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  • @llli*gilismom's Avatar
    Today, 04:32 AM
    My baby is ten weeks old and will be mostly home with me till she's seven months old. I pump every morning on one side as she feeds on the other, in order to have some fresh pumped milk in the fridge for when i want to go out for a few hours, do some sports without her, etc. This means that because I don't end up using most of what I pump, I am building up a supply of frozen milk, which I will only use when she starts going to daycare since I usually can't keep up with the supply necessary. In August we are moving from our home (Jerusalem, Israel) to the US for a year. In addition to moving my whole family (we have three other small children), I will want to take my frozen stash with me. I'm nervous about this! Pointers on how to do this? Practically speaking: Do I take it as a carry-on? With dry ice? Do security personnel let it through? amount - probably 8-9 liters (= 300 oz or so), frozen as tiny ice cubes. i estimate it would fill a large backpack, not counting whatever cooling supplies i would need many thanks! Miriam
    0 replies | 6 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:01 PM
    Generally it is suggested to avoid pacifiers for the first 6 weeks or if there are breastfeeding problems. But, if you understand the problems with pacifiers and are careful to avoid them, I think a pacifier can be used safely in any situation. The problem with pacifiers is that just like bottles, they are a breast replacement. But unlike bottles (or the breasts) they provide no nourishment. So pacifier overuse is linked to poor weight gain. Baby is given the pacifier too often/too long and this prevents baby nursing enough. Also, baby not nursing enough causes a problem with milk production. Another problem when pacifier interferes with normal nursing frequency is when mom is over producing, she gets more full between sessions and baby has an even stronger flow to deal with than if they nursed more often.
    13 replies | 546 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:18 PM
    Is it advisable to give the baby pacifier to calm her, it is very difficult to see her cry for so long :( Although, we did try to take her out on stroller which worked once , the next time she started crying later and stroller did not help :(
    13 replies | 546 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    Ok so what you want to think about is the daily total number of nursing sessions, since babies do not tend to nurse in a regular every such hours pattern, but more like a clustering pattern, typically. What is important is that newborn nurse at least 10-12 times in 24 hours. More often is fine and usually can only help. Many babies in the newborn period need to be awaken so they nurse often enough overall. Poops sound ok in amount, on the lower side but certainly within the range of normal output. So that is a good sign all is probably well. The real test will be weight gain, but here are some things you need to understand about weight gain in the early days so you can avoid problems. most babies lose some weight after they are born, and only start gaining again after 3-5 days or so. So if you have a "lowest known weight" from sometime after birth, use that as the measure, not birth weight. Because it is entirely possible baby is gaining just fine, but still below birth weight. What you want to see in most cases is baby back to birth weight by 10-14 days of age, although some babies who perhaps got a bit of a slower start on gain take a bit longer and it is not a problem. Weight checks at this age must be done with great care. Digital infant scale properly used, baby naked or in a dry diaper only, no blanket or anything else on scale unless it is also weighed (a light paper scale cover is fine.) Who ever is doing the weight check should be very careful and...
    3 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*fortheloveofboys's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:53 PM
    This is my second child. Breastfeeding didnt go so well with my first. I'm very determined to make this work. I think i may have spoke too soon. When i posted this he was only pooping 2 to 3 times but it was a pretty large liquidy amount. While he is now pooping more frequently (5 poops today) i would say only a teaspoon maybe tsp and. Ahalf. He is feeding about every 2 hours sometimes 4 but that's because i kind of forget and when he sleeps i just kinda let him be. I was having some difficulties nursing but i do feel more comfortable
    3 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:28 PM
    Ok that all sounds fine then. My middle son would not eat anything until he was 14 months so I know how that goes. funny he likes peanut butter. My kids never ate much peanut butter, which drove me nuts because it is so easy to prepare and take anywhere. But they like sunflower seed butter. Your husband might be reassured by the book My Child Won't Eat. Wonderful book by a pediatrician about all the normal variations in eating habits, including with bottles and nursing, and not a guide for making kids eat.
    5 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:59 PM
    Yes I nurse him before I go to bed if he hasn't already woke to eat. I am still pumping as much as before while I am at work, in addition to pumping first thing in the morning after he nurses (something I started a while ago to make a freezer stash). My husband was concerned he would suffer from malnutrition if he didn't eat while I was at work, but I didn't think so... I am very familiar with baby-led weaning, I did it with my other two sons. He, however, just does not put things in his mouth (even toys). He sits at the table with us at every meal time, and I try to always give him something, whether it is something we are eating or another item, and he just rolls it around for a couple minutes and then pushes it onto the floor. I know he will come around eventually, it is just his sudden refusing the bottle that is throwing a monkey wrench into things and making me wish he would eat something sooner rather than later. I have tried cooked carrots, sweet potato wedges, beans, banana, pear, ham, turkey, celery (more as a teething aid), oatmeal, peanut butter (off of a celery stick), puffs. The peanut butter is the only thing he wanted more of, but he still isn't EATING it yet. Thanks a lot for your input.
    5 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:57 PM
    Ok so I see baby nurses overnight, and during the day, and the total is about 6-7 times in 24 hours. So this may be enough but since baby is going so long without eating during the day right now, if you not already doing so, I would suggest consider waking baby when you come home if that is needed in order to get one more nursing session in. Sometimes baby will just nurse without waking as well. If that is not a good time for you to offer, you can try a different time. ... Ok for a 9 hour separation 9 ounces is normal/expected from newborn period on. As baby ages and growth rate slows, baby tends to not be as hungry, so some drop off in that amount around this age would probably just be normal. A more dramatic drop off as you have seen might be related to many things, and my even be temporary. As long as baby continues to nurse lots when you are together this should be fine. You do not mention pumping, but I assume you are continuing to pump at work with the frequency you did before? For dad, I have a couple suggestions aside try a regular cup. 1, whenever HE (dad) eats, offer baby some of whatever dad is eating. Babies learn to eat by mimicking. It is ok if he does not eat anything, but I think it is important to keep offering. Offering just means putting food on front of baby in a form he can safely eat it. A 9 month old is capable of picking food up and biting and chewing, so while you to not want hard stuff, baby can handle needing to bite and chew as long as...
    5 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:55 AM
    I am away from 12:30-9:30 pm , but he goes to bed at 7:15. He was eating 9.5 ounces per day. Yesterday he only ate two ounces. He does get fussy after a while, from being hungry, but he doesn't want to eat. Yeah, no go on the sippy cup. I keep offering different foods, he isn't into any of them except he likes peanut butter pretty well. He doesn't even put things into his mouth usually, and doesn't like us putting things near or into his mouth so it is difficult to get him to taste things willingly. I am not worried about him being too small, just that he didn't gain much weight between his six and nine month checkups, maybe half or 3/4 lb. My main concern is the sanity of my husband who has to deal with the fussy baby that results after several hours of not eating. I am hoping it is just a phase. He nurses at least three times during the night before wake up, and 3-4 times in the morning before I go to work.
    5 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:08 AM
    Are you certain your pump is working correctly and you are nursing or pumping often enough? What would be more concerning is how you got the plugs in the first place, as non-optimal milk removal is the primary cause. Non-optimal milk removal is the primary cause of low milk production as well, so that would be the connection that would be most likely. While plugs might make it hard to pump as much while present, once they have cleared, they should no longer have any impact on milk removal nor milk production. You mean leaning or kneeling on hands and feet over baby? I have also had good success with this when I have had plugs, but not sure if that is what you mean. Heat is purported to help milk flow, but because it can increase inflammation, it is no longer suggested for direct application to the breasts in most cases of plugs (some moms do find it helps of course) but what is more suggested now is cold on the breasts to relieve inflammation and, if needed, heat on the back or shoulders. Good overall tips on plugs: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    1 replies | 83 view(s)
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