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Thread: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    21

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    Yes - it makes a lot of sense. Thanks again!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    381

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    I agree, your doctor has been giving you crazy bad advice. No wonder you were starting to feel like you couldn't do it-but you CAN! Hang in there mama, and keep asking questions if you have them. And
    Mom to Taiga born 6/2010

    Pocket cloth diapers. Baby led solids. Full-time working mom. I my DH, DD, kitty Dr. Benway, and my working border collie Odin!
    BF for 1 year and she and I still love it !!!!

  3. #23

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    agree with previous posts!!!

    here is a link for llli website on milk supply, http://www.llli.org/faq/increase.html

    please print some info for your doctor. or email to your doctor, and switch doctors as soon as possible! i cannot believe that they would tell you to stop your baby nursing at a time limit this early!! unbelievable!!!

    breastfeeding is supply and demand, and actually the breast is never empty. im soooo sorry for you getting wrong info.
    SAHM of Baby Dominic, we

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    You make it. it's 3 scoops of powder to 5 oz water. All it does is mak it highrt calorie. you can search and find information on it.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    21

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    I am absolutely planning to change doctors - my experience with this medical group has been awful.
    Thanks again for the links and information. I've already learned a lot from it, and I'll be investing in the book that was mentioned to me earlier.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    1,293

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    Good luck with everything and keep us updated, we would love to hear how things are going.

    If you do get the book, get the new edition (8th). It was recently updated and is very different from the older version.

  7. #27

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    How stressful to have the "fix" just add to your problems. I'm sorry you're going through this!

    I second mommal's suggestion to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC). You may be able to find one near you on the International Lactation Consultant Association website.

    It sounds like you are very persistent and dedicated, and I certainly think that you'll be able to phase out the supplements and breastfeed exclusively. But I strongly recommend working with an IBCLC and staying in contact with your baby's doctor while you go through the process.

    I've checked and rechecked the resources I have and there are a few things that jumped out at me...

    - Your baby lost a little more than 8% of her birth weight. Average is 5-7%. The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine recommends that breastfeeding be evaluated if the baby loses more than 7%. And it sounds like they thought your baby was having some trouble transferring the colostrum. Do you feel like that's been resolved? Does she latch well and nurse actively now?

    - You mentioned that she nurses for about 15 minutes after it feels like she's drained the breast. Can you describe that a little more? Does she seem to be actively working to get more milk? Or is she dozing? Long, strong sucks, or choppy, fluttery ones? Do you hear her swallowing?

    - 3-4 hours between feedings seems like a long time to me. The number of feedings in a 24 hour period is a better measure than the interval between feedings though. For a 5 week old, 8-10 would be the minimum number of feedings you'd want to shoot for. For one who needs to catch up on growth, more would be better. I would suggest at least 10-12.

    - If my calculations are correct (which I can never depend on ), she's gained about 4 ounces per week from her lowest weight. Does that sound right? The average is 7-8 ounces per week during the first three months, so it does sound like her weight gain is slower than "normal". But how much of a problem that is, or how concerned you should be, I really don't know.

    From the info I can find, it sounds like the concern with SGA babies is that they start out with a nutritional deficit, and because of that tend to be less alert and have problems breastfeeding, which can predispose them for failure to thrive because they're already that much closer to being malnourished in the first place, and it's a big vicious cycle. So my guess is that your doctor is going to be more conservative about what's an acceptable rate of weight gain than he might have been if the SGA wasn't a factor.

    Studies have shown that SGA babies catch up faster -- not only in size, but developmentally -- when they're breastfed, so it's a great idea to phase out the formula. An IBCLC could help you make sure that your baby is getting the right amount of nutrition while you make the transition, which is always tricky, even for babies who don't have SGA complicating things. Regular, accurate weight checks are vital.

    You can do it. Your baby is lucky to have such a dedicated mom. Keep us posted!
    Last edited by @llli*LLLKaren; May 30th, 2011 at 09:25 PM.
    Karen
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  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    21

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    Had a similar start to life here with lots of concern about baby's birth weight seeing as he was term. Not as small as your baby but they were watching closely and we supplemented with formula after unsucessful breastfeeding.

    Lots of good advice here already. Not giving up seems to be the key but it is hard.

    What made a difference for me in terms of getting my milk supply up so I would have breast milk for him instead of formula was to really focus on pumping. I hate it but I did what all the information says for 3 days and finally had enough supply to cut the formula. Pump like crazy 8-10 times a day at least with an electric double pump. 5-6 times won't do. I really had to be pumping every two hours and it actually worked.

    We are heading to see our 3rd IBCLC this week to work on getting him off the bottle.

    Thinking of you

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    12

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    You make the 24 calorie with powder its 3 scoops to 5 oz water but if you google it you can find out how to add calories to breast milk too.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    21

    Default Re: Trying to Exclusively Breastfeed. Is it possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*LLLKaren View Post
    - Your baby lost a little more than 8% of her birth weight. Average is 5-7%. The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine recommends that breastfeeding be evaluated if the baby loses more than 7%. And it sounds like they thought your baby was having some trouble transferring the colostrum. Do you feel like that's been resolved? Does she latch well and nurse actively now?
    She loves to nurse and definitely does not refuse the breast, so I guess you could say she nurses actively. Latching is always a problem for her, but I just have to be patient and she will eventually take hold. The pinched nipple is a consistent problem, and I believe has developed a bit of nipple confusion because it takes her longer to latch on than it used to.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*LLLKaren View Post
    - You mentioned that she nurses for about 15 minutes after it feels like she's drained the breast. Can you describe that a little more? Does she seem to be actively working to get more milk? Or is she dozing? Long, strong sucks, or choppy, fluttery ones? Do you hear her swallowing?
    Sometimes it is active nursing and sometimes it is more like chewing. But I don't hear her swallow at this point which is why I assume she has drained the breast.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*LLLKaren View Post
    - 3-4 hours between feedings seems like a long time to me. The number of feedings in a 24 hour period is a better measure than the interval between feedings though. For a 5 week old, 8-10 would be the minimum number of feedings you'd want to shoot for. For one who needs to catch up on growth, more would be better. I would suggest at least 10-12.
    She eats 10 times a day pretty consistently. I usually use her diaper output as a judge of whether she is getting enough or not, and it continues to be fine.

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