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Thread: Several Questions for First Newborn

  1. #1

    Default Several Questions for First Newborn

    I have perused many of the posts looking for more info to answer my own questions... unfortunately, now I think I only have more questions and am worried I am dealing with several problems. I guess I should call someone local!
    But here goes anyway:

    Baby is nearly 2 weeks -- my first

    1. Everything I had read/learned says feed on demand. BUT My midwife urged me to always strive for 8-10 feedings a day even if I have to wake her up which I pretty much always do have to do. is this normal? She would sleep and sleep if I didn't. I am too worried to NOT do this... (wake her up and feed on this schedule).

    2. Her feedings (after waking up!) are anywhere between 18 and 45 minutes. Normal?

    3. Left side is the problem side: Latching is difficult and we both get frustrated. Over time, I've learned how to keep very sore nipples at bay by usually offering right side first or switching, etc., but there is still some definite issue here. I read on this forum "lipstick" shape is not desirable and that is what happens. Both positions on the L side are difficult, but football hold is usually slightly better. help....

    4. Let down. I have not definitely experienced this on either side (?), but I started "leaking" on R side yesterday and it is much easier to express milk on that side. Not so for the L.

    5. She can be fussy on either side at erratic times (or it seems). She may chomp, pull, loosen latch and fuss.

    6. Additionally, she will drift off to sleep, sometimes very quickly and is hard to arouse or impossible. Maybe I am just used to her longer feedings and worry she should get more...? when really she doesn't need to? Maybe I should allow her to sleep and then nurse again sooner.

    Is it possible for baby to sleep too much???

    not sure what to think overall... any input very welcome.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    I am also dealing and dealt with the some of the same issues. My son is now 5.5 weeks old. My doctors told me to feed every 3-4 hours and wake if need be, but I was only supposed to do that until after he was back up past his birth weight. I was doing it for the first 3 weeks and he was back to his birth weight by the end of the first week....he was born at 6lbs 7oz and dropped to 6lbs 2oz. We also latch better on one side than the other but it got better. Its still not perfect all the time but my nipples are not damaged. also i didnt start to feel let down until last week kinda feels like a squeeze near the top of my breast. Before that my nipple tingled a little. My nipples are still super sensitive but i think thats just part of breast feeding. The thing that we are struggling with now is sometimes near the end of that same side he gets very wiggly and pushes away from me...sometimes taking my nipple with him but then he isnt finished so he cries or he roots very quickly then does it again and again.....I have to take him away calm him then try again

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Denver, Co.
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    1,164

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn



    Congrats on your new baby, and nice work getting off on the right foot by providing breastmilk!

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    I have perused many of the posts looking for more info to answer my own questions... unfortunately, now I think I only have more questions and am worried I am dealing with several problems. I guess I should call someone local!
    But here goes anyway:

    Baby is nearly 2 weeks -- my first

    1. Everything I had read/learned says feed on demand. BUT My midwife urged me to always strive for 8-10 feedings a day even if I have to wake her up which I pretty much always do have to do. is this normal? She would sleep and sleep if I didn't. I am too worried to NOT do this... (wake her up and feed on this schedule).
    By "feed on demand" what that means is not to schedule a feeding, as in...it's better not to say, "Baby, you are only allowed to eat at 10 am, 2 pm and 6 pm." In other words, you offer often at this age and allow your baby to eat even if it's just 45 minutes after the last feed started. Does that make sense? It's less scheduled and more dependent upon when the baby wants/accepts nursing.

    Yes, in general you want to aim for 10-12 nursing sessions in a 24 hour period. I would allow the baby to sleep and not wake, but if the baby sleeps much beyond 4 or 5 hours - I would probably try putting him to the breast.

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/ne...tml#afterweek1

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    2. Her feedings (after waking up!) are anywhere between 18 and 45 minutes. Normal?
    Yes, perfection.


    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    . Left side is the problem side: Latching is difficult and we both get frustrated. Over time, I've learned how to keep very sore nipples at bay by usually offering right side first or switching, etc., but there is still some definite issue here. I read on this forum "lipstick" shape is not desirable and that is what happens. Both positions on the L side are difficult, but football hold is usually slightly better. help....
    I would just keep trying. I had struggles with latching up to about 6 weeks. It gets easier. Have you tried a nursing pillow? I liked the BrestFriend. I would also watch some of Dr. Jack Newman's latching videos:
    http://drjacknewman.com/video-clips.asp

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    . Let down. I have not definitely experienced this on either side (?), but I started "leaking" on R side yesterday and it is much easier to express milk on that side. Not so for the L.
    Yes, you have letdown because your milk is in. I presume your baby has had wet and dirty diapers? This means your milk is in. You may not have FELT the letdown, but that's normal too at this stage. See the Dr. Newman videos and watch the one of the baby drinking well. Watch your LO for this.

    You'll see your LO go from a fast fluttery suck to longer deeper ones. The longer deeper ones means the milk is flowing and the baby is swallowing. And, you've "Letdown."

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    . She can be fussy on either side at erratic times (or it seems). She may chomp, pull, loosen latch and fuss.
    Sounds pretty normal for a 2 week old. It gets easier. Just keep on keeping on, mama.
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    . Additionally, she will drift off to sleep, sometimes very quickly and is hard to arouse or impossible. Maybe I am just used to her longer feedings and worry she should get more...? when really she doesn't need to? Maybe I should allow her to sleep and then nurse again sooner.
    Well, if she's nursing 19-45 minutes like you said - that's plenty long. It's pretty normal for babies this age to sleep. Enjoy it! It will probably fade soon. Forget watching the clock and watch your baby instead. WAtch your baby's cues. Your baby will "tell" you everything you need to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    it possible for baby to sleep too much???

    not sure what to think overall... any input very welcome.
    How long is the longest stretch? I'd put the baby to the breast at anything much beyond 4.5 or 5 hours of straight sleep.

    Otherwise, enjoy the sleep, and sleep while the baby does. Someday you'll wish your baby would sleep.


    Christine
    Baby Girl Born 2/17/10 to her two mommies
    BF from day one. I looked up one day and realized I'm nursing a toddler!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    Congratulations!! I'm going to try and answer each one underneath...

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    I have perused many of the posts looking for more info to answer my own questions... unfortunately, now I think I only have more questions and am worried I am dealing with several problems. I guess I should call someone local!
    But here goes anyway:

    Baby is nearly 2 weeks -- my first

    1. Everything I had read/learned says feed on demand. BUT My midwife urged me to always strive for 8-10 feedings a day even if I have to wake her up which I pretty much always do have to do. is this normal? She would sleep and sleep if I didn't. I am too worried to NOT do this... (wake her up and feed on this schedule).
    I would suggest that you feed her on demand. Newborns sleep a lot and that is normal. As long as she has appropriate diaper output and is gaining weight, you don't need to be concerned. If she sleeps longer than 3hrs, I'd wake her to feed UNTIL she is consistently gaining weight and that isn't a concern. Keep her head and feet covered as that helps them gain weight. They sleep lots and lots! ENJOY IT and you can rest too!! She will let you know when she is hungry!

    2. Her feedings (after waking up!) are anywhere between 18 and 45 minutes. Normal?
    IMHO, 45 minutes is fairly long. It took me a long time to learn that 45 minute feedings weren't really full feedings, just mostly comfort nursing. Watch/listen for her swallowing with her chin thrusting in and out. Once she has stopped doing that, she's probably done eating. But, It's important for the closeness too.

    3. Left side is the problem side: Latching is difficult and we both get frustrated. Over time, I've learned how to keep very sore nipples at bay by usually offering right side first or switching, etc., but there is still some definite issue here. I read on this forum "lipstick" shape is not desirable and that is what happens. Both positions on the L side are difficult, but football hold is usually slightly better. help....
    BTDT!!! I had so many issues with latch! I had the lipstick issue as well. That tends to happen when LO doesn't get the nipple far enough back in her mouth (shallow latch). She should take in a chunk of the areola. Are you large breasted, small breasted, large or small nipples? That really makes a HUGE difference on how easy latch is. I'm extremely large breasted, small frame and was a 32HH immediately post partum. At 3 weeks PP, someone recommended "my breastfriend" feeding pillow and that made a WORLD of a difference with latch issues, etc. I could just rest DS on the pillow and didn't need to cradle him. It allowed me to support my breast better because I was so big I suffocated him. If you continue to have concerns with latch (you don't want to wait so long that you end up with cracked nipples), see if you can attend a La Leche league meeting or contact a leader and have her come help you. They should be really good about that.

    4. Let down. I have not definitely experienced this on either side (?), but I started "leaking" on R side yesterday and it is much easier to express milk on that side. Not so for the L.
    Sometimes, you just don't feel a let down. I still don't and DS is 14 months! I never really did. Try to relax and use warm compresses if it becomes a true issue. You should also start LO on the same side you last finished on.

    5. She can be fussy on either side at erratic times (or it seems). She may chomp, pull, loosen latch and fuss.
    That could be an indicator of several things: let down isn't fast enough for her; air in the tummy. I'd recommend that you start the feedings BEFORE she's hungry. If they are too hungry sometimes they get angry at the breast if milk doesn't let down quick enough.

    6. Additionally, she will drift off to sleep, sometimes very quickly and is hard to arouse or impossible. Maybe I am just used to her longer feedings and worry she should get more...? when really she doesn't need to? Maybe I should allow her to sleep and then nurse again sooner.
    She will let you know when she's hungry! If she falls asleep at the breast, she is most likely content. If she isn't, she'll wake soon enough and let you know. And then you can nurse again. Often, feeding ever 2-3hrs isn't ideal for newborns. They fall asleep, wake up, still hungry, nurse again. They eat and sleep All. Day. Long!! Try to enjoy it and not worry. If she's hungry, she won't fall asleep at the breast.

    Is it possible for baby to sleep too much???
    NO! Encourage it and support it!

    not sure what to think overall... any input very welcome.
    Hang in there momma!! You are doing a great job! This is such a joyful, overwhelming, scary time. I remember celebrating EACH week for the first month or two that he was still alive. I thought it was crazy the hospitals trust us new mom's to take these helpless, needy wonders home!! You are doing a great thing committing to breastfeeding. LLLI was SO HELPFUL for me!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,962

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    1. Everything I had read/learned says feed on demand. BUT My midwife urged me to always strive for 8-10 feedings a day even if I have to wake her up which I pretty much always do have to do. is this normal? She would sleep and sleep if I didn't. I am too worried to NOT do this... (wake her up and feed on this schedule).
    Yes, what you describe is normal. Newborn babies are often quite sleepy, and the "feed on demand" advice for them should be tweaked to read "feed on demand, or every 2-3 hours, whichever is more frequent". Once the vulnerable newborn period is past, you can stop watching the clock as carefully.

    2. Her feedings (after waking up!) are anywhere between 18 and 45 minutes. Normal?
    Yes. Feeding speed can vary a lot.

    Left side is the problem side: Latching is difficult and we both get frustrated. Over time, I've learned how to keep very sore nipples at bay by usually offering right side first or switching, etc., but there is still some definite issue here. I read on this forum "lipstick" shape is not desirable and that is what happens. Both positions on the L side are difficult, but football hold is usually slightly better. help....
    A lipstick nipple indicates that the latch is too shallow. You might want to see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC, for help with tweaking this. Hands-on help is the best!

    4. Let down. I have not definitely experienced this on either side (?), but I started "leaking" on R side yesterday and it is much easier to express milk on that side. Not so for the L.
    It is normal not to feel letdowns. As long as baby is having adequate wet and dirty diapers, this is not a reason for concern.

    5. She can be fussy on either side at erratic times (or it seems). She may chomp, pull, loosen latch and fuss.
    This is normal newborn behavior. Just be patient and watch diaper output.

    6. Additionally, she will drift off to sleep, sometimes very quickly and is hard to arouse or impossible. Maybe I am just used to her longer feedings and worry she should get more...? when really she doesn't need to? Maybe I should allow her to sleep and then nurse again sooner.
    Again, count diapers. As long as diaper output is on track, you don't need to obsess over the length of the feeding. When in doubt, always offer the breast. You cannot nurse too often!

    Is it possible for baby to sleep too much???
    Yes. Some extremely sleepy babies don't get enough to eat. Counting diapers will let you know if things are on target.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    your doctor should/will tell you when to feed on demand, usually at your two week checkup. before then you should wake up your lo. i did every 2 hrs during the day, and 3 at night. this will make sure your lo doesnt get low blood sugar, and also help build your supply. everything will get better promise!
    SAHM of Baby Dominic, we

  7. #7

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    1. Everything I had read/learned says feed on demand. BUT My midwife urged me to always strive for 8-10 feedings a day even if I have to wake her up which I pretty much always do have to do. is this normal? She would sleep and sleep if I didn't. I am too worried to NOT do this... (wake her up and feed on this schedule).
    I had a REALLY rough time with breastfeeding for the 1st 3 wks and difficulty lasting into month 2. (LO is 6mo now and we're awesome.) I spent way too much time worrying about quantity he was eating, how much he slept, when to let sleep and when to wake, etc. I totally sympathize. What I wish now is that I had just relaxed and watched my baby, learned how he was communicating. If I had it to do over again, I would let him sleep when he fell asleep, for as long as he wanted to sleep. I would nurse him if he wanted to nurse - even if last feeding was 15 minutes ago! For me the barrier to doing so at the time was thinking that I couldn't keep up that pace (of feeding, lack of sleeping for me), as well as (unfounded) worries about weight. Of course, he grew - and I didn't have to keep the pace that he wanted to be at those early weeks.

    I think relaxing and going with the flow would have worked so much better for baby and me. I can't guarantee it will for you, of course, but that said, I do recommend continuing to feed on demand, not worrying about counting feedings (unless she's failing to gain or there's some other significant medical reason), and as others have suggested, not waking until it's been like 4.5 to 5 hours or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    2. Her feedings (after waking up!) are anywhere between 18 and 45 minutes. Normal?
    Totally normal.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    3. Left side is the problem side: Latching is difficult and we both get frustrated. Over time, I've learned how to keep very sore nipples at bay by usually offering right side first or switching, etc., but there is still some definite issue here. I read on this forum "lipstick" shape is not desirable and that is what happens. Both positions on the L side are difficult, but football hold is usually slightly better. help....
    Once I had better support (a lactation consultant (LC)), being steadfast about not nursing until baby opened wide truly improved our latching problems. LC also helped identify mild tongue-tie, and once we had his frenulum clipped, this also improved things. A LC is SOOOO worth the cost. It is much easier for an experienced person to identify the source of your issues when she (he?) can see you two in person. Takes the guesswork out. I am sure some people would say this is bad advice, but we used nipple shields for a while. It was obnoxious to use them, to be sure, but spared me quite a bit of pain when I needed that. Just something to consider. You do also have to consider how/when to quit using them if you start.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    4. Let down. I have not definitely experienced this on either side (?), but I started "leaking" on R side yesterday and it is much easier to express milk on that side. Not so for the L.
    I never felt letdown until very recently. Totally normal. Don't let that make you think it isn't happening. Some women never feel it.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    5. She can be fussy on either side at erratic times (or it seems). She may chomp, pull, loosen latch and fuss.
    When I experienced this type of thing, I found that much of it was diminished when we corrected latch issues. Another thought - are you burping? Contrary to what I have read in other places, breastfed babies DO need to be burped too (or can)! Some more than others.

    At every stage so far, he has demonstrated nursing behaviors that I totally don't understand until some revelation after the fact. (Most recently - a new tooth poking out!) His nursing behaviors change continually, and we both do best when I just address whatever he needs at that moment. If he pulls away and cries, I comfort the crying. If he starts acting like he's hungry again, I just put him back to the breast. Not to sound like a broken record (do people still use this phrase?), but a LC might also be able to tell whether these are latch-related issues or something else.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    6. Additionally, she will drift off to sleep, sometimes very quickly and is hard to arouse or impossible. Maybe I am just used to her longer feedings and worry she should get more...? when really she doesn't need to? Maybe I should allow her to sleep and then nurse again sooner.
    Ohhhhh, I STRUGGLED with this. I mentioned that I was concerned about my son's weight. Well, this cause me to totally spaz when I thought he wasn't getting enough due to falling asleep. It was sooooo upsetting. So many tears, on both our parts. We tried everything. Of course, for your own sanity, there are things you can try to encourage longer/more efficient feedings. I am sure you want to get out of that glider/rocker/armchair/wherever you're nursing once in a while! Cold water (washcloths, dribbling on skin) and stripping down to diaper were somewhat helpful. BUT - what I wish I had done was really listen to my LC when she said that she tells new moms to just expect to be glued to their gliders for about the first month. I just couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel, but it was there. If I had settled in and accepted that he was going to do what he needed and not (necessarily) what I wanted, it would have been a difficult time still, to be sure, but a more peaceful one. Don't know if that's helpful to you or not, you don't sound desperate the way I was then.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lunalupina View Post
    Is it possible for baby to sleep too much???
    I'm no expert, but from what I read and other mamas I talk to - no, not really unless there's some significant medical factor going on.

    Congrats!!!! And - hang in there!!! I hope you're enjoying this time with your daughter - and getting some rest. Both are precious! Did I mention sleep when baby sleeps???? It's sooooo true!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*yoginimama View Post


    Congrats on your new baby, and nice work getting off on the right foot by providing breastmilk!



    By "feed on demand" what that means is not to schedule a feeding, as in...it's better not to say, "Baby, you are only allowed to eat at 10 am, 2 pm and 6 pm." In other words, you offer often at this age and allow your baby to eat even if it's just 45 minutes after the last feed started. Does that make sense? It's less scheduled and more dependent upon when the baby wants/accepts nursing.

    Yes, in general you want to aim for 10-12 nursing sessions in a 24 hour period. I would allow the baby to sleep and not wake, but if the baby sleeps much beyond 4 or 5 hours - I would probably try putting him to the breast.

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/ne...tml#afterweek1



    Yes, perfection.




    I would just keep trying. I had struggles with latching up to about 6 weeks. It gets easier. Have you tried a nursing pillow? I liked the BrestFriend. I would also watch some of Dr. Jack Newman's latching videos:
    http://drjacknewman.com/video-clips.asp



    Yes, you have letdown because your milk is in. I presume your baby has had wet and dirty diapers? This means your milk is in. You may not have FELT the letdown, but that's normal too at this stage. See the Dr. Newman videos and watch the one of the baby drinking well. Watch your LO for this.

    You'll see your LO go from a fast fluttery suck to longer deeper ones. The longer deeper ones means the milk is flowing and the baby is swallowing. And, you've "Letdown."



    Sounds pretty normal for a 2 week old. It gets easier. Just keep on keeping on, mama.


    Well, if she's nursing 19-45 minutes like you said - that's plenty long. It's pretty normal for babies this age to sleep. Enjoy it! It will probably fade soon. Forget watching the clock and watch your baby instead. WAtch your baby's cues. Your baby will "tell" you everything you need to know.



    How long is the longest stretch? I'd put the baby to the breast at anything much beyond 4.5 or 5 hours of straight sleep.

    Otherwise, enjoy the sleep, and sleep while the baby does. Someday you'll wish your baby would sleep.


    Thanks so much. I really needed the encouragement this morning...

  9. #9

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*firestar9s View Post
    I had a REALLY rough time with breastfeeding for the 1st 3 wks and difficulty lasting into month 2. (LO is 6mo now and we're awesome.) I spent way too much time worrying about quantity he was eating, how much he slept, when to let sleep and when to wake, etc. I totally sympathize. What I wish now is that I had just relaxed and watched my baby, learned how he was communicating. If I had it to do over again, I would let him sleep when he fell asleep, for as long as he wanted to sleep. I would nurse him if he wanted to nurse - even if last feeding was 15 minutes ago! For me the barrier to doing so at the time was thinking that I couldn't keep up that pace (of feeding, lack of sleeping for me), as well as (unfounded) worries about weight. Of course, he grew - and I didn't have to keep the pace that he wanted to be at those early weeks.

    I think relaxing and going with the flow would have worked so much better for baby and me. I can't guarantee it will for you, of course, but that said, I do recommend continuing to feed on demand, not worrying about counting feedings (unless she's failing to gain or there's some other significant medical reason), and as others have suggested, not waking until it's been like 4.5 to 5 hours or so.



    Totally normal.



    Once I had better support (a lactation consultant (LC)), being steadfast about not nursing until baby opened wide truly improved our latching problems. LC also helped identify mild tongue-tie, and once we had his frenulum clipped, this also improved things. A LC is SOOOO worth the cost. It is much easier for an experienced person to identify the source of your issues when she (he?) can see you two in person. Takes the guesswork out. I am sure some people would say this is bad advice, but we used nipple shields for a while. It was obnoxious to use them, to be sure, but spared me quite a bit of pain when I needed that. Just something to consider. You do also have to consider how/when to quit using them if you start.



    I never felt letdown until very recently. Totally normal. Don't let that make you think it isn't happening. Some women never feel it.



    When I experienced this type of thing, I found that much of it was diminished when we corrected latch issues. Another thought - are you burping? Contrary to what I have read in other places, breastfed babies DO need to be burped too (or can)! Some more than others.

    At every stage so far, he has demonstrated nursing behaviors that I totally don't understand until some revelation after the fact. (Most recently - a new tooth poking out!) His nursing behaviors change continually, and we both do best when I just address whatever he needs at that moment. If he pulls away and cries, I comfort the crying. If he starts acting like he's hungry again, I just put him back to the breast. Not to sound like a broken record (do people still use this phrase?), but a LC might also be able to tell whether these are latch-related issues or something else.



    Ohhhhh, I STRUGGLED with this. I mentioned that I was concerned about my son's weight. Well, this cause me to totally spaz when I thought he wasn't getting enough due to falling asleep. It was sooooo upsetting. So many tears, on both our parts. We tried everything. Of course, for your own sanity, there are things you can try to encourage longer/more efficient feedings. I am sure you want to get out of that glider/rocker/armchair/wherever you're nursing once in a while! Cold water (washcloths, dribbling on skin) and stripping down to diaper were somewhat helpful. BUT - what I wish I had done was really listen to my LC when she said that she tells new moms to just expect to be glued to their gliders for about the first month. I just couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel, but it was there. If I had settled in and accepted that he was going to do what he needed and not (necessarily) what I wanted, it would have been a difficult time still, to be sure, but a more peaceful one. Don't know if that's helpful to you or not, you don't sound desperate the way I was then.



    I'm no expert, but from what I read and other mamas I talk to - no, not really unless there's some significant medical factor going on.

    Congrats!!!! And - hang in there!!! I hope you're enjoying this time with your daughter - and getting some rest. Both are precious! Did I mention sleep when baby sleeps???? It's sooooo true!

    Thank you so much for your advice and input. I really appreciate it... Today I am feeling rather desperate after all... last 24 hrs things seem much worse. I am about to call local LLL contact now...

  10. #10

    Default Re: Several Questions for First Newborn

    Thanks to all who replied. This was the little boost of encouragement I really needed. Feeling really frustrated after last night where damaged nipple somehow just snuck up on me. Past 2 days things seemed to be going really well (I was trying a new latch "technique" that really seemed to be working). Then suddenly -- boom, I am bleeding. I have no idea ... I am really discouraged when I thought we were doing well with the latch. it looks terrible. I have limited success pumping and don't want to use bottle. Tried syringe/spoon -- seems like torturing the poor thing. My right side is now suffering as I tried to give left side a break. But I guess I just must continue to nurse through the pain/injury... How can you heal when you have to feed so often??? Yes, I am about to call local LLL contact right now. will post how things go with that later...

    Another issue is that the L side seems harder for her to empty (also true for pumping)... Any thoughts on this issue???

    Thanks again for the supportive words of advice and encouragement even if it just means I have to "suck it up" (ha) for several more weeks when I had hoped soreness/latch issues would have maybe subsided in first 2 weeks. I feel like I don't know if i can do this for another several weeks..

    *sigh*

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