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Thread: Put down the pump

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,552

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    I do agree with the article. I was very, very happy to have a pump when DS1 was born, because he would have been on formula if I didn't start pumping as early as I did since he didn't latch at all. I do have to say, with DS2, I was SO comfortable with pumping that I was pumping too much to prepare for work, and it did cause issues for me, since I tend towards OS and OALD as it is.
    Beth

    Exclusively pumped for Lance Oct 07
    Nursed until just before he turned 3 Levi Oct 09

    Do you have extra milk? Consider donating!
    http://www.hmbana.org/:

    "So I was welcomed by the consolations of human milk; but it was not my mother or my nurses who made any decision to fill their breasts, but you who through them gave me infant food, in accordance with your ordinance and the riches which are distributed deep in the natural order." -St Augustine

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Well, if you are doing what a lot of moms do, which is pump after feeding, or instead of nursing, that pump IS interfering. Because it is time away from baby. And many moms do not realize they could pump one side while they nurse the other until someone tells them.

    Don't you all remember me saying stuff like gosh, what am I supposed to do while I'm pumping and the baby wakes up way back at the beginning with Gav? It was awful because often I had to cut a session short or try to comfort him without being able to pick him up. Having a pump attached to me really did interfere with how I like to respond to my babies. And I do remember that from my first baby. There I was, pumping, and he would suddenly wake up, being the very difficult baby he was (no, I got no time away from him despite all that freezer stash because he would not tolerate anyone else), and I had to stop.

    EPing has taken such a toll on me, on how I view my fourth child's first year, that it has passed in a blur of pumping, washing bottles, obsession over how much fresh milk is in the fridge, and exhaustion. There is very little enjoyment in there. There was no time. Because of the pump. Extreme situation, yes, but one I will grieve for the rest of my life.

    Why do that unless you have to?
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Definitely understand what this blog post is getting at.

    I spent the first month of LO's life nursing, pumping, and bottle-feeding around the clock because that's what I was told to do. I would nurse "quickly" (was told to nurse only 8-10 min. per side) and then hurry up to give a bottle and pump, so that my body would have enough time to produce something for the next feed.

    Even at the 1-month check-up, pediatrician told me to continue the routine, to make sure weight gain was OK. I knew I wouldn't last, though. I was utterly exhausted and felt like a slave to the pump and the bottle. Not to mention that nursing was feeling less and less effective as LO got more and more used to the bottle.

    I decided to take my chances and abandoned all pumps and bottles cold turkey. It was totally liberating. I never did tell the pediatrician that we'd gone our own route, because I thought they'd think I was irresponsible. But one month later LO had gained 2 lbs. ALL on breastmilk, no pumping, no bottles.

    I still feel like I missed out on a lot that first month, and that pumping and bottle-feeding (and the washing of equipment, etc.) robbed us of time that could have been otherwise spent cuddling, resting and nursing. I'm just glad I decided on my own when I did to "put down the pump," stop counting ounces, and stop watching the clock, and let nature run its course. If I hadn't, the vicious circle would have soon been the end of BF for me.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    Don't you all remember me saying stuff like gosh, what am I supposed to do while I'm pumping and the baby wakes up way back at the beginning with Gav? It was awful because often I had to cut a session short or try to comfort him without being able to pick him up. Having a pump attached to me really did interfere with how I like to respond to my babies. And I do remember that from my first baby. There I was, pumping, and he would suddenly wake up, being the very difficult baby he was (no, I got no time away from him despite all that freezer stash because he would not tolerate anyone else), and I had to stop.

    EPing has taken such a toll on me, on how I view my fourth child's first year, that it has passed in a blur of pumping, washing bottles, obsession over how much fresh milk is in the fridge, and exhaustion. There is very little enjoyment in there. There was no time. Because of the pump. Extreme situation, yes, but one I will grieve for the rest of my life.

    Why do that unless you have to?
    I'm sorry you've had such a rotten time EPing this time. But the article isn't talking about EPing. And in answer to your question of why do that unless you have to - the truth is, not all of us are strong enough to deal with a screaming, fussing, inconsolable baby day in and day out with no break. I wasn't. And yeah, Shiloh didn't enjoy or probably like each time he was left with daddy or my MIL...but he dealt. And my nerves got a break. I got a chance to renew my mind so that I could come back and face the next 21hrs of screaming, nursing, crying, fussing, and non-sleeping. I did that because I NEEDED to. I NEEDED a break, even if Shiloh didn't WANT to give it to me And it wasn't a hardship for me. It was quite easy to take 10-15 minutes a day to pump - even with a brand new baby.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    I know it is not talking about EPing but so, so many moms come here on the verge of EPing, or they are going nuts trying to pump, feed the baby, then repeating, totally stressing out, not sleeping, crying, thinking they are failing. Because of bad advice about pumping. Like a PP said happened to her. And that is why I will lobby against a new mom pumping if she doesn't have to from the get-go. Because it is generally bad advice for most mothers. Fine, if you want to. But are you going to tell your clients to go home and pump after they have a baby? I hope not.

    If it works for you, you take it. But if it doesn't work, change it. Does that make sense?
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,476

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Maybe there should be a criteria that we can advocate as to when you may need to pump regularly and when you actually don't. The default should be that you don't, not that you do. Then, if you meet this criteria, THEN you need to pump. KWIM?

    Kinda like when you've had a c-section and you're pregnant with your following baby. Default to VBAC, then if this criteria exists, THEN consider a repeat CS.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Texas
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    818

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*amysmom View Post
    The default should be that you don't, not that you do.
    exactly! I bet people can get picky on criteria for sure, but there are some obvious criteria that would= need to pump. of course pumping is always optional! but it shouldn't be that you default MUST PUMP from the get go, with no consideration of criteria at all or possible problems, and I feel that is the way it is right now
    Christine
    Can't believe I've been and a full-time SAHM to Elena (5/2010) for over 2 yrs!
    Mami de mi preciosa Elenita
    http://forums.llli.org/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=32384&dateline=131170  7429 OakRoseCharms Free Shipping for LLLadies just pm me! My Blog

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    381

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Again, I agree with the main points of the article. I just think its not deterministic. My whole point was that early pumping does not have to equal a messed up BFing relationship, BF failure, or EPing. Those of us that choose to can do it in a smart way that does not affect our enjoyment of our newborns (could even enhance it as Leslie described, I think that is COMPLETELY valid) or mess up our supplies. And can be extremely helpful to set up a mom going back to work FT at 12 weeks for a year of success, like I described.
    Mom to Taiga born 6/2010

    Pocket cloth diapers. Baby led solids. Full-time working mom. I my DH, DD, kitty Dr. Benway, and my working border collie Odin!
    BF for 1 year and she and I still love it !!!!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Katy, TX
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Where, WHERE was this advice when I was pumping/returned to work for DS? We only successfully breastfed for about 6 months, 3 of which I supplemented for because my supply was so low. We were fine til I started pumping - 2 weeks PP. Oh how I wish I'd known better. Won't make that mistake again!!!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Landof2toddlers, Oregon
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    3,113

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    Well, if you are doing what a lot of moms do, which is pump after feeding, or instead of nursing, that pump IS interfering. Because it is time away from baby. And many moms do not realize they could pump one side while they nurse the other until someone tells them.

    Don't you all remember me saying stuff like gosh, what am I supposed to do while I'm pumping and the baby wakes up way back at the beginning with Gav? It was awful because often I had to cut a session short or try to comfort him without being able to pick him up. Having a pump attached to me really did interfere with how I like to respond to my babies. And I do remember that from my first baby. There I was, pumping, and he would suddenly wake up, being the very difficult baby he was (no, I got no time away from him despite all that freezer stash because he would not tolerate anyone else), and I had to stop.

    EPing has taken such a toll on me, on how I view my fourth child's first year, that it has passed in a blur of pumping, washing bottles, obsession over how much fresh milk is in the fridge, and exhaustion. There is very little enjoyment in there. There was no time. Because of the pump. Extreme situation, yes, but one I will grieve for the rest of my life.

    Why do that unless you have to?
    My baby - the newborn that slept 9 hrs in a 24hr period. The one that came out grabbing and pulling. The one that never could be satisfied unless he was being held. And me home alone for 12 plus hours a day. Not eating, rarely sleeping spending every waking moment either nursing or going to doctor or LC appointments, but public transportation, with 4th degree tearing. Yeah. Pumping even once a day threw me right over the edge. And I had undersupply (hence all the dr and LC appts) So I was trying to pump 8 times a day. With a baby that could not be put down. And never getting more than a few drops. And every single pumping session was both of us crying and feeling inconsolable. Which is why I gave up pumping. And I know a lot of you judge me for that because it meant formula supplements but my PPD could have killed us both and taking one extra stressor out meant it didn't.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*Leslie View Post
    the truth is, not all of us are strong enough to deal with a screaming, fussing, inconsolable baby day in and day out with no break. I wasn't.
    You are because I did. None of us should have to though.

    And for those of us who don't respond to the pump properly it can destroy a breastfeeding relationship by undermining confidence so badly.

    I am in full agreement that early pumping should not be a default.
    proud but exhausted working mammy to two high needs babies

    • my surprise baby: the one and only D-Man born 3 weeks late (5/5/08) at 9 lbs 14 oz and 21.5 inches, and
    • the shock H-Girl born about a week late (10/7/09) at 8lbs 15oz and 20.75 inches.


    If I am here I am covered in baby (probably two) and fighting for control of the keyboard.

    Family beds are awesome

    Wondering if you have PPD? Take the screening and see your doctor. You deserve to feel better.

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