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Thread: Scared to Block Feed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    429

    Default Scared to Block Feed

    Ok so I know I have overactive letdown and I produce a ton of milk. It wasn't a problem at the beginning but now my daughter (Just under 3 months) chokes and fights and cries at the breast at every feed! She refuses half the time! I keep thinking it will get better and doesn't I am scared that if I block feed that it will just make me dry up and that terrifies me. She goes every 3 or 4 hours between feedings anyway but acts hungry before this but will just fight me unless she is absolutely starving. This is just making me so sad and I am at a loss of what to do! I've tried letting the milk spray into a burp cloth when I let down for several minutes but this doesn't really seem to help her much. I only pump very occassionally when I wake up in the mornings after she sleeps longer than usual and I am in a lot of pain from being so full. I should probably just stop that all together though huh? I need advice please! Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    2,197

    Default Re: Scared to Block Feed

    Yes, stop the pumping. It will confuse your body at this point. Block feeding sounds like a great option, honestly. And you will see your supply reducing a little WAY before you dry up. I wouldn't worry about drying up right now. How often are you switching sides at this point?
    Teal

    25 May 96 and 14 January 08 and 27 February 2012

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: Scared to Block Feed

    She only eats one side at a time. So she will feed one side then 3 or 4 hours later eat the other side. So I don't really even know how I would go about block feeding?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TX
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    2,197

    Default Re: Scared to Block Feed

    Hm, mine nursed really frequently, every hour give or take. But I was at one point doing 8 hour blocks for a couple of days. It's possible (though not comfortable), and did do the trick. Have you tried nursing lying back (either reclined or lying fully down on your back)? If your daughter is on top of you, she may be better able to control the flow. In addition, the flow may be a little slower working against gravity. In addition, you might spend some time looking up foods/herbs that can increase supply (possibly look at cutting back on those if you eat many of them) and decrease supply (might be worth consulting with someone about adding some of these in). You probably already know this, but it's worth saying again - when your breasts are very full, it signals the body to cut back on production, so any time you pump or express to let off the pressure, you are removing that signal. This is why I suggested not pumping at all for a while. This is also the thought that got me through the discomfort of engorgement and block feeding. I just kept reminding myself that that fullness was doing a very important job. I wish you the very best of luck figuring this out! It can be done!
    Teal

    25 May 96 and 14 January 08 and 27 February 2012

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,321

    Default Re: Scared to Block Feed

    Agree with pp, nursing 'uphill' can be quite helpful in helping baby handle the flow.

    I know this sounds counterintuitive, but many moms find more frequent nursing sessions helps with oversupply/forceful letdown. Regularly going 3-4 hours between feedings is a somewhat unusual pattern for 3 months, and that may be contributing to the issue, at least the forceful letdown side of it. Sure baby is gaining fine, because you have oversupply. But letting baby have frequent 'snacks,' as opposed to widely spaced 'meals,' helps reduce the forceful letdown, because the build up is not so bad. It cuts down on the foremilk/hindmilk 'imbalance.' And it allows a small amount of milk to be taken out frequently, rather than a ton infrequently. This naturally allows you body to begin to get the idea that it can slow down production without risking engorgement & plugged ducts. And yes, you can nurse more frequently while also block feeding-just have baby nurse on one side through two or more feedings, and that is block nursing. Also, if baby will nurse more, that will help you stop feeling the need to pump, which is not only exacerbating your supply issue but makes extra work. And who needs that?

    To increase nursing sessions, if you are waiting for baby to tell you she wants to nurse, simply start offering more frequently. And keep baby close by, even at night, so you see even her earliest cues. Have you seen these articles on oversupply/ffld? http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...ggrimacing.pdf and http://kellymom.com/bf/supply/fast-letdown.html

    I have also heard some LCs recommend that when things are really bad, that mom pump ONE TIME until nothing comes out-pump 'dry.'-But only once! The idea is, this kind of 'resets' production.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Scared to Block Feed

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    .

    I know this sounds counterintuitive, but many moms find more frequent nursing sessions helps with oversupply/forceful letdown. Regularly going 3-4 hours between feedings is a somewhat unusual pattern for 3 months, and that may be contributing to the issue, at least the forceful letdown side of it. Sure baby is gaining fine, because you have oversupply. But letting baby have frequent 'snacks,' as opposed to widely spaced 'meals,' helps reduce the forceful letdown, because the build up is not so bad. It cuts down on the foremilk/hindmilk 'imbalance.' And it allows a small amount of milk to be taken out frequently, rather than a ton infrequently. This naturally allows you body to begin to get the idea that it can slow down production without risking engorgement & plugged ducts. And yes, you can nurse more frequently while also block feeding-just have baby nurse on one side through two or more feedings, and that is block nursing..
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

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