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Thread: How do Nepali women do it?!?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Bryan, Texas
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    4,260

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*djs.mom View Post
    Umm...your job WAS to watch the babies. Not the same as an office job. Where you can't really spend your day holding walking and feeding a newborn. OR Walking around all day to keep them sleeping.
    Right - which is what made it doable - though certainly not easy. But I could have EASILY taken Joey back to the office where I worked at after she was born. I had her 714 Saturday night, came home 714 Sunday night, and was up and going Monday morning. Shopping, dishes, etc. (But then I got a pp uterine infection, probably from trying to do too much too soon) Anways, it would've been easy with her because she was such an easy baby. Shiloh - no way.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*djs.mom View Post
    This post makes me think "QUIT" quite loudly.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    1,293

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*djs.mom View Post
    This post makes me think "QUIT" quite loudly.
    just not possible. we depend on my salary.

  3. #23
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    Sep 2007
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    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*Leslie View Post
    Right - which is what made it doable - though certainly not easy. But I could have EASILY taken Joey back to the office where I worked at after she was born. I had her 714 Saturday night, came home 714 Sunday night, and was up and going Monday morning. Shopping, dishes, etc. (But then I got a pp uterine infection, probably from trying to do too much too soon) Anways, it would've been easy with her because she was such an easy baby. Shiloh - no way.



    Are u sure the pp uterine infection wasn't from all the sex u and your dh were having?
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mtmama View Post
    just not possible. we depend on my salary.
    I get ya on this. I Haven't worked ft since ds was born. I haven't wanted to work more and dh didn't expect me to thankfully. We definately could have used the money but dh and I both knew that me working full time was not something I could maintain. Right now I have a cake job but am no happy wih the # of days I am forced to work. I was working three days but the dentist I work with went up to a four day week at our office so I had to also. This week I almost called in Monday and negotiated to be off Wednesday instead. That only worked out for me because of lack of patients on the schedule. I am missing out on Noah's last year not in school full time and I am not ok with it. It isn possible to have him come to work with me though and even I it were, if he were extremely calm and incurious I would still be looked down on, I am sure. I haven't had a job since he was born where I could have brought him to work with me. He would either be a huge distraction or in harms way.

  4. #24

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    I suppose although the Nepali women don't have the heart-break of being separated from their baby, they do have to carry their baby huge distances. I think the paths out to the fields from the villages are steep and narrow and at least half an hour's walk (at altitude!). Then there is the very manual labour of working in the fields, plus tending to the baby, and then carrying the baby back down to the village at the end of the day. It sounds back-breaking to me.

    So on the one hand we have back-breaking, on the other hand we have heart-breaking!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    Back breaking, a person can be conditioned for, heartbreaking not so much.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,440

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    If a baby is tied well, you hardly feel him there.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    381

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    I actually do field work for part of my job and a couple times considered bringing DD along in a sling or carrier...in each case I decided not to for two reasons that I think kind of exemplify how our work culture is not set up to accomodate this.

    Current work culture in my field, where my time IS what my company sells to other people, is simply not going to be friendly to a mom trying to do her job and parent at the same time. There's no way I could be as efficient in the field while having to also attend to a baby, just in terms of fussing and needing attention and diaper changes, etc. And since I bill out at almost $150/hour, that would either mean I'd have to overbill the client (fraud) or bill less than the time I was out there, which would be bad for my productivity goals. And if anyone was working with me, they'd likely have to wait while I did anything to take care of the baby.

    Secondly, I might have been willing to just bill less on a few days and try it even with the justification I gave above, but what really stopped me was, can I (do I want to) take a small baby outside in the heat/cold/rain/wind/sun/bugs for 8+ hours straight? In a situation where I could not easily adjust my activities to what my baby needed from me without lengthening the amount of time I needed to be out there?

    In other words, the culture gap works both ways. The culture surrounding me is not really friendly to it even in a similar situation to what the Nepali women do, and *I* don't feel like I have the skills or the courage to take a newborn out into the weather for long periods of time without causing them discomfort or even injury such as heat exhaustion etc. If some of you ladies truly would feel like you would do fine in such a situation, I'd love to hear about it, as it may pump up my courage in similar situations for #2!
    Mom to Taiga born 6/2010

    Pocket cloth diapers. Baby led solids. Full-time working mom. I my DH, DD, kitty Dr. Benway, and my working border collie Odin!
    BF for 1 year and she and I still love it !!!!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Northern Cal.
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    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    One of the partners in my firm would bring her baby boy to council meetings and he would sleep in a carrier while she staffed the meeting. All I can say is, that baby must have been more mellow than my baby! My baby was pretty demanding - no way I could do office work with him around, he was always squawking and didn't sleep much at all. He would have loved being carried around out in the field in a sling though. In stimulating environments like that, moving around, he was quiet and happy as a mouse.

    I don't like to romanticize what women in other cultures have to do just to survive, and with a baby strapped to them, no less (or, often, left behind with a caretaker, sometimes another child). But I too felt the heartbreak of having to leave my child all day to go to work. It's hard.


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    818

    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*joe.s.mom View Post
    I don't like to romanticize what women in other cultures have to do just to survive, and with a baby strapped to them, no less (or, often, left behind with a caretaker, sometimes another child). But I too felt the heartbreak of having to leave my child all day to go to work. It's hard.
    That reminded me of the documentary called Babies, I think it was a Mongolian family and the baby just basically got left during the day tied to something in their house and when it got older it just seemed to roam free and explore alone (or with his little brother) since where could he go anyway on the huge plain they were on. It made me sad to see him all alone all the time, but thats what they had to do to survive.
    Christine
    Can't believe I've been and a full-time SAHM to Elena (5/2010) for over 2 yrs!
    Mami de mi preciosa Elenita
    http://forums.llli.org/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=32384&dateline=131170  7429 OakRoseCharms Free Shipping for LLLadies just pm me! My Blog

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Default Re: How do Nepali women do it?!?

    not all sunshine and roses. Other cultures also have to do things that we could not even imagine doing. You all probably won't believe this one, but my SIL is from Nicaragua. She's due in January. My brother told me the SHE suggested that they bring the baby - the newborn baby - down to stay with her mom by itself for months just so that she can work up here. It's common for people to do that down there. She lived in another country (ElSalvator) when her 1st child was born so that she could work and send money home to him. That's just what they do. Some one else feeds the baby, either a nursing relative or neighbor. And her son calls her by her first name, not Mom. It's totally beyond my comprehension. But, I guess thats what they have to do
    Proud mom of 2:
    DD 5/2008 nursed for 3 years and 3 months.
    DS born 8/2011 nursing like a champ

    Sorry for the short responses...always, always, always NAK or holding a baby

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