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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:40 PM
    I agree with mamawin. I am confused how a weight gain issue was diagnosed. My daughter was in the 85th% for height and 15th for weight at her last checkup (age 2.) I told my pediatrician that based on what some other moms had told me, some doctors might not be happy with that. He said it was totally fine. I really agree with mamawin on this. How and what an infant is fed is something that affects a persons lifetime health, and we know the benefits of breastmilk are dose related- any amount(or amount of time) is great, but the more (or longer) the better. Wanting to breastfeed your child and for your child to get more of your milk for longer is thus very legitimate no matter how you look at it. Whether or not you need to continue to supplement, having support and help in your choice to breastfeed your child is always a good idea.
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:23 PM
    How close to birth weight is baby? How is output-poops? It is hard when a baby is very sleepy, I had that experience with my oldest and trying to get him awake to nurse was very hard. But it had to be done. Once he started nursing often enough on his own and gain was on track, we let him find his own sleep/wake pattern and it got way easier. But it was really important he nursed often enough to get that weight gain going and to make sure my milk production was ok. I had lots of meds in labor and post due to C-section, and those probably played a role in my sons sleepiness. One of the misunderstandings about cue feeding is that it always means wait until baby cues. It can mean that, and this may be fine assuming baby is nursing with normal frequency and gaining well. But it can also mean that mom can offer to nurse whenever she feels a 'cue' - an urge to nurse, either physical or mental. That is also cue feeding. More to the point with your situation, it is pretty common for a baby to not cue quite often enough in the very early weeks and to really need to nurse more often than baby is cuing. This can be for many reasons but meds that might make baby sleepy would certainly be a reason to nurse more than baby cues if there is any question of whether baby is nursing often enough. If a baby is not getting enough to eat, that is another reason baby may not have the energy to cue enough and be very sleepy.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:01 PM
    Mothers do not need a high fat diet to make high fat milk. Mothers all over the world and throughout all history and pre-history, with a very wide range of typical diet, managed to make milk that was good enough for the human race to be a very successful species. Oatmeal is thought to be a galactagogue, which means it helps some moms make MORE milk. There are many galactagogues to try if the issue is not enough milk. Is fat content ever an issue? Sometimes, in rare circumstances, especially with preterm babies who need to gain weight much more quickly than normal. But in the vast majority of cases, if a baby is not gaining at an acceptable rate, (and no gain at all over long periods of is probably not acceptable) the issue is almost always either not enough milk or some underlying health issue.
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:21 PM
    Can you go to bed earlier in the evening? Let nonessential things slide? That helped me when I was at that stage. I also have a high-pressure job and I was not at the top of my game either during my (three) babies' infancies. I was also really, really tired. My youngest is 3 now (and still nursing, by the way!) and although I still have nights of interrupted sleep because she decides to sleep on TOP of me rather than next to me overall I am much less tired and more productive. I guess I want to say that although it's really, really hard when you are going through it to try to balance taking care of an infant and doing well at your job, and it feels like forever, you WILL eventually be less exhausted. (And honestly, you'd be tired if you were formula-feeding baby too.) And, in my opinion, having learned to balance all that I am actually all the more capable now. I used to shrug it off when people called me a "super woman" but I think the truth in it is that once you figure out how to balance all those conflicting priorities and get the sh*t done that needs to get done, whether at home or at work, you can do anything! Hang in there, it's awesome that you were able to get your supply back up!
    6 replies | 340 view(s)
  • @llli*pr2000's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:47 PM
    Hi there, just wanted to provide an update. Thanks so much, Dandelions and bsua65. We made it through the slump and are still going strong! The thing that seems to have worked is resuming night nursing. I did pump a little more frequently, but that is the one big change I made, and it seems to have made the difference. It is hard because my milk flow tends to be quite slow, so baby doesn't get much in one session, and so he wakes up 2-3x per night to nurse. So I am not exactly at the top of my game the next day at work - we do cosleep but I simply can't sleep while he nurses, so I only sleep 3-4 hours per night in total (and not at a stretch). I wish I was able to sleep for 6 hours at night, and not have it affect my supply. But on the other hand, by night nursing, I am at least able to make as much milk as he drinks, so I plan to do it for as long as I can. He is still small (7th percentile), but he doesn't seem to be hungry, and I always have at least a little leftover milk every day. Thanks again for the support!
    6 replies | 340 view(s)
  • @llli*v0mich01's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:36 PM
    No mini pill. And baby has been fussy at the bread today...i had alot of issues that cause bleeding during my pregnancy, so I feel like maybe I should call. It was essentially spotting, I've had a bit more through out today, but no flow yet.
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:26 PM
    5 to 6 minutes? Wow, that sounds extremely sleepy. I think it'd be good to talk with your doc and/or pediatrician and/or Infantrisk about the meds your on.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:24 PM
    I think you should try and anticipate when she's going to be tired so she doesn't get to that crazy over-tired state. Most babies that age can only be awake one to two hours before they need to sleep again. For my kids, they could handle about 1.5 hours of wakefulness before they needed to sleep again. So, about 10 minutes prior to that I'd start a sleep routine...nursing, walking, bouncing, etc....in an effort to avoid the overtired state.
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*rani's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:58 PM
    Breastmilk is of higher calorie than formula: 22 versus 20 http://kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/milkcalories/ Don't remember where I read that mom needs a high fat diet to make high fat milk. I eat organic butter, wild salmon, chicken with fat along with fruits and veggies. Oatmeal is useless for me. Not losing weight but haven't gained any weight either. No, my baby is not chunky, he is long and lean. He will eat how much he wants to eat and just cannot make him eat more!
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:24 PM
    You may find it better to start a new post jray5326 as it may not get answered properly here! Have you done any pump maintenance recently? Checked flanges still fit? If you want a stash have you thought about adding pump sessions when at home as well as nursing?
    6 replies | 724 view(s)
  • @llli*bbmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:22 PM
    Hi ladies. I have a little man who will be 2 weeks old tomorrow and he has yet to reach his birth weight again. He was 6lbs 11oz at birth, proceeded to do huge black sticky poops (I think there were 8 in the first 24 hours) and went down to 6lbs 1oz. Hospital made me 'top him up with formula' after I'd bfed him to see if it would help him put on weight faster, but after I protested and said I would rather he have my ebm they agreed and let me do it that way. Now, my LO has been mostly asleep since he was born. Only in the past three days has he had 'waking' periods of 5 or 6 minutes before he goes back to sleep again. He has cried three times since birth and if he wants feeding he only whimpers or goes 'eh, eh'. I'm atuned to these cues and will feed him when he asks, but generally I have to wake him up to do so as he lets it go for hours other wise. The longest he has left it between feeds is a good 5 hours, which isn't helping him gain that weight back and is making my midwives uneasy about it. They want me to feed him every three hours, and I want to feed on demand.. but if I do it on demand, he'll never put on weight! How do we get over the sleeping baby thing?? It's frustrating because I've got to literally strip him down to his nappy, pop him on his belly and rub his back to get him to wake up enough to feed! He's on the breast for about 15 minutes and then refuses to latch any further after pulling himself off. I've got a very good let down reflex (I can feel...
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:19 PM
    Definitely see an LC preferably an IBCLC if you can. Nipple pain and damage are often due to latch issues and can indicate other issues such as high palate/TT/LT. All of which are much easier for someone to assess in person. Have you tried laid back/biological nurturing positions? It's quite common for one side to be different to the other with regards to latch as nipples will be different either side :)
    3 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*epm9176's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:12 PM
    I am having the same problem, on the same side with my 5-week-old. So much so that I'm avoiding nursing on the side because of the pain. I know that's a horrible thing to do, but I'm a wimp. There is this small gash that just won't heal. I've been pumping that side and nursing minimally, and each time I do, the wound opens and bleeds again. My son had a problem from the get-go with this side, and he had a moderate tongue tie, which has been corrected based on advice of the pediatrician and ENT. I thought that would correct things. I have very "experienced" nipples with more than 3.5 years of nursing to toughen them up before his birth, so I'm really stuck with how to fix it. I was just thinking about calling lactation, and thought I would visit here to get some advice first. My right breast is constantly throbbing now, either because of the wound and bruising or due to being engorged. I've gotten myself into a vicious cycle.
    3 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:05 PM
    I strongly suggest getting a second opinion. The first thing I would do is make very, very sure there was no scale error. Does your baby seem to you as if he weighs exactly what he did 2 months ago? What about other growth measures? Next, even if gain is not happening, it is simply not true this would be because your milk is not nutritious enough. If your baby is not gaining weight, it means either 1) Baby is not getting ENOUGH milk to gain, or 2) baby is ill or has some serious medical condition or nutritional deficit. The quality of breastmilk vs. formula is not the issue with slow gain. If you can, see a board certified lactation consultant. (IBCLC) She can help you figure out if you have low milk production or if there is an issue with baby not being able to transfer milk normally, or what. If you give us a full history of weight gain and nursing frequency, as well as noting any reasons you might have low production (birth control, supplementing without pumping, pacifier overuse, using nipple shields, etc.) we might be able to help you troubleshoot. But a baby not gaining any weight between 2 and 4 months is a very serious issue, and seeing a professional who can help you figure out what is wrong and how to fix it while supporting breastfeeding is important. That is what an IBCLC should be able to do, and unfortunately doctors are not trained in typically. See this for more: http://cwgenna.com/lconsult.html If you supplement with bottles, you need to pump...
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*jray5326's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:59 PM
    I tried not to worry when the milk I pumped at work decreased and still decreasing (I pump every 3 hours). I took Fenugreek and some lactation cookies but they didn't help at all. I nurse my baby when I get home, I also eat well and take lots of fluid but it seems like nothing is working. Before I want to build a freezer stash but it looks like it's not going to happen. Now I just need is to pump enough milk to feed Lukas (he's 3 months old) when I'm at work. I am starting to worry that i cannot sustain the supply if my milk continue to decrease. What should I do? Can stress be a factor?
    6 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*jray5326's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:51 PM
    I tried not to worry when the milk I pumped at work decreased and still decreasing (I pump every 3 hours). I took Fenugreek and some lactation cookies but they didn't help at all. I nurse my baby when I get home, I also eat well and take lots of fluid but it seems like nothing is working. Before I want to build a freezer stash but it looks like it's not going to happen. Now I just need is to pump enough milk to feed Lukas when I'm at work. I am starting to worry that i cannot sustain the supply if my milk continue to decrease. Any advice?
    6 replies | 724 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:49 PM
    We didnt start supplementing until my supply dropped. It happened with my first one as well. nurse on demand when Im home and pump at work 3 times (every 3 hours). Thankfully I have a very understanding boss... I only switch sides after he stops on one side. Usually its sooner on the right than the left. Baby's latch is great! We have never had an issue there and he was doing great at the last visit. He was 7lbs 5oz when he was born and was gaining weight at a steady pace. He weighed 10lbs at his 2 month check up and he is still at 10lbs at 4 months.
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*mjollnir's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:19 PM
    Thanks for replying :) The switching to formula was more about sharing the load rather than trying to solve the problem, which I think is just overtiredness. My husband just put her in the pram and took her for a walk and she fell asleep within about 10 seconds. She then woke up after 10 minutes screaming again but this time I was able to feed her to sleep and she's now lying calmly beside me still half feeding. She cluster feeds in the evenings leading up to this so I don't think it's really hunger related. I tried different positions, yeah. I guess we're just going to have to go to bed earlier.
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:11 PM
    The supplementing with formula is also hurting your supply. The doctor might be referring to foremilk and hindmilk where the milk at the start if a feed usually has more of the sugar while the milk towards the end has more fat but it's not like the fore milk has no fat or is devoid of anything nutritious. If you switch breasts too quickly in a feed he might get all foremilk which might lead to greener poops I think but it's not necessarily bad. How is your baby's latch? He might not be transferring milk from your breast to his tummy very well if he has a bad latch. What was his birth weight and what dies he weigh now? It sounds like he's peeing just fine and the poops sound normal.
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:04 PM
    I don't think switching to formula will help much especially since it sounds like she was fine before this? Maybe try feeding her more often so she's not so hungry when she's also really tired? Have you changed your diet recently? Maybe she doesn't like something, like if you started drinking coffee or suddenly ate a lot of onions etc. Does she get upset at both breast s or just one side? Have you tried using different positions such as a reclining one to ease the let down flow since shes already frustrated or trying the side lying position so she can be sleepy and suck a bit without having to really work for it? My son is 8 weeks and I find if he's really tired but also hungry the side lying helps to calm him down better than any other trick I have. I know it can be frustrating especially if nothing you do seems to help but try to hang in there! I'm sure there's a fix that we can brainstorm to allow you two to enjoy breastfeeding again :)
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:54 PM
    He wets very often. I change him 4-5 times at night while I have him and my mother in law watches him during the day and she changes him pretty often as well. Now poopy... He sometimes goes a couple of days without having one but I have seen that is normal with breast fed babies. I think what I will do is feed him the bottles for the next week as the doctor has asked but follow with nursing and see how he does after that. When he is not nursing, he has been very fussy and irritable and he roots around quite a bit. The way the pediatrician explained it is that my milk could be more water than fat which means less carlories? Does that sound right? I feel terrible that the baby didnt gain a single ounce in 2 months! I feel like I have starved him for the last 2 months. My mother in law has supplemented with formula a couple times a day since my supply has dropped with the pumping.
    8 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*ajayson192004's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:52 PM
    Good to know....he is sprouting his 1st tooth so the nights make sense....thanks for your insight
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:45 PM
    Your baby sounds completely normal! Actually a lot of babies increase night nursing at 6 months because of teething. Baby still needs the same amount of milk at 6 months as at 1 month and still receives the same amount of milk at each feeding, so nursing shouldn't space out. Up until age 1, breastmilk is the main nutrition and solids are for gaining experience with tastes and textures, and to develop the motor skills to self-feed. That is, solids don't replace breastmilk at this age and therefore, do not decrease baby's breastmilk requirements.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:41 PM
    One of the mamas on here posted a link a while back to an interesting article about a Canadian mom breastfeeding her baby in Mongolia. It's really interesting and I think highlights a lot of the cultural differences around breastfeeding. http://www.drmomma.org/2009/07/breastfeeding-in-land-of-genghis-khan.html With regards to your specific question, this is relevant: "If a woman's breasts are engorged and her baby is not at hand, she will simply go around and ask a family member, of any age or sex, if they'd like a drink. Often a woman will express a bowlful for her husband as a treat, or leave some in the fridge for anyone to help themselves." ruchiccio makes a good point though, if oversupply is an ongoing issue, from the perspective of regulating supply it might be best to either wake up baby to nurse (nothing wrong with doing that, nursing more often is helpful with oversupply) or hand express.
    3 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:33 PM
    The rule of thumb is that you need about 1-1.5 ounces of milk for baby per hour apart. So, if you're gone for 7 hours, you want maybe 12-15 oz in the fridge to cover the first day with a little to spare. Since you're going back to work in just a few weeks, you might want to start pumping now to build up that first day stash. A lot of moms find that morning works best to add in a pumping session since that is when you have the most milk, but anytime that is convenient is fine. Don't worry if you get very little at first, it sometimes takes time to get used to pumping. But also don't overdo the pumping as you don't want to get into an oversupply situation, once a day will hopefully be enough - if you get 0.5 to 1 oz a day over the next few weeks you should have enough for that first day. Then each day you work, you pump for the next day, probably 2 or 3 times for a 6-7 hour shift. As for the bottle, it's fine to start a few days before you go back to work. Best if someone other than you gives the bottle as baby will expect the breast if you're there. Some babies take to the bottle immediately, others are more reluctant and it takes some trial and error to figure out which bottle baby likes best. Whichever bottle you choose, use the slowest flow nipple (marked "0" for many nipples), and continue to use those slowest flow nipples throughout bottle-feeding - ie, no need to ever use a bigger nipple. I personally used Avent bottles and the Medela bottles that came with the pump,...
    1 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:29 PM
    This was terrible advice. I am sorry. There is really nothing that could have undermined breastfeeding more than this. Supplementing means baby was not "demanding" that milk from your body which means your body never produced it. Establishing supply in the early weeks is so crucial and supplementing can (if not used in conjunction with pumping) can hurt your supply a lot. I need more info here. Why was doc concerned? Was baby dropping percentiles? (ie from 40 to 15) If so, what was the drop? Or, was the concern just because baby was in the 15th percentile? If the issue was a drop, then maybe there is/was a problem. If the issue was him being in the 15th percentile, then that was a total false alarm. There is NOTHING wrong with a baby being in the 15th percentile. By definition, some babies will be there. Some people are tall and skinny. Those people were probably once tall and skinny babies. There is nothing wrong with that.
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mjollnir's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:29 PM
    Hi all, my 8 week old has just suddenly developed this habit of wildly thrashing at the breast when she's tired. It only happens when she's due for a sleep, and if it happens during the day I put her in the pram or manduca and go for a walk with her and she falls asleep within about 2 minutes. But in the evenings when I can't just do that (I have another child) I don't know what to do. She screams before letdown, during letdown (if she even stays calm long enough for it to happen) and afterwards too. She pulls off, thrashes wildly and screams, legs and arms flailing. If I take her off the breast and try walking around with her in my arms in her normal favourite positions, she screams too. I don't know if it's related to breastfeeding per se, or just overtired and inability to put herself to sleep but it makes me want to stop breastfeeding and switch to formula just so I can give her over to my husband and get a break from the constant screaming. Because if he takes her now she gets even more hysterical. Any ideas?
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
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