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Thread: OZ per day for baby

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    20

    Question OZ per day for baby

    LO had his 2 month check up today. He was AMAZING after his shots. He literally stopped crying while the bandaids were being put on. SUCH a sweetheart.

    Anywho, the doctor asked how bfing was going, and I told him we're still EPing. They just got a new IBCLC who's a NP at the office, and I made an appt. to see her next week to get LO back to the breast! He asked how many oz per day LO is taking, and I told him 20 oz. Some days it's 22, if LO seems a little more hungry. But, he's only 9 lbs, 6 oz, so not a huge baby or anything.

    Pedi wants him taking 25 oz per day, though. He said that's what he should be taking now and to keep going up from there. He said weight gain looks great, growth looks great, and baby looks wonderful, but to up the oz to 25.

    LO is obviously not hungry. He falls asleep after most bottles for a little bit before waking up and being alert and happy. If weight gain and growth are good and baby is happy, why do we need to up his intake?

    Just thought I'd ask all of you what you think.

    Thanks!
    Tiffany

    BFAR to Little Man born 5/4/11

    Also Momma to Little Princess born 8/22/07

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    2,197

    Default Re: OZ per day for baby

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/milkcalc.html

    I would look to the baby. If he is growing adequately, and seems healthy and happy, I would keep following his cues.
    Teal

    25 May 96 and 14 January 08 and 27 February 2012

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    219

    Default Re: OZ per day for baby

    If your baby is obviously not hungry, it seems odd to recommend that he take more ounces in, especially since weight gain and growth were good. At two months my LO was supposed to be taking 25.5 oz daily (so said my LC), but he was already over 10.5 lbs (he was born big, and he steadily dropped percentiles even though he gained weight, but thankfully my pediatrician monitored but did not freak out!). My little guy had sucking issues (couldn't even feed from a drippy bottle appropriately in his early weeks), and so he did have a hard time meeting his caloric needs. It doesn't seem like there should be anything like that going on with yours.

    I do wish you well getting your LO back to the breast. I EPed for my daughter, and I'm glad I did, but it is still a sorrow to me that we never had a nursing relationship (despite much trying on my part). I hope the new LC will be helpful to you, and I wouldn't hesitate to ask her opinion about the number of ounces.

    Just for some interesting information, when I bottle fed my daughter, she took in way more than the "average" breastfed baby, and I used to freak out about over-feeding her. I used slow-flow Breastflow bottles, and it took ages to feed her, but she drank and drank. My doctor was reassuring on two points. She pointed out that my baby was way above average in height and weight but not at all heavy for her height, and she said, "You wouldn't know if you were breastfeeding. If she wanted to nurse, you'd nurse. If she wants more milk, give her more milk." (We did use a pacifier to see if that would help with sucking needs, but she still was a little milk drinker.) After all my son's difficulties with learning to nurse, I used a rented scale to keep track of his intake just to make sure that breastfeeding was going okay, and it was very interesting to me to see that as he grew he took in more and more ounces. By the time he hit about 40 per day (way above average, about 4 months, and he wasn't a frequent feeder either) I stopped weighing because I figured we weren't having any problems. He was born smaller than my daughter and isn't growing quite as fast, but he still consumed lots of ounces.

    This is more information about my kids than you need, of course, but perhaps it shows that children, like adults, can have different metabolisms. Feeding a baby with a bottle can be tricky because they will drink even if they don't need to, but if you can tell yours is satisfied, and he's growing well, I'd say you're in great shape. You may need to increase the ounces as he grows, but he'll let you know when it's time to do that.
    I breast milk fed my Blossom for fifteen months (after exclusively pumping for thirteen). My Bud (nineteen months) is still nursing directly (after a rough start that included a few months of pumping and supplementing with mommy's milk).

    TwoDewdrops: Nursing Dresses and Tops for Discreet Breastfeeding (and Pumping)

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