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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 AM
    Generally speaking, milk production depends on milk being removed from the breasts frequently and effectively. Frequently would mean a minimum of 8-12 times in 24 hours. Effectively would be, enough so the breasts know to respond by making more milk. People often say "empty" the breasts, but this is not really possible. However, in some cases, if baby is not nursing with normal effectiveness, pumping after nursing for several minutes is suggested. But this has much more to so with the effectiveness of the nursing session - how well baby can transfer milk- than the length of the nursing session. So, how frequently is baby nursing now? -how many times in 24 hours? Did someone tell you he has to nurse "through to a second letdown?" How are you measuring that...do you feel all letdowns? Not all moms do... When you say you are struggling with low milk production, can you tell us how this was diagnosed and by whom? If you do not make enough milk, baby must be getting supplements. How often, how much, and how is baby being fed these supplements? And what is baby's weight gain history? This is an excellent article on low milk production concerns. http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/low-supply/
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*qd's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 AM
    Yes we mostly do the laid back position as that created the least amount of pain in the beginning. I literally have held him, while burping and/or bouncing him for a long time after nursing and then go to lay him down to sleep and within minutes he barfs or it could take an hour or more for it to happen. I know its because he has air trapped. I have a hard time sleeping sitting up or with him and i do wear him frequently. I cant get himto take a pacifier yet so i might try hard on that. Seriously sometimes a latch him back on and hope there wont be another letdown. Is this a latch issue on top ofiver supply and is there anything else i can try to help him? I know this is a big part but he will only sleep on his belly but even after trying everything and waiting for long periods of time he'll still barf 90% of the time.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:23 AM
    It is certainly in no way too late to get a baby to latch. Some babies latch for the first time months after birth- It's not too late! How is your engorgement now? When the breast is engorged or even very full, it is harder for a baby to latch. One solution is to pump just before offering the breast, but the drawback to that is that the pump may pull fluid into the areola creating or exacerbating the situation of a swollen areola baby cannot latch onto. Hand expression may help, or you can try reverse pressure softening- info below in linked article on engorgement. How many times is baby being fed each day, how much each feeding, and how? "Nipple confusion" usually means baby is getting so much to eat via the bottle that they have no interest in nursing, or the bottle is being given in such a way that the milk flows into them and they make little or no effort to get the milk as they must at the breast. Yes you want your baby to be fed enough, but it is very important to take the steps necessary to prevent overfeeding. This may mean using a cup, syringe or spoon to supplement, or using paced bottle feeding. If you are unable to get baby to latch soon, as in, the next day or two, for most feedings, then you almost certainly need a much, much better pump. A manual pump is entirely inadequate for eping and continued use of only a manual is very likely to result in poor milk production and even possible breast injury. Of course, if it's all you have, keep using it....
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:31 PM
    Thank you so much, dormir41! That link has some awesome tips! Thank you so much!
    2 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    If he thrashes his hands, try preoccuping them by slipping a silky/lovey between him and your chest? This is the current trick for my 9mo who distracts herself by slapping anything within reach. If it's his desire to knead then the silky may help him relax.
    3 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*lnjscott's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    Hi, I'm a new mom with a one week old newborn. He latched at the hospital but was not having enough wet diapers for the nurses. I was beginning to get engorged upon discharge, so I got a manual pump. I have been pumping since day 3 and bottle feeding the breast milk; however, I would like for my son to re-latch at the breast. Pumping around the clock is extremely time consuming and I was only using pumping for back to work and outings. My supply is awesome (3-5 ounces per breast per pumping session). Can anyone offer any advice or is it too late for him to latch? Has nipple confusion already set in? Also, he gets a pacifier we needed. Help!!
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*rtmalin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:23 PM
    My baby is 6 weeks old and I have been struggling with low milk supply since birth. I have been trying to get my baby to suck through to a second let down (which seems like it takes forever and he usually ends up falling asleep) in hopes that it will help stimulate more milk production. But would it be better to take a break and just feed him more often?
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:19 PM
    Do it AFTER the move is my suggestion. At least 1 or 2 months after, or at least a few weeks after you all feel "settled". Here is why I suggest this: If you transition her now and it actually works and goes smoothly, and she sleeps peacefully for long period in her own room, that scenario may be completely blown apart by the move to unfamiliar surroundings. If you transition her now and it does not go smoothly, you and your husband will be far more tired while doing this move. Night weaning/no longer bedsharing does not necessarily mean a child sleeps any longer. In fact, it often means the opposite. It just depends.
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:09 PM
    Without knowing anything else about the situation, I think it might make sense to stop pumping after every feeding if baby is more or less cluster nursing (nursing very frequently- every hour or so.) But if your baby is going 8+ hours every day without nursing, definitely pump then, in fact since you are concerned about your milk production I would suggest pump twice over night until you are sure production is ok. I also can only urge you again to see if baby can be roused enough to nurse at night- this does not necessarily require baby to be awake, as babies can and do nurse in their sleep. It seems very odd to me that a baby who is not gaining within normal parameters would never cue to nurse for such a long period. Is baby swaddled, using a pacifier, or sleeping in a separate room from you at night? On the other hand, if your baby is not transferring milk well, the pumping after nursing may be needed to get more milk out in order to stimulate production normally. It just depends so much on the individual situation, so I would suggest directing your questions to whoever has examined you and baby and ascertained pumping is required. Who is treating baby for the tongue tie? Do you plan to visit an IBCLC after the tt is treated? I strongly suggest doing this. BTW there is no reason to think a baby needs 4 ounces for it to be a 'full feed." this would be on the larger end of a normal feeding, which would range from about 1-4 ounces at this age. As far as if you...
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*virag1127's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:20 PM
    Hello all! I would like to nightwean my 19 month old and move her to her own bed and room ASAP. Right now I share a bed with her while my husband sleeps in another room so he gets rest before work (LO very much disrupts both our sleep with movement, nursing, and waking in the middle of the night). However, we are also moving to a new house within the next month. Soooo... I have no idea what order to do this all in. I plan to BF until she's two but hubby and I both desperately need our sleep back (and would like to share a room again!). But there's a lot of transition right now. Any advice on how to proceed? She's very attached to the boob and needs it to fall asleep for her nap and at bedtime, though has fallen asleep in the car and with hubby on her own before. TIA!
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:39 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I think that the first thing you want to do is to get in to see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC. There may be some positioning trick that you have not thought of that will solve this problem. Or at least help. This is particularly true because you're a mom with larger breasts- that can pose special challenges that requires more careful positioning, pillows, lots of experimenting with new positions... Questions about time- like "when will this get better?"- are the hardest breastfeeding questions to answer. Often moms are told that "everything gets better at 6 weeks"- but that is the roughest of averages! With my first baby, it took 4.5 MONTHS for things to get better, but with my second it took less than 3 weeks. (My second experience was far more typical than my first.) I think that if you have significant nipple trauma- cracks, blisters, scabs- you're more likely to take longer for things to improve. If your skin isn't damaged, it's more likely to be a shorter period until you see improvement. But if I put a number on your question, I'd be doing you a disservice! Regarding pumping, I would far rather see a mom use judicious pumping to give herself a break than to give up breastfeeding completely. What you are doing- taking days off, giving your baby a lot of bottles- is a risk for making the baby's latch worse or even having him start refusing to nurse. It's a choice you make when you...
    1 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:25 PM
    It depends. If you happen to respond really well to pumping and you're able to pump frequently, your supply would either stay constant or increase. If, on the other hand, you don't respond that well to pumping and/or your pumping frequency is low, you're more likely to see a decrease. Unfortunately, decreased production upon return to work is probably more common than an increase. However, once you are pumping in place of nursing, your per-session yield is likely to be greater than what you get when you nurse and then pump. Does that make sense? :eyebrow 4 oz per sitting? Wow. That is a lot of milk for a single pump session! Average yield per pump session is more like 2 oz. of course some moms get more and some less. But don't go back to the office thinking that you have to express 4 oz every time you pump. That's just unrealistic! Rule of thumb for a baby's expressed milk needs is 1.5 oz per hour of separation. Some days your baby will take more some days less, but if it's consistently over 1.5 there's a good chance your baby is being over fed and it's probably time to discuss feeding techniques with his caregivers.
    7 replies | 191 view(s)
  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:04 PM
    I had clicking with my first starting at 6 weeks and was told it was related to the OS. The laid back, or biological, position helped us a lot, and side-lying position allowed DD to just let "excess" milk flow out of her mouth, onto a towel beneath her, but you say you've tried all the positions. For trhe reflux, which now my second has much worse than my first, i do find that the advice to hold baby upright after feedings, is helpful, not just with getting the burps out, but with avoiding the spit up/vomit. Personally, I find holding him against my chest, so that he is really on his tummy, at an angle, is the best for this. During that day, that might mean babywearing. At night, it's the same as the laid back position, only I hold him higher on my chest than if he was nursing. I also use a pacifier if he gets into that vicious cycle of nurse, fall asleep, spit up, wake up from discomfort, nurse again to fall back asleep, hey look, that makes me spit up and wake up again! I am careful not to replace comfort nursing or feeding with the paci, I always remove the paci when the job is done (he falls asleep), and my son nurses A LOT so I think i'm ok for supply issues!
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mamacitablanquita's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:50 PM
    Hi - so I did see a few threads with similar concerns. I would appreciate any and all advise as I am losing my mind!! I just had my third son one month ago - I have 2 sons, 2 and 8, who I breastfed for 2 years each. I remember having soreness, cracked nipples, etc...but dont remember if it lasted this long? I have really large breasts, and so I always have had to use the sandwich method to get them to encompass the areola. This baby was taken to the NICU on his 2nd day of life for very high bilirubin counts, which meant many bottle feedings (of my pumped milk) as they didnt want him taken out of the lights for breastfeeding. When we came home, I noticed he was a bit lazy so I combined pumping with breastfeeding to make sure he was eating enough. It has been SO painful to breastfeed, that some days I exclusively pump till I feel so guilty I breastfeed a bit, but literally after the first feed Im back to where I was a day ago! I treated him and myself for possible thrush - wasnt it, barely had any white on tongue but did that just in case. I took him to the ENT - he is perfectly fine, no tongue or lip tie. I went to a lactation consultant and she said he has an overbite and high palette which sometimes is corrected at 4-6 weeks of age, and that Sacro-cranial massage from a Chiropractor (or lots of tummy time to loosen chest muscles/ loosen jaw) help. After reading several posts here - it makes a lot of sense that small mouths = poor latch and that as baby grows,...
    1 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*qd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:39 PM
    My son is eight weeks tomorrow. We had some struggles but worked through them. One of the problems was his latch as he was biting and not able to nurse well and causing me lots of pain. An ibclc said he was tongue tied so we went to a ped dentist and she agreed and clipped his tongue. Things got better but as soon as my milk came in he started to lose suction and click. Like with my first son i have oald and thus os. The clicking is getting worse and worse. Ive tried letting the start of my let down into a towel but that doesn't help. Every single let down he clicks and now hes starting to even click when there is no letdown. Ok so no big deal except this causes him to have a lot of gas. Most of the time i cant get him to burp so when i go to lay him down to sleep he either barfs or sleeps very restless. Ive tried all nursing positions and relatching him but it doesnt help. Is there anything else i should look at or do to try to fix this or is this something he might grow out of? Thanks for any help.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*yorkshiregirl76's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:58 PM
    Yes this has been most of our issues, very slow weight gain due to her getting very tired very easily because of the TT & not transferring milk properly. This is why I was told to pump after EVERY feed for 10mins, to make me make more milk so it will flow quicker for her but as I'm not filling up very fast it isn't having the desired effect because there is always so little milk there as she is feeding so often, it's like she is now finding feeding even harder. I was just really confused and wondered if I should stop pumping so I'm not taking any of the milk away from her. We tried giving her expressed milk top ups after feeding to help with the weight gain but she just won't take it as she doesn't really like her feeder cup. We are lucky if she takes 1/2oz from it & it takes 45mins to give her just that little bit! Which in turn is 45mins less of boob time!
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:45 PM
    There is no way to answer this. the body does not make milk based on a schedule, and the rate of milk production is affected by so many factors that it is not even the same for a single 24 hour period. And pumping four ounces after four hours (or at any other time) only means that at that particular time, there was at least 4 ounces in the breasts. It does not, for example, mean that it took 4 hours to produce 4 ounces. As long as your baby is gaining normally, then you make enough milk. How "quick" you make milk is simply irrelevant. How milk production works is that the more often milk is removed from the breasts, the more milk your body is told to make. The milk needs to be removed in sufficient levels each time to signal the breasts to make more, but this does not mean that the breasts need to be "emptied," nor that baby takes or needs the same amount each time. It is entirely normal and expected that you would not feel full between nursing session if baby is nursing often. Also, every time your breasts do feel full, your body starts to get the signal to make LESS milk. So breast fullness is not a goal to pursue if you are concerned about milk production. How long a baby "goes" between nursing sessions is not an accurate indicator of how much milk baby got. Many babies who are getting lots of milk each session and gaining very rapidly nurse very frequently, and some babies who are not getting enough to eat do not signal to eat very often. Let down is...
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*gold86en's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:45 PM
    Hi evergreen, my son will be 2 months old on Wednesday, and sometimes during nursing, he will pull his head back while still latched if he needs to burp. After i burp him and put him back on my breast he is fine. Also, my little guy gets all crazy fingers over here too- i just try to keep his nails clipped. Good luck!
    3 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:23 PM
    I am not sure there is anything to worry about yet, since all those poops day two put your baby a bit ahead of the game. Have you been noticing any changes in your breasts- feeling any fuller? Does it appear baby is latching ok in general? And what is the pee diaper count? What usually happens is the poops slowly transition- getting gradually lighter and lighter- so that baby has fully transitioned poops by day 7. Typically transitioning would at least start by day 4, so if the poops are still very dark and tarry still, yes, this is a warning sign that baby may not be getting enough milk...but not proof by any means. Its so hard to be sure this early because baby's very next poop may show clear transitioning. As far as the spit up goes, "sticky thick fluid" could describe colostrum, which is what you would expect baby to be getting (an consequently, also spitting up) the first several days. If you think it is something serious you might want to ask the doctor.
    1 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*kirstie.barr's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:19 AM
    My newborn daughter is 4 days old. On her 2nd day she had 5 poopy meconium diapers but since then has only had one poopy diaper (still meconium). She has plenty of wet diapers. She's also spitting up yellow sticky thick fluid.. She did swallow some mucus when she was born. She nurses constantly but I'm worried about her not having enough poopy diapers and spitting up within an hour of feeding.
    1 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*tima23's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:54 AM
    Thank you!! That's what I thought but the doctor made me feel like a failure. I love breastfeeding and I wouldn't change it for anything. It's what feels natural.
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*yorkshiregirl76's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:19 AM
    I have TRIED to wake her but she won't. We have tried stripping her off, cold wet wipes, tickling her etc and she just won't wake up. It's like she is too tired from not sleeping much in the day with all the constant feeding. I then tried dream feeding her but as she won't wake up enough, I can't get her to latch on! What I wanted to know is, if I can pump 4oz of milk after a 4hr stretch, how long does it take to make the 4oz in the 1st place? She is settled if she has had a longish stretch between feeds because my boobs feel fuller but when she is feeding so regular it seems like my boobs are not making the milk quick enough for her. Also, if she feeds very often, I hardly ever feel the let down but if she goes at least 2hrs between feeds then I have a strong let down which she likes.
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:12 AM
    I am not sure what your initial question refers to- is what enough? Enough nursing frequency? Enough milk? Enough weight gain? Etc. I will suggest this. If you have any concerns whatsoever about whether your child is getting enough to eat, or about your milk production, I would strongly encourage that you not allow baby to go 8+ hours every night without nursing. Encourage baby to nurse at least once during this time. Even at 3 months, it is not all that common for a child to sleep so long every night without eating. The definition of sleeping "through the night" is a 5 hour long sleep stretch, and of course many 3 month olds do not even have regular stretches of that length. Since your child has tongue tie and that of course may indeed lead to not enough milk intake and/or eventual low milk production, it may make since to see if baby will nurse during that time. Given that long of a sleep stretch at night, it is probably a very good thing your baby nurses very frequently the rest of the day.
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*marleenyowakim's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    Yes, I'm using the SNS to supplement 2 ounces. Once I go back to work, baby will be nursing with bottles; I have around 15 3-ounce bottles stashed in the freezer to help me start off. Once I begin pumping at work without nursing, should my output increase? His pediatrician said I need to aim for pumping 4 ounces in each sitting to make sure he has enough while I'm away. She also said that if baby gets at least 2 ounces of breastmilk a day, he's receiving all the nutrients of breastmilk - even if i'm having to supplement. I've been pumping vigorously to make sure my milk supply doesn't decrease due to the supplementation. Hopefully, the other LC I see Wednesday can give me more direction on how to address these constant plugged ducts because they seem to cause most of the decrease.
    7 replies | 191 view(s)
  • @llli*yorkshiregirl76's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:34 AM
    I know I said she feeds every hour to hour & a half but that is from the start of the feed & as she takes so long to feed because of a tongue tie, by the time she has finished feeding she wants it again half an hour later! She is getting her TT cut tomorrow so hoping that will help.
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*yorkshiregirl76's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:29 AM
    Hi, I'm a little confused & hope someone can help. My baby is 11wks old tomorrow & sleeps through the night from 9.30 till between 5.30 & 7ish. Our day starts with a REALLY good feed & it seems like I have plenty of milk for her, she will then continue to feed roughly EVERY HOUR until about 11 (cluster feeding I suppose but the feeds take ages so don't get much of a break in between). She will then have a nap for maybe an hour & a half to two hours & then repeat the same feeding as the morning. As she is feeding so often & I have to pump after feeds, it's like when she does feed, there just isn't enough milk re made to fill her so she is always hungry not long after feeding & cries for more. She has a last feed about 8.30 to 9.30 & then settles for bed. I then pump 4 hours after her last feed to keep my supply & as she hasn't fed for so long I will double pump for 20mins instead of the usual 10. I then finally get to bed at about 1am to then start it all again. When I pump at midnight (4 hours after her last feed), I can now pump 4oz between both boobs (usually 2oz each side). This has improved from the 2oz using a single pump. What I want to know is, if I can pump 4oz at midnight then I presume she is getting that, or more, when she wakes up, but how long does it take to then make the 4oz again?
    6 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 AM
    Ugh your doctor gave you a bunch of bad advice! Your milk is still the most nutritious thing your baby will ever get. It remains this way until you wean. Mill doesn't turn to water, or lose nutrients as the baby ages. In fact, your milk will provide better immune system support for your baby now that he's a toddler to help protect him from all the stuff that he'll be getting into. Nursing to sleep and nursing at night is still perfectly normal. I personally wouldn't stop nursing my son to sleep. It's nature's best tool to help a toddler to sleep, so why fight it? In regards to being bad for teeth, nursing is not the problem. As long as you're brushing your baby's teeth before bed and you don't give him a bottle of milk or juice at night for him to sleep with at night, then there's no reason to worry. Some people are more prone to cavities due to genetics while some people never get them. You can be assured that nursing is not the problem. Think about it. Before dentists, everyone was breast fed and most people kept their teeth until it got knocked out by a rock or something. It can't be all bad, right? I say keep on doing what you feel is right, momma. The doctors advice should be used for physical issues, not so much for parenting.
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
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