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  • @llli*oncemorewith's Avatar
    Today, 03:50 AM
    Hi Mommal and tclynx I use a medela swing to pump. The most I've ever got at one session is about 20mls. If I pump more than 10 times i.e. straight after feeds and half way between feeds, I might get 50-70mls that day. I've been given some info on combining hand expressing with breast compressions and pumping so I'll try that too. I've thought about renting a hospital grade one but I'm not sure how much difference it will make. I'm not sure what you mean by how does pumping feel. I don't get a let-down which I do when I feed him. I've swapped quite a few of the pumping sessions to give him a snack instead. I figure that's as good if not better. His weight gain is good now I'm supplementing - over 200g last week and he gets around 300ml of supplement a day. I managed to track down a good LC at a local support group and I taer amounts, keep checking whether he's till hungry after each bit and stop when he's full (rather than the recommended 60mls every 3 hours). He has a big feed every 3-4 hours and a snack in between. I pump when I can and try to do at least 2 or 3 a day. This may not be strictly enough but it has made a huge improvement in my mental health as I can leave the house :)
    7 replies | 190 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 AM
    This is a myth that has a little fact in it. The grains that some beer is derived from act as galactagogues in some women. But alcohol dehydrates so that will tend to lower production. Of course, on the other hand, one (real) beer is perfectly safe, probably won't dehydrate you, and some moms find it relaxing and that never hurts. Rather than non-alcoholic beer, which I have never understood the point of, I would suggest, Look into eating oatmeal: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/oatmeal/ Other grains that have reported galactgogue properties: Barley and brown rice. Lately I have heard of many moms taking brewers yeast. Good resources in low milk production generally: The book Making More Milk and http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/low-supply/
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:55 AM
    Have you seen this article on reoccurring mastitis? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/recurrent-mastitis/
    3 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:51 AM
    If baby is truly being cue fed, she may want to eat twice some days and 5 times other days. I would suggest, discuss with nanny if she is using paced bottle feeding techniques. Also, cue feeding does not necessarily mean it is always best to 'wait for hunger cues." Depending on baby and time of day, that may mean too much time has gone by baby is now very hungry and upset. This can particularly happen if the feeding is right after nap or after a period of activity or distraction. Just as it is ok to offer the breast, it is ok to offer a bottle, assuming the bottle is given correctly, and only in the amount baby wants, including, no amount. Also, maybe at that particular time, baby wants something different than the other times. Nanny can try cold milk, different room, go outside, etc. paced bottle feeding: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf and video: http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+paced+bottle&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 AM
    I agree with mommal. Breastfeeding does get easier. But pumping every three hours will pretty much be just as hard on day 100 as it was on day one! This is why rigid pumping schedules like this often do not work. They drive moms crazy so it is unsustainable. WHY are you being told to pump every three hours? That is NINE times a 24 hour day. That is more than many moms who are exclusively pumping-no nursing- would be pumping! Also, there is no need to pump every such & such hours. This makes something that is already hard basically impossible. Say a moms goal is to pump 8 times a day (just as a for instance.) Such a mom could pump like this on Monday: 8 am, 10 am, 2 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 8:30 pm, 10 pm & 4 am. This would give her time to sleep on either side of the one overnight pump. Of course on Tuesday, she could pump at entirely different times, just keeping in mind her goal of trying for 8 times. Babies do not nurse on set schedules, so there is no need to pump on them either. If on Tuesday she can only pump 6 times, that is not the end of the world. She just resets her goal and tries again for 8 on Wed. I have no idea how often you actually 'need" to pump. But if you could set your own flexible schedule, would that make it more doable for you? When pumping due to supplementing, generally a person will want to aim to pump to counteract how much baby is being supplemented. This does not necessarily mean you will express that exact amount, usually this will...
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:57 AM
    Nursing 6 times a 24 hour day would be on the low end of normal for a 2 month old. However, for some babies, it would certainly be enough. This infographic explains one reason why different babies will nurse with different frequencies: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/infographics It sounds as if you have some concerns about your milk production. This is understandable due to your breast surgery. Yet a pump output of 4 ounces is on the HIGH side. Many mothers have an unrealistic expectation of what is normal pump output. Being in the 10 percentile on a growth chart is perfectly normal. Growth charts measure the varying growth rates of normal, healthy children. What is a sign of a potential issue is if a baby stops gaining to the point she is dropping off percentiles. This confuses me: Do you mean she nursed very well an hour later, took the bottle very well, or nursed very well after getting a bottle? I think it is a good idea to pump a little in order to relieve pressure if you are getting full between nursing sessions. But I would suggest, don't then give that milk to your baby with a bottle. Freeze it and save it. Also, avoid pacifiers as much as possible. You want to encourage baby to nurse for comfort. Maybe try stopping bottles entirely and pacifiers as well for a couple weeks (think of both as For emergency use only.) see if this encourages your baby to nurse more often. Give it a little time. If baby has no interest in nursing more often, and...
    3 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*mommele's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 PM
    Problem is when I offer when she's not hungry she gets upset withme....she'll latch for 3 or so minutes then get upset and refuse....then I don't know if I start counting from that super short feeding or the previous. And the whole day is thrown off because I keep on trying throughout the day and I never get a good feeding from her. Today I let her ask me (when I say that I don't mean crying...I never wait till that point....I mean a little complaining)...one stretch went 5 hours!...but I got a good feeding from her when she was ready. Feedings were at 8:30pm, 3am, 7:20am, 12noon, 5pm, 8pm (being this last one). Does this sound ok?
    3 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*laurennn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:33 PM
    I've heard that drinking a beer will increase milk... I feel uncomfortable doing that, but would a nonalcoholic beer do the same thing?
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*ccb52914's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:50 PM
    No, unfortunately we can't do a mid-day feed at work (although I would love to!).
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    ohh okay, no discomfort before or after spitting up. Actually she smiles. Thanks!! I was getting a little worried.
    3 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    Okay, this is likely not possible otherwise it probably would already have been happening, but just in case-- would nanny be able to bring her to you for her middle meal during your lunch break?
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    "First of all, in posting this, I presume that the baby is gaining weight well and is generally a happy baby. If that’s the case, spitting up and aspirating are not a bad thing. In fact, probably they are a good thing. Breastmilk is full of immune factors (not just antibodies, but dozens of others as well that all interact) that protect the baby from invasion by bacteria and other microorganisms (fungi, viruses etc) by lining the baby’s mucous membranes (the linings of the gut, respiratory tract and elsewhere). A baby who spits up has double protection, when the baby drinks the milk and it goes to the stomach and then when he spits it up. I frequently use this example of how breastfeeding is so different from formula and bottle feeding. Spitting up formula, if all else is going well, is probably not bad. Spitting up breastmilk, if all else is going well, is probably good." Dr. Jack Newman, found here: https://m.facebook.com/LLLAndover/posts/571889979565552
    3 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 PM
    Does your little one seem in pain or discomfort during or surrounding the spitting up? If not, I believe that spitting up is really normal and not to worry about. My little one is alms of seven months old has been spitting up from the start, though it decreased in amount and frequency around three months.
    3 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:16 PM
    My 1 month lately has been spitting up. She is EBF, Their has been no change in my diet. Is it thats she's over eating?! :confused::confused:
    3 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:15 PM
    :ita with the PPs. The most common reason for evening fussiness is just the baby being a baby. They get tired and cranky just like adults do! The best thing you can do is get a stack of novels or a Netflix subscription, and spend the fussy time glued to the couch, nursing and nursing and nursing....and nursing some more! That's what I had to do with baby #2, and while it was frustrating at the time it was nevertheless infinitely easier than trying to soothe her in other ways. 6 weeks was the maximum fussy time for both my kids. But it gets better, I swear! By around 3 months they start turning into little people, who interact with you and have more predictable rhythms.
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    Don't let anyone tell you that you'll regret it if you quit. Only YOU can judge whether or not this is true. Yes, a lot of women do regret it, but there are a lot who don't. I agree with the PPs that hands-on help from an IBCLC is a really good idea right now. Maybe the problem here is something simple. Or maybe it's not, but help from a LC will enable you to see a clear path forward. It sounds like your biggest issue right now is sleep, or rather lack thereof. Since that seems to be the case, I would think about dropping some or all of the nighttime pumps. If you get some more sleep and are better able to function during the day, maybe the whole pumping and nursing thing will seem more doable. And maybe you'll have more energy to focus on getting baby to nurse more.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    First try and relax, I have a 1 month old and BF, i from time to time bottle bf and have given her formula, only thing was that she seems to not be satisfied with the formula and was drinking wayy to much like 5oz and was still fussy, it wasn't gas either.:shrug She needed that comfort from nursing. I am no longer pumping unless i need to. ( going out and leaving her with daddy). Try different positions to BF her , that might help her latch better. I put her to bed around 10:30-11pm, change her diaper and i make sure she's in a milk comma :) . She wakes up one time around 3-4am. feed her again and straight back to sleep until 8-10am. Also i find that going to bed as soon as she does works for me. She even has gone thru the entire night without getting up. I couldn't imagine pumping so much. its too much time consuming. Most babies adapt well to formula, all my friends BF for maybe 1 week or 2. They couldn't take it anymore. They are on formula and doing great. Try and pump as much as u can now and freeze it if you would still like to give bm and introduce more formula, this way once you go to work u don't have to worry about pumping as much. Good luck!
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Provided all weight gain and medical is good. Get a sling or carrier and wear him during the afternoon/evening during these days when he wants to comfort nurse or be touching mamma all the time.
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Some babies do well with few feedings per day. I don't think I know of any who have spontaneously dipped below 5-6 nursing sessions per day, but they do exist. So it's possible that your baby will do just fine with widely spaced feedings. If you decide to simply feed on demand, watch her diaper output and weight gain carefully. If they are on track, then she's getting enough. My preference, in this situation, would be to offer before she demands it. Nursing is a two-way street, and it is okay for mom to offer in advance of baby's request, just like it's okay for baby to request when mom isn't ready. This would go for any baby, but I think it is particularly a good idea when you have a smaller baby and therefore less margin for error.
    3 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:01 PM
    I agree that you should get some help. Preferably some hands on help. Have you looked into taking medication that can help with your milk supply? How is babies latch now, did it improve? Have you looked into physical therapy to help improve milk transfer? http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?120631-Resources-for-Milk-Transfer-Issues and IBCLC may be able to help you figure out if it is possible to wean off the supplements or not. http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901 Have you looked into using an at the breast supplementer instead of the bottles? This would at least save you one step in the nurse, supplement, pump treadmill. And Rest assured, breastfeeding need not be all or nothing. If you need to use formula to make up the difference, especially when you go back to work, then it is what you need to do. Think of formula like medication, if it is needed, it is needed.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Wow, that is persistance! If he exhibits that same determination throughout his life, he'll go far. Maybe that's cold comfort right now, but still, wow! It sounds like the issue isn't nursing per se, but rather his attachment to the breast. He's using it the way other kids use a blanket or a stuffed toy- as a source of comfort during his most stressful moments. I would try taking him to the store and letting him choose a stuffed toy or blanket, no limit on price or theme, with the stated intention that the item he chooses will be his comfort item (or lovey or whatever term you want to use) when he's upset. Then when a tantrum hits, have him go and get said item. You could also try allowing him to come in for cuddles, but interspersing some item, like a pillow, in between him and the breast. One of my friends swears by the glitter bottle- see http://www.instructables.com/id/Calm-Bottle-aka-Glitter-Jar/. When a tantrum strikes, the bottle gets a good shake, and then the kid has to wait for the glitter to settle before negotiations for whatever it is he wanted are resumed. By the time the glitter settles, the unreasonable urge has usually passed.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*seoid's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:27 PM
    Just going to add that my little one dislikes the taste of coconut oil. He will eventually latch but he pulls all sorts of faces before doing so. That being said- it's wonderful for sore nipples and healing.
    8 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*ashley.s's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:09 PM
    I stopped nursing at 18 months also. We were down to 1 or 2 feedings/ day. My situation was a little bit different. I think my body stopped producing milk making it painful for me to keep nursing. One day I decided we were done because it was painful to nurse him. So I just stopped offering it. If he asked, I would distract him. If that didn't work I just simply said no, he got upset but was content just cuddling on my bosom. My son also has his alternative comfort (his thumb) it was easy at this age for him to forget about "booby". He didn't ask me past a week. I didn't deal with engorgement but I would only pump to relieve engorgement. The less you pump/nurse the less you will produce.
    5 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:07 PM
    I agree with mommal. I definitely have a higher producer (also the same side that holding her in is more comfortable for me--- chicken or the egg!?!?...), but I feel like keeping both going at *their* own best is a necessary insurance against something happening to one. (So much personification!)
    2 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*vanne's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:04 PM
    I'm so sorry, thrush is horrible! I was on antibiotics for the last 3 months of pregnancy, and you bet we got thrush BADLY! First pediatrician (male) was very reserved in treating it. Second pediatrician (female, and a momma) treated it very aggressively. We were both on topical and systemic treatments. You need effective treatment. This is serious stuff because it is SO PAINFUL that it affects baby's ability to eat and momma's ability to feed! Pumping with thrush was horrifically painful. Expressing by hand worked much better for me.
    8 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:58 PM
    Has his weight gain trajectory been satisfying to your pediatrician thus far? Does he have a sufficient number of wet and dirty diapers? If both of these are "yes", then I would say that it sounds like you have a baby that loves to be near his mama! And if so, congrats! I think, barring any outlying medical condition, babies tend to know what they need, and to be good at asking it of us. Are you using any of the lying-down nursing positions? Are you practicing safe co sleeping? Even if you aren't intending cosleeping to happen, if you nurse baby in bed, it can be good to make it a safe place just in case. Side-lying was truly a eureka moment for me in those early weeks (and still a favorite!).
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:50 PM
    "I've started to feel incredibly anxious/depressed and something needs to change." I am so sorry to hear that you're hurting, and that things have gotten off to a rough start. This all is really rough. You're mental health is indeed really important. Whatever you decide to do in re: breast/pump/formula, I would urge you to seek out some help, whether that be touching base with your family physician or just rounding the wagons and making sure you're surrounded by loved ones, who will be an extra set of hands to hold a baby, to make nourishing food for you, take dogs on a walk, etc. I hear you- that what's going on right now is Not sustainable for you, that you need for something to change. I hope some more experienced mamas will chime in, maybe some mamas with combo feeding first hand knowledge, to help you have options to consider for that change. Babies are also changing all the time, too, so there might be some of that just around the bend that could help too. Are you working with any in person help? An IBCLC, a WIC peer counselor, a La Leche leader?
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*anaduralia's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:48 PM
    Would pumping help? Perhaps once a day just to empy out anything in there? You could do it after she goes to bed or during nap this way you won't feel like you are stealing milk from her. Then she could drink it from a cup when you usually offer a cup.
    3 replies | 126 view(s)
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