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  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:01 PM
    Don't beat yourself up! You can only do what you can do with the knowledge you have at the time! I'm glad the ties have been found and sorted and that feeding is better!
    30 replies | 1184 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 03:07 PM
    YAY and good that your case was one of the ones where an immediate difference was obvious. It is such a shame that so few pediatricians seem to know anything about breastfeeding. It is really hard to deal with some of these issues when the Doctors give less than helpful advice since we are so conditioned to trust the doctors.
    30 replies | 1184 view(s)
  • @llli*tinamanni's Avatar
    Today, 01:54 PM
    Update - 3 pediatricians have said that he doesn't have a lip or tongue tie. Well we were still struggling so I contacted Dr. Kotlow (http://www.mommypotamus.com/how-to-diagnose-tongue-and-lip-ties/) and he said that my guy does. So, I took him to an ENT and he clipped both lip tie and posterior tongue tie yesterday. He is getting milk now! It was immediately different. Now I'm beating myself up for listening to the 3 pediatricians.
    30 replies | 1184 view(s)
  • @llli*momager's Avatar
    Today, 01:47 PM
    Thanks @llli*katienjohnny, it makes me feel much better! I appreciate your reply. She started to go down to one nap per day so I will just keep on nursing and pray that supply keeps up.
    5 replies | 203 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:17 PM
    Great news! So to your question, it appears baby is taking much less supplement now. So I think you can definitely reduce pumping frequency. Basically a mom with normal milk production (no need to increase it) only needs to pump enough to meet the amount of expressed milk or formula baby is supplemented. If baby is not being supplemented at all, (is exclusively breasted) then no pumping is needed. It sounds like you may actually have a slight overproduction at this point, so you will probably want to wean yourself gradually from pumping, so you do not get overfull or engorged. And of course if you become concerned about your production again, you can always increase the pumping frequency. One nice thing about not worrying about pumping after every session is that if baby seems to want more, you can simply offer to nurse more, rather than offering the bottle. While it appears to be working well for you so far, and I am not one to argue with success, whether a baby wants a bottle after nursing or not is not considered an accurate indicator that baby is not getting enough. I suggest, use that info, but also watch output and maybe have baby weighed every two weeks or so to be sure all is going well as you wean off the bottle feedings.
    4 replies | 249 view(s)
  • @llli*eltrix's Avatar
    Today, 12:29 PM
    Radrad8888, you are not alone! I am so glad you commented because this stuff is hard. Your baby is SO young, with so much time to learn, I think the odds of success for you must be very high. You're still at the stage where it seems like almost everyone is trying to resolve some issue or other. Maddieb, thanks so much for your sympathy and advice. I'm happy to update that all of a sudden, on Thursday baby started making SO much progress, being willing to switch sides multiple times, open his mouth to latch, and even start doing full feedings at the breast. (I'm testing whether he gets enough by seeing if he will take a bottle when he seems done, or whether he keeps his mouth shut, and sometimes it's one, sometimes the other.) He went from taking 19-20 oz of expressed milk per day on average, to taking only 11.5 yesterday, and only 3 since midnight last night. I could not be more thrilled! I don't think it's anything I did, either - I went to a support group to get help with laid back positioning and nipple shield use, but he's still not interested in either of those most of the time. It seems to be all him, maybe he did hit that 6-8 week progress and just start figuring it out. I hope this means that an end is in sight. One last question: I'd been pumping after almost every feeding, an average of 9-11 times a day, to keep my supply up and get milk for his bottles, because when he was 2 weeks old he was not transferring milk well and my suply was low. The LC at the...
    4 replies | 249 view(s)
  • @llli*mango.lily's Avatar
    Today, 08:06 AM
    Hi Maddieb, Thank you very much for the tips on increasing milk production! Yes, I really do want some hands on help to get a good latch. As you said, there's only so much I can try by myself. I've seen lactation specialists in the hospital several times and got some tips from them. But even at the hospital, with her help, we couldn't get a good latch. The nipple still got flat and hurt a little bit. Now I think my last straw will be IBCLC or the group Erin mentioned. I've contacted them and hopefully will hear back soon. :-)
    9 replies | 311 view(s)
  • @llli*mango.lily's Avatar
    Today, 07:59 AM
    Hi Erin, Thank you very much for the encouraging words! I really need it at this down time! That website looks very helpful. I will try to get in touch with them. I've seen lactation specialists in the hospital several times and got some tips from them. But even at the hospital, with her help, I couldn't get a good latch. The nipple still got flat and hurt a little bit. I'd love to see an IBCLC. There's only one in Stockholm area listed on the website. I've contacted her, but haven't heard back yet :-(
    9 replies | 311 view(s)
  • @llli*mommytotwo11's Avatar
    Today, 07:59 AM
    Hello. My son is 5 weeks, 4 days old. He is up 4 pounds from his birth weight and has been ebf (on demand) since birth. I have noticed his eating habits are much different than my first; he usually only eats from one side and the feedings range from 7-12 minutes. Sometimes he will nurse from both sides as well. Many times he falls asleep while nursing. I always alternate sides after a feeding too. I know it is normal for breasts to not feel full as your body begins to regulate feedings and I have not experienced fullness in my breasts, and last night, he was very fussy and my husband gave him formula and he ate 4 ounces and slept a good 3 hours (while nursing we are on a 1.5-2 hour schedule and night). I was devastated when he ate so much formula and now am thinking maybe my evening supply is low? He is gaining weight well, has the normal amounts of wet diapers (10-12 per day) and has regular bowel movements. We have also been dealing with some spit up issues. Sometimes is a small amount, but sometimes, he spits up a lot (it almost looks like a whole feeding). He doesn't show signs of any pain when he does and the doctor was not concerned, but sometimes it feels like after he spits up so much, his tummy feels empty quicker. I have not been pumping because I plan on being with the baby and didn't see the need to, but now I'm second guessing my decision. Could my supply be low? Should I be pumping after a feeding? And if so, do I pump after he eats from...
    0 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:21 AM
    @llli*mommal replied to a thread Dropping first feed? in Weaning
    In your situation, I would at least try dropping the bottle and simply nursing. I would not try to forgo the feeding, because your baby most likely isn't ready for that. In my experience, the pre-bedtime feedings are the very last to go, as the baby depends on the closeness and cuddling and milk to help her transition to sleep. It strikes me that your overall milk removal frequency is fairly low, considering that your baby is just 11 months old. If I understood your last correctly, you're nursing just 4x in a 24-hour period, and pumping once. You feel like your supply is decreasing due to your period, but I think it is probably a result of the low number of nursing/pumping sessions. So if you want to boost your supply, you could try nursing a lot more often. I know your baby doesn't "ask"- but as you know you do not have to wait for her to do so. Feeding on cue doesn't have to mean that you just follow the baby's cues. You can follow yours, as well. If you feel like a nursing session might distract her from something you don't want her to be doing, or might help her take a nap, or might be convenient before you go somewhere, feel free to offer.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:04 AM
    The best way to wean is slowly. Trying to wean too quickly increases the risk of problems like engorgement, plugged ducts, and mastitis. So even though pumping is exhausting, I think you have to accept that you are stuck with it for a little while longer. In your situation, here is what I would do: - Decrease your number of pumping sessions by one, and then continue at the lower frequency for a few days to allow your body to get the message that demand is down and supply needs to go down, too. When you feel like your supply has adjusted to the new, lower level of demand, drop another pump session and wait a few days. Continue the process until all the unwanted sessions are gone. - If you get uncomfortably engorged in between pump sessions, you can pump or hand-express just enough milk to restore comfort. Hand-expression is thought to be preferable to pumping, as it is supposed to be less stimulating to supply. Whichever you choose, remember to take just enough to make yourself comfortable; leaving milk in the breast is what signals your body to reduce production. Don't feel like weaning has to be a one-way street. Pumping is very tiring when you are doing it frequently. But there may come a point when you're down to just a few pump sessions per day, and you realize "Hey, this isn't so bad, I could keep this up for a while longer". If you get to that point, don't be afraid to keep pumping at the same (or even higher) frequency. You can always get back on the...
    3 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*aschindler's Avatar
    Today, 04:43 AM
    Thanks for your help! She nursed only once today (and bit me again after, which I tried not to respond to), every other time she has completely refused to nurse. When I try to put her to the breast, she pulls away, arches her back, and starts crying. She will drink my milk from a pumped bottle, which is how she got her last three feedings. There's no way I can keep up with this pump, feed her the bottle, wash everything schedule, though. It also REALLY sucks to be giving her a bottle in the middle of the night while my breasts are so full and ready to feed her! So I guess my question really is how to stop producing milk because she going to have to have formula or something for her last 3 weeks of being under 1.
    3 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mtngirl77's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 AM
    I'm starting to think about dropping my daughter's bedtime feed and would love some feedback. My milk supply has been gradually decreasing since my menstrual cycle returned. I currently nurse C (almost 11 months) once early am/middle of the night, and 3 times during the day. My milk supply has always been low in the evenings, so for many months, we've given C a 4 oz bottle of pumped milk before bed (that I pump before I go to bed the night before). In the last few nights, I'm lucky to even pump 3 oz total (even with pumping twice over the span of a few hours). I have very little frozen milk, so I'm considering trying to gradually cut back that feeding and eliminate the bottle altogether. I'm happy to keep the other feeds for now. Does this sound like a good plan? I really really want to be done with this stupid pump. Should I try nursing her before bed instead? If not, am I ok going from late afternoon to early morning without nursing? Has anyone had luck with dropping the before bed feed first? I"m concerned about her waking up more/earlier without it. Sorry for all the questions- I'm totally clueless about weaning! If it helps to know this, I tend to nurse her after she wakes in the morning and after naps, because she does not "ask for it" any other time. She is a fantastic solids eater and eats more than you'd think possible, so I'm not worried about her going hungry.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*jsloanmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:58 PM
    Thanks for this post! And for your reply, sonogirl. Bah, I HATE pumping, for all the same reasons. Also having the guilt of thinking of stopping at 12mo. I keep hoping that he'll stop drinking so much milk so I can switch to once a day pumping. Just commiserating here.
    5 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*jsloanmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:50 PM
    My DS is 11mo old, so I'm thinking to the future about transitioning to sippy cups. Has anyone done this and have a suggestion as to the best sippy cup for breastmilk?
    0 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*jsloanmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:49 PM
    I ditto all of the above. haha. I pump to and from work, but I pump for more like 20-30min at a time. I also know for certain that DS drinks more from a bottle than he does nursing. You may want to make sure that grandma is not filling the bottle all the way to 8oz and is using the level 1 nipple. Try to add in that extra session. After a few dsays, your body should adjust and start making more milk.
    4 replies | 309 view(s)
  • @llli*jsloanmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:44 PM
    "Oh, I just figured out what you are doing." "We're out of coffee creamer. The only milk in the fridge is Dr. Sloan's." "Oh, are you still doing that?" (breastfeeding, he's only 11mo)
    1 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*jsloanmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:39 PM
    I also dropped a session around 6mo. I pump the same amount with just two sessions (8am and 4 or 5pm). I pump 18-24oz a day. I work four days a week and breastfeed when I'm at home.
    5 replies | 351 view(s)
  • @llli*katienjohnny's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:19 PM
    I know there is a wide variety of "normal" but my son is 12 months old as well, and he only nurses upon waking, before naps (he still does 2), and before bed. He also nurses a few times during the night (we co-sleep for half of the night). So, 4x per day and 3x at night. He is quick about it as well... anywhere from 3-10 min max. Don't know if it makes you feel better but it sounds like our babies have similar nursing patterns. :-)
    5 replies | 203 view(s)
  • @llli*fleur's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    Thank you all so much for taking the time to help me. I think that all of you have raised very good points. She actually does not wake up eat in the night - has slept through with one dreamfeed since she was 2 months old. We get the occasional night feed but mostly not. Actually, as her naps are lengthening, I feel that the number of feeds overall are going down. Nowadays, it seems to only ever be initiated by me. I guess that is what happens naturally. I think that my main issue is that I am offering to nurse a bit too often in the evening. And as pointed out, she may not be hungry at that time or not be too interested. I usually nurse her at 5 when she wakes from her nap and then again at 6.30. Too short a gap after the heavy feed she took at 5, I think. That's why I am holding off on solids too. We are doing BLW and I am so far offering only at morning and mid morning. I can't actually understand how nursing and solids work. Anyway, thanks again. Ruchiccio - reading your link now! :)
    6 replies | 247 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:38 PM
    we were able to give all meds in a syringe with a wide opening but if a bottle works best for you why not. We put the prevacid suspension in distilled water I think? The prevacid was sweet. http://www.ehow.com/how_2062868_give-baby-prevacid-treat-reflux.html Unless things have changed in the last 11 years, liquid Zantac tastes irredeemably gross. This is a little out there but maybe mixing it with breastmilk caused baby to associate breastmilk taste with zantac taste? Just FYI More on the possible impact of bottles and pacifiers on breastfeeding http://www.normalfed.com/continuing/tripnip/ and http://www.carrielauth.com/breastfeeding-tip-avoid-triple-nipple-syndrome.html For encouraging the reluctant nurser in general, here are many ideas: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*oom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:17 PM
    En mi experiencia personal, mis hijos siempre prefieren comer frutas ( serán por que son riquisimas y a veces algo adictivas), pero incorporar la carne, el pollo, los pescados y sobre todo los vegetales es una tarea que se vuelve complicada. Por eso es muy importante cambiarle los sabores a la hora de cocinar, la cocina es nuestra super herramienta que nos va ayudar a incorporar esos alimentos que a nuestros hijos no les gustan. Una de las mejores maneras de incorporar estos alimentos es haciendo cremitas (sin agregarle tantos lacteos) con base de verduras y su respectiva carne, La carne la puedes hacer en una olla de cocción lenta para que quede muy blandita y la puedes desmuzar y despues camuflajearla con la crema. El truco en este caso es que la comida quede riquisima, y tu juez va a ser tu hijo.
    3 replies | 2917 view(s)
  • @llli*kaywong's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:17 PM
    Yes, We waited until almost 4 weeks with the bottles and pacifier because we were concerned about baby refusing the breast because of using those. And no, of course the bottle did not just contain medicine - it was medicine and breast milk. She is on Prevacid this week, so we are down to one bottle a day as before. We were giving the Zantac in a bottle with breast milk. I do pump when she's being given a bottle. She has at least 6-8 poopy diapers and wet diapers a day, sometimes more. I do wear her in a sling quite a bit. It's the only way she will calm down sometimes.
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:49 PM
    As far as I know, the only possible reason to give a baby solids prior to 6 months is 1) kid is ready (some are, but a baby who is not sitting up yet probably is not) or 2) baby is not able to get enough breastmilk but mom wants to avoid formula. Food instead of formula supplements when a baby is not gaining well is controversial but in appropriate cases is championed (so to speak) by Dr. Jack Newman. But your child is already getting some formula as a supplement to the milk you can pump. Right? So I am not sure why exactly the doctor is suggesting solids- can you ask them? Maybe they suspect an iron deficiency, in which case, maybe baby should be tested for that. Nursing more often at night is common at this age and alone does not indicate baby is not getting enough to eat. Have you worked with anyone in upping milk production and/or making sure baby transfers milk adequately?
    2 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:27 PM
    Ok thanks for answering my questions. First lets look at weight gain. In the 2 weeks between 2 and 4 week checks, baby gained 14 ounces. So that indicates normal gain for this period of about an ounce a day, which is neither particularly fast nor at all slow. It's normal. So this does not indicate overproduction. But knowing how baby has gained since will help. I forgot to ask how poops have been which would also give a clue. Both coughing and gulping 'too fast' are signs of a fast milk flow. But unless the flow was more obviously causing the breast refusal, or in the presence of more rapid weight gain, I think we can pretty much rule out fast flow as the main issue even if it is a contributing factor. You may have heard that it is typically suggested to avoid or limit bottles and pacifiers in the early weeks with a breastfeeding baby. The reasons are many, but one is that both can lead to baby being inadvertently trained to use those 'nipples' for their needs- bottles for food, and pacifiers for comfort- rather than the breast. Overtime, this can cause breast reluctance or even breast refusal. If you think this may be happening, I suggest first, no pacifiers except in emergencies (such as, you are driving or in the shower and literally cannot nurse) Explain to your mom and MIL that instead of giving baby a pacifier, please bring baby to you to be comforted by nursing. So called comfort nursing is an important part of breastfeeding and it may be helpful to...
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:05 PM
    http://drsircus.com/medicine/magnesium/magnesium-and-sleep-disturbance http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2700668/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23853635 Magnesium is the mineral essential for good sleep. It's estimated that two thirds of our western population is deficient in this key mineral. You can see from the second article that mag levels are at the lowest point during ovulation. I would try magnesium chloride (oil) as its best absorbed externally.
    21 replies | 2145 view(s)
  • @llli*soblessed's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 PM
    Hope you figure it out! Mine fusses till i can get him to sleep a bit then he will eat pretty well
    8 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:54 PM
    http://kellymom.com/health/growth/weight-gain_increase/ Hi mama. I'd say that the gain for the last two weeks is concerning but as they were on different scales, I'm not going to completely trust the numbers. Have you been offering to nurse more often? Sometimes babies get really distracted at this age and forget to ask as often. Do you know if the doctor uses the cdc charts or WHO charts? Breastfed babies grow at a different pace than formula fed babies so that can skew percentiles. Also can you post baby's complete weight history? Increased night waking is normal around 4 months.
    2 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*kaywong's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:21 PM
    The issues started over a week ago when she was about to turn 7 weeks old. Her ped and I suspected reflux since she was about 3 weeks old but also not ruling out colic at that time. The ped did not want to put her on meds then because she was too young so she started Zantac when she was 4 weeks old. We agreed on giving her probiotics and gas drops to see if it helped prior to medicating her, but those did not do much for her. No tests were done on her, the diagnosis was based on her behavior. She was miserable most of the day, screaming and crying and could not be put down to sleep. We would lay her down and she would wake up 5-10 mins later screaming. She would cry after feeding, was spitting up a few times a day with hiccups. Zantac helped for about 2 weeks but then it seemed she had a downturn again...this was around the time the latching problem occurred. She was getting one bottle during the night starting at 3.5 weeks old so that I could rest and my husband fed her. When she started Zantac at week 4, we upped the bottles to two a day because Zantac was given twice and day and we put it in a bottle. She starting taking the pacifier around 3.5 weeks, prior to that she would not take it. She has been using it more though because my mom and MIL were watching her for a few weeks and they would use it quite a bit. She typically nurses 8 times day. Since last week, I've been trying to feed her more frequently but smaller feelings since I have read that it helps with...
    5 replies | 168 view(s)
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