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Thread: several problems feeding my newborn

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1

    Default several problems feeding my newborn

    Hello all, I'm new here so excuse me if I ramble. It has been an exhausting week. My baby was born 10 days ago and we have been struggling to get a good latch since he's always so hungry and frantic. He's a big boy born by c-section who was losing weight so we had to supplement him with both pumped breast milk and formula. While pumping this weekend I noticed that stringy, sometimes clumpy gelatinous stuff was being pumped out and clogging the bottle nipples. I'm wondering if this is a sign of a clogged duct. I did warm compresses for two days and it has since resolved but I would like to avoid that again if possible. I didn't have any lumps or painful areas that I could tell-- I've been sore all along so I guess I may have not noticed? I'm open to any replies/suggestions/ideas. The lactation consultant says he has good latch and I have good insinct on what to do but I can't get him to calm himself enough to latch at feedings. He roots all up my arm, into my neck. He's a strong boy! I don't want him to associate being near me with negative things. I basically end up crying from frustration because I don't understand how something that can come so naturally for some is so difficult for me. I guess I always thought this was instinctual between a mother and a baby. So thanks again for reading, and even moreso for replying.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: several problems feeding my newborn

    It is instinctual, but it's NOT easy.

    The cloggy stuff sounds like you are engorged and not emptying your breasts completely. It could turn into something if you aren't careful.

    The frantic thing is tough. I remember that from my first baby. Zero to starved in 0.1 seconds. Are you waiting for baby to cry and root before feeding? If so, you might be missing baby's cues. However, there is an easier way

    Go to bed. Take baby with you. Lay down and nurse. If baby wakes up, feed the baby before baby even asks. Nurse while baby is asleep.

    I did this with my last three, even the one I'm pumping for, and very quickly, the day/night thing worked out, and I had a good supply. In fact, with the middle two, I never got engorged, and they never lost any weight after birth.

    If you can, stop pumping. That can lead to an over supply, and babies fed via bottles are not as good at regulating their intake as one who is nursed.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    166

    Default Re: several problems feeding my newborn



    I second the co sleeping and night nursing. Just make sure it is safe by doing some research. http://cosleeping.nd.edu/frequently-asked-questions/#23

    It is MUCH easier than waking to feed and nighttime is great for supply. Also wear him as much as possible and try to nurse very frequently so you can up your supply and get him before he gets too hungry. I was so out of it that I set a timer for my DD at that age and if we got close to 3 hours (and never longer than 4) I would nurse her. I fed her almost hourly but the timer was just in case I went too long. It wasn't easy but it really helped my supply and kept her from the frantic no-latch screaming fit when she was so hungry.

    Also we had a big exercise ball and would hold her and lightly bounce to soothe. I don't know how we could have soothed her without the ball. We even had a smaller travel size for the car in case she got upset at a doc appt or on an errand. I remember pulling the car over at a park and bouncing her in a parking lot to get her to relax. I think we might actually have to bury those balls once they give out because they are more like pets in our house.
    being a SAHM to DD born 12/09

  4. #4

    Default Re: several problems feeding my newborn

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*aprilsmagic View Post
    It is instinctual, but it's NOT easy.

    The cloggy stuff sounds like you are engorged and not emptying your breasts completely. It could turn into something if you aren't careful.

    The frantic thing is tough. I remember that from my first baby. Zero to starved in 0.1 seconds. Are you waiting for baby to cry and root before feeding? If so, you might be missing baby's cues. However, there is an easier way

    Go to bed. Take baby with you. Lay down and nurse. If baby wakes up, feed the baby before baby even asks. Nurse while baby is asleep.

    I did this with my last three, even the one I'm pumping for, and very quickly, the day/night thing worked out, and I had a good supply. In fact, with the middle two, I never got engorged, and they never lost any weight after birth.

    If you can, stop pumping. That can lead to an over supply, and babies fed via bottles are not as good at regulating their intake as one who is nursed.
    Susan always has such AWESOME advise
    Im Jenn
    Mamma To:
    Kelsey BF 3 months
    Kenneth BF 3 months
    Blaze BF 3.5 years (tandem)
    Bristol BF 3.5 years (tandem)
    Raiden BF 15months & counting


    We
    NIP BLS

    In need of some

    LACTIVIST

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,357

    Default Re: several problems feeding my newborn

    Breastfeeding is natural, but that doesn't mean it's easy, especially the first time round and even more so when mom has just been through major abdominal surgery.

    If you're having trouble with latching, I suggest taking the PPs' advice and taking him to bed, and also being as patient as you can be. Some babies latch on more willingly if you get to them before they are hungry, but some babies go from 0 to 60 so fast that this isn't pssible. It may help to offer the baby your pinky finger to suck when he's frantic- make sure to hold the nail down towards the tongue. This can calm him enough to enable another latching attempt.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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