Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: Put down the pump

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*rachiebee View Post

    DD (baby #3) is now almost 6 weeks, and I have only pumped 3 times, and only to relieve some fullness when she slept super long a couple nights. I swore I would not stress and just trust that my body would know how much she needs. She only nurses one side at each feeding for 5-8 minutes at most, and she's gaining weight wonderfully and very content. With baby #2, when he started only eating on one side per feeding, I would consistently pump the other side
    Exactly!!! This is how it should work! Go mama!
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Haha, I know I already said some of this on FB, but having had low supply later on in nursing with both babies (due to decreased prolactin levels from PCOS) - I KNOW that it is much easier to correct an oversupply than it is to bring a low supply up. I was "THAT" mom with Shiloh. He was jaundiced and sleepy, and I didn't even get to nurse him until he was 36hrs old. The nurses at the hospital gave me a pump and I started pumping. When I got home and my sweet angel wouldn't nurse, I pumped. And yeah, I was scared that I wouldn't have enough. And I did pump too much and obsessively to the point of having oversupply - which is what brought me here. Not for one second would I have changed anything I did. Block feeding for 12 and 12 hrs on each side corrected the problem and no problems. But when my supply tanked because of my PCOS, Shiloh would've gone on formula had I not had such a nice freezer stash.

    Joey comes along. Same thing. Around 1wk I started pumping 1x/day. It wasn't this awful hardship or a take forever thing. Shiloh was in bed every night by 7pm. At 10pm I sat down with Joey and nursed her on 1 side and pumped the other. Took maybe 10-12minutes, and I was ALREADY NURSING So its not like I lost out on precious time with my baby because I was hooked up to a pump for all of 12 minutes My DH was able to take her to bed with him and had a 3-4oz bottle to give her(she never took that much). I slept for 4-6hrs and let him take her for her first waking. When she woke the second time, or if he just couldn't settle her, he'd bring her to me. But it was after I was able to sleep some. And considering the alternative - PPD aggravated by insane lack of sleep(yes, even some of us that co-sleep still feel sleep deprived, imagine that)...no thanks

    Pumping was such a lifesaver. I had over 140ozs stored up with Joey so that I was able to help hold her over while waiting for my domperidone to arrive, and I wasn't any worse for the wear. Pumping helped me be successful at BFing - BOTH times and early on, so that I didn't have to supplement my children with formula.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    I think people are taking this article the wrong way.

    She is NOT saying don't pump. She herself has pumped. She is a working mom. So that is why I'm a little over some of the comments I have seen.

    She flat out says pumps are useful. I think the word she used was actually valuable.

    But she is saying EVALUATE your reasons behind pumping. If you are doing it just because you are "supposed" to....well...why? That is the root cause behind many problems.

    I had so many problems with my first kid. And looking back, most of those were a direct result of the advice I was given to pump. I already have an OS naturally, along with an OALD. I didn't need to pump. But there I was, pumping. And things got worse and worse. It is a miracle I managed to breastfeed at all or didnt EP. Things got better about 2 weeks after I stopped pumping.

    That is what she is talking about. Most moms don't need to pump like I was told to. There are some -- I have a mom IRL about to have her third, and we have been talking for months about what to do, as she has never produced enough milk (IGT) -- who maybe should pump early. But most of us...just put it down. Enjoy your time with a brand new baby.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Yeah, it's obviously different for every family...but I agree that it's NOT the norm for women to pump early on and NOT have problems related to it. I have a friend who knew she was going back to work at 8 weeks, and started pumping right away...and then promptly ended up with mastitis 3 times and a VERY gassy and angry green-pooping baby. But of course, she is very proud of and happy about her milk stash. The OS issues I dealt with from pumping I never knew about...I never even thought about how it could affect me. So I think this is a great article, but you have to know what works for you and your family. I have my own home-based business, so I don't HAVE to rush back to work, but I will admit, there was a part of me that really wanted to stock up on frozen milk just so I knew I would have something in case I needed to leave her, but my experience was SO bad with the OS issues with my last baby, I just refuse to use it unless necessary until she is a little older.

    And thanks for the props, Susan! It's sad it's taken me until baby #3 to figure this out...I wish Iwould have read this article with #1 and saved myself a lot of grief!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,475

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    I thought the focus was what we see here at times...".I thought I was supposed to pump, and now I have too much milk, my baby won't latch," that sort of thing, instead of a new mom just enjoying her time off with her baby. Instead, she is all upset because she can't get anything out, the baby won't nurse and would rather have a bottle, or it's just not working. Sure, it takes practice, but not from birth and most moms just need a couple days worth of milk anyway, not this huge stash I have had moms tell me they need. So I thought this was a good reminder to just let baby nurse. To enjoy the time. And if you don't have to, don't pump.
    You know, I didn't think of it at the time, but looking back.... DD1 was born 6 weeks early. I pumped in the hospital to get my production to start, to replace the formula they were giving her with my milk. Once she was out of the NICU, I continued to pump after nursing because I was so worried about production. I ended up getting overactive let down. I'd get engorged, leak, spray poor DD1.... We eventually got over it and she nursed for 17 months. But it was a tough time.

    With DD2, I didn't pump. I wasn't worried about it. I think I have 1 bag of milk in the freezer "just in case" that we never used. I didn't have OALD this time. We sync'd up in no time. Maybe if I hadn't been pumping so much in the beginning with DD1, beyond what was needed in the hospital, I wouldn't have developed OALD then either.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    But she is saying EVALUATE your reasons behind pumping. If you are doing it just because you are "supposed" to....well...why? That is the root cause behind many problems.
    My issue was not with the not pumping but with the insinuation that if you weren't a working mom, why would you NEED to pump? Well, I didn't work after having Shiloh or Joey - and I still pumped. Because I needed to. I needed to be able to hand my child off for a few hours to have a hot shower, a trip to the store by myself, a few hours of sleep, etc.

    ETA: And I didn't NEED that time away as much with an easy-going second baby. But with the first, that cried all the time, even when he was in my arms - then yeah. It made me a better mom and more prepared to handle the other 21hrs a day of his fussing if I could get a few hours break. Pumping made that possible. And if I had waited 1-2mos to begin pumping, I'm not sure just how I would have responded to the pump. But I do know after taking a 4 month sabbatical from pumping with Joey, I couldn't pump 2 dribbles out - even with a hospital grade pump.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    But most of us...just put it down. Enjoy your time with a brand new baby.
    And THIS was my second beef...that because you pump, you can't possibly be enjoying your time with your baby Major here. That's where I got so annoyed. Because I'm missing out on so much nursing my baby on the left side and pumping my right side. Again -
    Last edited by @llli*Leslie; November 24th, 2011 at 09:10 AM.
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    381

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    IDK - I liked the article, overall, I just felt it didn't apply to my situation. And like Leslie I honestly feel that the pumping I did those early weeks were crucial to me being able to breastfeed to a year with no supplementation. Crucial. Not that supplementing is evil but I didn't want to do it if I could help it. The 12 oz stash that was sufficient for Sarale wouldn't have even got me to 6 months with only BM - I would have had to turn to formula supplements at DC on at least some days. Because while my baby was great at regulating my supply, me being a poor responder to the pump but having to rely on that about 9 hours a day during weekdays meant that I could not, no matter how I tried, get ahead again. I could, at best, keep up with daily DC demand - and even fell short of that sometimes. And if there was any incident with the milk, I had to pull from the stash - which I was always SO grateful to have. I guess I feel like with my almost-undersupply, (if I hadn't worked FT, I guess you'd call it perfect supply ), the worse danger for me would have been to start supplementing, then watch my supply go down even more the more we had to use that.

    If I had had OS then it would have been different. And maybe that's the thing - OS does not have the same issues as US. And I do acknowledge there is point to be made that at 3 weeks and a FTM, I didn't have any idea what my real supply tendencies were going to be like. But I pumped once a day, during her long morning nap. It didn't stop me from enjoying her. I read stuff that let me know it was OK to only get 1/4-1/2 oz when I first started. It did the opposite of mess up our BF relationship. Using a pump early like this is also different than women who, worried about supply (often with no good reason to worry) pump multiple times a day on top of feeding baby, after every feeding or whatever.
    Mom to Taiga born 6/2010

    Pocket cloth diapers. Baby led solids. Full-time working mom. I my DH, DD, kitty Dr. Benway, and my working border collie Odin!
    BF for 1 year and she and I still love it !!!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    did not read all the posts, just wanted to say thank you for posting the article.

    i agree with the unnecessary "rush to the pump" i hear it too often, imho. pumps are great when you need to work or if something else keeps you from your baby. otherwaise, hold the baby close and let your body learn what the baby needs through his/her suckling.

    thanks!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Bryan, Texas
    Posts
    4,260

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*ooky View Post
    IDK - I liked the article, overall, I just felt it didn't apply to my situation. And like Leslie I honestly feel that the pumping I did those early weeks were crucial to me being able to breastfeed to a year with no supplementation. Crucial. Not that supplementing is evil but I didn't want to do it if I could help it. The 12 oz stash that was sufficient for Sarale wouldn't have even got me to 6 months with only BM - I would have had to turn to formula supplements at DC on at least some days. Because while my baby was great at regulating my supply, me being a poor responder to the pump but having to rely on that about 9 hours a day during weekdays meant that I could not, no matter how I tried, get ahead again. I could, at best, keep up with daily DC demand - and even fell short of that sometimes. And if there was any incident with the milk, I had to pull from the stash - which I was always SO grateful to have. I guess I feel like with my almost-undersupply, (if I hadn't worked FT, I guess you'd call it perfect supply ), the worse danger for me would have been to start supplementing, then watch my supply go down even more the more we had to use that.

    If I had had OS then it would have been different. And maybe that's the thing - OS does not have the same issues as US. And I do acknowledge there is point to be made that at 3 weeks and a FTM, I didn't have any idea what my real supply tendencies were going to be like. But I pumped once a day, during her long morning nap. It didn't stop me from enjoying her. I read stuff that let me know it was OK to only get 1/4-1/2 oz when I first started. It did the opposite of mess up our BF relationship. Using a pump early like this is also different than women who, worried about supply (often with no good reason to worry) pump multiple times a day on top of feeding baby, after every feeding or whatever.
    That's what I was going for. My mind isn't expressing itself very clearly right now! Thank you!
    All over the world there exists in every society a small group of women who feel themselves strongly attracted to giving care to other women during pregnancy and childbirth. Failure to make use of this group of highly motivated people is regrettable and a sin against the principle of subsidiary. ~ Dr. Kloosterman, Chief of OB/GYN, Univ. of Amsterdam, Holland


    **Leslie**

    Mama to:
    Shiloh (5/6/06) Nursed for 13 months and Josephine (7/26/08) Nursed for 23.5 mos Currently nursing my new little firecracker, Finley Catherine, born on the 4th of July!!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    818

    Default Re: Put down the pump

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*Leslie View Post
    My issue was not with the not pumping but with the insinuation that if you weren't a working mom, why would you NEED to pump? Well, I didn't work after having Shiloh or Joey - and I still pumped. Because I needed to. I needed to be able to hand my child off for a few hours to have a hot shower, a trip to the store by myself, a few hours of sleep, etc...ETA: And I didn't NEED that time away as much with an easy-going second baby. But with the first, that cried all the time, even when he was in my arms - then yeah.
    I understand what you're saying, and I think its a matter of opinion sometimes (and personal preference). But I think it goes both ways. People still *expected* me to pump as a SAHM. And their reasons were "so you can get some time to yourself, go out for a few hours, so we can enjoy feeding the baby too".

    Just as you said its possible (like with an easy going baby) to not have to pump and still do those things, and I did.. I mean that it shouldn't be expected that the only way I can get any time to myself is to pump, b/c that's not true (for me). it shouldn't be expected that all nursing moms pump, and IME that is what I see and hear around me.

    I know not pumping is not for everyone there are very valid reasons to do so and those vary depending on the person. but it shouldn't be the expectation B/c that's what most FTM operate from, how things should be. And yea, a lot of those expectations are wrong, and we should be reading the right way to do it. But alot of the time there is not enough support, especially about pumping. I never once heard about problems that could occur with pumping, only that I should be doing it "just in case". the default information out there is: buy a pump, use it. I only got more information by searching diligently.
    Christine
    Can't believe I've been and a full-time SAHM to Elena (5/2010) for over 2 yrs!
    Mami de mi preciosa Elenita
    http://forums.llli.org/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=32384&dateline=131170  7429 OakRoseCharms Free Shipping for LLLadies just pm me! My Blog

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •