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  • @llli*andreica's Avatar
    Today, 08:09 AM
    Have you considered something like this: http://www.amazon.com/LilyPadz%C2%AE-Reusable-Silicone-Nursing-Regular/dp/B000YOUIN6 I don't really know what they're like since I don't have such problems but I've heard of these so I thought to mention it. Perhaps you could look up some reviews
    6 replies | 241 view(s)
  • @llli*schecariaga's Avatar
    Today, 06:42 AM
    Help! I want to give my baby my stored breastmilk even when we go out is it safe to just put the frozen milk in my bag and let it come to room temp? Or i need to bring an ice pack? What do i do if my baby doesnt like cold milk and im outside? Is it safe to let the chilled milk come to room temp ? How many hours will it last? Thank you !! Sorry for the manu questions im just worried that the baby will spoil and it will harm my baby...
    0 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:59 AM
    You know, just evaluating how much you need can help you decide how much you need stashed. With my first two children I worked FT and never had more than one small bottle in the freezer at the crèche and two in the deep freeze at home. I gave fresh bottles pumped the day prior, which is more healthfult han pumped. Also, it may be helpful to know if your baby will accept thawed milk, as samm percentage of mamas make a lot of helpful enzyme to break down and digest milk for their LOs but freezer storage just slows the enzyme down, and the thawed milk has a soapy taste. Some babies will refuse the soapy milk, which is healthy nonetheless. It might be kind of annoying if you end up in this position. So I'd advise thawing a small amount, taking a whiff for a soap smell, and offering it to baby when you are not around (lots of babies will not eat frozen food when fresh from the tap is right there!) to see how that goes. There was a mama here who posted here recently that she had an impressive stash but ended up having lipase/soapy milk which her baby refused, and was *so* frustrated over that. I decided after reading that that I would stick to the tiny freezer stash when I go back to FT work in July! Thirdly, consider that you're good at pumping and producing milk, and yes--you can always make more!
    3 replies | 123 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:33 AM
    Awesome, MaddieB! Why not use a carrot approach and bring in the brochures in PDF form here? http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/bf-links-pumping/#workplace Also you could try sending them by email? Point out that breastmilk-fed babies and their mothers have fewer sick days? The other side of that is techniques like pumping if you drive to work, and trying to get it faster? Like not rinsing things off if the pump parts are going to be kept in the cooler? Or using hand sanitizer/using rubbing alcohol from a travel dispenser to sanitize your hands rather than washing? Also perhaps you can wear a bra that lets you just fit int he flanges and not have to take it off? The thread on pumping over a 12-hour shift has info on this. She only pumped twice a day and it still worked. Do you have a double electric pump? That will speed things up too. You can, actually, train your body to respond quickly in just a short time, but the best would be to get some leeway on how long your breaks can be without that ridiculous punishment hanging over you. I really hope this helps :)
    5 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:26 AM
    Hi MaddieB and Midnightsangel, yes indeed I have done the ol' crossed arms trick to halt a letdown in public, but when helping people out it could be tricky as it's a gesture of being closed to the other person :rolleyes: Bummer! What about strategically holding things in front of you? Would that work? Thanks for the lanisoh tip! Because I'm sporting Got Milk stains right now :cool: I tried silk and wool inserts and they didn't work, plus they left funny waviness under my shirt. For going back to work I'm going to buy push-up bras and swimsuit inserts--you know, those neoprene-like inserts? I hope they'll form an invisible waterproof layer. I work 12-hour shifts and bra halos on the job are not going to be cool!!
    6 replies | 241 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:19 AM
    Why not have a look at the Kellymom resources for dealing with nursing strikes and relactation? :)
    5 replies | 204 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 PM
    Hmm- I know those are ideas for GER (although in my personal experience not very effective for that) I think for drool having/encouraging child (who is well past the SIDS risk age as yours is) to sleep on side or tummy makes more sense, so the drool runs out of the mouth rather than down the hatch?
    5 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:23 PM
    Sorry I did not have an answer for your previous question- how are you feeling now? As far as gaining an ounce, yes v. good baby is gaining, but whether the gain is slow at this point is still not clear. Yes it us true about the birth weight possibly being inflated and it is considered normal for breastfed babies to lose weight the first few days. But baby was born a week ago and there have been weight checks since then. So whether or not birth weight was inflated does not really matter at this point. More to the point at age one week, It all depends on WHEN the gain started. You know baby was 6-11 at day 4, and that is the lowest known weight. But, It is possible baby lost more weight after that 4 day check. Or, after loosing up until 4 days, weight plateaued at 6-11 for a day or two before beginning to gain. Are there plans for more weight checks? How is output? (Poops) ?
    12 replies | 346 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Thank you both so much for the insight and clarification. This really helps me! I have found it really challenging to find a balance as a new mother between meeting my own needs and meeting my baby's (now very young toddler). I've never had cue nursing explained to me quite like this. I think I've tried to practice meeting my own needs all along, but I always had this trepidation of missing cues, because I knew that missed feedings could lead to failure to thrive especially when a baby/young toddler's main nutrition is breast milk. One of my struggles has been how quickly time can elapse with a small baby or child. For example, I will have gotten myself something to eat and tried to eat it, and, wham, much more time than I intended has elapsed! Can anyone else relate to any of this?
    3 replies | 145 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:25 PM
    Thank you! I wasn't sure if the tips were too similar to nipple, so thank you for the input and reminder about anything can be used to comfort baby to the point of missed feedings.
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    Thank you so much for the tips! They really help! I would not have thought of some of them! It seems like I read somewhere a very long time ago about people propping younger babies up in a swing or putting the crib mattress at the slightest incline to help with drool. I could be totally wrong about this and be remembering incorrectly. I wondered if something like this translated to older babies or bedsharing families.
    5 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:46 PM
    I agree with Mommal. Maybe this would be a situation where very much decreasing nursing as opposed to full on weaning would be the best scenario. Not because I don't think you have "time" to wean-if you really had to, you could tell your child tomorrow she can't nurse anymore and that would be that and she would be weaned. This would obviously be the most upsetting way to do it for both you and your child but if you had to that is what you could do. Here is what helped me when I was nursing while pregnant. I didn't have aversion so bad but I definitely had some bad nipple pain. I kept the sessions that worked for me because they helped both of us get more sleep, like naps and bedtime, pretty much the same as always. Otherwise I limited the length of nursing sessions I made them really short. If you want some ideas on how to do this let me know. When I nursed I would take my mind to another place either by reading or daydreaming or deep breathing or something to take my mind off of how it was feeling. I also had overproduction with all babies and I agree with Mommal. having the toddler still nursing actually can help. Yes theoretically it would mean more milk however it sounds likely you're going to have a lot no matter what. Having a toddler there to nurse when baby can't as much as you need is really nice and convenient.
    2 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    Oh ugh I hope you don't get it as bad as I did. Anyway try to stay hydrated nurse your baby as much as you can you may see a dip in production if the illness is bad due to some dehydration but it should rebound quickly hang in there. And just in case – don't let anyone tell you that you should not nurse your baby when you're sick this is not true.
    17 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:55 PM
    I hope you feel better soon!
    17 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:54 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the baby to come! Questions about time- like "When will I have a full supply?" or "When will my milk dry up?" or "Do I have enough time to warn my older kid and have her forget how much she loves to nurse?"- are always the hardest to answer. Everyone is so individual, and as a result the answers will be different for every mom/baby pair! That being said, it's not too late for you to wean your older child. Many moms wean at some point during pregnancy, due to the discomfort or the aversive feelings. Many babies spontaneously wean due to the lack of milk; most moms lose some or all supply during pregnancy. If you do continue to nurse your toddler, there are no guarantees about how you will feel once the new baby arrives. Some moms feel a rush of "I love nursing both my babies, more cuddling is more awesome!" while others feel an increased desire to get the older child off the breast. The one thing that is fairly certain to be less of problem if you continue to nurse your toddler is oversupply- you're just as likely to have an oversupply as you were the first time around, but nursing the toddler is likely to help you manage it. You won't have to rely on just one child to drain off the excess milk!
    2 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:48 PM
    Hi! can you explain what exactly happened when you try to latch baby early on or before baby had any bottles? And what you have tried as far as positioning or latch techniques? Also are you sure your baby gained two pounds over birthweight in his first two weeks? This is exceedingly rapid weight gain. What often happens when a baby has to be bottle-fed is that baby is overfed with bottles, both in the sense that baby is getting much too much milk in the bottle's overall, and that each feeding is unusually large And fast. This is quite possibly much more likely to make a baby refuse to nurse then so-called nipple confusion. Are you feeding baby with bottles? Have you considered a different alternative method? Or are you doing paced bottlefeeding method with baby in an upright position and the bottle horizontal and encouraging baby to take frequent pauses etc?
    1 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:43 PM
    Based on what you're describing, my guess is that you have some relatively minor oversupply going on. Pumping 4-5 oz at one go, having baby occasionally gulp/choke/sputter, very liquid stools- those are all good indicators of some degree of oversupply. But those liquid poops are yellow, the gulping/choking/sputtering is only at night, you don't feel full, the feedings aren't short and the baby isn't resisting nursing. That all indicates that the oversupply must not be too crazy. So, what caused the plugged duct? It could be the oversupply, it could be the new bra, it could be the latch, or it could have no clear explanation. I think you have to go with "no clear explanation" when you're talking about a single isolated plug. Now, if you get a plug every time you wear the underwire bra, or every time you notice your baby's latch being off, then you might be able to pin down the cause. So the best thing to do at this point is to just be patient and pay attention to your body!
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:03 PM
    I am sorry I have no advice about drool- but I do think excess drool is a reasonable explanation for the increased spit up. It sounds like baby is figuring out some ideas. I guess I would suggest not limiting nursing at all, as nursing is comforting and the more breastmilk in baby's tummy with the drool, the less likely the drool is to irritate(?) . Of course this will mean more volume when spitups happen, but hopefully an overall more comfortable baby. When my oldest drooled a ton with teething we made the mistake of keeping cloth bibs on him all the time (except when he was sleeping) to keep from having to change his clothes all the time, and he ended up with a horrible drool rash around his neck from the drenched bibs. So that is an idea of what NOT to do.
    5 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:55 PM
    :ita that's my understanding as well. Not an expert here as well. Just a question. Will baby nurse while asleep?
    5 replies | 204 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:45 PM
    I'm no expert by any means and we supplement w formula bc I can't pump enough at work to cover how long I'm away. I don't know if this will help more long term, as I'm slowly seeing an improvement in my pumping amount. Here's what I'm doing. 1. rented a hospital grade pump and only use my PISA occasionally. 2. Pump in the car on the way to and from work--sometimes during the day (I have home visits to clients often)--so I can pump at least 3-5 x per day 3. Nurse as often as I can when we are together. We co sleep for my sanity and she eats at least 3-4 times at night. If you can swing it, you could pump opposite breast while nursing as well. I was doing that before i returned to work. I just can't do it now. 4. Take fenugreek and drink Mother's Milk tea. You can also look at any factors that might lower supply, such as your birth control or other health issues. The book The Breastfeeding Mother's Guide to Making More Milk has been recommended frequently on this forum. I'm reading it but haven't finished it. Also, it sounds like your child is getting some breastmilk, right? It is my understanding that some is always better than none. ETA: I have also found putting coconut oil on the flanges of the pump where your nipple goes in really seems to help me. The lady who rented me the pump suggested it and I have noticed a difference when I do that v. not. She suggested olive oil or lanolin, so anything safe with to put on your nipples with breastfeeding...
    2 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*sausages's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:45 PM
    I'm 18 weeks pregnant. Is there enough time before new baby arrives to not only wean my daughter, but also, crucially, for her to forget her love of nursing by then? It would be awful for her to still be mourning the loss and then have to watch the newborn constantly at the breast! I thought I wanted to tandem feed, but I've got the most horrible feeding aversion, have for the last month or so, and now not keen to keep going as: a) worried aversion will continue up to and even following birth and that that will negatively affect our relationship - she already can't help but be aware of how much I'm hating it at the moment as I'm basically climbing the wall every time she feeds, and already having to limit feeding time. b)oversupply - I had appalling, really appalling oversupply after daughter was born, just nursing her as a singleton. Having to have showers/ change bedding etc a couple of times a night, soaking wet all day, awful. Worried that can only be worse trying to feed two at once. Any advice would be so greatly appreciated! TIA.
    2 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*amy.hawkins's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:08 PM
    I had a blocked duct last week and I'm try to determine the cause to prevent its happening again. Was it just poor latch or could it be oversupply? Or maybe that new nursing bra with underwire? My baby is two months old. He was five weeks early, but perfectly healthy. The article about oversupply on this website give the following symptoms for oversupply, of which we have a few. Baby cries a lot, and is often very irritable and/or restless: some days, usually more in the evenings like I've been told to expect Baby may sometimes gulp, choke, sputter, or cough during feedings at breast: occasionally during nighttime feedings Baby may seem to bite or clamp down on the nipple while feeding: since about three weeks he has loved to bite down and shake his head at the end of feeding on each breast. This got a little better, but for the past couple weeks he's been pulling back and pushing with his hands a little at a time until I finally take him off. It is usually when he is done truly feeding and is just comfort sucking. Occasionally this will happen in the middle of a feeding. I think that this results in a poor latch Milk sprays when baby comes off, especially at the beginning of a feeding: no Mother may have sore nipples: Yes, when I let him comfort suck on the second side for a long time after he is finished eating, they get a little sore, maybe from poor latch at that time Baby may arch and hold himself very stiffly, sometimes screaming: no Feedings often seem like...
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*nosila's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:36 PM
    My baby is three weeks old and I have been EP since birth because he cannot latch on to my nipples. My nipples are greater than 30MM. The two lactation consultants I have seen have said that with time he will be able to latch but to continue to pump to feed him. I have ordered special nipple shields from Europe that are supposed to be the right size for my nipples (the US does not have the right size). The shield is expected to arrive by the end of the week but I am worried if I wait to latch my baby, past the time that has already passed, he will not be interested. I have tried to latch him on a daily basis but he wants nothing to do with my nipple and kicks and cries until I give him a bottle. Any advice would be appreciated. Information about baby: At birth he was 5lb 10oz. At his two week appointment he was 7lb 10oz. He was born at 39 weeks. He is my second child and his sister also had problems latching but she at least would latch on a daily basis but was unable to get enough milk until about 8 weeks.
    1 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*elandlanes.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:17 PM
    Well, he only gained an ounce-which is discouraging-but it is a gain... I think I've read that when you have a planned csection and they pump you full of fluids before hand that it can make your baby weigh more. My two that were over due by 5 and 6 days were 6.8 and 7.2. My other planned csection was 10 days early and he was 6.2. This csection was 6 days early and he was 7.4. So I don't know if fluids are playing a role or if it's just slow weight gain..
    12 replies | 346 view(s)
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