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Thread: Is there any way to minimize leaking?

  1. #11

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    I have a question with regards to leaking - when feeding one baby on one breast, is it normal for the other breast to leak as well? I often have this problem on the breast that produces alot of milk!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    goishka, I have that problem with the other breast leaking. So I am not sure if it's "normal" but you're not the only one! The LC I saw suggested just catching the milk flowing from the opposite side during nursing, but not trying to express any. I was doing this for a while, catching the milk in a 1 c. measuring cup that I would wedge in with a towel or something. It took some finagling, but I was able to not just be wasting all this spare milk. I don't know if that would help? I ultimately gave it up because I prefer laid-back and couldn't make the cup thing work for this.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    I had the same issue for months with my son (other side leaking when nursing). I bought the Medela breast shields. They are used to help poke out inverted nipples but I would tuck one in the side that I wasn't nursing on, vent holes up, and it would catch the milk that leaked out during letdown. It was often more than an ounce so these added up quickly! Another thing that helps is to push on the leaky nipple. This stops the flow for me pretty much instantly.

    They make a product just for this purpose but I could never find it in stores near me so I bought the breastshields. They were pretty cheap and worked like a dream. Eventually things seem to even out and you don't leak like you do when you have a tiny baby.
    Proud mom of two boys!

    DS1- born 1/10/03
    and
    DS2- born 3/8/11


  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    278

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    I hate to say this, but my son is nearly a year old and the other side still leaks while he is nursing....
    Mama to five beautiful kids- 9, 8, 3, 2 and currently nursing our new baby girl born 1/20/2013


    "It should not be necessary to tell reasonably intelligent mammals to suckle and not dismember their neonates." ~Susan Blustein

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*rolltidemama View Post
    I had started pumping at the lactation nurse's suggestion. I immediately had enough milk for multiples, so she said to pump after he fed, so he has been on breast in addition to my pumping (dad gives breast milk bottle at night for his own bonding time). I believe the nurse was so enthusiastic about my milk supply she didn't register that realistically, that doesn't work for me working and going to school. So by the time someone told me not to pump, I'd probably already made the problem worse. I stopped pumping after feedings several days ago and started only pumping when things got really bad. Last night I began the one side per feeding suggestion, which seems to have helped quite a bit today. I'm still very full, but he brings the given side down enough that I can handle it. So today I haven't pumped at all

    As for the leaking, I am doubling up on pads and towels, and it's just become a game of catching it before it reaches my shirt :P My friend said that self-expression doesn't tell my breasts to make more milk-is this true? That was her suggestion to help the leaking. Cold compresses helped last night, too.

    So after I get this all under control, I'd like to be able to stock up for while I'm at work. At what point can I allow myself to pump a little extra, and how do I do this in a manageable way? I go back to work in about a month, and my shifts will require about two feedings two to three days a week. I have a decent stock right now thanks to my early pumping, but I need to make sure to keep a steady enough supply for when the time comes.

    Thank you for the help everyone! Our lactation nurse is $20 per appointment, and obviously the first advice I got wasn't the best for me. I'm so thankful to have a breastfeeding resource!
    Wow. Can you please (nicely) tell that nurse about your experience? How could she not know that unnecesary pumping would lead to oversupply-a potentially very troublesome and serious issue for a mom? You are not a prized dairy cow. Jeepers. I still don't understand why you were told to pump at all.

    I have two suggestions-1) Stop having dad feed bb bottles, or make this a very occasional thing at best. There are 1400 ways to bond with bb that will not interfere with nursing, unnecesary bottles at such an early age are potentially very problematic. That will let you save your stash for when you return to work. here are some ideas of the wonderful ways dad can bond with bb and protect and support mom and bb http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...t_partners.pdf

    2) Then then best thing to do would be to pump while you are at work, as you will need to keep regularly taking milk out so you don't get engorged and/or lose supply. That milk can be used for bb next day. You want to have a stash in the freezer, jic, but it need not be more than maybe a weeks worth. If you cannot pump at work, that is going to be an issue if you are separated from bb for more than 3 or 4 hours.

    If you need to pump before going back to work to have a stash, try to pump no more than once a day.

    As far as self expression not increasing supply-well, milk removal, no matter how it is done, potentially increases supply. But hand expression is much more gentle and far less of a hassle than pumping so if you are just trying to releve pressue, its often an easier choice than draging out teh pump to just take eh edge off. However if you went gang busters and hand expressed regularly and often and for a long enough time, certainly that could increase supply just as pumping that much does. But your hand would get tired lol.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,594

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    it is perfectly normal for the other side to leak when nursing. 100 % normal.
    There is a device that was designed to catch the leaking milk, so that milk could be saved. I forget what it was called. Certainly only a plus for moms who need milk saved for separations, otherwise it is far easier to just catch the leak in a cloth diaper or burp cloth or whatever and enjoy nursing bb.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    Thanks! I'll have to talk to my manager about taking a quick 10 min to pump in my car at work, but I'm sure he won't mind. Yesterday was a full day with no pumping, so I'm off to a good start

    I have to keep a towel or breast pads on my other breast when I nurse because of leaking as well. The cold compress idea worked for me the other night. I wrapped up an ice pack and held it over my breast, and it stopped the leaking for a few minutes. It started leaking again, but it did help temporarily (I didn't leave it on my nipple that long, anyway.)

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Smithfield, Va
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*cherron View Post
    I had the same issue for months with my son (other side leaking when nursing). I bought the Medela breast shields. They are used to help poke out inverted nipples but I would tuck one in the side that I wasn't nursing on, vent holes up, and it would catch the milk that leaked out during letdown. It was often more than an ounce so these added up quickly! Another thing that helps is to push on the leaky nipple. This stops the flow for me pretty much instantly.

    They make a product just for this purpose but I could never find it in stores near me so I bought the breastshields. They were pretty cheap and worked like a dream. Eventually things seem to even out and you don't leak like you do when you have a tiny baby.
    The lactation consultant actually suggested this to me when I was in the hospital. I used them for a while, even when I was not nursing. Worked pretty well. Just be sure not to bend over if you are wearing them when not nursing, because of the holes that are there to help vent. They come with sponges that are meant to soak up the milk, just do not put them in.
    AdriAnn born 6/24/09
    Kayleigh born 9/15/11 with its struggles, but worth it all!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,594

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    Thanks! I'll have to talk to my manager about taking a quick 10 min to pump in my car at work, but I'm sure he won't mind. Yesterday was a full day with no pumping, so I'm off to a good start
    rolltidemama, when you have a lttle time, you can search here (llli.org) and on kellymom.com for many articles on working while breastfeeding, pumping at work, etc. I also suggest you look into whether or not there are any laws in your area that may support your right to pump at work, or if your company has a pump at work policy. Great your manager is likely to be supportive.

    If you are going back to work before baby is even 2 months old, and it will not be possible to nurse duing the day, it is extremely important not only for milk supply & for milk for baby but for your own health that you are given adequate space and time to pump, (as much as is possible in your work situaton, obviously some businesses simply have no space but hopefully they can at least give a mom adequate time.) Without a way to have regular milk removal, you could possibly get engorged and that can lead to the possibility of plugged ducts and even breast infection. A 10 minute break may do it, some moms are amazingly quick with pumping,-but it may take more time especially at first as you figure it out.

    There is an article or two on llli.org that gives reasons that it is good for an EMPLOYER to allow a mom adequate pumping support at work.

    The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition, 2010) also includes a very complete discussion of pumping and handling separations.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Is there any way to minimize leaking

    I hate to say this, but if you want to maintain supply you need to pump every 3 hours with a baby this young....
    Mama to five beautiful kids- 9, 8, 3, 2 and currently nursing our new baby girl born 1/20/2013


    "It should not be necessary to tell reasonably intelligent mammals to suckle and not dismember their neonates." ~Susan Blustein

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