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  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Today, 01:05 AM
    Exhausted and frustrated is definitely what I am feeling. Although she always has a mouthful of milk when she comes off the breast, she has never seemed to have gotten satisfied from just breastfeeding, and she seems to get just as frustrated as I do with it. It feels like such a waste of time as I still have to pump afterward, and sometimes give the bottle as well. We left the hospital on Tuesday, she weighed 6 lb 10 oz. Thursday was her next doctor’s appt where she weighed 6 lb 13 oz. At that time, she was content with just the breast and pumped milk, but since Saturday she seems insatiable, and that’s when we started adding in formula as well. Poopy diapers are about 2-3 a day and probably about 8+ wet. She is definitely eating plenty with the pumping and formula. I’m never offering her the bottle until after she is showing many hunger signs and is crying/screaming, and she always does this even after 30-45 minutes at the breast. She falls asleep at the breast, and I continually wake her up, switch sides, etc. and after she falls asleep and it seems I can’t wake her back up and I finally take her off, within 5 minutes she starts opening her mouth, sticking hands in mouth, going back to my breast, etc, along with crying. Like I said, exhausted and frustrated are definitely how I’m feeling. My husband suggests I just go to strictly pumping because it’s taking such a toll on me, but i really want to be able to breastfeed her. I’m just at a loss. :(
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Today, 12:13 AM
    Nursing is uncomfortable. It was painful due to very sore nipples, but has gotten better. On one side it feels alright, but the other is often painful. Even when the lactation consultants say everything is correct with her latch, it has never been comfortable on that side. She will nurse about 8 times in a 24 hour period. That was the only weighed feed we did, my next appointment is Friday. I give her, on average, 1.5 oz pumped milk per feeding, and often times she is still hungry (looking for breast, hands in mouth, screaming/crying, sucking very hard on my finger and seeming to be frustrated she is not getting any milk) so I give her about 1 oz of formula after that about 3-4 times a day. I have not tried putting her back to the breast after the bottle, but will!
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:05 PM
    I agree with mommal. Babies nurse lots because nursing feels so good. Also it is very possible baby is not getting 4 ounces when baby nurses but more like 2-3, all normal intake. To combat the possibility of breast refusal, being very careful about how bottles are given (we can provide info if you like) and encouraging lots of nursing when you are with baby, usually helps.
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 PM
    I agree with mommal. We need more information, because from what I can tell so far person you saw in the hospital made you feel like there was a problem when there possibly was none, and instructed you to do interventions that may have been unneeded, needlessly exhausting and frustrating you. It would also help to know if more weight checks have been done (how much has baby gained since lowest known weight in what time frame) and How poop output is looking (how many per day, look, size) Newborns nurse a lot and they prefer to be held the vast majority of the time. It is also normal (and healthy) for a baby to kind of "wake up" after a week or so and want to nurse even more than before! They often do not seem 'satisfied' because it is normal for them to want to nurse lots and never be put down. Also, it pretty much means nothing that baby will take more in a bottle, because the newborn infant is internally programmed to suck when something to suck on is offered to them. Breastfed babies require supplements if they are not gaining weight appropriately despite nursing 10-12 times in 24 hours, and not for any other reason.
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    I'm no one special but I read your post and figured I could chime in for a second. My baby did the exact same thing as yours (gaging, pushing it out with his tongue, chomping down, etc).. and I did exactly what you did (buying numerous types of bottles). None worked. The ONLY ONE that worked was Medela's bottle top called Calma. Maybe try that one out? I used that, pushed it to the roof of his mouth and he took it. Occasionally he will "forget", but for the most part.. he takes it no problem!! Good luck.. I think it's just a trial and error thing. I went through a TON of bottles just like you, so just keep trying until you find ONE he likes! :thumbsup Also, who said he didn't have a tongue tie? I saw numerous LC's, his PED's doctor and an ENT doctor tell me my son didn't have a lip tie and just recently found out he has a VERY tight lip tie :mad:... SO just be careful.
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:39 PM
    "Chomping" is often a way for a baby to control a rapid flow of milk. Do you ever see any of the following: - Frequent feelings of fullness or engorgement - Mom experiencing strong letdown sensations, frequent and/or abundant leaking - Mom being able to pump lots of milk in a relatively short amount of time - Baby gagging or coughing, making a clicking or clucking noise while nursing - Baby acting fussy at the breast, perhaps pulling off the breast while nursing - If the baby pulls off the breast, mom may notice milk squirting or streaming from the breast - Baby gaining weight at a faster than average rate - Baby's poops consistently or frequently green or greenish
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Frequent feeding in the evening, a.k.a. cluster feeding, is completely normal. Often it's a baby's way of reconnecting with mom after she comes home from work. It's also a great way for the baby to tank up on calories before a long stretch of sleep, and 6 hours at 3 months is quite a long stretch. As long as you Re not having trouble pumping enough milk when you're at work, I wouldn't see the cluster feeding as a sign as anything, or worry about the long stretch of sleep. However, if you are experiencing difficulty pumong enough at work, it might be a good idea to not let the baby sleep quite so long at night. More nursing at night = better supply by day and less need for calories delivered by bottle.
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    Welcome to the forum! So if I did my math right, by day 4 your baby lost not quite 10% of birthweight, which is within the normal range. Some questions for you: - How does nursing feel? - How many times in a 24 hour period does the baby nurse? - Have you done any weighed feeds aside from the one at the LC's office? - How much supplement are you giving per feeding, and what is the total amount are you giving in a 24 hour period? - After giving the bottle, do you ever put the baby back to the breast? (Concluding all feedings at the breast is a great way to deal with baby acting "unsatisfied" after adequate feedings, because it trains the baby to associate the feelings of satiation and relaxation with being at the breast, rather than associating those feelings from the bottle.)
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*trentsmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:17 PM
    Helpppp! Im at the end of my rope here... My son Is 10 weeks old and EBF, however...shortly after a bought of bilateral mastitis and Keflex antibiotics his latch declined and his sucking turned into chomping down. He will gag on a finger test and will not take a dummy, nipple shield, or bottle. I'm looking to get him on Bottles so I can pump and go out once in awhile but all he does is push it out with his tounge, gag, cry, and occasionally chomp down. I've tried spectra bottles, Avent natural, tommee tippee, mimijumi, dr browns, playtex, nubi, and munchkin latch to no avail...anyone else had this issue and figured it out? He's seeing an occupational therapist but not seeing any progress. Edit: my son has also been diagnosed with severe acid reflux and is on nexium twice a day. He does not have a tounge tie or pyloric stenosis (sp?)
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*boholectra's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:37 PM
    lo is 3 months old and has a mild tongue tie. I have been nursing her with a nipple shield but now that I am at work, I nurse her in the morning and she takes 4 to 4.5 oz bottles every 3 to 3.5 hours while I am away. I have noticed that once I am back, she gets hungry every 1.5 to 2 hours even after nursing for 30-40 minutes. She is a good sleeper and sleeps for at least 6 hour stretches at night. My question is why is there such a big difference in frequency? I am concerned that it may be because of low milk supply during evenings combined with poor milk transfer. I don't want her to start rejecting nursing because bottles give her more milk for less work.
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:23 PM
    :ita Sounds like it's time to go back to the LC, and see if your current plan can be adjusted. One thing that often happens with weighed feeds is that the baby feeds differently at the LC's office compared to what she does at home. Maybe the baby is a bit distracted and out of her usual routine, so she feeds less well than she does at home. Or the LC has helped mom with her positioning, and as a result the baby feeds better than she does at home. That's why I am a big believer in moms taking home a scale- if possible!- and doing their own before-and-after weights for a while. That can give you a far more accurate picture of milk transfer than a single weighed feed at the LC's office.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    So you are pumping between 29 and 34 ounces a day, and baby is gaining very well with only an extra 8 ounces a day? If so, you are pumping much more milk than you need to be and are probably on your way to a major case of overproduction, which believe me may sound good at this point but it can actually have a serious impact on breastfeeding. I would suggest call your LC back and tell her how much you are pumping (how much output.) My bet is she will give you an adjustment to your plan. I also think you should see her again so she can watch baby nurse and do some more before and after nursing weight checks. If you can pump that much more milk than baby needs, and baby still needs any supplements, that suggests baby has a serious milk transfer issue and you need to be working on latch and improving milk transfer, not on increasing your production. Yes, absolutely, assuming baby can transfer milk normally. My guess is you will very shortly be nursing exclusively and no longer pumping. Hang in there.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:19 PM
    My daughter is 9 days old. She was born 7lb 4oz, and was down to 6lb 10oz 4 days later when we left the hospital. The lactation consultant had advised me to breastfeed and then pump and give her that, and if needed to supplement with formula. I also went thursday to another lactation consultant, and she said my milk production looked good, as did her latch and it looked like she was getting a lot from my breast, but when she was weighed, she really was only getting a couple grams. I've continued with the breastfeeding and pumping every 2-3 hours, as well as doing everything I can to increase my supply. Even after breastfeeding, I usually pump 1-2 oz more of milk, but the past 3 days she has not seemed satisfied. I have had to give her formula in addition a couple times a day and she will easily take 2 oz after the breast and pumped milk. I hate giving her formula, but don't know what else to do. Also, why is she not getting enough from my breast? I try to go back and forth between breasts and try to do at least a total of 30 minutes, but it's never enough to even close to satisfy her. It makes me feel like such a waste of all the time she is breastfeeding because I always have to pump after and now it's getting to the point where I often have to give her formula after that. Any help would be so much appreciated.
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*christine.coff's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:55 PM
    Bear with me, this is long. But I need advice. I have a four week old and have been triple feeding for her the past two and a half weeks. She was born 7lb 2oz at 37 weeks, lost to 6lb11, but was back up to 7lb like five days later? However, a week after that she was still only 7even, no gain at all. She had become very sleepy at the breast, LC said likely due to and very common with late preterm infants. So the plan was to bf, supplement with 1-2 oz BM in a bottle, total of eight oz supps a day, and pump after every feed to maintain supply. Well, this worked and she is now up to 7lb 14oz as of last Tuesday, which averaged about 1.5oz a day gain. So LC said to cut supp down to only six oz a day, continue pumping after every feed. I can definitely tell she's become a better stronger nurser, she doesn't fall asleep every feed, although she does still seem to root constNtly. It makes me question if she is getting enough off me when she roots and seems hungry almost after every feed. Every time a bottle is offered she takes it happily. I know milk is there. I am pumping about seven times a day after feeds and my supply is continuing to increase by the day. I pumped in the past four days 29oz, 30 oz, 32, then yesterday 34, this on top of her feeding 8-10 times a day......we go for another weight check Wednesday to reasses. My question is on the pumping. I hate pumping seven times a day, HATE IT. But I fear a drop in supply if I dropsessions, as I am only four weeks...
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*sashaamb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:48 PM
    We use Lifefactory bottles for our 11 month old with size 1 nipples. The ladies at LO's daycare know how to pace feed and we have had zero issues with our bottles there. With some family members, and the same bottles, we have had issues.... One family member I showed her a video of paced feeding on my phone and it made a big difference. Check out Kellymom.com's expressed breastmilk calculator to help you figure out the number of ounces. The shorthand is 1-1.25 oz per hour away from mom. For example, my LO gets 13 oz per day, 4/5/4, and occasionally a *little* bit less if I have a low volume pump day the day before. Technically, my LO is overfed at those numbers because she is away about 10 hours. The other suggestion I have is to leave your caregivers with instructions to feed the bottles (say 3-4 oz at a time) and follow it with a solid food served BLW style. If your LO is truly still hungry, he will eat the food. If he is not, the caregiver will need to try something else to provide comfort. Maybe leave a list of comfort measures to try, in order. If that still does not help, consider a milk/meal schedule with times that have some limited flexibility (breakfast bottle/solids given between 8:30 and 9:30 am, lunch bottle/solids between 11:30 - 12:30, etc.). Schedules are discouraged for BFing, but some caregivers really struggle with understanding baby's hunger from other cues, and your baby is old enough that a little structure would probably be ok.
    8 replies | 245 view(s)
  • @llli*sashaamb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:30 PM
    Hi there. I had a sleepy baby who was slow to gain weight. Her problem was an undiagnosed allergy to the dairy in my diet - once I went dairy free we were able to stay EBF and her gain rallied. Have you considered the possibility of an allergy?
    3 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:26 PM
    Join La Leche League International (LLLI) live online on October 1st, 2016 for its first-ever 24-hour breastfeeding support meeting! https://www.facebook.com/groups/LLLIGlobalMeeting/ If you are: expecting a baby, a new mother struggling to breastfeed, facing challenges or concerns at any stage of parenting,
    0 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:14 PM
    Mother’s situation: Putting a stop to breastfeeding: gentle toddler weaning Breastfeeding Today, August 2016 I am ready to stop breastfeeding my 18-month-old son, but how? He still nurses a fair amount day and night but I want my body back. Please can you share gentle ways to get him to give up this habit because I do not want to make him unhappy? Response: My son is 17 months and, similarly, he breastfeeds a fair amount day and night. In particular, I’ve been having some very intense feelings at night, when I feel like calling out, "Just leave me alone" or "Go back to sleep," as he lies suckling for half the night and won’t let me even roll over! Is this what you mean when you say you "want your body back"?
    0 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:04 PM
    LLLGB Conference 2016 14-15th October 2016 https://www.laleche.org.uk/lllgb-conference-2016/ The Hayes Conference Centre, Derbyshire Speakers include:
    0 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 AM
    Celebrate La Leche League's 60th anniversary with us! Below you’ll find details on upcoming events and festivities happening throughout the 60th Anniversary year. And don't forget to Like our LLLI 60th Anniversary Page on Facebook for all the latest updates! 24-Hour Online Meeting https://www.facebook.com/groups/LLLIGlobalMeeting/ LLLI’s 24-hour online meeting will take place beginning on October 1, 2016! This digital meeting will run for 24 consecutive hours and be held in multiple languages, bringing together women from all over the world.
    0 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:24 AM
    La Leche League of the Garden State 2016 Mini-Conference Saturday, October 1st, 2016 http://www.lllgardenstateconference.org/ Villa Victoria Academy 376 W Upper Ferry Road, Ewing Twp. 08628 New Jersey
    0 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:07 AM
    personally, for child no 1, he slept in own crib- what a challenge to put him down. DD slept with us, nursed slept and all over through the night. DS - baby no 3 also co sleeps. We do have a co-sleeper type of thingy from Babies R us. He may fall asleep there but often we fall asleep next to eqchother when nursing and remain like that till morning.
    3 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 AM
    Ha! This is us. Absolutely no sleeping in the crib, not even in the swing. Only on ke and in the carrier. He also only sleeps while physically having a nipple in his mouth and may continue sleeping if it pops out only if I literally stabd still. To get things done, I carry him in a carrier and nipple in the mouth. eats every 1.5 hrs or sooner. husband takes care of older kids and does laundry, I manage to cook when he is in the carrier. Also hired cleaning lady
    3 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 25th, 2016, 08:12 PM
    Some babies do just sleep longer than others. My oldest never went more than 2-3 hours in a stretch until he was almost 3 years old, next one slept 6 hours in a row while right beside me the first week and completely freaked me out! So yes longer stretches can be normal. But, no harm in waking baby when you feel full and it will only help milk production going forward as well as help in avoiding plugs. Sounds like in all other respects your plan is working well and I really like that you can nurse baby once during your work day. And yes I agree getting 10 ounces in 2 pump sessions indicates a very healthy production. This output may reduce over time so do not let that worry you.
    5 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*fishmama's Avatar
    September 25th, 2016, 07:32 PM
    Hi there, My son is 7 weeks old and we have struggled hard with breastfeeding from day 1. His latch was shallow and he would not open his mouth very far at all. The LCs at the hospital pretty much insisted that I use a nipple shield to help him out because his pallet was high and my nipples are "soft" (though subsequent LCs have told me "there is nothing wrong with my equipment.") My LO's posterior tongue tie was IDd inthe hospital and they cut it with scissors while we were there, but I never noticed a difference with his nursing. We saw another LC as soon as we left the hospital and she advised me to entice my baby to latch with expressed milk in a feeding tube with a syringe. This didnt seem to make much of a difference either, but I worked hard to learn proper latching technique and during the second week of his life I thought I had finally mastered it. The next day I was severely engorged and I noticed my baby hadn't been wetting enough diapers and I began to worry. I wondered if the new latch was the problem, so I let him nurse the old (painful) way, and he did soften my breasts, but still no wet diapers. I pumped to see if I could get some more milk to syrenge feed him, but ai could only express 4 drops. I panicked amd called the Drs office. The pediatrician asked us to come in asap, she weighed him and advised us to give him formula in the SNS at the breast. I cried and cried and began my rigorous pumping regimen(which I am still performing at 7 weeks) to get my...
    4 replies | 206 view(s)
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