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  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 07:12 AM
    I read somewhere that putting warm milk into cold one will heat it up and promote bacteria growth, spoiling the milk. I think it is standard practice to cool milk to same temperature before mixing them.
    3 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    The only way to know if this is self-weaning is retrospective. If he's still nursing a couple of months from now, then it wasn't self-weaning, if he has stopped, then it was... Not a very helpful answer, I know! If you're happy to continue nursing, just keep offering.
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:22 AM
    Can you see a specialist? I'm thinking that an allergist and pediatric otolaryngologist would be the docs you want to see. The difficulty breathing at night sounds beyond the range of normal to me. Can you take a video of her nighttime breathing to share with the doctor?
    5 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*pickle.pie's Avatar
    Today, 03:27 AM
    Well, according to the stupid doctor, we would be able to solve her blocked nose if she was in a cot in her own room rather than co-sleeping, as the blocked nose "isn't bothering her" (what? waking up constantly from 2am onwards because she can't breathe isn't bothering her??), and we need to get some sleep (while she screams herself stupid in the next room). Basically, they won't do anything to help, we just have to put up with it and it's probably all our fault anyway because of the way we parent. I have enough self-doubt without people saying this kind of thing, I feel like we've done everything wrong and she'd truly be better off with different parents.
    5 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*pickle.pie's Avatar
    Today, 03:23 AM
    Sorry to say but no - in fact I've just posted another thread about how much worse it is at the moment, although I think a lot of that is because she has a chronic blocked nose. I've tried a bit of the unlatching but like you it's not been very successful. One thing that has improved slightly I guess, is that she will now often unlatch herself and roll over to sleep, so at the beginning of the evening I can at least get up for however long she gives me until she wakes again. But it doesn't seem to have stopped her need to comfort suck every time she wakes so I'm not convinced that persevering with the unlatching will help much. She has also given me 2 or 3 hours a bit more consistently at the beginning of the night over the last few weeks (used to be 30 mins to an hour every time) but the rest of the night is still terrible I'm afraid...
    28 replies | 2312 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:42 PM
    Just taste/smell it before you use it. Sour milk should be pretty obvious :)
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:59 PM
    My nipples do this all the time too! I just count myself lucky I don't tend to get pain with it unless it's cold. I have Raynards phenomenon in my hands and feet tho so I figure I must be prone to this sort of thing. I do wonder if it's more common than people think and actually folks only tend to check their nipples if there is pain. If you do get pain, gentle heat works wonders :)
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:42 PM
    Hi. I also tend to overproduction, and with my third baby I had mastitis 3 times! I had never had it before, so this was a nice learning experience for me. :p Mastitis makes you feel awful, but usually clears up very quickly with the ab treatment. Aside from taking your abs as prescribed, I found the best advice is the old "Empty Breast, Lots of Rest" This means, nurse as much as you can, and don't be afraid to pump or hand express as needed, IF baby is not getting milk out of the affected breast well or often enough. Rest means, sleep if you can, and lie down if you can't sleep. Let others do for you so you can lie down as much as possible and nurse baby lots. You may start feeling much better quickly. But don't overdo it, or you may relapse. Once you are feeling better you can address any issues you may be having with overproduction and fast letdown, if needed. Has nursing been comfortable overall? No latch issues or pain?
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:33 PM
    Nipple blanching is an indication of vasospasm. And baby clamping when nursing is something that leads to vasospasm. But usually vasospasm hurts mom- a lot! Especially immediately post nursing. More: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-V-RP
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:07 PM
    I completely agree with the other posters. You are not even remotely resembling a liar, so put that idea out of your head! :) The weaning process is a relationship between two people, and there is inherently negotiation between the needs of the two parties. Nothing about that deprives a child's nursing experience of being child-led. So long as your child wants to nurse and you are still meeting that need, your journey is child led. :) With my 3.5yo son, I am finding the biggest impediment to our continued nursing (with abundant milk) is my reduced supply coming off domperidone. It is what it is. We nurse whenever DS wants--milk or no milk--some days I have lots, others only drops. I have taken domperidone for 2.5 years, and that has required some substantial personal sacrifices on my and DH's part. I feel that I am appropriately balancing the various members of our family's needs by accepting reduced milk at a stage where my DS is happily and heartily nourished by other foods and drinks. Yes, the change is bittersweet, and yes it is hastening his dropping of some feeds, but I still feel my process is child-led because I'm respecting my son's desire to nurse. I will continue to nurse him even if my milk disappears, as I feel the primary importance of nursing at this stage is sharing love, and that particular way of sharing love continues to be important to both DS and me. I hope you don't feel conflicted. Weaning journeys are as unique as the individuals traveling...
    7 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*shamrock's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    I have a 4 week old baby. Today I started running a fever 102, and my right breast is sore. I also have had chills off and on. I called in to my midwife and she prescribed me an antibiotic that my husband is picking up now. I have oald I think (can spray across the room) and battled oversupply with my older daughter. I'm trying to nurse a ton bit I have a sleepy baby who fills up quick. She seems to be growing fine - 6'11 at birth, lowest weight was 6'5 and up to 7 at her one week appt. She has another appt on Wednesday but I can see in her body that's she's gained. Lots of wet and poppy diapers. Anything else I should be doing? And advice or reassurance that we will make it over this difficulty? Thanks Kimberly
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*ap9981's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    I work from home, but last week I had to be our of the house for some time. I pumped and kept the milk in a lunch bag with ice packs. The one day when I unpacked the bags, they were no longer cold , but just cool. Probably because I left everything in the car when I picked up DS from grandma's! I put the bags in the freezer - not sure if they are still good or not. I was planning on mixing with baby food as needed, unless it's no longer good. Is it OK to keep our should I toss?
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 PM
    Hi! I feel you. My daughter is little and we've struggled with weight gain as well. We are supplementing, but I work full time (went back two weeks ago)and just can't seem to pump enough yet to keep her only on breastmilk, but I'm doing the best I can, and its only a few oz per day at least. :/ not sure this will help, but this is what ive done: 1. met with a good LC. got a weighted feed, then kept an eye on her weight and intake at home (dont go crazy with this, though, and if you're getting hung up on the numbers, stop. it helps me know what she's getting, but if it upsets you its not worth it.) 2. learned her cues and fed her everytime she seemed hungry. im still learning, but im getting there. when she unlatches, unless shes sleeping, i burp her, check her diaper, etc, then offer again. 3. check on her developmental milestones, as well as measurements, at each appointment. 4. drink mothers milk tea and take fenugreek just in case 5. pump when i can. 6. checked w family members . . . we have a history of small, slow to gain babies.
    5 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:10 PM
    my three kids all went about transitioning to not nursing to sleep every time differently. Oldest needed to nurse to sleep most of the time right up into toddler hood. He would fall asleep in other circumstances of course – in the car for example or if I was out he would fall asleep for his dad. But if I was home we nursed to sleep it was way easier than doing anything else. When he was three and a half I decided to try not having him nurse to sleep. I was also nursing his younger brother at the time so it was getting to be too much. I still nursed him at naptime but not to sleep -then he went into his own room to have 'quiet time' which always resulted in him falling to sleep. I also nursed at bedtime and then my husband would gentle him to sleep. He completely outgrew needing to be gentled to sleep when he was about four. His younger brother was what I called the wam bam thank you ma'am nurser. This means he would nurse and then rollover and fall asleep on his own -this started sometime before he was about a year old. I don't mean he never nursed asleep he still did but he clearly didn't have to nurse to sleep. He decided on his own when he was about three that he wanted to go sleep with his brother his and no longer needed to be nursed to sleep for bedtime at all. I still nursed him to sleep for naps because that insured he got a nap which was great. I did not bother to see if he would that be any other way because nursing to sleep worked great. My daughter is...
    3 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:45 PM
    Do you mean baby is waking up every 30 minutes all night long? Or do you mean you nurse baby to sleep at bedtime, and then baby wakes again 30 minutes later, then nurse baby to sleep and the baby sleeps for a while? As far as naps go, can you lay down with your baby and nap with her? that's how I always got the longest naps from my kids. Plus I also got a nap which was nice. If I didn't want to sleep I would read or something. Have you tried darkening the room more, using some sort of low white noise like a fan? What are you doing when baby naps -could you wear baby in a carrier or backpack? If you would like to learn more about the research says about sleep and babies and what's normal and what isn't and whether or not babies need to be taught to go to sleep 'by themselves' I suggest the book Sweet Sleep which explains in detail sleep research, as well as suggesting some real world ideas that might help everyone in the family to get enough sleep.
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:59 PM
    At around 6 months my DD would easily fall sleep nursing, but her actual sleep wasn't good (would wake up after a short nap and would wake frequently at night) so I knew she needed to learn to fall asleep on her own. As such, I started getting her to nap/bed a little earlier so she wasn't as tired and wasn't as likely to fall asleep while nursing. I'd actively cut off the nursing session before she was asleep (when just comfort suckling), read her a quick story and then put her in bed with her paci. Yes, there was some crying for a couple of nights but it wasn't much (less than 10 minutes) and she started sleeping much better, so I knew it was worth it.
    3 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:50 PM
    Baby is waking up at the end of his first sleep cycle because he's "startled" by the change in environment (i.e. he fell asleep nursing and now isn't nursing). It's like if you fell asleep in your bed but woke on the kitchen floor...instead of just naturally transitioning through to the next sleep cycle, you'd wake up and wonder WTH? Baby needs to learn to fall asleep on his own. Then he will transition through the light and deep phases of his sleep cycle without waking up.
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*new.mama86's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:03 PM
    Hi Pickle pie- did you have any success in encouraging your little one to sleep for longer periods of time in the end? I am attempting to get my 6.5 month old to fall asleep without nursing after 2 months of her waking next to me constantly throughout the night and immediately comfort sucking for a couple of minutes and then dropping back to sleep. I'm just finding it hard not having more than an hour or two of sleep at a time. I've been trying to unlatch her before she falls fast asleep but it does NOT make for a very happy baby! Thanks.
    28 replies | 2312 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:43 PM
    Yes, my baby stopped falling asleep at the bedtime nursing session when he was a few months old. Probably 4-5 months old. Till then, by the end of the feeding he'd be fast asleep. Then one day he just didn't! He was awake after nursing. And that began a pretty stressful time for us. Although I did know that if we'd do sleep training, it's easier if the baby is awake when put into bed, rather than asleep when put into bed. We'd put him into his bed and then he'd call us after a few minutes. Lots of going in and out and patting his back got him to sleep. We also gave him a pacifier for the bed which helped. But till he learned how to put it back into his mouth after it fell out... well that was a struggle. Then with the paci we did some gentle sleep training for a few nights. That got him to really learn how to fall asleep nicely, no complaint, within a few minutes of lying down in bed. This was at about 8-9 months or so. We did a modified controlled crying if you're wondering. Since then we always nurse before I put him to bed. Only this week (he just turned 18 months) is he going to bed without nursing. He just bites me and refuses to nurse so I stopped pushing him :) Instead he nurses in the early AM. You can do whatever you want, really, as long as your baby is willing! Some mothers who go out a lot and have to leave their baby with a babysitter woudl probably cut out the bedtime feed earlier than others since it's just impractical. But whatever works for you...
    3 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:37 PM
    Yes, I also think the amount your baby is being fed is a bit much. My baby was happy with an ounce per hour, often even less. What confuses me is that you first say you find it hard to pump "enough" but then in the evenings it sounds like you have a copious amount and your daughter can't manage the flow. The normal mount for pumping is about 2-4 ounces for a missed feeding so you definitely sound like you have enough. The problem probably lies in the way your baby is being fed - as pp suggested, you should read up on paced bottlefeeding techniques. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*burffi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:30 PM
    Can anybody tell me what it looks like when a baby learns to fall asleep without nursing? I always nurse my 8-month old to sleep, and have done it since the beginning, but I wonder whether it's true that they will eventually learn to fall asleep by themselves, without any further training. Can anybody share their experiences with this? What does it look like, what are the signs that a baby is beginning to learn this? And when does this usually happen? I enjoy nursing my baby to sleep, but I also sometimes worry that I'll be doing it forever (as in, not until he goes to college, but until he's 3 years old - which I'm not that keen on!), so would love to know what the future looks like, what signs to look for that indicates that he will eventually learn to fall asleep on his own, and when I can expect this to start happening. Would love to hear different stories from a variety of people!
    3 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*burffi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:23 PM
    My 8 month old baby always wakes up after 30 minutes, for naps or at bedtime, and needs to be nursed back to sleep again every time this happens (not always successfully at naps, but always successfully at bedtime). I can literally set my clock after it! It's getting a bit tiresome, especially as he sometimes won't go back to sleep again after the first 30 minutes of his morning nap despite really needing more sleep. Also, in the evenings I wish I could put him to sleep once and not have to run up to him again after 15-20 minutes to nurse him back to sleep again. Does anybody have any experience with how to overcome this? Is there anything I can do to help him sleep through past 30 minutes? (Without nursing him back to sleep he just wakes up, and we co-sleep so I just quietly lie down next to him to nurse him back to sleep, I don't pick him up or anything as that would just wake him up.) Or, alternatively, can anybody tell me when this naturally stops happening? Give me some hope? :)
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:05 PM
    I found it more annoying to be in the hospital than at home! Once discharged we went to my parents for two weeks. During that time we had no visitors EXCEPT: a) my two sisters (not their kids) which was amazing because they gave me so much good nursing and mothering advice - they were mothers more recently than my mother was! b) We had a circumcision ritual for my son which was on a Saturday so my in-laws flew out from Belgium, plus my husbands other siblings all came in from the city to be with us that day. They did not sleep at my house, but instead stayed at neighbors. It was crazy though. I was NOT IN THE MOOD of any guests and I hated having to excuse myself to go breastfeed (what? It's only been two hours since your last feeding, he can't be hungry!) and to put up an entertaining mood when I was very not in the mood. At some point I just went to my bedroom and stayed there and was crying for half an hour with dh beside me. But I told myself it's just for a day and a half and I can survive. And I did. That night my two close friends came and at first I hated that they came but then I was grateful for the opportunity to just be normal and act the way I felt. I don't feel my breastfeeding relationship suffered any because of this, though.
    9 replies | 320 view(s)
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