This certainly does take patience but it definitely can happen and does happen all the time. I definitely concur with mommal the instant reward techniques are often key in helping baby back to the breast. If you baby can latch for a minute she can certainly latch for much longer given time and encouragement. Any time at or even interest in the breast is a step forward!

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