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Thread: Nursing on demand and maintaining supply

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Question Nursing on demand and maintaining supply

    My son is 10 weeks old. We do not have any problems when I am only nursing, however, I am not able to pump and still have enough milk for him when he is hungary. I would like to have a supply in the freezer, but cannot seem to get that far. I drink a ton of water and I drink the Mother's Milk tea 3-5 times a day. Is there something more that I can do to make sure I have enough for him and extra in the freezer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    Are you trying to get a supply going for a return to work, or just for the occasional bottle for a sitter?
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    For return to work. I just pumped for a half hour and only got 2oz. I'm hoping I don't regret it tonight, but if I am only pumping 2oz and I know my son can put down six, how can he be getting enough?? I think I'll be going to a lactation consultant tomorrow, but if you have any suggestions that can relieve my anxiety about it, that would be wonderful! Thank you for your help!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    Six is a LOT. Most breastfed babies should only take 1 to 1.5 oz per our of separation. Re-evaluate your feeding method, your bottles, everything.

    My bottle fed baby only takes 4, and he's 10 months. Been taking 4 since he was several months old. Your milk becomes more concentrated, unlike formula, which is how a breastfed baby tops out on intake.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    When I started pumping I was barely getting anything. I had to "learn" how to pump in the same way I had to learn to breastfeed. They feel so different. I made sure to pump a bit every night at the same time (simulates an extra feeding in the day). At first I would only get 0.5 oz, but now it is consistently 3-4 oz.

    Also make sure that you have a good pump if you are going to use it for work. What kind do you have?
    EBFing, CDing, BWing, co-sleeping mamma to Bennett (9/5/11).
    Excited to be a BM donor through Indiana Mothers Milk Bank (http://www.immb.org/).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    I am using the First Years pump. I like it. It is not as good as the one I used in the hospital, but it does the job. How do I get him on a schedule? I have just been feeding him on demand. Perhaps that will help with pumping and having enough to nurse him when he's hungary. Would getting bigger cups on my pump help with expressing more milk? I also watched that video on using the electric pump and hand pumping at the same time to express more milk. I'm trying that in the morning after my sons first feeding to see if it works. If I could do that at least once a day and freeze it, I figure it will add up eventually...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    No schedule. It will only make your life more difficult. Your baby will be miserable, because you can't get a little baby onto a schedule without a huge amount of desperate crying. He's going to be starving, since babies don't understand that they are only "supposed" to eat every X number of hours. And you are likely to end up with decreased milk supply since supply = demand, and if you reduce your baby's demand, your supply will go down as a consequence. You may have heard that babies should eat "meals" and not "snacks" but nothing could be farther from the truth. Eating infrequent, large meals is a typical eating pattern for an ADULT. Not for an infant (or even a toddler). Their normal pattern is snacking. It keeps their blood sugar nice and even and ensures a good milk supply.

    So no schedules.

    And get yourself a better pump. The First Years is a very lightweight pump meant for a mom who needs to pump the occasional bottle and who responds well to pumping. It isn't a good pump for a working mom, who will be relying on it fairly heavily. You haven't thrown your money away- just keep the FY as your back-up in case you forget your work pump.

    A lot of new moms think that if they let milk build up in the breast they will yield more, and that frequent feeding results in lower supply. Actually, the opposite is true. The more often you remove milk from the breast, the more you will make, and the longer you allow milk to sit in the breast, the less you will make. The body interprets reduced demand as a good reason to reduce supply. so for building a good supply, it's probably better to pump 1 oz 5 times a day than 5 oz once a day.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    Excellent ideas here. Remember that when you are back at work, so you will likely be able to pump more per session, as the pumping sessions will REPLACE a nursing session, rather than being in addition to nursing.

    Someone has given you unrealistic expectations about how much the average mom 'should' be able to pump. Between .5 oz and 2 oz is normal pump output for a mom who is pumping once a day ON TOP of nursing her baby regularly. Think about it. Why should your body be making tons of extra milk? Just because some moms, perhaps with insane oversupply, can pump more than that, does not mean it is normal or even desirable.

    How much time do you have before you return to work, and how much will you need to have saved? At a minimum, enough for the first day- as you will (presumably/hopefully) pump enough at work for the following day. Of course, it will ease your mind to have a cushion, say, between two days and a weeks worth in the freezer, in case it takes a while to get into a pumping groove at work, so pump what you can, but don’t stress too much about it.

    Babies will take more from a bottle than the breast. Bottle fed babies are often overfed, because they will take more than they need from a bottle. So, a common issue when moms return to work is the baby's caregiver unintentionally overfeeds the baby, making mom think she can’t keep up. This article explains a bottle feeding technique that may help prevent this. http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf

    Milk calculator: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkcalc.html

    Nice informative pumping article: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/p..._decrease.html

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    13

    Default Re: Nursing on demand and maintaining su

    Very helpful! I will forget about schedule. I will definately get a better pump. I was never recommended what was better than the other, so just went with it. I'm thinking I am going to hold out on work for just a little while longer. I need to be comfortable with this before I can go back and I'm not going to rush it. Thank you for your help! I didn't know what was normal and what wasn't.

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