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Thread: Drowning my baby in milk!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Schofield Barracks, Hawaii
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    Default Drowning my baby in milk!

    I'm a first time mother of a 3 week old baby girl, so I am full of questions! I think I may be overproducing. I am producing so much milk I nearly drown her at every feeding, not to mention soaking my shirt and everything within arms reach.. within an hour or so of her completely finishing one breast, it is so full that I'm leaking through breast pads.

    It's getting to the point where she doesn't latch on well anymore (she was a pro at the beginning!) When she does latch on correctly, she drinks for only a few seconds before choking.

    I don't switch breasts at each feeding, because she is full and uninterested after only one side (and sometimes there is still milk left even after a full feeding).

    Although her weight gain and output are great, almost above average, I'm afraid that at 3 weeks producing this much milk if I don't do something I'll be drowning her until I give it up because of all the extra hassle :/ I express some of the milk until it stops free flowing before attempting to feed her, but it doesn't seem to help make things any easier for her to manage.

    Any advice?
    Loving my life as a new mommy!

    Ayana July 30, 2011

  2. #2

    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    I'm also having trouble with oversupply. I read that I should "block feed," meaning that you use only one breast for two hrs, then switch. It can take a couple of weeks for your supply to even out. I've been doing it for a little less than a week and I notice a difference in her behavior (she chokes and let's go of the breast less).

    If your other breast gets overfull, you can pump just enough to relieve the pressure (1min or less).

    Start with 2hrs per side, and if it seems like you need to spend more time on one breast increase it. But be careful, You don't want to decrease your supplytoo much.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    25

    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    Ohhhh, I feel for you. I have had oversupply problems with all 4 of my babies. It's so sad to drown those little ones, isn't it? For me, my body always slows down and regulates at about 3 and a half or 4 months, but that feels like a million years away when they're only 3 weeks old, doesn't it? Hang in there, I think you will love breastfeeding if you can just get through this for a little while.

    Be aware that the more milk you express, the more you will produce. I've never been a big fan of getting rid of some before you feed because it always makes me make more and makes the problem worse within a few days. It's okay in the middle of the night when the baby is asleep and you're still leaving your breasts full afterwards, but to do it and then feed tells your body that's how much your baby wants.

    Also familiarize yourself with the signs of plugged ducts and mastitis which often gohand in hand with o/s and after a few rounds make it REALLY tempting to quit.

    Block feeding is what helped me the most. I would feed on one side any time the baby wanted to eat for a certain length of time and then switch to the other side. Gradually increase the lengh of time you spend on one side until you feel like you have slowed down to a comfortable amount of milk production. Take it slowly, increasing the amount of time every few days. What you don't want is to let the non-feeding side get so full you get uncomfortable and possibly clog up a duct.

    You can also try lying down and letting the baby eat on top of you so that gravity is working for you instead of against you. I've heard applying a little pressure with your fingers in a V shape around your nipple can help slow things down a bit too, but that never seemed to do much for me.

    I'm sure others here will have great advice too.

    Here's the scientific article on what to do about oversupply if you're interested.

    http://www.internationalbreastfeedin...content/2/1/11
    Mamma to: DS 1 (6/1/2002) DS 2 (1/12/2004) DS 3 (8/24/2006) DS 4 (3/12/2011)

    And still smiling!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mmb View Post
    But be careful, You don't want to decrease your supplytoo much.
    It's true that it's possible to decrease your supply too much, but right now your prolactin levels are still sky rocketing and your body is in "make more" mode so if you do run into this problem (which in my experience is hard to do at this stage) it will correct itself VERY quickly, so don't let that stress you out. After 4 months, then it's a little harder to correct but still not impossible.
    Mamma to: DS 1 (6/1/2002) DS 2 (1/12/2004) DS 3 (8/24/2006) DS 4 (3/12/2011)

    And still smiling!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    You need to block feed to get your supply to chill-out. Feed from the same boob for two consecutive feedings, then switch (only offer one boob per feeding). Oversupply is horrible to deal with. So sorry. xox

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    colombia
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    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    I'm also dealing with oversupply plus overactive letdown. My DS is 7wks old and I started block feeding which seems to be working perfectly. I know it can be frustrating but hang in there!
    You can also go over the following article:

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/fast-letdown.html

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Default Re: Drowning my baby in milk!

    Been there myself! Still having issues and my daughter is 7 weeks old...literally spraying and leaking everywhere. What was posted above about block feeding above DOES help greatly! Mine has slowed down from a torrent to a stream now. She took a growth spurt, so they've been restimulated again, and apparently mine are over eager to produce, so I need to start again. I will tell you as an LC told me, see if you can lean back a bit when you nurse. She likened what is happening to us laying flat on our backs with someone putting a hose in our mouth and turning it on full blast. We would choke and sputter too! So if you lean back, the force isn't as great. I also find it helpful to hold a cloth or nursing pad on my breast initially after let down to let some of it spray out. It usually calms down fairly quickly and she can nurse without getting choked as easily. Just be prepared to cover quickly! Also, if you get uncomfortable express the bare minimum for comfort...you don't want to signal your body to increase your supply. I found that hand expressing a tiny bit usually gave me enough comfort without making my breast go crazy. And as said above, learn the signs of mastitis and clogged ducts. Lots of luck!

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