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Thread: Newborn and extreme oversupply

  1. #1

    Default Newborn and extreme oversupply

    Hi. My daughter is five days old and I have an oversupply issue that is impacting our ability to form a strong nursing relationship. It started day 2.

    We had a natural home birth.

    I have had this problem with my previous children as well and it always results in breast infections, fevers, green and gassy poops and other struggles.

    I'm wondering if anyone here can help me.

    My breasts seem to immediately produce about 10 ounce on each side within just 48 hours after delivery. I only have the baby nursing on one side per every three to four hours. I only pump to relieve enough tension to be able to function.

    My breasts are so full that raising my arms is very painful and it is very hard to get my baby latched because my nipples are so stretched out and flat.

    I've gotten advice ranging from pump it all completely out and start fresh -- to don't pump at all and it will resolve in 12 hours. (THAT didn't work.)

    I've looked into herbal remedies to cut milk supply but have been told by experts not to try these because they might cut my supply too much. And that is the last thing I want to do.

    What should I do?!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,632

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    Welcome and congratulations on the new baby! I'm sorry you have such an extreme oversupply problem. That must be very uncomfortable.

    The key to reducing milk supply is to leave as much milk ass possible sitting in the breast for as long as possible. The body eventually detects that milk is just sitting, and is not required, and reacts by decreasing supply. For some women, the decrease in supply happens fairly quickly, in hours or days. For others, it can take days, weeks, even months of leaving milk sitting in the breast before the body finally decides that it would be a good idea to reduce supply.

    So, how do you leave milk sitting in the breast? You block feed, feeding the baby from only one breast for more than one feeding in a row. Some moms only need to do short blocks- say 2-3 hours- before they see an effect. Other moms need to do longer blocks- perhaps 6 hours or even more- to get their bodies to decrease supply.

    The unfortunate thing about block feeding is that when a mom has an extreme oversupply, block feeding means that the unused breast is going to be very full, perhaps painfully so, for a long time. And being full is more likely to result in plugged ducts and mastitis. Nice, right?! If you are painfully full, you can either put up with it, or you can pump, or better yet hand express, just enough milk to restore comfort. Removing that minimum amount will keep your supply a little higher than if you don't remove any milk at all, slowing the process of supply reduction, but it's probably worth the price.

    Since you have such an extreme oversupply, I would not hesitate to try the herbal methods of reducing supply. Cold cabbage leaves, peppermint or sage tea. I doubt that they would be sufficient to reduce your supply too much. Just be cautious with them. As soon as you feel like you're close to where you want to be, discontinue them.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18,063

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    yup wss.. Hand express when needed...
    Hang in there.

    You know the signs of infection, don't suffer get the anti-botic if you need it.


    IF your not cracked and bleeding thats a very good thing the broken skin sets you up for worse infections.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Welcome and congratulations on the new baby! I'm sorry you have such an extreme oversupply problem. That must be very uncomfortable.

    The key to reducing milk supply is to leave as much milk ass possible sitting in the breast for as long as possible. The body eventually detects that milk is just sitting, and is not required, and reacts by decreasing supply. For some women, the decrease in supply happens fairly quickly, in hours or days. For others, it can take days, weeks, even months of leaving milk sitting in the breast before the body finally decides that it would be a good idea to reduce supply.

    So, how do you leave milk sitting in the breast? You block feed, feeding the baby from only one breast for more than one feeding in a row. Some moms only need to do short blocks- say 2-3 hours- before they see an effect. Other moms need to do longer blocks- perhaps 6 hours or even more- to get their bodies to decrease supply.

    The unfortunate thing about block feeding is that when a mom has an extreme oversupply, block feeding means that the unused breast is going to be very full, perhaps painfully so, for a long time. And being full is more likely to result in plugged ducts and mastitis. Nice, right?! If you are painfully full, you can either put up with it, or you can pump, or better yet hand express, just enough milk to restore comfort. Removing that minimum amount will keep your supply a little higher than if you don't remove any milk at all, slowing the process of supply reduction, but it's probably worth the price.

    Since you have such an extreme oversupply, I would not hesitate to try the herbal methods of reducing supply. Cold cabbage leaves, peppermint or sage tea. I doubt that they would be sufficient to reduce your supply too much. Just be cautious with them. As soon as you feel like you're close to where you want to be, discontinue them.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Cal.
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    4,984

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    Try to stay away from the pump. It would make you feel better in the short term, but will make your oversupply worse in the long run. Instead, if you are painfully engorged, take a hot shower and let your milk flow, massaging your breasts to avoid painful hard spots. Or hand express. Yes, this still will result in a lot of milk flowing out of your breasts, but at least there will be less nipple stimulation than a pump would provide. For moms with natural oversupply, any extra stimulation can make your breasts think you have twins/triplets/just gave birth to a football team!

    Expect this next week to be rough, but HANG IN THERE. If you can regulate your supply early on, while it is still sensitive and in constant flux, you will have a much easier first couple months! (I second the recommendation of sage tea and cabbage leaves.)


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    549

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Welcome and congratulations on the new baby! I'm sorry you have such an extreme oversupply problem. That must be very uncomfortable.

    The key to reducing milk supply is to leave as much milk ass possible sitting in the breast for as long as possible. The body eventually detects that milk is just sitting, and is not required, and reacts by decreasing supply. For some women, the decrease in supply happens fairly quickly, in hours or days. For others, it can take days, weeks, even months of leaving milk sitting in the breast before the body finally decides that it would be a good idea to reduce supply.

    So, how do you leave milk sitting in the breast? You block feed, feeding the baby from only one breast for more than one feeding in a row. Some moms only need to do short blocks- say 2-3 hours- before they see an effect. Other moms need to do longer blocks- perhaps 6 hours or even more- to get their bodies to decrease supply.

    The unfortunate thing about block feeding is that when a mom has an extreme oversupply, block feeding means that the unused breast is going to be very full, perhaps painfully so, for a long time. And being full is more likely to result in plugged ducts and mastitis. Nice, right?! If you are painfully full, you can either put up with it, or you can pump, or better yet hand express, just enough milk to restore comfort. Removing that minimum amount will keep your supply a little higher than if you don't remove any milk at all, slowing the process of supply reduction, but it's probably worth the price.

    Since you have such an extreme oversupply, I would not hesitate to try the herbal methods of reducing supply. Cold cabbage leaves, peppermint or sage tea. I doubt that they would be sufficient to reduce your supply too much. Just be cautious with them. As soon as you feel like you're close to where you want to be, discontinue them.


    I had similar amounts of oversupply with my first. When DD (my second) was born, I started with 6 hour blocks the day my milk came in. By starting so early, I was able to get the problem to a manageable level fairly quickly.

    Another thing that helped was the introduction of a pacifier. I absolutely would not use one until your daughter is a few weeks older, but if at that point you are still having some problems it is something to consider. By 4 weeks, nursing was well established, but DD's comfort nursing was stimulating my supply too much. I very carefully started using one when I was sure she didn't need to suckle for nutrition, but for comfort. We would cuddle together skin to skin, but instead of nursing I gave her the paci. I know this approach may be a bit more controversial, but I mention it in case you start feeling desperate.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18,063

    Default Re: Newborn and extreme oversupply

    how are things going now?

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