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Thread: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

  1. #1

    Default Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    Hello everyone

    I have to say again thank you to everyone who has given me great advice since coming to this website! I truly have appreciated it all!!!

    So... when I went to see the lactation consultant she advised I should allow the baby to sleep on my chest skin to skin. I have been allowing this. She sleeps on her tummy on my chest. However, I have started to worry about SIDS. I have read many articles about SIDS and cosleeping etc. I don't want to end up being a person who is completely educated on something, but still does the complete opposite... however it seems like what I am doing. Are there any comments here? Frankly, I am not a smoker and always ensure her breathing airway is good when she is on me. What does everyone feel about this?

    Second, they have advised sleeping with a soother after one month is good to avoid SIDS. I was avoiding the soother like the plague as I had so many breastfeeding issues. However, now that the bub is approaching one month, I thought I would try. Well, frankly she gags when ever I try so I think it will be a miss for us, but any thoughts on this as well!

    Thanks to everyone who takes the time to read an respond. I want to make sure I am doing everything for my little lady!

    S

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    The research I have found seems to show that most deaths from co-sleeping are either when the child is not with the primary caregiver or when the adult falls asleep somewhere not on purpose (for exp. in a rocker). It is actually beneficial for a newborn to sleep with its mother. It helps them regulate their breathing and heartbeat, and keeps them from going into that too deep sleep that can cause SIDS. Also, as a mother I am so aware of my DS that i don't think there is any way he could be harmed while sleeping with me, in fact I feel much safer. Hope that helps
    -Arin

    Sealed for time and eternity to Chris on 08/26/10
    Mom to Ezra 06/24/11
    and Rebekah 12/27/13
    Proudly

  3. #3
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    When I was in the hospital, the LC there told me that there are 2 exceptions to the "never on the tummy rule" and that one of those is when she is on her tummy ON TOP OF ME. I can't remember the other one right now! It may have been supervised tummy time, naturally. But, she wasn't talking about me sleeping, but the baby breastfeeding, I think she would have meant it applied to sleeping too because naturally you and baby might fall asleep in this position, and she was recommending this position for breastfeeding, although I have never used that position except that time she showed me how. Our pediatrician recommended sleeping in the same room, but not in the same bed. I'm nervous about co-sleeping altogether because I am so worried about SIDS but I've started doing it because otherwise I was sitting in a chair nursing half the night and I needed sleep so bad. I have been side-lying and and we both fall asleep while she is nursing, and I love the feeling, and when I wake up neither one of us as hardly moved at all, so it seems safe enough. I position myself so that her nose is clear, which is hard to do, it means leaning the upper part of my body way back, my head and shoulders - that was hard to get used to but now I fall asleep that way, rather than curving over her, which is really the natural way I'd rather be...if any of that makes sense. But with baby sleeping on top that wouldn't apply, I don't know how you'd make sure her nose stayed clear, but I do know the LC told me it was ok for her to be on me that way. With our co-sleeping, although it feels great and I'm getting more sleep, in the back of my mind, I have a little worry along the lines of "you know better than this." So I will be very eager to hear the input from the more experienced moms on this.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    I agree with PP. There are safe ways to cosleep and if done properly are extremely beneficial for both baby and mama. I'm on my phone but recently there has been a link to safe cosleeping. Hopefully someone will come along with it. My daughter spent the first 5 months of her life sleeping on either me or my husband. She had apnea and we were so afraid to put her down for fear she would stop breathing. In her case the soother was recommended. However I don't think it's an across the board thing. My son has never taken a pacifier. If your baby doesn't have a high suck need and you are meeting her needs, why bother introducing something else to the mix?
    If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun. - Katharine Hepburn

  5. #5
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    And like you, I wanted to use the pacifier to reduce risk of SIDS, but since I am using the shield which is already on the list of things that could potentially reduce milk supply, I haven't wanted to add another thing that has the potential to reduce supply. I am wanting to do all things to reduce risk of SIDS and the pacifier is recommended, plus we've had a few hairy crying episodes in the car which broke my heart, and perhaps a pacifier would have soothed her in that situation. I am avoiding going anywhere very far in the car because it breaks my heart for her to cry and I can't pick her up. Of course I can if we pull over, which we've done.

    So I'd like to know form anyone who knows, why is it that a pacifier can reduce supply? Is it because they may be sucking the pacifier rather than mommy? Like during fussy times getting the pacy instead of the breast? Because if that is the case then I could control that by never using it other than in the car, or sleeping in the cases where she goes to sleep without nursing, so those are times when she wouldn't be nursing me anyway. Or is it something about changing the way they suck that might reduce supply or what?

    And for milkless, since you, like me and all parents I guess, are worried about SIDS, have you heard that sleeping with a fan in the room reduces risk? I didn't know that until a friend of mine said that her pediatrician told her it was one of the best things you could do - my ped. hadn't menitoned it and I'd missed it in everything I read too! I've had a fan in our room since I heard! I point it away from us, but it's moving air in the room.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    This is a great article: http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/sle...your-baby-safe

    If you choose to cosleep, there are ways to make it safe. Actually, safer than leaving them in the crib. This is how humans evolved! I know it's been a Godsend in our home with our girls. They sleep better and we do too.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*amysmom View Post
    This is a great article: http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/sle...your-baby-safe

    If you choose to cosleep, there are ways to make it safe. Actually, safer than leaving them in the crib. This is how humans evolved! I know it's been a Godsend in our home with our girls. They sleep better and we do too.
    A lot of experts actually think cosleeping, done safely, is SAFER than putting babies to sleep alone in a crib, although there is some debate. I found it comforting to remember that, around the world, the vast majority of babies sleep with their mothers. In hunter gatherer societies (which is how humans lived for 99% of their history) it is the norm. Unfortunately, no sleeping arrangement can protect you 100% from SIDS. But I believe safe cosleeping can be as safe as any other arrangement. (Also, my child simply didn't sleep anywhere else. So I didn't have much choice!)


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mydreamscametrue View Post
    So I'd like to know form anyone who knows, why is it that a pacifier can reduce supply? Is it because they may be sucking the pacifier rather than mommy?
    Yup. The sucking reflex is very strong in babies. Their need to suck, they get to nurse, they get that closeness, Mom gets that stimulation that she needs for her production. If you replace that need with something artificial, then you both miss out on that opportunity. Technically the same can be said of thumb sucking.

    There was an article about thumb sucking that one of the Mom's posted here about how thumb sucking practically doesn't exist in other countries (where babes remain with Momma 24/7). Where babies are never left to self-soothe. The thread got fairly heated, as some Mom's took it as a slam against them, that they work, that sometimes their babies have to self-soothe when they can't be there. Honestly, I don't see it that way. My first sucks her thumb. My second does not. I did the same for both of them, neither took to a soother. It's just what happened. I don't feel that it's horrible. They're healthy, we had a great BF relationship - I'm a proud Momma.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    56

    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    I said I would never cosleep because I work in a pediatric ICU and have taken care of babies who have been smothered by a parent. But those were all instances where parents fell asleep in a rocker or on a couch. I finally got to a point in my breastfeeding relationship where I was so tired that I learned to sleep nurse my daughter. It has been wonderful. We lay on our sides and she nurses while I sleep. When she is ready to nurse again, her movements wake me up and we switch sides. It did take some getting used because I had to change the way I lay. Also, not sure where I read it but they say that cosleeping moms and babies don't sleep as deeply which keeps mom more aware of baby.

    Also, it's not the pacifier that lowers the SIDS risk but the act of sucking. Cosleeping breastfeeding moms will offer the breast for the infant to suck instead of a pacifier which keeps the infant from falling into that deeper stage of sleep where a baby is susceptible to SIDS.

  10. #10
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    May 2006
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    24,440

    Default Re: Breastfeeding and Cosleeping

    IDK if anyone has covered this yet, but SIDS is not the same thing as death by smothering. There seems to be good evidence that safe co-sleeping is actually protective against SIDS- probably because a breastfeeding mom is so hyper-aware of her baby's breathing, and wakes quickly if there is a problem. So if you're concerned about co-sleeping, be concerned because you're worried about smothering, not because you're worried about elevating your child's chances of being felled by SIDS.

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