Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Clear All
  • @llli*shanghai's Avatar
    Today, 12:14 PM
    @mommal thanks for your continued advice and support and just reading my posts! It's very encouraging through this time. I let my LO comfort nurse as much and as often as she likes and it's how she falls asleep. I hope that is enough. I just don't want to fool myself into thinking that she's getting adequate nutrition from my breasts and continue to let her not gain weight. I really hope that some day it will click for her. By the way she is a tiny baby. She was 6 lb 15 oz and 20 inches at birth and lowest weight was 6 lb and 1 month later she is 7 lb 14 oz and 21 inches. I am now pumping 10 times a day for about 12 mins and am getting about 1-2 ounces from both breasts each time. I have about a 4 hour break at night and after that break is when I can pump 2 oz. I also find that I get the most milk in probably the first 6-8 mins and I can't seem to get a second let down. Is there anything else I can do differently?
    20 replies | 1005 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:19 AM
    :ita with the excellent post above!
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:14 AM
    :( Mama, I am so sorry that you are in such a rough place that you can't even watch your baby get a bottle. i know that it is very hard the first few times- I remember when I needed to give my oldest a bottle of formula, and I felt AWFUL. It felt like I had failed as a mom and a woman, all within 2 weeks of having a baby. It does get easier, I promise. Try to see the bottle as a tool that is helping you meet your breastfeeding goals and your goals as a mom. If you are going to exclusively pump, the ideal set-up is to have a hospital-grade pump. The PISA is a good pump but it is prmarily designed for the working mom who is relying on it only part of the time. If it's all you can get, that is okay! I would simply suggest looking into getting a hospital-grade machine, especially right now while you are trying to build supply. The best way to increase supply with a pump is to pump frequently and to empty the breast as much as possible when you do. Supply is created by demand, so every time you remove milk from the breast, your body gets a message to make more. This seems counterintuitive to a lot of moms- they think "Well, if I let the milk build up, there will be more to pump out". But letting the milk sit in the breast will cue the body to reduce production. So you are aiming to pump as many times as realistically possible in a 24-hour period. 8-10 or more pump sessions per day, with some taking place overnight, would be excellent. That is what I did when...
    20 replies | 1005 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:51 AM
    If you would like to nurse and baby isn't into it, there are ways to gently, subtly convince her that it might be a good idea. Like taking her into a dark, quiet bedroom where everything is very boring. Nothing to do but nurse, in that situation, right? Or sitting down in your favorite nursing chair- sometimes that can subtly cue the baby to start thinking about nursing and pretty soon she is crawling over to you...
    3 replies | 166 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:47 AM
    :ita This sounds like something that requires help from someone with specialized knowledge. If an IBCLC or LC is not available, talk to your doctor or midwife.
    4 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:37 AM
    Yes, your pediatrician is obviously wrong! At this point, I would be looking for a different pediatrician but I don't know that I would switch doctors if you can't find someone who is obviously better. What I look for in a pediatrician is that he/she be a good diagnostician, and know how treat disease. If my kids' doctor can do that, then I know I can just ignore their advice on things like sleep and breastfeeding. Then next time you go in, think about what YOU want to talk about, and what is of concern to YOU. Three are answers you can give that will short-circuit the conversation about breastfeeding and co-sleeping before it even has a chance to start. Of the doctor asks if the baby is breastfeeding, the answer can be "He nurses during the day." You didn't lie- you just conveniently forgot to mention that he also nurses at night. If the doctor asks where the baby sleeps, you can answer "He has a crib." You don't need to mention that he never uses it. ;)
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:28 AM
    If you just got your period back, I think it makes sense to be very patient with your body. IIRC, the average chance of conceiving is about 30% per cycle. And if your cycle just started up again, you can kind of expect things to be a bit wonky for a few months, which probably puts the chances even lower for a while.
    5 replies | 334 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:44 PM
    Hi Sprocket. It is amazing how much progress you and baby are making! I think that whenever an IBCLC gives a mom a plan and the plan is tried, some tweaking of that plan is typically needed. After all we are talking about biological processes and human beings, not machines. It sounds like the pumping suggested is "just in case" pumping. It is not "You must pump 5 times a day or your production will tank" Or "You must pump 5 times a day because you do not make enough milk yet" but rather "If you pump 5 times a day, even if baby is not nursing super efficiently yet, we can be extra super sure that your milk production will be just fine. So do that, just in case." But the reality is that this specific plan (pumping 5 times every day but during the day only) is 1) Exhausting 2) worrying you and 3) making it harder for baby to nurse after you have pumped. Given any of those things, some tweaking of the plan would be in order. Ideally I would suggest calling your IBCLC and discussing the need for adjustments to this plan with her. She has seen you and your baby and is very familiar with the entire situation.
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:17 PM
    Hi pthgrl. I have three kids, all of whom nursed well into their preschool years. I have weaned 2 kids and am currently nursing a child who will turn 4 this summer. I attempted nightweaning my oldest child at 17-18 months of age but gave it up after a few months of worse sleep for everyone. He was a very, very frequent waker. I have experience nightweaning that same child at an older age and also transitioning two kids from the family bed to their own beds and rooms. I also used to run a nursing toddler support group where nightweaning and sleep issues was a common topic. So that is my experience in this area. Obviously every child is very different and it is not really possible to predict reactions to night weaning. In my experience, nightweaning can be done at any age, but it is not likely to be easier to night wean at 18 months than it is now. Kids usually start putting together much longer stretches of sleep and also may become more comfortable sleeping alone at an older age- think between age 3 and 4. If there is a time that night weaning becomes generally noticeably easier, my guess is that would be a more realistic age. This does not mean your child might not be easier to night wean before that, I am speaking very generally. I also have seen nightweaning or other partial weaning attempts turn into complete weaning or nursing strikes. While I would not say this is common, it does happen sometimes. Developmentally, the second year of life is one with many,...
    1 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*stina.hi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:32 PM
    Yes, it makes sense. I think I will at least reduce pumping for now, then stop altogether for a while and start again later. Thank you for your suggestions and help!! I appreciate it! :gvibes
    12 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:43 PM
    Yes over time the lactating breasts soften more, feel less full or even empty, and by then if not before you will probably feel much more "even." But you may always produce more on one side than the other. Everyone is a little asymmetrical.
    12 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:15 PM
    Thank you Maddieb for the info, this is very helpful! Will my breasts eventually "even" out once my milk supply collaborates with my babie's demand?
    12 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:54 PM
    Yes obviously this is all patently ridiculous. You are right and pediatrician is incorrect - the problem is what to do about it? You could challenge the doctor and say can you please give me sources for the information you're giving me, you could bring your own sources to attempt to educate her, or you can find another doctor, or you can live with it knowing you're going to get poor advice in this area. It is frustrating that even young doctors still get little to no education in this area.
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:45 PM
    Layne.cough yes it sounds like one breast makes more. This is typical. You can hand express as needed or encourage baby to nurse a bit more on that side as needed for your comfort. Going several sessions on one side regularly would act to increase production on that side while decreasing it on the other, so that might lead to more "lopsidedness". This is not an exact science and it probably makes the most sense to just approach the feelings of overfulness as feels right in the moment.
    12 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 PM
    Ok so you have enough milk saved already for at least the first couple weeks back even if you did not pump at all at work. But of course you will have to pump, (or hand express) not only to continue to produce milk but to protect your self from getting engorged, getting plugs, mastitis, etc. How often you will need to pump is not knowable at this point, lots changes in the first several months of life. But generally speaking, The higher your milk production, the more often you will need to pump at work to prevent these issues. So while in theory it sounds great to make more than enough milk, in actuality it is the root of many possible issues. My wonder if at this point you can stop pumping altogether, or reduce it to at most one or two ounces once a day or less, as long as you can do that comfortably? Or stop now and start again in a month? Or whatever feels best to you. You may find that you need to reduce pumping slowly to avoid getting engorged. I think it is smart to keep avoiding bottles as much as possible as well. "Practice" bottles can be both infrequent and very small. Does that make sense?
    12 replies | 228 view(s)
No More Results