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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:08 AM
    Okay, that does sound like mastitis! The reason I asked is that sometimes health care professionals step in with antibiotics for something that turns out not to be masttis- for example, a mom with thrush-related pain might be given antibiotics because the doc thinks "pain in the breast = mastitis". And the last thing you want, when you suspect thrush, is to have unnecessary antibiotics further unbalance your microbial community. Excellent! I think hands-on help is a really good idea. Here's what I would do: - Nurse as much as possible but don't be too afraid to pump when you really can't stand to nurse.
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*sunsetbean's Avatar
    Today, 04:34 AM
    Thank you. We just had an early morning feed and I noticed the glass "cut" feeling again AND for the first time ever I saw a slight flaky film on the areola after she came off the breast. This must be thrush!!!! And I've had a dull aching in both breasts since being on the antibiotics, which would also point to yeast I think. The mastitis came on very quick with severe flu like symptoms and incredible pain in my right breast that eventually made a big red area. It's all responded well to the antibiotics. I am meeting with a really good IBCLC this Monday morning. What should I do until then for the pain? It did hurt less to pump than it has to have her on the breast. I don't want to diagnose for sure until I meet with her, but if there are simple things I can do today to mitigate pain or start treating the yeast, I'd like to. In retrospect, I now believe the symptoms started to get worse after I finished my probiotics post birth, around 4 weeks. I bet we have had a mild yeast infection that has gone undiagnosed for weeks because we've had all these other TT issues going on as well, and I've been calling what I've been feeling fissures. This is making more sense now!!! As far as vasospasms, my nipples were always extremely sensitive during pregnancy, and with my first DD (who also had TT and was a winter baby) I remember having sensitivity to the weather and when I would open my deep freeze!! This summer weather has helped I think.
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*7preemiemum's Avatar
    Today, 04:25 AM
    Bumping up my post here Guys, just bear with me again and my world disaster probs;)aaaach i wish i could actually joke about it Anyways, so we r still pumping, i just have a few quests again, wanted to know what u all think As I prev wrote the combo of eping by day and nursing eve, night n early morning worked well until 8 months When i found dd suddenly "upped" her breast refusal by a few notches Happens to be this coincided with me cutting thru her medela teet which as its a tiny hole was driving me crazy by the lengthy feeds So cut it to make the hole bigger n suddenly the milk flooooooowed Im not joking that her breast refusal seriously became more sever from that point on Do u think its related? Also, there was absolutely no paced feeding going on. She takes between 3-5. oz a feed depending on her hunger state of the day, that very much varies by her, also her intake of solids does
    28 replies | 683 view(s)
  • @llli*katy77's Avatar
    3 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*katy77's Avatar
    Today, 03:38 AM
    I created an id to reply to this. I am 38 weeks pregnant and have been BF my son (now 18 months) throughout pregnancy. Much of what happened with me didn't fit the standard timing but perhaps my experiences will help/ be interesting to you. From about 2 months pregnant I started to find BF painful. I don't know if you have ever had a milk blister but it felt like that. This was relieved when I used lanolin or coconut oil on my nipples before nursing. For a month I would not BF without one of these creams. My milk dried up for the most part around 4 months but my son continued to comfort nurse (he still got some milk) and to my surprise at about 5 months my milk came back again. I did notice my milk turned to colostrum at about 8 months. None of these changes affected my sons desire to nurse at all. Another big thing was pain not when actual nursing but when the milk is coming in. If my chest is cold it can be absolute agony. I advise to have shawls and sweaters that fit well during pregnancy. Even on sunny days do not leave the house without something warm you can put on your chest. I used a hot water bottle in bed sometimes as well. Keeping my chest warm stopped the pain.
    3 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:55 PM
    :ita Terrific advice from MaddieB. Can you tell us more about the medical issue which is keeping you from nursing? Maybe we can help!
    2 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:52 PM
    For the tendinitis, icing when possible and anti inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen should help.
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:44 PM
    Based on your description, I'm thinking that your troubles are a mix of three issues which are very hard to distinguish from each other. First, I think there is an excellent chance that you have thrush. You had antibiotics for GBS+ at birth, you have the radiating ground glass pain, and you're on antibiotics right now. I know you're not seeing a lot of other symptoms- the yeast diaper rash, the oral thrush, the slit-like cracks, the pink/red nipples, the flaky skin- but that doesn't rule out thrush. I personally would want to eat both yourself and the baby and see if the pain improves. Second, I think there's every reason to think that you have an issue with the baby's latch. The asymmetrical nipples, the prior existence of w tongue tie, and the pain during feedings are suggestive of a poor latch, so keep on using the reclined positions and maybe go back to see a LC for more help on getting a deeper latch. Third, there's a good chance that the poor latch is giving you vasospasms, which are painful constrictions of blood flow related to compression of the nipple. Vasospasms will usually be visible as a post-feeding blanching of the skin of the tip of the nipple- perhaps that's the slight white color you're observing after some nursing sessions? The best thing about vasospasms is that they are the easiest of the 3 potential problems to treat: apply heat and the vasospasm should diminish. So keep a hot water bottle or heating pad handy and slap it on when the...
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 PM
    Your description sounds like yeast though it may not be overtly obvious on a visual level. I would suggest trying Jack Newman's all purpose nipple ointment: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-CP. I used this for months with my first baby after a tongue tie caused cracks, mastitis, yeast, and a poor latch the took a few months to correct. The ointment is safe to use while nursing and does not need to be washed off. If yeast proves to be the culprit I would suggest trying gentian violet (also discussed on the Jack Newman site). It's a bit messy and can stain clothing purple, but worth it. It can also be used to treat a vaginal yeast infection when other creams don't work and you can't take fluconazole, such as during pregnancy.
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:38 PM
    http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/#whattodo I would try treating it like biting. It is just a part of teaching breastfeeding manners. Breastfeeding is a two way relationship in which both parties deserve respect. She may not realize that what she is doing hurts/bothers you and you can teach her. This is all easier said than done. I know because my son has started doing that too. I am not taffy! I do think it has to do with impatience for let down. :( I feel so bad taking him off because I know be doesn't mean any harm. However, I want us both to enjoy nursing. Good luck! :)
    2 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    I second the My Breast Friend pillow. I loved mine, especially the fact the the pillow is flat on the top so baby is not rolling towards you while nursing. I even carted mine around with me until DS was over a year old! You can find them on Amazon for about $35.
    3 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:47 PM
    We have champion sleeper daughters! Yeah, in the first four weeks or so I woke her to feed but the LC and pediatrician said to let her sleep after that since she was well beyond her birth weight. But certainly for the last 8 weeks it's been the same (nurses to sleep, she wakes only once during 8ish hours, sometimes at 2am sometimes more towards 4-5am). My OB said my supply would regulate itself to make less at night as a result but still fine during the day, which seemed to be the case until this week which is after a while of these short feedings happening and why I worried they are linked. That all said, I'm wondering if the stress of returning to work/leaving her and poor sleep (due to said stress) is really the reason. I just pumped (my one pumping session to add to a stash) and pumped only 2 oz total whereas I normally get at least 5-6. So needless to say that kinda freaked me out. Oh man, it is painful! Luckily though we caught it relatively early and it seems to be getting better. I think that's a great idea to try different positions, will do!
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:32 PM
    Oh Ok, I had one of those too, but she was a smallish baby (under 7 lbs birth weight) so go figure! I chalked it up to my having over production, but as she is almost three and still the most reliably lengthy sleeper in the family - waking an hour or longer after her older brothers in the morning, I now think it is just some aspect of her personality. Ouch that sounds really painful! As baby gets older, different positions where baby takes more control might help?
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 PM
    Well all sounds really good! But does nursing still hurt? Some babies just will not open wide in the classic "gape" prior to coming on the breast, but this is not necessarily needed for comfortable latch. For the timing issue, Where does baby spend the most time when not nursing? One way to get the breast to baby quicker is to hold baby with easy access most of the time, including while baby sleeps, as early cues occur while baby sleeps. if football is working keep doing it be all means, but be sure you are comfortable as well. if you look at my july 2 reply here, I link to some good latch help ideas. http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?123676-Breastfeeding-After-Tongue-Tie
    3 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:42 PM
    Thanks for your help! It's baffling to me: we co-sleep, no pacifier (ever), and she is rarely swaddled (and if so arms-out) -- she's always been a big night sleeper, only waking once to nurse (and my supply never suffered until now). The LC I saw pinned it on her being a big baby. I always nurse her to sleep and never cut nursing short. But I can try encouraging more nursing at night. That's great to hear about the short feedings being okay. Mommy thumb is a kind of tendonitis: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Quervain_syndrome Mine is getting better with wearing a brace but it makes holding her very difficult when nursing on the other side. Thanks again!
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*minasmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:22 PM
    Sorry it took me so long to reply, there was an issue with my login. Baby is nursing about 10-12 times a day, basically on demand. It may be more but I have been so busy that I even forget to get my app running when I start to nurse. Her poop output seems to be great too, she has less frequent poops per day, 2 on average, but her poop amount in those two could equal 4 diapers lol. Her pee output is great in my opinion so I think she is getting enough at this point. Still waiting on the appointment next week to get her weighed. I am having issues with her opening her mouth wide when I go to put her on. She begins to suck on an imaginary teet before I can get the breast in there. I have tried to use my knuckle to place on her chin to help open it longer.......my timing on this isn't the best. Is there any resource for helping that issue? I have altered my hold to the football hold with plenty of support for her body with pillows and blankets and referencing videos and literature I am holding her correctly I just cant get the boob in her mouth fast enough right now.
    3 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:05 PM
    I would be less concerned about the short sessions and more about the long sleep stretch, as far as impact on milk production. It is fine to encourage a baby to nurse more overnight, and/or to eliminate or cut back on sleep lengthening measures (pacifier, swaddling, baby sleeping in a separate room) so baby might cue to nurse more often on her own. I am not saying 3 month old sleeping that long every 24 hour period is necessarily bad, but since it is pretty unusual in the breastfed baby it is always a little red flag to me. Especially with a return to work looming, night nursing might be something to consider encouraging. The return to work and the need to pump rather than nurse for several hours is the most dangerous time as far as milk production is concerned. Overall, short frequent nursing sessions at this age are entirely normal. As long as baby is being given the opportunity to nurse as long as she likes, nurse to sleep, etc, then it is fine if baby choses another way for now. This may well change anyway. I am not sure what mommy thumb means... Do you mean she always needs you to shape the breast in order to latch? For the whole session or only when latching? Have you tried different positions to help baby latch better? I suggest do not worry about how the way your baby nurses effects how your baby will eat at day care. They are such totally different things- your baby may well not cue as often at day care. I would suggest be very sure your baby's...
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:44 PM
    Did you nurse your first two children or were you also EPing? For most mothers who are working on "bringing in" a normal milk production when only pumping, this is wrong. Pumping has to replicate what a newborn typically does. Newborns typically nurse 10-12 times OR MORE in 24 hours. Of course, many of these sessions are not all that productive, but they are still vital. So, the bare minimum typically suggested for exclusive pumping in the first two months (approximately) is 8 times in 24 hours. After that, 6 times MAY be ok. It depends on the mom. Diferent moms, different breasts, make a difference. Some mothers need to pump more often than others, just as some need to nurse more often than others. If you possibly can, Yes and Yes. But you are not trying to get more milk per session, or rather that is a secondary concern. What you are trying to do (always, but especially at this critical period) is tell your body that there is a hungry baby and so it needs to step up milk production so you can make enough milk over all. Right now, your body is being told there is about half a baby, not a whole one, if you see what I mean. Your body is not going to want to make more milk than that half of a baby needs. So, your body should respond to more frequent milk removal by making more milk overall. If baby cannot nurse, you do that by using a pump or hand expression (or both) to mimic how a normal healthy newborn eats at the breast, which is very frequently both night...
    2 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*missfickleness's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:48 PM
    So here is the latest on my relactation project: I'm pumping 3-4oz per day now. I generally see an increase of a half ounce (give or take a little) per day. :) Wyatt is now willing to nurse using just a nipple shield, no SNS necessary. He has nursed for up to 20 minutes at a time using just the shield. When I pump after he nurses, I get just a few mL, so he is able to transfer at least some milk.
    5 replies | 531 view(s)
  • @llli*nybkmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:09 PM
    Hello fellow moms, I am looking for help and advice with my breast milk supply, which I find too low. I had a planned c-section on June 27th (due to a medical issue). I am currently exclusively pumping (due to another medical issue). I have a medela double electrical pump.
    2 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:54 PM
    My almost 12 week old (12 weeks in three days so I figured this was the most appropriate forum, apologies if not!) has been averaging 3-5 mins total per feeding (sometimes one side/refuses the second side, sometimes gets annoyed at first side and does 2 minutes each side). She's certainly gaining developmentally (getting distracted while nursing by exciting things like a beige wall, ha) which I read causes distracted nursing. Her wet diapers seem okay (5-7/day) and she is pooping every three days or so (poo tends to be thick), she's about 13lbs 5 oz (born at 9lbs 1oz), sleeping from 6-8 hours at night in one stretch, wakes to nurse for about 6 mins, then sleeps another 2.5 hours or so. For the most part she's a good latcher (I've never had a sore nipple and after her tongue tie was fixed at 4 weeks our lactation consultant said all looks great). The problem: I've developed terrible "mommy thumb" which makes holding her to help her latch difficult but not impossible. Coinciding with her short feeds I've noticed what seems to be a drop in supply (which was much more abundant a week ago) even though I'm feeding on demand (she often nurses every 1.5-2 hours during the day) and there are times she clearly seems frustrated on the boob. I understand by this point my supply may have regulated (not feeling engorged in the mornings, etc.) but I'm really worried about these short feedings (and how that will impact her being bottle fed at daycare) and producing enough as I stare...
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*sunsetbean's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:15 AM
    Thanks for the help. So... -pain can be during a feeding (when it feels like baby is directly hitting a "cut"), sometimes right after she comes off (a stinging pain as if from a cut), and not so often I can feel it against fabric. The sting can radiate through the breast. This has basically been going on from birth. -tips of nipples do NOT turn colors. maybe slightly white sometimes, but that seems like it's from milk. -nipple shape is slightly asymmetrical. She has a very high palate and keeps her tongue far back in her mouth (resulting in clicking, most prevalent during let down and when she's tired). We are doing myofacial with a speech therapist for this part, and laid back nursing as much as possible. -nothing on the nipple that you mentioned. -no diaper rash that I've noticed. -I did have antibiotics during delivery for GBS, but was also taking a probiotic and baby took one in her Vitiman D supplement. I am back on a probiotic nOw. I read about thrush and would be surprised if that's what we have. The pain I've had has been around since birth, to varying degrees, and I really think it's due to latch and sucking coordination. One of th descriptions of th pain though spoke to me...the feeling of shards of glass being in your areola. It then radiates out to the breast at times.
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 AM
    Hello nowellina. Here are the three basics when a baby will not latch. first, milk production must be stimulated by frequent milk removal. This can be with a pump, or hand expressing, or both. but frequent milk removal is vital. A minimum of 8 times a 24 hour day if at all possible. So, no matter how little comes out, it is vital to pump or hand express frequently if baby will not latch. It is also important to know that pump type matters greatly. Usually, the best pump for this situation is a "hospital grade & multi-user pump" This is a type of pump a mother rents by the week or month from a hospital or a lactation consultant. If this is not possible for you, the second best choice is a NEW double sided electric pump- the type designed for mothers who have to pump due to daily separations due to work or school. The pump has to not only be in excellent working order, it has to fit mother properly. So my first question would be, what is your pump like and where did you get it. The second thing is to look at how a baby is fed. The typical way babies are fed with bottles is not at all helpful in encouraging a baby to nurse. Babies tend to be over fed, both overall and at each feed. They tend to be fed very rapidly, with the bottle tilted up, and that causes gravity to force the baby to drink very quickly and to drink more than they really need. This interferes with breastfeeding due to baby being overly full and to expect that milk should pour into baby's mouth...
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 AM
    That doesn't sound like a fissure; again, cracked nipples generally aren't subtle! Some more questions for you: - When do you have pain- at the beginning of the feeding, throughout the feeding, at the end of a feeding, or after the feeding is over? - After feedings, do the tips of your nipples ever turn white, or perhaps bluish-purple, before returning to their normal color? - When baby comes off the breast, is the nipple symmetrical, like a pencil eraser, or asymmetrical/wedged/creased/ridged/shaped like a new lipstick? - Are you seeing any of the following in the nipple/areola area: dry-looking, flaking, or peeling skin, increased redness or pinkness, or skin which appears shiny? - Does the baby happen to have oral thrush or a yeast diaper rash? - Have you had a recent vaginal yeast infection or a recent course of antibiotics (aside from the ones you're on now)?
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 AM
    . :ita I am mostly looking for answers because you think baby is more fussy as well as the poops. The poops alone may mean nothing at all. But now that I think about it, behavioral changes including increased fussiness are pretty normal at this age as well.
    6 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*sunsetbean's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 AM
    Baby is 11 weeks. Oftentimes when she is nursing it can feel like there is a cut on my areola. It will sting and has caused deeper breast pain at times. I can't actually see any cuts or fissures though. So maybe fissure isn't the correct term? We started back on the breast today because my nipples were feeling better. Is my plan for keeping the nipples healed ok?
    8 replies | 136 view(s)
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