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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:14 AM
    Have you tried a course of antibiotics? Or treating this as thrush?
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:37 AM
    That sounds unpleasant. Since this is an unusual problem, I have several questions if you do not mind. Have you ruled out vasospasm? the timing of the pain seems odd for vasospasm but the intensity of the pain sounds like vasospasm. What makes you think the pain is related to latch? It sounds completely unrelated since the pain comes on so long after the nursing session ends. How many times total each day is milk removed from the breasts? 2 times for nursing, how many times for pumping? When you pump, how much milk do you extract in how much time?
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*kaf12's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:17 PM
    Hi new friends! I'm about to hit my 11-month anniversary of breastfeeding my little boy. For about two months, I've had very sharp and painful sensations after nursing. It starts about 30 minutes after I'm done and lasts for 60-90 minutes before easing up. First I just noticed in the morning. Then it was after every time I nursed. Now I've started to notice it after pumping, also. And it HURTS. Like, so much that I've wondered if it's worse than contractions. I'm trying to keep going, in hopes that it's just a phase, but I don't know how much more I can take. I've tried switching positions, adjusting his latch, warm compresses, hot showers, Advil... you name it. Some of this has helped but not long-term. The doctor said my son has no signs of thrush. And he's 11 months old, so if it's a latch issue, it won't be easy to fix at this stage. Additional background: I'm down to two sessions a day (usually) plus bottle feeding from a frozen stash. Had some overproduction issues which have mostly evened out, but I still get clogs about once a week. And yes, he's been teething for about 5 months already. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Any recommendations? I'm about to call it quits, but I feel bad since he does love it. (And I used to, also!) Thanks in advance!
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*kaf12's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:07 PM
    Hi new friends! I'm about to hit my 11-month anniversary of breastfeeding my little boy. For about two months, I've had very sharp and painful sensations after nursing. It starts about 30 minutes after I'm done and lasts for 60-90 minutes before easing up. First I just noticed in the morning. Then it was after every time I nursed. Now I've started to notice it after pumping, also. And it HURTS. Like, so much that I've wondered if it's worse than contractions. I'm trying to keep going, in hopes that it's just a phase, but I don't know how much more I can take. I've tried switching positions, adjusting his latch, warm compresses, hot showers, Advil... you name it. Some of this has helped but not long-term. The doctor said my son has no signs of thrush. And he's 11 months old, so if it's a latch issue, it won't be easy to fix at this stage. Additional background: I'm down to two sessions a day (usually) plus bottle feeding from a frozen stash. Had some overproduction issues which have mostly evened out, but I still get clogs about once a week. And yes, he's been teething for about 5 months already. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Any recommendations? I'm about to call it quits, but I feel bad since he does love it. (And I used to, also!) Thanks in advance!
    0 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:12 PM
    First I suggest try to relax. As long as baby is gaining normally from nursing at the breast, and mom is not in pain from poor latch or plugs or engorgement, there is most likely absolutely nothing wrong with baby or breastfeeding. Things might be tweaked to make life easier, but it is unlikely to be anything serious. For the 5 week old, I wonder if you have noticed having a particularly fast flow? The other thing I wonder is if this issue is happening at some particular time of day? 5 weeks is the typical high point for milk production. Additionally, 5 weeks is right in the typical window for the onset of colic. By definition, colic means that for part of the day, baby is upset and not consolable or not easily consolable. This often means that baby is not as readily able to be consoled via nursing during colicky times. If the pacifier is helping, I think that is fine. Just be very careful that the pacifier does not interfere with nursing frequency at all. Otherwise, here is what I suggest pretty much for any age. If you have had baby on a nap, nighttime or nursing schedule, stop. Offer to nurse whenever you like and at any cues. If baby will not nurse, resist the urge to bottle or cup feed as a substitute. A missed feeding here and there never hurt a healthy, otherwise normally gaining baby. Try and keep trying the ideas here for gently encouraging baby to nurse: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ Again, relax. These types of...
    4 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    Ok but that was all weeks ago when baby was a newborn- correct? Baby is now over 3 months old! baby is no longer jaundiced or overtly sleepy, right? Gain is normal now? And how is LC diagnosing poor suction and poor coordination if she is not even doing a weighted feed? If you want to nurse your baby again, at some point you will need to start nursing baby more often and bottle feeding less. If you nurse more and baby is getting the milk then you can pump less. Even if your milk production is not up there, you might be able to nurse more and consequently pump less. Wouldn't that help with the time issue? Milk production tends to be helped by frequent and "complete" milk extraction. This last is why people say "baby must drain the breast" or "pump until you are empty." In the normal course of things, with normal or high production, this is not really necessary at all as long as baby is getting enough milk and nursing with normal frequency. But when a mom has low milk production and wants to increase it, then truly "emptying" the breasts as frequently as possible is needed. And a very effective way to do this is to nurse and then pump. I am not saying every time you nurse you must pump. How often depends on what works for you. WHY would your baby have poor coordination at 13 weeks? Could it be, at least in part, because baby has been bottle fed a lot and consequently has not learned to nurse effectively? Could it be baby is being almost exclusively bottle fed, is...
    11 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:28 PM
    OK here is more info: Block feeding do's and don'ts: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog?tag=Block+Feeding Helping baby handle fast flow: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog?tag=Fast+Milk+Flow and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/19_gaininggulpinggrimacing.pdf For extreme OP that is not responding to normal block feeding: FDBF: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2075483/
    2 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:53 PM
    My 5 week old has been doing the same thing. She's been nursing great since the beginning with no issues at all until just a few days ago. She would nurse fine at one feeding and then the next feeding when I would try to nurse her and put her up to my nipple she would latch on for a few seconds and then get extremely fussy, fidgety and start screaming and pull away. I would hold her and try to soothe her and calm her back down. Once I got her calmed down I tried again and the same thing happened. When trying to soothe her I gave her a pacifier which she took and calmed down but then I would hear her swallow so I assumed to she was hungry and would try nursing again but she would only get fussy and cry at the breast. Is this normal behavior for a 5 week? Or am I doing something wrong? Help!
    4 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:13 PM
    Just wanted to pop by and update. Jess has had a reasonably sized bowel movement, with some harder and some looser stool, and seems much more comfortable since. Will give her a little more time before contacting her doctor. I feel that breastfeeding only really helped, but the poor little mite looked so forlorn whilst I ate my lunch today that I put out a (small) stewed P-fruit salad for her at dinner and she thoroughly enjoyed herself. Since the constipation began she had been showing little to no interest in solids, so her interest today after her dirty diaper was lovely to see. She must really have seen the look on my face when I caught a whiff of her bottom because she started laughing and clapping :D
    5 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:03 PM
    I'm so glad you're feeling better about this. Pre-formula breastfeeding was how all babies were fed, but with the rise of formula breastfeeding has become taboo and unfortunately society makes women feel like they have to hide. Don't knock yourself down, feeding even in the car is a huge achievement. You put tourself on the situation where someone might see, but hey, you darn well fed the baby anyway. That's massive. Believe it or not, people usually can't tell you're feeding and may think you're just having a cuddle. And those that do know are usually those who have been there themselves. Occasionally a little old man will nod to himself thinking "That baby is getting the best." He may even say it. Your targets sound brilliant. There's nothing more frightening than holding a new baby and thinking "Just six months/ a year/ two years to go". If you're finding things tough it can make things easier to look only into the immediate future rather than a distant one as you've seen. Who knows, maybe you will make it through this tough time (and you sure seem like you're a strong enough person to do so), come to enjoy it, and perhaps even look back one day and MISS it. Now wouldn't that be something :) One other piece of advice you may find useful with regards to public feeding. If you can get to a sling library and try a few different carriers you may find one you can comfortably feed in. This is something I've had success with recently, I use an Ergobaby. I can feed...
    7 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:13 PM
    Unfortunately I can't afford to buy a scale like that but there is a children centre nearby which has a digital baby scale for self-weighing. I wonder if it is the same sort of scale.
    11 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:32 PM
    Well, I already had LO's tongue tie lasered by a pediatric dentist, who also recommended we laser the lip tie. It's only been one day and I haven't noticed a big difference yet - although once yesterday he got milk out of my right breast without my having to compress it. I feel somewhat guilty for having the procedures done because he seems to still be in a bit of pain and it wasn't an instant improvement in latch. (Nipples still come out lipstick shaped with a crease.) I'm getting treated for my PPD but it's making the situation incredibly difficult. I am completely obsessing over the idea that I've mutilated my child, and that I've unnecessarily messed with his upper lip and tongue. Perhaps the only good thing to come out of this so far is that my maternal instinct definitely kicked into high gear - I felt distant and detached from LO before and now I don't want to put him down for even a second, and I can't stop kissing him and talking to him. But I'm literally having nightmares that I've damaged his smile/mouth/tongue in some permanent way. I'm hoping that things improve in the next week or two and I won't feel such immense guilt for getting the ties removed. I mean, part of me is worried it's all BS and that the IBCLC and dentist are wrong. The upper lip tie is especially bothering me because my daughter has one and I've never had issues with her latch or later her teeth (no gap, no decay). I'm worried I made the wrong decision out of desperation :(
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:22 PM
    Hi. First I would suggest, try to help baby deal with fast slow using laid back or "uphill' positioning and by taking baby off when baby objects to extreme flow, letting milk flow into a cloth, then trying again. The longer milk sits in the breasts, the more milk builds up and the faster the flow will be. This makes block feeding tricky but you can help by encouraging baby to nurse frequency on the non-blocked side. Eating every 3-4 hours is pretty infrequent. Encouraging very frequent nursing is usually very helpful when there is OP and FFLD. With more frequent sessions, baby should be able to nurse comfortably until you need to switch her to the other side in order to change what breast is being "blocked." for that first feeding on the side that is very full, try hand expression or even a little pumping before putting baby on. When a mom has OP, baby is NOT going to "drain" her breast and is often not going to take more than one side at a time. This is entirely normal. You do not really want baby to drain the breast, as draining will act to increase milk production. As long as baby gets enough milk at the breast overall, nursing with normal to high frequency of a minimum of 10-12 times a day, then baby is getting what they need. The sooner you can eliminate bottles the better, as of course if baby is bottle fed that is more time before baby nurses again. And of course once baby is nursing often enough, you want to eliminate all pumping except what is absolutely...
    2 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:29 AM
    OK tracking gain sounds like a good idea. Be very careful that the same scale is used as previous check(s) and that baby is naked or in a dry diaper. Watch to be sure scale is properly set up, and that math is checked and rechecked, especially if any conversions are done. If you have any doubt, request baby be weighed twice, maybe at the start and again at the end of the appt. in fact, I would suggest this as a matter of course. Make sure gain is measured from lowest known weight, (or previous check weight) and not birth weight. If baby had a big poop or large wet diaper right before weight check note that. I think that whenever there are breastfeeding issues severe enough that baby require supplements, it is vital both mom and baby see an IBCLC for a complete private consult. (With follow-up as needed) IBCLCs are the only professionals who are trained specifically to help mothers and babies with breastfeeding issues. Because they have to look at so many things- history, baby, mom, and a nursing session, and even examine the pump if mom is pumping and how baby is being supplemented if baby is being supplemented, these sessions take time. At LEAST 90 minutes in a case like this, typically. here is more info- http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html Watson Genna's might also be a good website to look at further. It sounds like baby may have sucking or swallowing issues and she literally wrote the book in that area. I would add you do not know if you need to make double...
    3 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*niklas.sarah's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:16 AM
    The baby is 17 days old. Weight gain did not start until supplement started. She gets 1 ounce in the bottle which she does not always finish. I have seen lactation, but not 1 on 1. On the breast milk is there, we are using a shield because of her size, but she only sucks intermittently. Sometimes she will suck but not swallow and the milk simply drips out of her mouth. No I do not feel that I am making enough for the long term. My understanding is I should be making double in order to meet baby's needs as she gets older. I do use breast compression when we nurse and I do switch sides, but one side is slow with flow and let down so many times she will sleep as soon as she gets to that side. Tried using a syringe to Jumpstart nursing but most of the time she will drink that and then stop. We go back to the pedi tomorrow, so we will see how much progress we made on gaining.
    3 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:11 AM
    Baraboo, we have had moms on here who report great success after tt and lip tie release. We have had moms who report little or no difference, at least temporarily, and once or twice over the last 4-5 years or so I have seen parents report a negative outcome- meaning, feeding issues got worse, at least temporarily. I will say that from everything I have read and heard from moms, when TT treatment is indicated because TT has been visualized by someone who knows what to look for and there is nursing pain or poor gain it certainly makes sense to seriously consider frenotomy. I have seen babies treated for tt who were gaining fine and mom was not in any pain, but baby was "gassy" or colicky or having green poops and in my observation, those are the cases where moms felt the frenotomy did little. I think the evidence suggests your baby is having a difficult time latching because it hurts and injures you to nurse. But "falling off" the breast and clucking are not conclusively tongue tie related. Fast letdown that usually accompanies overproduction can also cause these. Of course plugs might indicate baby is incapable of normal transfer OR they might mean mom just makes more milk than baby needs. (OP.) This continues to be an area that is not properly studied but that does not mean there is not plenty of evidence and information you can use. This is a good, recent article that sheds light on what is known and what is not known about tongue tie and how to help a mom and...
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 AM
    Of course you do not want to exclusively pump. Hopefully this is a temporary solution to a temporary problem! I have a few suggestions. First I am sorry but I am not seeing an age. How old is baby and when were the weighted feeds done? Depending on the age of baby .5 ounce might be close to norm for transfer. For example, in the first week of life. What I have seen as an estimated quantity that indicates normal transfer is 2 ounces AFTER 2 weeks of age. So did gain begin to occur with only nursing at the breast? Or only after supplements were started? When you did the weighted feeds, was that with a board certified LC? If you have not had a consult with an IBCLC I strongly suggest doing so. If you did but do not feel all that helped by her, maybe see someone else? If a baby cannot transfer milk normally, there is a reason. What reason was diagnosed in your baby? Is it just that she is little and getting worn out, or some other issue? If it is primarily tiredness, sometimes giving baby a small shot of milk in a syringe before nursing kind of wakes baby up and gets baby nursing more efficiently. Have you tried using breast compressions and/or switching sides to help baby get more at the breast? Are you continuing to use an SNS? A lactation aid can reduce the total time it takes to feed a baby when nursing/supplementing and pumping is needed. Here is an article about that: http://cwgenna.com/smartnothard.html So you think you ARE making enough when pumping or not...
    3 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:20 AM
    Awesome! Now, tell us what present you're going to buy for yourself when you reach your first milestone. I love Jessiesmum's idea of buying a nice pair of shoes or a handbag or some swanky jewelry! You will have earned it. :cheer
    7 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:16 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby and on making it through the first 8 weeks of nursing! The first thing to know about spit up and mucousy poop is that both are generally completely normal. The way you know of spit up and mucous indicate a problem is by looking at the baby. If the baby is generally happy, healthy, gaining weight at a normal pace, developing normally, and has no additional symptoms, spit up and mucous can be ignored. If, on the other hand, the baby is generally miserable, does not seem well, is not gaining and developing normally, and has more symptoms (like bloody poop, evidence of pain, eczema), then mucous and spit-up could be indicators that there is some sort of issue that needs to be addressed. Since you describe your baby as generally happy and nursing well, my guess is that she's just a baby with some weird poop. And weird poop is kind of par for the course with babies! I see absolutely no reason why you should switch to a hypoallergenic formula. Hypoallergenic formulas are for babies who are clearly sick. Not just fussy or spit-uppy or producing funny-looking poops. We're talking babies who are failing to thrive, babies with erosive eczema, babies who are not growing normally despite eating sufficient quantities of breastmilk or conventional formula. If you're wondering how that could be the case when hypoallergenic formulas are marketed right alongside conventional ones, just look at the price differential. ...
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*iveehill's Avatar
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*milkncookies90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:46 AM
    Omg THANK YOU! You have no idea how much you have all helped. I was having a really bad day and couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel but your kind, non-judgemental advice was exactly what I needed to hear and I already feel a lot more positive. One day at a time is how I am taking things at the moment, current goal is 6 weeks, then when I get there I will move the goal up :) I also fed her in public this morning (granted I was in the car but it's a step in the right direction) and it wasn't nearly as terrifying as I thought. And I have looked up my local BF group so will be going to that next week. Things are definitely looking up so thank you again :)
    7 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*ellie.smom43's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:48 AM
    I need some help. My 8 week old daughter has been having mucus in her poop for the last 3-4 weeks. It started around the time that I was taking an antibiotic for a UTI I had started taking a probiotic at that time as well due to the antibiotic. I wanted to give it time for the antibiotic to leave my system to rule out that being the culprit and then I stopped taking the probiotic as well to see if that would make a difference in her poop. I thought the poop was getting better after I stopped the probiotics, but I just changed her diaper and it was a large amount of mucousy poop again! The only sign of something being wrong is the mucus in her poop and she spits up a lot after eating. She's not fussy, she's actually a very good baby and only rarely gets agitated and cries. She nurses really well, and she doesn't seem to have any stomach discomfort when passing gas or pooping. I guess my next step is to cut dairy out of my diet and see if that will make a difference.how long after cutting dairy out of my diet will I see some improvement in her poop? Any feedback is greatly appreciated. I planned to EBF until I go back to work at 5 months, but now I'm feeling so discouraged. I'm feeling like I'm doing more harm than good at this point and I'm being pressured by people to put her on a hypoallergenic formula.
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
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