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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I'm sorry you fell down the pumping rabbit hole- so many moms get told "Pump whenever you nurse" and it's terrible advice! The way to make feeding easier for your baby is to be patient and keep nursing on demand and avoiding the pump. That will help your supply throttle back so that it's just what your baby needs, without a lot of extra to cause fast letdowns and gas and leaking. When you're nursing, experiment with reclined positions; they use gravity to slow milk flow to the baby. The leaking should subside with time. One way to stop leaking is to put pressure on the nipple when you feel leaking start- sometimes that will stop the flow. But the best way to get leaking to taper down is to nurse on demand and be patient!
    1 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:19 PM
    That is so awesome! Fingers crossed that things continue to go well! :fingers
    5 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*soap.mom's Avatar
    Today, 02:03 PM
    Hi there everyone! This will be my first post...I am so glad to have found this forum :) I am a first time mom and my guy is now 5 weeks old. When we got home from the hospital, I just assumed I was supposed to pump as well as breastfeed him. Rather quickly I began dealing with engorgement and tapered off the pumping. I don't pump very much at all now - maybe 2-3 oz every couple days just in case (for freezer). Problem is, just about every time I go to feed him, he pops off and milk goes shooting (I feel terrible when it gets him in the face). I try using a cloth to catch it and apply a little pressure and eventually it will slow down, but it doesn't always stop flowing. Sometimes he'll cough or seem like he's choking. He also gulps a lot and seems to always have gas issues. By the end of feeding, I usually have milk all over the place :( I also leak a lot. Anytime I feel the letdown, I leak from both sides. So, I have at least two questions. How can I help making the feeding process easier on him? Will I ever stop leaking and/or are there ways to help curb the leaking?
    1 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 01:52 PM
    Bilirubin is down from where it was!! It was up to 17 then came down to 16.something and now it is 12!! She nurses good I think!! She nurses at least every 2-3 hours! Her weight has been on the same scale at pediatricians office! Nude, and no conversions needed! She generally has a dirty diaper with every feed! Not always a lot but at least a squirt!!
    20 replies | 384 view(s)
  • @llli*elandlanes.mommy's Avatar
    Today, 01:43 PM
    Also, he's 10 days old today.
    21 replies | 503 view(s)
  • @llli*elandlanes.mommy's Avatar
    Today, 01:42 PM
    The scale came in.. It read him at 6lbs 14.5 oz. So, I guess I start with that weight and go from there. Maybe weigh him at this time every day???
    21 replies | 503 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:27 PM
    It is safe to take most anti-depressents when nursing, just as it is generaly safe to take any needed medication when nursing. Every medication has potential side effects. Whenever we decide to take a medication (or doctor prescribes it) the potential for harm from the medication is weighed against the good it will do. Unfortunately, for too long, instead of doing this when a mom was nursing, people have just said "Wean or don't take the medicine" Without looking at the potential harm of 1) mom not taking a medication she needs or 2) the proven harmful effects of baby not nursing. This has left moms with the terrible choice of either not nursing or not taking a medication that will help them. This is wrong, and it is REALLY bad medical practice to do this to mothers. Luckily there is now lots of information out there about most commonly prescribed meds and moms can make an informed choice. I have had three kids, all C-sections. During breastfeeding I have had to take prescription narcotic painkillers, prescription strength non-narcotic pain killers, anti- anxiety medication, prevacid (Chronic GERD), and anti-biotics on several occasions, and I am sure a few things I have forgotten. I always nursed and never even considered not doing so due to taking these meds. There is not a doubt in my mind that taking these meds-including the anti-anxiety med- while continuing to nurse, was 100% the right choice,.
    2 replies | 18 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:11 PM
    Ok, I understand why you are frustrated But the check shows baby IS gaining, and that is good. What about those bilirubin levels- are those up or down? Is any treatment being suggested? IS baby showing symptoms of jaundice like overt sleepiness or unwillingness/inability to nurse effectively? Weight checks- Same scale? Baby naked or in dry diaper? Measurements done with care? Any unit conversions done that may have been done incorrectly? Baby make a giant poop prior to 2nd check etc. can cause measurements to be 'off.' The closer together weight checks are, the more likely they will be somewhat inaccurate due to these kinds of factors. That is not to say don't weight baby weekly if that is what you and doctor want, just be aware that close together weight checks have this problem. How many times a day is baby pooping and what does it look like? As far as I am aware, spit up is not a foreteller of adequate intake one way or another. If your baby requires supplements, (Feedings not at the breast) then the first choice (if possible) would be your own expressed milk. But this would be AS WELL as normal nursing frequency, not INSTEAD OF. Same with formula supplements should it be they are needed.
    20 replies | 384 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 01:09 PM
    Hi mama, I'm glad to hear that you are getting help for this. I haven't personally taken anti-depressants while breastfeeding but there are definitely others who have posted on here who have, hopefully some of them will jump in with their experiences. In the meantime, I just wanted to link to a page that has a lot of good resources for asking about medication safety with breastfeeding, including phone numbers for places in the U.S., Canada and UK: http://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/illness-surgery/med-risks/ Hope you start feeling better soon. :hug
    2 replies | 18 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 01:04 PM
    I think another factor for many moms is that many babies can start tolerating cow's milk at a year. Of course, some babies are sensitive or outright allergic to cow's milk, and some families choose not to drink cow's milk, but it does increase the options for many moms and babies in terms of what to give baby during the day. Also, some babies increase their solids intake at around that time, though of course that is also variable, and certainly was very different between my three kids. Personally I view "around a year" (and that might mean at a year, or a year and a half, or even later, for different moms/babies) as a reasonable compromise - pumping at work for me, personally, was really rather difficult logistically, and again, for me personally, pump weaning has not compromised my ongoing ability to nurse. Overall I do think it's important to consider that this will differ from mother to mother and baby to baby, and I do think it's important to consider the various factors like feelings about cow's milk/ability of baby to drink cow's milk, baby's solids intake, mother's ability to maintain supply with fewer times of removing milk, etc. In short, it is not a black and white matter and will differ in each case, but I do think there is often more flexibility after a year and for many working moms it is a relief to know that. I mean, this is real life, it's not science or evidence but people making different choices and sharing their experiences, and I don't see anywhere on...
    7 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*babymm's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 PM
    I have a history of depression and anxiety. Most of the women on my mother's side have it. I had been taking medication for about 4 years and stopped when I got pregnant. I surprisingly felt pretty good throughout my pregnancy and postpartum until a few weeks ago. I can feel the depression coming back and I decided to try therapy instead of medication because I don't want to stop breastfeeding. I think not breastfeeding my baby would be more damaging to my mental health. I have an appointment with the therapist in about 2 weeks. I know there are some antidepressant medications that are considered safe while breastfeeding including the one I used to take. My question is, does anyone have any experience with taking these medications while breastfeeding? I am wondering in case things get too bad and therapy isn't enough. I'd like to know what the other options are and possible side effects for my baby. I don't want to do anything to harm her and I'd like to know more about it from a mother's perspective to decide if that is even an option I would be willing to consider. Also, my depression symptoms are not horrible right now. I have no feelings of harming myself or others. It is mostly just feeling down and being unable to go to sleep and having trouble enjoying anything. I exercise every day and eat very healthy and unfortunately that has not been enough to help with the depression.
    2 replies | 18 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:34 PM
    Mine is toying with getting rid of her nap. She does get tired and cranky in the evening when she doesn't nap, I guess one solution to that would be to put her to bed earlier, but that's hard in our household because now all the kids go to bed at the same time, so it would be hard to get her to go to bed before the others. In your case though, maybe it's just not worth the struggle? ie, maybe give her 20 minutes to get to sleep, and if she doesn't, you do an earlier bedtime that night? We also go through days where it literally takes an hour to get to sleep at naptime, and I almost feel like it's not worth spending an hour to get her to go to sleep in order to get that golden hour of napping time. In your case, there may be some negotiation with your husband as to when exactly his child-watching duties start, but eventually you will likely get to that point anyway.
    8 replies | 261 view(s)
  • @llli*chivislh's Avatar
    Today, 12:34 PM
    Creo que mi bebe olvidó como mamar, o no se que pasa, nunca me habían salido grietas. No se si es porque lo estoy tratando de destetar, solo le doy cuando llego del trabajo y en la noche antes de dormir, a lo mejor, el vio la baja de producción o no se que, no quiere soltarme por la noche, y además me lastima. Pensaba darle hasta que el dejara solito, pero con estas grietas pienso que a lo mejor será parar, solo que no se como, tampoco quiero que sufra mi bebe.
    0 replies | 5 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 10:59 AM
    Update: at day 17 she was 7lbs 2oz, today at 24 days she is 7lbs 6.6oz! Bilirubin was 12!! I'm thinking my supply did go down a lil due to sickness, but as much as she nurses and sometimes spits up, I would have thought it would have been a better gain!! I thought about pumping and bottle feeding her the breast milk but not really wanting to have to pump!! So much easier to nurse!! I'm lost!!! I have to go for another weight check next week!! I pray it will be better!!
    20 replies | 384 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:24 AM
    I am sorry to be the naysayer here, but I am aware of no evidence that it is always 'safe' for a mom to entirely stop pumping during regular long separations (such as for workdays) at a year or any other particular age. I think this depends tremendously on the individual mother, child, and situation. Reducing the amount of times milk is removed from the breasts acts to reduce milk production, and (in some cases) might also lead to uncomfortable overfullness or worse, no matter what age the child is. Whether milk production reducing is a problem or not will be very individual and depends on how often the child nurses otherwise, how much the child is relying on breastmilk for their overall nutrition, and what the moms typical milk production and breast storage capacity is, and what mom's goal is as far as breastfeeding longevity. As far as I can tell, the idea that moms can pump wean at 12 months is based on 1) the desire of moms to stop pumping at some point, which I very much understand and 2) the idea that children no longer "need' breastmilk or to breastfeed after one year, so if breastfeeding is in any way compromised by the lower frequency of milk removal, it is not a big deal. This is different than the idea that pump weaning will have no effect on anything at this age. If there is science or evidence (aside from anecdotal) to suggest that I am incorrect and milk production, breast health, and consequently breastfeeding longevity is never affected by pump weaning at...
    7 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:19 AM
    as far as I know, there is no evidence that a baby must have some particular amount of the breast in their mouth to nurse effectively. "Fixing" latch is something that is tried when there are symptoms of latch issues- pain and/or injury for mom when nursing, poor weight gain, and/or the breasts feeling full or engorged even right after baby has nursed or despite baby nursing with normal frequency. (10-12 times a day or more in the newborn period.) For more peace of mind when going back to work, I would suggest, 1) Make sure you have an excellent pump and (as much as possible) time and space to pump as needed at work and 2) learn how to help your baby's caregivers feed baby in a breastfeeding supportive way, without over feeding or rushing feedings. This is very, very important for preventing breastfeeding issues or breast refusal. Also, since baby will be getting bottles all day, encouraging baby to nurse with normal frequency at night and weekends/days off is going to be helpful for keeping baby nursing. One thing you might want to consider (if you are not already) is if bedsharing would be safe and appropriate for your situation. More: http://www.llli.org/sweetsleepbook/tearsheets The best way to prevent problems when going back to work is to have breastfeeding be in great shape before you return to work, and it sounds like you are pretty much there. I would suggest stopping unneeded formula supplements as even small amounts in bottles when mom is there to nurse...
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:52 AM
    1stmombabeg, I hope the tips above are helpful to you. If not, it may be helpful if you start your own thread. Situations with breastfeeding issues are never exactly the same, and the more we know about a particular situation, the more specific we can be with suggestions, usually. Overall, milk production is helped by frequent and effective milk removal, and harmed by infrequent or ineffective milk removal. Milk removal can be by baby, hand expression, or pump. Usually baby is the best remover of milk and nursing frequently will increase production the best. Is this is impossible, pumping with a pump that is in good condition and working properly and fits mom correctly is usually going to be most convenient, but some moms do not respond well to pumps or need to do something else like hand expression or breast compressions while pumping. only when milk removal happening as often as it should might galactagogues be helpful, for some but not all moms. But it is also important to address why the issues began in the first place and how severe they are. Additionally, many mothers have perfectly fine milk production but think it is low due to not being able to pump unusually large amounts, because baby is being overfed while mom is at work, or because of normal changes in baby's rate of growth and behavior and normal changes in how the lactating breasts feel. This is a good tip. Some moms find lanolin too sticky and thus irritating when pumping. Lubing the flange...
    5 replies | 265 view(s)
  • @llli*andreica's Avatar
    Today, 06:36 AM
    Together with fenugreek, blessed thistle is also good for you supply. And definitely, a hospital grade rental is the way to go when trying to boost suppply. I also put some lanolin, tried putting on the flanges but now I just rub some on my nipples just before pumping. Hurts less that way (I have very sensitive nipples). And, before pumping (or even while pumping if you can pull it off) something warm on your breasts will help the milk flow and release. Lansinoh makes gel pads which you warm up and use before/while pumping. I found a tip online once, doing that ever since. Some rice in a couple of socks or something like that, tie them up of course, and before pumping I toss them in the microwave for a bit and hold over my bra for a few minutes. I've found it really helps, milk comes out easier, it starts fliwing almost immediately, let down comes quickly, while it takes more if I don't warm them up. A hot shower will help too but it's not always possible.
    5 replies | 265 view(s)
  • @llli*mummykate's Avatar
    Today, 02:33 AM
    Thank you so much for reading my post and replying so thoroughly :) it's given me lots of good advice and also the help sheet was very useful so I will try the suggestions on there. I've been trying to call the LLL helpline and also another UK breastfeeding support and nobody ever answers. However I have an appointment with my midwife this morning so I will ask her to give me the details of someone local to me. X
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:53 PM
    Hi. This sounds like plugs, and since I cannot speak to whether it is something else possibly as that would be outside my knowledge, my reply is going to assume that is what is going on. The suggestions from your GP sound...not quite right. I am not sure how often a GP has to deal with plugged ducts, but these are something lactation consultants come across frequently, and I would take the advice of lactation consultants for plugs over these suggestions. IBCLC's wrote The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, and I am attaching their tip sheet for plugs. But it's difficult, because of course in most cases of plugs, mom is not weaning- she wants to keep nursing. And the major way for taking care of plugs (namely effective and regular milk removal) might lead to more milk being made...but since you are pregnant and baby is not nursing much at all, this would probably just be minor and temporary. Binding the breast tightly was once thought to be appropriate when a mom was trying to "dry up" her milk. I have never heard of it for plugs, but it is certainly no longer suggested by those with knowledge of lactation for drying up milk or for any other reason that I am aware of. Heat and direct massage is no longer the only game in town for plugs. In fact heat is a cause of inflammation, so may even be counter productive. Same with massage that is directed right on the plugs. What may be more effective is the "bag of marbles" massage where the whole breast is lifted and...
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*stepbelt's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:50 PM
    Thanks again, @llli*mommal. Introducing a variety of foods back into my diet is one suggestion I'd gladly take! Just an update, in case anybody with a similar problem ever comes across this thread in search for answers. Barely one day after I wrote that first post, things started to turn a corner with my son. It has only been a few days of progress, so I don't want to celebrate prematurely, but I am really seeing a change. He is now nursing about 5 times in the daytime hours, staying on the breast for a good 15 minutes each time (given the issues we have had lately, these are extremely long feeds). Honestly, I don't really know what triggered this change. The other morning he was really fussy, so I offered to nurse him expecting to be rejected or at least battled yet again, and he latched on and fed like it was the only thing in the world he wanted. The routine seems different now than it was when he was younger, in that he seems to want to nurse to sleep rather than nurse first thing when he wakes up. He takes lots of naps every day, still, (after every ~1.5-2 hrs of being awake) so this equals plenty of feeds. All in all, I can't say I did anything to fix it because I'm not doing anything differently--I always offered feeds when he was fussy before naps, and he used to reject me. So, he seems to have made progress with this issue on his own (fingers crossed it continues this way!). If anyone else is experiencing this issue, I think this at least goes to show that...
    5 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:11 PM
    Don't worry about those videos- they can be helpful but moms always say "My breasts don't look like those perfect breasts in the video" or "My baby doesn't latch nicely like that!" Well, not always but certainly often. IMO those videos should come with a disclaimer, something like "Not all babies latch like this and not all breasts look like this". How leaned back are you, in your current nursing position? A deeper recline might help... Or not! The best thing about your situation is that if you have no pain, there's every reason to believe that things will improve even if you do nothing. A bigger baby with a bigger mouth will be able to achieve a deeper latch with less effort and less assistance from you.
    1 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! When weight gain is normal and there's no pain when you nurse, that's a good latch and there's absolutely no reason to worry about it. A bad latch feels bad, and the baby may not gain well. So don't worry about the turned-in lips, the smacking, or the air gulping. My guess is that those things will improve with time, as baby gets bigger and stronger. No worries, you're doing great! Do you want to keep supplementing with formula? We may be able to help you ditch it, if you want!
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:42 PM
    Ok, so normal weight gain in the early months is an average of about an ounce a day. And many babies do lose weight for a few days after being born, so that is why I was surprised at the rapid weight gain. Of course, some babies do gain faster than others, and some, very fast , but rapid gain when baby is bottle fed might indicate over-feeding. Paced bottle feeding is a very specific feeding technique that is thought to reduce nipple confusion and overfeeding and breast refusal when a baby has to be given bottles. I will link some videos and a description that I think are helpful below. It can be done with any bottle nipple. As far as I know, the claims by bottle manufacturers that their products are 'more like the breast' or help babies learn to nurse better are marketing more than anything else. The overall point of paced feeding is to slow feedings down and to allow baby to have more control over intake. Burping baby during bottle feedings is a technique to get a baby to take more than baby would otherwise take during the bottle feeding. Paced feeding basically has the opposite purpose. Unless baby has a trapped air bubble that is bothering baby, which baby will let you know about, there is little need to burp a baby. Holding baby upright during and after feedings usually helps baby bring up air easily. A newborn breastfed baby will typically nurse 10-12 times in 24 hours at a minimum, and irregularly- part of the day, clustering several feedings around the...
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*pteroglossus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:48 PM
    Yeah, I ask myself the same question. Believe me, I have tried! It doesn't work. I think at night I fall asleep before her or with her most of the time. At nap time, when I try this, she will play in the bed for ages, but not go to sleep. I don't fall asleep during her nap, so I am on edge waiting to go downstairs so I can start working (I look after her in the morning and until she falls asleep, then I work all afternoon and evening while my husband looks after her). Even when I am really tired and do want to take a nap, she won't go to sleep and will fool around and keep me awake (at night she lies calmly). If I leave her in the room by herslef and say "stay here til I come get you", she'll stay for maybe 40 min, but won't fall asleep. Then she'll be shouting for her dad or me, or coming downstairs, or whatever. and ends up not sleeping. Basically, if I don't nurse her to sleep, she doesn't take a nap, and then it screws up our day because she is overtired in the evening.
    8 replies | 261 view(s)
  • @llli*nosila's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:41 PM
    At birth he was able to only latch on the tip of the nipple. It led to a blister on both nipples. By day two he had lost too much weight and his blood sugar was extremely low. I started to pump and provide colostrum through the use of a syringe. By day three my milk had come in and we started to feed through the use of a slow nipple with the bottle held at a 180 degree angle to his mouth. As for trying to attach, I have tried multiple different positions and even tried to use a nipple shield (my nipple would not fit inside the Medium Medela). As for weight gain, they measured him as having 2lbs between his birth and 18 days (his two week appointment). As for other options than bottles, I haven't heard of anything. I use slow nipples in Playtex Ventaire bottles and I use Breastflow bottles. Both are supposed to help train the baby to latch better. As for pausing during feedings, I burp throughout each feeding. Baby doesn't always finish the 3 ounces but I have found that if I offer less he will act hungry and I will be providing him two to three bottles for one feeding time period.
    3 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*findmeintahiti's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:55 PM
    my baby is six weeks old now and we're still having issues with latch. we saw lactation consultant in the first week because my nipples were extremely sore and scanned. since then we have gotten more comfortable but lately I'm still finding a real struggle with getting him to open wide/deep latch (nipples are sore) and even when I think he has a good latch when he comes off my nipple is lipsticks shape- both sides. I have large breasts and use cross hold. I also lean back but I have stopped holding the under part of breast and I'm not sure if that's part of the problem. it's really hard at night especially, he's so feisty and I hate feeling like we're struggling and he's frustrated. I do have the book womanly art of breast feeding, looked at KellyMom and watch a million videos but they all look like baby just latches on their own and they're feeding like champs which makes it hard for me... especially the side lying position- we did that but he's not deeply latched- is that even possible? (he also pulls at nipple but I think that's a milk issue?) thanks so much for anyone who relates or has thoughts!!
    1 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*measure.thesun's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:55 PM
    Hi. My baby is one month old and I'm breastfeeding him. He was 6 lbs 11 oz at birth, 6 lbs 4 oz at one week, 7 lbs and 4 oz at two weeks, and is now 9 lbs 7 oz at one month. I do occasionally supplement with formula, only at night when I'm mentally and physically drained, about 1-3 oz every other day. There is no doubt his weight gain is from the breast milk as he eats so little formula and his poopy diapers are seedy and yellow every time. The doctor says his weight gain is exactly what they'd expect and they couldn't ask for anything better. The problem is my baby's latch. I know deep down that it's not right. His lips are curled inwards, sometimes I hear smacking and gulps of air. There are times he unlatches and I see that he only had the nipple and I cringe. I have almost no pain anymore and no cracking. But my mind can't let the latch go. I go back to work in less that two weeks and will be pumping so he will begin to be bottle fed much more frequently. He won't take a pacifier, so that is not interfering. My question is, do I seek help to fix the latch or just let it go since he is gaining so well and I'm not in any pain? May seem like a stupid question, but I really need the reassurance. Thanks in advance.
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
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