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Thread: oversupply and weight gain

  1. #1
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    Sep 2011
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    Default oversupply and weight gain

    hello.
    i think that i have a forceful letdown which is causing my baby to get symptoms. if i try to control the overflow, will my baby stop gaining so much weight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Usually when a mom has a fast letdown, the root cause is that she has an oversupply of milk. However, this is not always the case. It is possible to have fast letdowns with normal supply, or to have symptoms that appear to match fastletdowns but are actually something else. So, before we get into what to do about your situation, can you tell us what symptoms you are experiencing? And can you tell us what concerns you about your baby's weight? Is he/she gaining extremely fast, and you're worried that he/she is gaining too much weight, or are you worried that your baby's weight gain may slow too much if you control the letdown issue?
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
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    Sep 2011
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Hi.. Thanks for responding.
    My baby has been having a lot of the issues related to forceful let down. He has been extremely fussy, stomach pains, grunts about everything, very gassy, a lot of spit ups. I went to the doctor to rule out pyloric stenosis. When I'm breastfeeding I could feel the letdown and he starts swallowing hard and removing from the breast. At first I thought he was hungry but that's not the case. He has gained 3 pounds in 4 weeks. The dr said it was not good so I'm concern.

  4. #4
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Okay, what you describe certainly could be overactive letdown and oversupply. The fast weight gain and baby coming off the breast during letdowns matches well, as does the gassiness, spit-up, and general fussiness. Now, if this is oversupply and fast letdowns, how much of a problem is it? Well, first of all, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a breastfed baby gaining weight quickly in the early weeks!!! My second daughter gained a pound a week for about a month when she was a newborn, and all my pediatrician said was "Good job!". As your baby gets older, the rate of weight gain will slow down, particularly once he becomes mobile and starts using up her calories on action instead of packing them on as fat.

    However, what you describe could also be reflux. Babies with reflux will sometimes nurse a lot, and gain weight very quickly, because constant swallowing helps keep their stomach acid down and because breastmilk helps neutralize stomach acid. So here is what I suggest you do:
    1. Start trying to control the milk flow by nursing in reclined positions. This link shows some: http://kellymom.com/bf/supply/fast-letdown.html. If the reclined positions make your baby more comfortable, you don't need to do anything else.
    2. If reclined positions are not enough, progress to block feeding. Offer only one breast at a time for one or more feedings in a row. Since block feeding is designed to reduce milk supply, watch your baby's diaper output carefully. If it drops too low, you may have reduced supply too much, and you should immediately return to feeding on both breasts at a feeding.
    3. Be patient. Controlling overactive letdown and oversupply can take time, and progress can be uneven.
    4. Don't let your doctor stress you out about your baby's weight gain! Gaining a pound a week is NORMAL in a breastfed baby. My babies have gained about that much, and my husband did too, when he was an infant. He is now over two meters tall and a big, strong guy- so gaining a pound a week was very appropriate for his body type.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
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    Sep 2011
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Thanks for the info. I was just scared since my dr made it seemed as though it was something bad. I thought that breastfeed babies were suppose to gain weight less than formula feed babies. I just want to do the right thing. If it's normal for him to gain that much weight then continuing breastfeeding it is... Just modified.

  6. #6
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Sorry your doctor scared you!

    Breastfed babies do exhibit a different weight gain pattern than formula-fed babies. In general, breastfed babies put on weight very quickly as newborns. Formula-fed babies tend to gain weight more slowly during the newborn stage. As babies grow, the weight gain pattern changes. Breastfed babies generally slow down their rate of weight gain, while formula-fed babies speed up. So really all you have to do about your baby's weight gain is...nothing at all! Just wait. As he becomes mobile and starts rolling, reaching, scooting, crawling, walking, etc., the baby fat is going to melt away and a lean toddler will emerge.

    A lot of doctors still act like the weight gain for formula-fed babies is the norm, and tell moms that their breastfed babies are somehow weird for being different. But really, the opposite is true! The weight gain pattern exhibited by breastfed infants is normal, because breastfeeding is the biological ideal for a human baby. It's the formula-fed babies who are exhibiting a "weird" pattern.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #7
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    You've gotten wonderful information from mommal, and I just hopped on to commiserate. I had pretty crazy overactive letdown (everything in my house was covered in milk from the spraying for a few months) and minor oversupply. My son was gaining a pound a week for a little while early on, and has been perfectly healthy (he's nine months now and doing great). While our pediatrician was a bit surprised by the weight gain at the time, he was happy with his health overall and said that babies do tend to gain quickly in the first few months.

    We did deal with lots of gas and spitting up for the first few months. What really helped us was nursing while reclined (I would lean back on a few pillows and lay my son on my chest to nurse), feeding one breast at a time (more severe oversupply may require larger "blocks", but my son rarely had the green, frothy poops so I didn't want to overdo it), and bicycling his legs and tummy massage for gas. In the end, though, my son really just needed to grow out of the spitting up and into the gas (still pretty gassy, but he giggles about it now ).

  8. #8
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    Sep 2011
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    Wow I guess I'm nit the only one which is great. The whole breastfeeding thing is still new to me. But I'm glad that it's fine. I thought that it was me making have all these problems... Lol..
    How do you nurse in public? Bottle/ pump

  9. #9
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    Default Re: oversupply and weight gain

    I think a lot of us have trouble with breastfeeding in the beginning. Because it is the natural method of feeding, I thought it would come naturally. HA! I was miserable for about eight weeks, but once my little guy and I carved out our groove it has been such a wonderful bonding experience.

    Honestly, at first I didn't nurse in public because I was very self concious about milk spraying everywhere. I did pump and give bottles for a short time when we would go out, but pumping not only sucks, it can make OALD even worse. I ended up getting a nursing cover, feeding my son under the cover with a cloth stuffed under my breast to keep from leaking on my clothes.

    Eventually my OALD calmed down enough for me to nurse without the cover. In fact, nursing is far more discrete without it. Wearing a tank top to pull down and a baggier top to pull up, most people don't even know that I'm nursing my baby. I still spray when my son gets a good flow going then pulls off at just the right time, but we haven't had this problem in public. At this age he often gets distracted before we even get to that point when we're out, or has been so busy that when he finally nurses he stays latched and tries to get every last drop.

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