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  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:07 AM
    got sick (vomiting) last night around midnight and 2am. Only nursed in bed because not feeling so well. Didn't pump overnight. Back really hurt by morning from nursing in bed but otherwise feeling better. Must have been something I ate. Still went to Acupuncture appointment. Again, Epic results immediately following treatment with improved flow. Supply seemed better through the day though I only pumped one time in the afternoon. Wound up taking a nap with DS since I was tired from the previous nights sickness. A little bit of fussy in the evening, I only managed to get him to take 2 oz of supplement. Tonight the "schedule" seems off since DS slept so much during the day he is awake more tonight. After feeding at 1 am though he did fall to sleep and come off the breast asleep so I was able to give him to daddy to snuggle in bed while I then pumped an additional 2 oz. It's now 4 am and he ate well off one side for 10 minutes and latched onto the other side for a few minutes but is now farm more interested in looking around and is wide awake.
    122 replies | 4287 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 12:21 AM
    Your baby is growing. Weight gain is growth! Also It can be quite hard to accurately measure the height of a baby/toddler. (I had one kid shrink between doctor visits, which alarmed me but our pediatrician said there was no way that happened and clearly one of the measurements were off.) Your child would have to be severely undernourished for nutritional issues to be harming your child's growth in height. I do not see how a child who is that lacking in nutrients could be gaining weight. How tall a normally nourished child grows to be is not partly genetic, it is ENTIRELY genetic. And as pp have noted, growth in height or weight is never 100 percent steady. I doubt my daughter ate 17 ounces of solids during her entire 15th month! This does not sound like a baby who is refusing solids, due to breastfeeding or anything else. This sounds like a child who loves to eat when he is hungry and in the mood, and to not eat when he is not hungry or in the mood. In other words, like a normal toddler. I strongly suggest the book My Child Won't Eat. It is not about making a child eat. It is about what is normal in eating and growth patterns. I think it will help ease your mind. And yes, even if your child was not getting enough to eat, withholding readily available breastmilk, the healthiest, most nutritionally complete single food your child can eat or will EVER eat, does not make sense.
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 12:06 AM
    It might be. Clicking is a sign of an "off" latch, which can also be caused by tongue tie or a fast letdown, or positioning issues. Can you tell us more- how old is baby, any previous bfding issues, how are bottles being given, (is baby's caregiver using paced bottle feeding technique and positioning?) how many times each day baby nurses, how many bottles each day and how big they are- any other possibly relevant info?
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 PM
    Your concerns are not silly! It is certainly true that a plug may lead to mastitis. And that is not fun, because you can feel quite sick. But even mastitis is something you can get through! I understand your concern about pumping. But when mom is struggling with engorgement and baby cannot do the job, pumping can really help. No, not at all. Pump when you need to, when you FEEL like you are getting too full and baby will not nurse, or nursing is not softening the breast enough. Go by how you feel, don't worry about the time. I agree about pumping just until you feel comfortable. But for some moms that might be more or less than an ounce. Again, go by how you feel. Also, if you are continuing to not be able to extract the plug with nursing, pumping for longer may help, just on that one side until you get the plug resolved. Good. Pump when or if needed, not on any set timing.
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*anaduralia's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:39 PM
    Hi! Awesome! I also nursed twins! My boy is still nursing. My girl stopped on her own a couple of months ago - just before her second birthday. I remember the early months being a real challenge! Both had reflux, etc.
    5 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:54 PM
    i have got really silly doubts . because of oversupply i don't want to pump.. but today one breast was so full so i pumped out one ounce. is it necessary to pump at the same time every day to regulate supply?(jus one ounce or so to feel comfortable) i just feed on cue so there is no scheduled time for me to pump. because of engorgement i was feeding on the same breast for two feeding sessions is that ok? or is it ok to alternate breast?or should i remove the plugged duct first? my son just takes one breast at a time and there my breast feel soft after that but it does not get empty. by the time of next feeding the one fed before also gets full..
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:36 PM
    thanks for the response.. i am scared it might lead to any breast infection. seems like being first time mom i am getting scared about everything.. no they are not painful or i never had mastitis, so far nursing is comfortable. because of oversupply if the lump is not removed completely its getting big again so i am worried about that. i will definitely try what u suggested.. thank you
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:34 PM
    Follow your instincts momma, you were doing great before you got the rotten advise, there are times you need to just take what the Ped says under advisement and not as orders. Feed often, dream feeds or even waking baby to nurse at night is not going to hurt her. Feed on cue (that includes when baby wants or when you want as well as when is appropriate like before going somewhere or for naps or to sleep etc.) If you must consider a clock, think of it as feed as often as you want and if it's been more than X amount of time, then consider feeding anyway even if baby and you don't feel a driving need but probably not necessary if baby is cuing often.
    8 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*sailorscout27's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:21 PM
    I have been back to work for a little over a week now, and I have noticed that when my lo is nursing he will make this clicking sound and it hurts me. when he starts doing that I unlatch him and try to get a better latch. how can I make him stop? is this a sign of nipple confusion?
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:34 PM
    It should help. Every time you pump, you are signaling your body to increase the production of prolactin, which is the hormone responsible for milk production. Can you tell us more about your situation?
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*anaduralia's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:07 PM
    My babies are are all *underweight* for their age (I have 4 - they are now 6 years, 4 years, and 2 year old twins). Though they are quite tall. With my first, I got rather paranoid about her underweightedness. I went to see a dietition and a pediatric gastrointestinal specialist (she was 10 months old at the time). They recommended lots of stuff. Formula mixed with the breast milk in her bottles (with no extra water). Even fat supliments! (The fat supliment was called durocal and was this white powder that you would add to their food. But really, nothing worked. She just gained at her same old slow rate. They said I could give her medicine to make her want to eat, but that just seemed wrong to me. I eventually just stopped trying to hide calories in her food and let her body do what it was designed to do. Today she is still an extremely picky eater and rail thin. But she's healthy as far as I can tell. Her sibs are similarly tall and thin. The twins are much better eaters and are willing to try new foods (unlike the older too). But I think it is because I gave the older two jar foods for their first solids and no "real" foods for quite a while. The twins got ground/mashed real foods. Anyways, I would say that if the baby is happy and not getting excessively sick, why not let him choose how much to eat? I don't think two nursings a day are going to kill his appetite. And breast milk is one of the more healthy foods a young child could have. My twins...
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*lalalola777's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:04 PM
    I've been pumping at the suggestion of a LC to increase my supply (I'm already supplementing with formula due to low supply); however my ouput with the pump ranges from nonexistent to drops. Is pumping an effective way to increase supply if I'm expressing so little milk?
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:57 PM
    I don't get your doc's rationale at all. When you suspect that a child is not taking in enough calories, why would you remove one sure source of balanced nutrition from his diet? I also don't really understand the freak out about a 3 month pause in height when the baby has continued to gain weight. Height is the hardest dimension to measure- the baby squirms one way and measures an inch longer, but squirms the other way and measures an inch shorter. That happened with one of my kids- she actually appeared to have shrunk between office visits! Luckily my doctor just laughed it off as an obvious mismeasurement. :ita with Zaynethepain that kids tend to chub up and then stretch out. Both my kids have followed this pattern, from infancy onward. They will pack on some pounds, growing poochy little tummies and mini double chins- and just when I'm wondering if I should stop feeding them ice cream, they go through a height spurt and they're skinny again!
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:42 PM
    :ita with LLLMeg. Please don't let the plug scare you! Sometimes it just takes a while for a plug to go away completely. The fact that it gets smaller after nursing is a very good sign- it means the area is not totally plugged.
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:41 PM
    Welcome to the forum! A lot of moms start out with massive oversupply, but by the time their babies are a year old most of them are down to having just enough. Our bodies are smart, and they don't want to waste energy producing unneeded milk, so they "read" the difference between how much they are making and how much the baby is taking and use that difference to adjust supply. If you decide you want to increase your supply, the best thing to do is to nurse more and pump more, and to do that consistently. Adding in one pump session here and there is great, don't get me wrong! But if you really want to signal your body that more milk is needed, you want to pump/nurse more every day. If you decide that increasing supply is too much trouble at this point, I still don't think you need to start actively refusing to nurse. Your LO might have some tough times as she gets used to the fact that your supply isn't as abundant as it used to be, but eventually she's going to accept that it is what it is, and accept that while she can get unlimited snuggles out of you, more milk just isn't going to happen. If you want to hasten the process a bit, you could offer a sippy cup of milk after nursing, and see if that helps with the crying.
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:06 PM
    Hi nivlovely. What has worked well for me with really bad plugs is vibration (using a electric toothbrush or personal massager to "break up" the plug) and also, laying baby on the floor and leaning over baby on all fours and nursing baby that way. I also like the 'bag of marbles' massage technique, where mom gently lifts and moves around the entire breast, rather than rubbing and rubbing on the same spot. Also, cold compresses seem to help lots of moms. Sometimes, if a plug is reoccurring, it helps for mom to take lecithin and/or make diet changes. If nursing frequently is not taking care of the engorgement and the plug, what about doing some pumping or hand expression after nursing or between nursing sessions? Is the plug very painful? Have you had issues with mastitis? I am wondering what about this is scaring you? plugs are a fairly common event and while of course it is very important to work on getting the plug out, they are not usually a huge issue on their own. Is this a plug that is making nursing or other activities very painful? Or is it the fact it's been a few days? It can take several days to resolve a plug sometimes. Here is quick tips on plugs - http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:03 PM
    http://www.thebadassbreastfeeder.com/every-again-until-the-day-we-die/ The previous posters have great advice. This is a blog that always has me in tears and makes me feel much less alone.
    5 replies | 173 view(s)
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