Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Forums Last 7 Days Clear All
  • @llli*minasmomma's Avatar
    Today, 11:53 AM
    Hello all, So I am 33 years old and the mother of 3 but this is my first time trying to breastfeed. My little one is 13 days old and I began nursing her as soon as she was born. She lost 4% of her body weight at her first checkup which was 4 days after birth and she had a touch of jaundice which cleared itself up a few days ago. I have read through the FAQ but still have questions which I am sure will sound silly to some of you more senior breastfeeders....lol My first week I was very engorged and she would nurse until full but still leave me fairly full feeling. I opted to not pump because I was told this might lead to more production than she needed. That overly full feeling went away and for the past few days, I have felt a normal (what I feel to be normal) amount of fullness in the breasts before she nurses. The feeling isn't painful but just full. Question - is this the normal cycle of how milk comes in and then levels out to supply the baby with what it needs? Question - Baby is feeding more often now and cluster feeding at times and is acting like she is wanting more food than I am able to provide - Is this considered in the norm for the cycle of milk production as well? I do not have an updated weight for her as her 2 week apt hasn't come up yet but she does look to be gaining weight and is fitting in her clothes better. Our latch is fairly good and I know to break the latch if there is pain and get a better one - I have larger breasts and nipples and...
    0 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:33 AM
    This would be my personal choice. I am basing my opinion on this: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search2/f?./temp/~Z1pQlo:1
    1 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:26 AM
    First It is possible that nursing more often may lead to baby taking one side at a time more anyway. Some moms have such bad overproduction they need to block feed in order to quickly reduce production- this means, they "make" baby stay on one side for a length of time...but I do not get think block feeding is appropriate in your case at least not at the moment. I think it is fine to follow babies lead while nursing even if you are sort of not following baby's lead by waking baby a bit more often to nurse more often overall. So if baby stops nursing but is still alert I think it is fine to offer the other side, but if baby falls asleep nursing on the first side, then let baby do that? (usually?) Pay attention to how you feel too- if baby has nursed on the right and you are feeling really full on the left, go ahead and encourage baby nurse on the left if you like. Another variation is that If baby stops nursing on one side and pulls off, you can also offer the same side again...what is "right" will typically change nursing session to nursing session...you and your baby will probably get a feel and know what is best at the moment. Breastfeeding rhythm really is more or an improvised couples dance than a choreographed one. Here is something I learned early in my breastfeeding struggles with my oldest- Use all videos/ pictures/descriptions as touchstone suggestions to experiment from, not rules to follow minutely...you and your baby will fit 'best' together in a way...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mysticpizza's Avatar
    Today, 10:10 AM
    Duh. That makes total sense to me now that you mentioned it! Thanks! Although it makes me cringe at the thought of waking him up now that he's finally starting to sleep in longer stretches, I'm definitely going to try it to see if it makes a difference. As far as him feeding on both sides, I offer the other side to him to see if he's interested, and he almost always is. Should I try stopping after one side to see how long (or if) he stays content? Thanks for the video links. The woman in the large breasted video made me laugh... "I can't imagine having a 9-10 lb newborn and trying to hold it up." Mine was 8 lb 11 oz at birth :) I'm going to try out the position she was in though; maybe that'll help!
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:36 AM
    Based on you pump output and developing mastitis, I think you probably had some over production. What is weight gain like? You may still have a plug, and you may still have mastitis. Mastitis is notorious for mom feeling better and then relapsing. If you are at work right now, my best suggestion is to go home, stay there as many days as you can, get in bed with your baby, and rest and nurse as much as baby will. I am more worried about the mastitis reoccurring or plugs forming than your milk production, but this idea would help with both. if this is not possible, then up pumping frequency at the very least. But a mother with mastitis is sick and should not be at work. If symptoms recur, I would suggest considering anti-biotics. Yes with frequent milk removal. but you may never pump 4-5 ounces at a time again, this was on the high side to pump every session. Milk production tends to naturally and normally reduce at this age if not before if mom had overproduction in the early months. Your body wants to make enough milk, not all this extra. Also please have your pump(s) checked, change membranes, check tubing connections, find a place to test the suction, make sure flanges fit still etc., I would also ask why you are pumping over night and in the morning. If it is because you are feeling full at those time, I suggest that is an indication baby is not nursing often enough overnight. This can harm production and also lead to issues of engorgement/ mastitis.
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*pui106's Avatar
    Today, 09:26 AM
    My supply seems to be diminishing. I pump 3x at work and used to be able to get 15 oz. I also pump 1 side in the middle of the night and first feed in the morning (~6AM) and I used to be able to get 4-5 oz from each pump. Yes, my son only drink around 10-12 oz a day so I have been freezing a lot. Recently, my pumping output has dropped a lot. It first started from the drop at work. I can only get 10 or less oz. Then since couple days ago, the other 2 session has dropped to 2.5-3 oz each only. I understand it's all about supply and demand. But I haven't changed any of my pumping schedule hence I don't understand why the changes. 3 days ago, I think I have developed mastitis on both side. Part of my breasts harden and hurt so bad and I also had flu like symptom and fever of around 102F. I rest at home for a day and the second day the fever was gone and the pain wasn't as intense hence I didn't see a doctor. However, I have notice further drop in my pumping output. This morning for example, I only got barely 2 oz from my first pump at work. It is taking forever for a letdown and even I have a letdown, only droplet comes out. This is really scaring me. Can my supply go back up again? My goal was to breastfeed my son till 1 year old and he's only 4 1/2 month now. What should I do now? He doesn't even nurse well at home.
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:57 AM
    Ok, first off I suggest encourage baby to nurse more often. If your baby is audibly gulping and choking and your pump output is high, I think you have a little oversupply (probably a very good thing in this circumstance with the TT) and when that happens, the flow may cause baby to clamp a bit at the breast, or to pull back a tad so your nipple is no longer in the "comfort zone" in baby's mouth. The easiest and safest way to help baby with a fast flow is to nurse frequently. I know it seems counterintuitive to nurse more often when nursing hurts, but ultimately nursing more often should help. (Pumping -unless it is during a separation from baby- may increase your milk production beyond what you and your baby can comfortable handle so be aware of that when pumping.) Does baby always want to nurse both sides or is that your idea? There is nothing wrong with nursing both sides (unless a mom has bad enough over production it is causing problems) but it is not necessary assuming baby nurses often enough and is not interested in both every time. Basically, assuming good weight gain and frequent enough nursing, it is ok and may help to let baby nurse one side at a time if and when baby prefers. I think you want to at least consider and (hopefully) rule out thrush as a factor based on the nipple color: see: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-CP Ok so you are trying breast sandwich already, great. Here are many other ideas. If football is working best,...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:37 AM
    OK, I do not know what that is. Is it a cream designed for use on the nipples by nursing mothers? Because using the wrong type of cream (or a "right" one that is wrong for you- that you have a reaction to) can cause problems including severe irritation and bleeding. If not, I suggest you use something that is. Alternatives (for example, food quality pure coconut oil) sometimes help some moms, and if you have a specific skin condition that is not necessarily related to nursing maybe there is something else you need....but ordinary skin care products (moisturizers) are not typically appropriate for use on the nipples of a lactating mom. one idea that is usually safe is to allow your own expressed milk to dry on your nipples. If you have any sense that your cream is in part the issue, it might make sense to stop using it, & just only let your own milk help for a day and see if things feel any better NOT using it. 2 creams that are accepted as helpful when there is nipple pain/injury for many but not all moms are purified lanolin (there are a few different brands) and APNO, which is something a pharmacist must compound for you. ( see: http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&id=76:all-purpose-nipple-ointment-apno&Itemid=17 ) In addition, there are special nipple creams available in health food stores or well stocked baby stores that avoid using lanolin as some moms cannot use it (although most can.) Some moms are going to react to antibiotic creams...
    4 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 08:26 AM
    There are many things that you can do to increase your breast-milk supply but the best thing is to be sure that baby is sucking at the breast often. The reason for low breast milk could be that you were expressing milk in order to relieve engorgement. Expressing milk does not provide the same stimulation to the breast that a baby's sucking does. Your milk will increase and decrease in direct response to sucking stimulation from your baby. If a baby get sick they will intend to breastfeed more and mother who feed often during the first day of when the baby is sick will have more milk for her baby the next day. when a baby has fever they need more liquids during this time to keep them away from dehydrated. Drink purified water is the best thing. Always you need to drink purified glass of water right by when your breastfeeding or pumping. You must have plenty of liquids in you to create milk for your baby. Drink mother's milk tea which has the herbs in it like anise, fennel and coriander. It can help you to increase the breast-milk production. I had come across this information about how to increase breast milk. http://www.momjunction.com/articles/simple-ways-increase-breast-milk-supply_0076173/
    7 replies | 2451 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 07:38 AM
    The solids food will make her less hungry for breast-milk. Even if she is still nursing, she likely won't be taking in as much with a tummy full of solids. The breast-milk or formula milk is necessary for proper brain development during the first year.
    4 replies | 3911 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 07:17 AM
    Usually I use to give potato, carrot, sweet potato and spinach in to a crock pot. So I thought to make little different. I followed from few steps this site to make http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/baby-food-nutrition-9/making-baby-food. It was good, my LO loved it.
    10 replies | 2671 view(s)
  • @llli*newsadmom's Avatar
    Today, 07:04 AM
    thanks guys i use an antibiotic and mebo and panthenol cream the baby's weight gain is normal and i breastfeed him once every 2 hours for 1 hour (i don't know why he stays for that long) i think that might be a factor but i'm not sure how to deal with it
    4 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*7preemiemum's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    Im just as stubborn as u stubborn.mama Stubborn to get to a year and then i guess well call it quits
    10 replies | 801 view(s)
  • @llli*mysticpizza's Avatar
    Today, 06:51 AM
    I guess I was just wondering if anyone had gone through this particular issue before and had a general idea of how long relearning generally takes (days, weeks, months). I understand that it's not something that will happen instantly and takes work, but I thought it would help if I had some sort of goal to get me through the rough parts. I've gotten a few recommendations for a specific IBCLC to see, but unfortunately, this is a holiday week, so I have to wait until next week to see her. Baby is a few days shy of 4 weeks, and has been gaining weight within the normal range. It's hard to say if he's fully satisfied after eating, because sometimes I can go 3 hours on one feed, and other times, I can only make it 30 minutes before he's crying for more. He almost always stays on each breast for 20+ minutes (both sides each feeding). I hear the gulping/swallowing sound maybe every 3-4 sucks typically, but occasionally he will choke (maybe once or twice during the entire 40 minute feeding). Based on pumping, I seem to be producing plenty of milk, and he generally empties my breasts after feedings. I'm not sure how to describe the pain. Thankfully, I haven't had any sort of cracked, bleeding nipples since the first week. Now, the nipples are just really sore and sensitive (I understand there's a process of getting used to BFing, but I feel like this is more than that based on my past ability of handling pain). After feeding, they're a light pink color (no clue if...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*7preemiemum's Avatar
    Today, 06:51 AM
    Yeah tell me about it Here its dreary:) Whatever, good thing is that my supply picked up a bit again after my pump slump My main prob is my anxiety of putting my baby to the breast since shes rejected me lately basically 9/10 times Im so sad about having to pump my milk instead Sad that if i stop pumping then its all over
    10 replies | 801 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    No, I haven't tried it anytime. Even I had come cross many sites about this recipes.
    1 replies | 711 view(s)
  • @llli*karaeubanks's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    Thanks for this very thoughtful reply! I'll answer your question about Trazodone first, then your other questions in-text, below (and may I say again how grateful I am for your advice? I'm so thankful!!!) When I take Trazodone, I'm not completely knocked unconscious, but I'm incapacitated for 8-9 hours. I have a serious sleep disorder, and I have to take it to function, so I can't take less or stop taking it. I can wake up enough to have a conversation, but can't lift my head for more than a minute without becoming dizzy and passing out. My husband and I have talked about side-lying nursing, when the baby can latch without a nipple shield and pull milk effectively, but I'm not sure if this is really an option, because I really can't "help" with the nursing. My husband would have to do everything for me, and I might feel very sick during the nursing from being woken during the drugged period when I'm not supposed to be woken. What is baby's complete weight history? he was born at 5,7 and has been gaining like a champ. He's now 5,10 at 2.5 weeks. How many times a day does baby poop and what does it look like (size) He poops constantly, and it's healthy looking. I estimate one million poops per day, I can't even count them! Every time I change him, he has pooped and peed. It looks seedy/mealy and mustard/orange colored. How many ounces in a bottle is baby given at each feeding (day and night) He's eating about 4 ounces at a time during the night, every 2-3 hours. He...
    2 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    I have give water when he was around 8 month. I use to give sip of water. You should not give too much water to drink. It can lead to water intoxication. This happens when excess amounts of water dilute the electrolytes in the baby’s blood.
    3 replies | 1359 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 06:27 AM
    Yes you can offer water you need to boil the water before giving to your baby. And you can give dilute fruit juice it you baby is over 6 months. Diluted fruit juice with meals an be beneficial as the vitamin C is present it might help the absorption of iron.
    3 replies | 1086 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 06:23 AM
    Have you tried even a larger size of flange, just to be safe (the 27mm)? When I have a flange that's too large, my nipples go way too far into the tube. But you're not having that happen. It sounds like we are anatomically similar, but I have not had any of the problems you're mentioning. I use a Hygeia pump now, but have used Medela in the past. In fact, I use the Medela flanges with my Hygeia pump. I use the Medela 24mm with the Hygeia valves. When I used the Medela valves with the Hygeia pump, the suction was a little weird (worked fine, but felt weird). I had lots of milk leak with the 24mm Hygeia flanges. I still do with the Medela, but less-so. I don't remember this happening with my other pumps. Not sure why it happens with Hygeia. Also, have you tried pumping with a hands-free bra? I noticed the suction is different when I do. Glad you have a little bit of time to try to trouble-shoot before you go back. Hope we can figure out a solution for you.
    3 replies | 99 view(s)
  • @llli*mommytoac's Avatar
    Today, 02:19 AM
    My son was born on May 30th and I need to have a medical procedure done on September 3rd, so he will be right at three months old. The procedure is Mohs surgery and it is to get rid of an area of skin cancer on the side of my nose that was discovered when I was pregnant. It could take anywhere from a couple of hours to all day. It just depends on how long it takes them to remove all of the cancerous tissue. Luckily, only a local anesthetic, Lidocaine, will need to be used. From what I have researched, Lidocaine seems to be pretty compatible with breastfeeding. My surgeon knows that I'm breastfeeding and recommends waiting five hours after the last dose of Lidocaine is administered before I breastfeed. However, he also said that he tends to err on the more cautious side. So here is my predicament...obviously I want to do what is safest for my son, but I would also like to limit any unnecessary stress as well. Do you guys feel that Lidocaine is safe enough where my husband and I could bring our son with us and I could nurse him myself in between procedures? Our other option is to have my mom watch him while we are gone. This would most likely be the first time he would be without me and I would also need to introduce a bottle prior to this because he has never had one before. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you!
    1 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:33 PM
    Latch issues of any type can take quite a while to resolve, and even if tongue tie was part of the problem and has now been effectively treated, then latch issues may continue. In other words, I would certainly say, don't give up. My first suggestion (if possible) is to seek more in person help but with someone who is going to roll up their sleeves and work with you and baby on latch, rather than dismiss your problems as a temporary situation to ride out. Latch pain is never acceptable and always points to a problem. Just because the problem does sometimes get solved by mom on her own does not mean there wasn't a problem! Of course this will usually be an IBCLC, but some LLL Leaders or other such volunteer support can also be helpful. You could also talk to the ENT, because sometimes a second procedure is indicated. Here is a description of a "complete" consultation with an IBCLC. It is an intensive process and not something that can typically be done during a breastfeeding support meeting with others around. http://cwgenna.com/lconsult.html
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*stubborn.mama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:33 PM
    Oh my god I could have written this word for word. Except my son is now 6 months. And he's been refusing and sleep feeding only since he was 4 months. 8 weeks of this hell. Did it continue going well for you OP? We are also treating for reflux... And OALD.... Praying this ends soon
    10 replies | 801 view(s)
More Activity