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Thread: Desperate for advice

  1. #1

    Default Desperate for advice

    Hi, with the holidays I am posting this hoping to get some information until I can talk to my physician.
    I am going into my 5th day with no mil as of yet. My newborn needs to eat as he is jaundiced and his levels are going up which can happen if hes not getting enough. He has not had a poopy diaper as of today and only 2 wet diapers. Is it ok to supplement every other feeding or a few times a day until I can speak with someone about this. He is nursing about every 10 x a day but Im concerned about how much colustrum (sp) he is getting if any. He seems tired after each feeding and sleeps immediately and almost all day. Today I gave him a bit of formula and he ate it right away and stayed alert and bright eyed for over an hour.
    Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    Is there a store at a hospital around you that you can get a supplemental nursing system? I'm not entirely sure in this area but I would supplement at this point. You can feed via a dropper or a cup OR if you use a bottle I would get the slowest nipple possible. I use a Breastflow bottle which makes the baby work harder and more in a nursing mode to get the formula in your case. I would also continue to put him to the breast EVERYtime and end with either formula in a dropper or the bottle. Do you pump at all? My milk came in 6 days pp with my first so I know your feelings. s.
    Mommy to Maxwell 10-9-07 weaned with love (a party and a remote control monster truck) on his 4th birthday
    My Boy 3-16-10
    And my sweet pea Sam 2-12-11

    Watch Your Language

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    Hang on mama, I'm going to try to ask around for you too.
    Mommy to Maxwell 10-9-07 weaned with love (a party and a remote control monster truck) on his 4th birthday
    My Boy 3-16-10
    And my sweet pea Sam 2-12-11

    Watch Your Language

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    are things any beter overnight?
    can you tell us a little bit more about your birth? Sometimes its common for moms to have troubles.
    When do you go back to the doctor? ITs ok too call the hospital at any time your worried about the baby, one of the nurses would help.
    Have you thought about giving the suppliment in a spoon or cup so the baby meets all its sucking needs at the breast?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    Best way to gauge whether or not baby is getting enough milk is to watch diaper output very carefully. Here's what to look for, birth to 6 weeks:http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/enough-milk.html. It can be hard to judge the amount of pee in a newborn diaper, so tuck a square of tissue paper in front of your baby's genital area. When he pees, the tissue will be visibly wet.

    How do you know your milk isn't in? A lot of moms expect that they will see huge, engorged breasts or streams of milk, and it doesn't always work that way. If you express some droplets onto the nipple surface, what do they look like? Clear and yellow is colostrum. Translucent or cloudy cream-colored is milk. The first mature milk tends to be quite yellowish, because it still contains an admixture of colostrum.

    When supplementing a newborn, use small amounts of formula. 2 oz, maximum. Babies will eat more than that from a bottle, but that's because bottles deliver a very rapid milk flow compared to the breast and it's hard for a baby not to overeat. If you use a bottle, use a slow-flow (newborn) nipple and pause the feeding frequently, to help the baby stay accustomed to the natural pauses of milk flow that come from the breast. If you can, use a bottle nipple that is designed to be breast-like- Adiri and Breastflow make them. When latching the baby onto the bottle, make that experience as much like breastfeeding as possible. Bring the baby close to the bare breast, tickle his lips with the bottle, and wait until he opens WIDE before putting the bottle in. It's easy to let baby develop a sloppy latch from getting a bottle slipped into a half-open mouth.

    Every time you offer the bottle, pump. The best way to get milk supply going is frequent stimulation to the breast. Use a good pump- hospital grade rentals are best but you may not be able to obtain one over the holiday, so use what you have or can get your hands on. A Medela Pump In Style would be the best off-the-shelf option.

    Please let us know how things go, mama! This is TG but we'll do our best to fight our way out of turkey comas and give you whatever help we can!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    The other thing I want to mention is that most all pedi I know of , except my new one or drs Sears, Gordon etc are not well versed in BF. What would be ideal is to see an IBCLC for BF issues next week.

    How is it going now. Btw my local Target has Breastflow bottles
    Mommy to Maxwell 10-9-07 weaned with love (a party and a remote control monster truck) on his 4th birthday
    My Boy 3-16-10
    And my sweet pea Sam 2-12-11

    Watch Your Language

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    Hi mama,

    Have you gotten to speak to an IBCLC yet? There are some red flags that are causing me concern:
    1) low diaper output: on day 5 we would like to see 5 poops, 5 wets
    2) the jaundice: jaundice can make babies sleepy, which leads to them not nursing effectively (not removing enough milk from the breast), which leads to low output and an increasingly lethargic baby.

    How many weeks gestation was your baby?
    What kind of birth did you have?

    The first few days can be very stressful, especially if you are concerned about your baby getting enough to eat. You can certainly continue to exclusively breastfeed, and if supplementation is deemed necessary (and I personally think it might be for a few days), you can supplement with your own pumped milk via Supplemental Nursing System (SNS), cup, or bottle.

    If you decide to supplement, it would be a good idea to follow the Triple Feed Plan: Nurse; Supplement (tiny amount! remember that your baby's tummy is only the size of a ping pong ball when he/she is only a few days old); and then Pump. The purpose of pumping is to give your breasts added stimulated and to remove even more milk after nursing especially if baby is too sleepy to nurse effectively at the breast.

    Hang in there, mama. You and your baby can get over this hump and enjoy breastfeeding without intervention.
    JoEllen married to Jason 10-29-2005.

    Mama to Logan 12-26-2007
    Breastfed for 2 years and weaned on his own terms


    Our Lincoln 6-11-2011 to 9-12-2011
    my homebirthed-water baby, who was born with a broken heart




    And our special blessing, Leonidas 9-5-2012. A toddler who loves his "boops!"

    Come visit our blog here!

    SURPRISE!!! We caught the first PP egg and are currently baking baby BOY #4! Due to arrive late-Jan/early-Feb

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Desperate for advice

    Most peds offices have an 'on call' dr. over weekends and holidays, so if you are alarmed (and NO poops, at all, ever?? I find that alarming) you should be able to call and reach the on call dr. at least. Also if you had a hospital birth, most hospitals you can call a the post partum nurse? Has a dr. already told you to supplement? I don't understand how you know babies jaundice levels are going up if you have not seen a doctor & had a follow up blood test.

    While it is true that many peds and nurses are not really up on good bfding management, they are certainly the ones to contact for general baby health concerns. Whether you should or should not supplement, and how much you should, is a decision to be made by you with input from babies dr. based on an exam and a professional assessment of babies overall health, which (ideally) is based on observation as well as his weight or output.

    Be assured that even if you supplement temporarily that does not have to mean the end of breastfeeding. As pp says, if you are able to pump enough, you can supplement with your own milk. Even if you have to go to a breast milk alternative, that need only be very temporary.

    When a baby is having trouble getting enough, Rule #1 is: feed the baby. (supplement, if necessary) Rule # 2 is, protect milk supply (pump or hand express every time a supplement is given or if baby is not nursing well) Rule # 3 is, get help from a breastfeeding helper (an LC and/or LLL Leader or similar person in your area)

    Also, if you can encourage baby to nurse more often, and/or stay on the breast longer that may be helpful. Of the two, the 'more often' is the most important. If you can pump or express some milk, you can try dribbling it on your nipple to keep/get baby interested. You could use formula for this too, if that is all you have. Some babies nurse longer if mom does breast compressions.

    I would not read too much into baby suddenly becoming 'alert and bright eyed' after getting formula. My kids get 'alert and bright eyed' after eating too much Halloween candy. But I'm still going to make then eat a healthy diet! Seriously, this is a huge issue when a baby is given supplements-even when the supplementing is completely appropriate-moms confidence in her ability to feed her baby can take a major hit! If formula is better for your baby than your delicious milk, than he is an extremely unusual baby. It has been proven beyond all reasonable doubt that breastmilk (especially colustrum) is vastly superior nutritionally than formula. So what you observed either means nothing, (had nothing to do with feeding) or it may mean that baby is not getting enough when he nurses, and that is about that-a milk transfer issue, not even necessarily a milk supply issue, and certainly not a milk quality issue. This is why you may want to have breastfeeding assessed by someone who understands breastfeeding, and can help you figure out WHY baby is not getting enough.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; November 24th, 2011 at 10:58 AM.

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