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  • @llli*gingermarie's Avatar
    Today, 12:00 PM
    i have offered sippy cups, straws, different style cups, etc. :( i have tried all typs of juices, diluted and everything. i spoke with a nurse and she said, use a syringe to force him to drink. so, we're at that point. it's awful. i have always avoided constipation causing foods, and right now he' so picky he's refusing fruits and eating only cereal, goldfish, and french fries. this is really frustrating and making me sad.
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:59 AM
    I assume you think your should do this because you pumped 3.5 ounces per side, and you know that that number represents a full feeding? So, the short answer is no, no reason to "nurse one side." It is usually a good idea to never let what you are able to pump affect your thinking about how to breastfeed, as they (pumping and nursing) are two entirely different things. In other words, the fact you pumped 7 ounces at once in no way indicates that number is representative of baby's typical at the breast feeding. Also, very good gain early on is typical of breastfed babies. A baby who is only 2 months old will typically be gaining about a half pound a week and more is entirely fine. This growth rate WILL decrease later on and that is also entirely normal. When nursing, the usual suggestion is to let baby take charge. If baby wants both sides, nurse both sides. If baby does not want both, no reason to insist. Baby can decide when and how long to nurse, AND it never hurts for mom to offer or gently encourage nursing as well. Nursing patterns change overtime, as does milk production, the rate of flow, and even breast storage capacity. So as baby ages, some babies may start needing both sides when they did not before, and sometimes the opposite occurs. I would say most babies probably do a combination of one and both sides. After a return to work it can be particularly problematic to keep milk production in good shape.
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 10:22 AM
    I have been thinking the same thing but I warn against doing it unless you're feeling like your supply is more than what you need. My LO is 5 months old. I generally pump too much milk, and my freezer is getting overstocked. But after having trouble last time, I decided I'd rather err on the side of caution until about 9 months -- too much milk is better than not enough when it comes to stress levels. Many moms have a pump slump around then. So my take on it for now is that if I have a really hard time pumping some days (like back-to-back meetings) and can only do 2, I won't get stressed about it. But if I can do 3 most days, I'm going to stick with it. Plus I pump in the car on the way to work, so 4 times in about 9.5-10 hours. I don't remember when I cut sessions last time, but I feel like it was somewhere in the 6 to 9-month range. But I kept pumping at least 1x a day until DD was about 18 months old because she drank the milk in a cup. I think you and the moms can work something out. When there was one other mom pumping here we just had an open-door policy for the room (we'd just have to get up to unlock it for each other if that happened) and if someone else had to come pump at the same time it was okay. We never had that happen, but there were only 2 of us!
    1 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 10:15 AM
    Oh, yes -- the old "you have to fix this non-existent problem before it becomes a habit." I choose to get up at 5:00 a.m. for morning, but that doesn't mean I should stop because I may wake up every morning at 5:00 a.m. for the rest of my life. I have told my dentist I'm limiting my x-rays to once every few years, unless they see an issue that needs to be addressed. You should hear the warning cries of "you might not get a proper diagnosis" and such (I get cavities very rarely)! Every year I go through it again with them. But when I said, "Radiation could cause health problems," they argued that it wasn't enough and that was unlikely. So everything COULD be a problem, except when it comes to radiation?? I've found the "fix the problem before it starts" only matters to them when it involves their end profiting and benefiting! Do all these doctors and dentists go to a school that hasn't changed since 1950? It makes me want to go to medical school at 39 and apply the common sense and real-life lessons I've learned to a medical practice. My daughter nursed until she weaned herself at 2 years, 4 months. I haven't taken her to the dentist yet, but if she has any issues I'd blame it on her refusal to cooperate with teeth brushing or mouth cleaning for the past nearly 2 years -- a behavior that was not caused by extended breastfeeding but her personality!
    9 replies | 220 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:13 AM
    It's normal. My baby prefers left as well. I am always loop-sided, so I can only wear loose fitting clothes or I will look weird in public! I try to get baby to latch on to the other side anyway, especially when they are sleepy and less picky.
    3 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:09 AM
    When I am spotted wandering with my pump and parts at work, sometimes I get hilarious responses. So far, they include: * What goodies do you have there? * Are you giving out flu shots? * Why do you do dishes so often? * Silent confused/WTF stares. The ones that recognize them for what they are, the usual response is, "Oh yeah, I have been there. Don't miss it at all." LoL
    0 replies | 15 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    There will be an influx of new moms at my work place after the holidays. I am worried that I'm hogging the only dedicated room we have at work for pumping, so I am thinking to reduce pumping from three times to two. But I read that reducing pumping session will also reduce milk supply. Baby will be 8 months when I plan to do it. Is that too soon?
    1 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 09:39 AM
    Toddlers manipulate, huh? Who knew! What exactly does night feeding have to do with that? You decide what you let your child do, and you not setting a limit for night feeding doesn't make your parenting any better or worse than someone else. Don't create a problem to fix a non-existent problem just because someone thinks you should. Sounds like you already came to that conclusion yourself, but I am just throwing that out there as the general way I approach this kind of "advice".
    9 replies | 220 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:52 AM
    It's pretty common for younger breastfed children to get a lot or even all their fluid needs met by breastfeeding. But by age 2 it seems to me that most kids are taking fluids from other sources. It's not that relying on breastfeeding alone for fluids is unhealthy- just that it would probably be good if your LO took something in addition to your milk, particularly in light of huge constipation issues. Are you only offering plain water in his sippy cups? In this situation, I would be willing to offer dilute or even full-strength juice, just to see if that would result in better fluid intake- unless he has terrible tooth decay, in which case maybe some sort of flavored but sugar-free option would be preferable. When it comes to solids, I would avoid the constipating BRAT foods (Bananas, Rice, Apples, Toast/bread) and focus on offering constipation-fighting blueberries, cherries, and "P" fruits (Pears, Plums, Prunes, Peaches, aPricots).
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*mominstress's Avatar
    Today, 08:18 AM
    Hi My daugter turned 4 weeks few days ago, we are currently having problems with breast feeding her. Her weight when she was born was 2945 Grams when we left hospital her weight was 2980 grams, she was breast feeding though only for few minutes each time. During 1st week my wife had breast engorgement and we bought pump. During first week she gained 100 grams of weight and she was exclusively on breast feeding. We also realized she was very sleepy all the time not getting up to breast feed and we decided that we need to bottle feed her. She gained another 100 grams of weight in 2nd week by 3rd week she was having nipple confusion i.e. she does intial sign of breast feeding and goes to breast but doesnt have proper latch and doesnt sucks on breast. I would also like to mention that during 1st and 2nd week when was breast feeding she use to exhibit same behavior i.e. go to breast and quite lot of times she will sleep without drinking or even a sip, She was sleeping just too much and when trying to wake her she was not wake enough to take breast no matter what we did. During this time she will suck for 5 minutes and go to sleep. 3rd week weight was 3430. We wanted to make sure she is fed and that is reason we bottle fed her. After 4 weeks her weight is 3570. We want to bring her back to breast feeding and trying skin to skin contact and Medela SNS but nothing seems to be working. We saw lactation consultant and she told us that we should try skin to skin as well as...
    0 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 07:09 AM
    Did you see the lactation consultant in person? She should help watch you pump to assess what might be going on. You may need a different size flange or something else might be up. Also, the LC should be able to help you hand express, if you don't know how to do that (it took until my second baby to learn from an LC). It might be worth trying that to see if you get more milk. That would be tough to do at work, but at least you'd know if you can get milk and a letdown that way.
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:53 AM
    Congratulations on working through your initial pain issues and nursing your baby! You're right, a baby who is exclusively nursing at the breast will not overeat, because they are able to control the nursing process. Babies who are fed via bottle--even bottles that have expressed breastmilk in them--can be overfed, though, depending on how their care provider is delivering those bottles. "Paced bottle feeding" is a method that tries to give baby as much control as possible over the bottle-feeding session. It would be great to discuss and model this with your sitter, so that baby can be fed in this breastfeeding supportive manner in your absence. Quick information sheet: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf Video demonstration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs Another piece of helping nourish your baby in your absence, in a way that helps you continue to nurse when together, is providing the right amount of expressed milk. The general guideline is 1-1.5 ounces per hour of separation, fed on cue, in a paced way, in small amounts.: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/ Best of luck, mama!
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*luvmy.munchkins's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 PM
    Hi, there. I am not an expert by any means....but from what I have learned, breast feeding is very supply and demand. So, if you have gone a week without pumping during the day, then I imagine your supply would adjust eventually assuming your body didn't need to make that milk any longer. Now, how quickly your body adjusts would vary per individual. The choice to supplement formula on the weekend as well or to start pumping again during the week is entirely yours. I understand the stress of pumping at work and my LO is 8 months as well. But the 1 year mark is right around the corner and you have made it this far. It would be wonderful if there were a way that you could continue to be able to maintain your supply for the weekends. Maybe there is a way to simplify your pumping sessions some how...... How many times are you pumping? How long? How long are you away from baby? How many days a week? Is there anything in particular about your line of work that makes it more difficult to pump? I hope I have helped at least a little. I am sure that some more experienced mamas will be able to give you even more advice especially if you can supply some more detailed information. Congratulations on making it this far!
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*blueberrysmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:02 PM
    I just wanted to post quickly to say that I know what you are going through. DS is eating the same way. Sometimes he is on the breast for 2+ hours just nursing, falling asleep, waking up in 10 mins and nursing again. Normally he eats every 30-45 minutes (from start of the first to start of the next feeding) during his waking hours. It's EXHAUSTING!!! But his diaper output is stellar, but much like your DD. My baby is also TT and we're waiting for our appt to get it taken care of. There are some times when he's on but won't latch for more than 10 seconds, gets frustrated and pops off - I will switch him some 10 or 12 times and he just gets upset. So I take him off and we walk around, or I give him to my husband to walk around with him. Even if he cries, it's OK - babies cry. I'll take him back in 10 mins or so and he does better. Swaddling or covering in a blanket also seems to calm him down so that he can be more patient for a letdown. You've got to just take a deep breath and know that her body is going to provide for you LO - but even she needs a break, even if that means listening to crying a little bit. Give hugs to your wife. BFing can be a tough tough game for mom and baby in the beginning. Know that you all will get through it! I would get her weight checked for peace of mind, and if all is well just go with the flow. This WILL not last forever - she won't be going to high school still eating every 15 minutes :)
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*gingermarie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:43 PM
    Hi! My son is breastfed and is now 2 years and 1 month old. (he was solely bf for the first 8 months.) my issue is this. For the last few months, he has been drinking less and less water and only nursing, to the point that now he only will nurse. no cups, straws, sippy cups, i've tried. he nurses at least 6 times a day and still night feeds during the night once or twice. i'm concerned as he has always had constipation issues and they've gotten worse since he's refusing everything but the breast. should i be worried about his health? is this common in bf kids? he also is eating poorly, but that's a whole nother topic. :( he's 26.5 lbs and healthy, iron is good, etc.. any advise would be great. thank you.
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*vothisau's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:38 PM
    Hi all! I know this is a silly question because you're not supposed to be able to over feed but I've been exclusively nursing after some issues with nipple pain and today I'm back at work after my maternity leave and I pumped 7 oz total and I typically nurse on both sides at that time of day. My LO will be 2 months on the 7th and is already in 3 mo clothes. Since I stopped pumping, I thought I'd just sent just over 3.5 oz to the sitter in each of the bags. (I pulled frozen milk from last month to send today) Should I go to nursing on one side per feeding?
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*vothisau's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 PM
    Hello everybody. Recently my lo hasn't been latching correctly. I've had issues getting her to open very wide from the beginning. she has a extremely strong suck, isnt tongue tied. Now she wont open hardly at all and when she does and i get a decent latch she pushes my nipple out to where she just has the nipple between her gums and its extremely painful. I've tried relatching her over and over and over again, changing positions and im so lost. I'm trying so hard to keep nursing her but im starting to get discouraged and it hurts so bad. its getting to the point i dread nursing. i live in a small town and resources are minimal. I've been thinking about trying nipple shields but not to sure on them. any advice?
    0 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*vothisau's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:33 PM
    Hi there, My DD is now 8 months old and I've been mix feeding since back at work four months ago. She used to have 1 bottle formula and 2 bottles EBM (I never could get more that 2 bottles expressed during the day). A week ago I decided to stop expressing at work as she was happy with the formula and it all became too much of a mission to do. Anyway - so she now has 3 bottles formula during the day and I breastfeed in the evenings, and morning (and whenever she wakes up at night). On the weekend though - the last one was the first - I breastfed as normal. I didn't even consider my supply until my Mom asked me on Sunday eve if I have enough milk... Babba was fussing quite a bit and bit me out of the blue. (I switched breasts and continued fine, although she woke up more during the night to feed.) My question is this..... Have i messed things up by stopping to express, should I start again? Should I give her, her bottles during the week-end as well so that she has a routine??? Am I confusing my breasts terribly and will it ultimately effect my supply?? Thanks,
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*vothisau's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:31 PM
    Hello everyone! I started back to work yesterday. I also got my first period on Tuesday. I have had no problems nursing my 13 week old until now. Yesterday I pumped 5 times for a total of ... 1 oz! I spoke to a lactation consultant who recommended I get a new pump (this one was also used for my 3 year old with no problems). So I got a new medela instyle. Today I pumped and pumped and power pumped ( I have an office thank God) and still only 2 oz. I have been taking fenugreek. I don't see any letdown when I pump. I listened to a guided meditation, looked at video of the baby and still nothing! I am home now and she is nursing with no complaints. I don't know what to do. I feel like I am simply unable to pump.
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:20 PM
    I think in general it is a good idea to check with doctor about severe edema. Of course temporary edema is to be expected when you have been pumped full of fluids, but it is important to be sure something more serious is not going on. Edema can make it very hard for baby to latch and transfer milk effectively, and also may contribute to engorgement. How is baby's latch and are you finding you are getting engorged? I put chilled green cabbage leaves on my feet and ankles when I had crazy edema in them after my first C-section. It seemed to help. Of course cabbage leaves on the breasts are also often suggested when mom is engorged.
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:15 PM
    All of the above is excellent. If at all possible (and you know the degree of possibility best, as does mom), I would think that if interventions that *might* interfere with breastfeeding are going to be considered, like pacifiers or formula use or bottle use, would be best held off until getting in touch with the LC, just so that that person can have the situation as it currently stands to help you make a plan from, and not any other potential issues as well thrown in. But that is just my own opinion! If you're going to be making an appointment tomorrow, could those things wait until talking with your future IBCLC so that that person and you can craft the best plan, without any added impediments or issues? Again, also, I understand that sometimes we need solutions now. Have nursing positions been discussed at all? My reading comprehension is failing me, and it's hard to search through on my phone. If mom is not using a laid back or side lying nursing position, I think both would be great to try, to help mom atleast relax her body during these rough days. Side lying was a godsend to me in the early weeks (okay, honest--early months), when I had a frequently nursing newborn (though admittedly not AS frequently nursing). Best of luck, again. It is hugely important how supportive you are being, too.
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*moonrex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    I just had my second baby a few days ago. It was an emergency induction and I was given tons of meds and lots of fluids. I woke up this morning to basketball boobs, and if I press my finger in one, it makes a dent that takes minutes to fade! Should I be worried? I have VERY large breasts so I have to hold it in place while feeding my newborn. When I'm done and I let go there will be DEEP crevasses where my fingers were holding it. They're extremely uncomfortable! Any ideas? I also BF my 2 year old and this never happened with her!
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
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