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  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Today, 12:53 PM
    That Kelly mom link is interesting because it says a sign of being developmentally ready is the development of the pincer grip. For my first, I remember that coming past 7 months. The BLW book doesn't mention that as a readiness sign, does it? (Lent my copy) I'm doubtful because the book talks about cutting pieces big enough that a baby can grip them in their first, which did not require the pincer grip.
    4 replies | 651 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:17 AM
    Huh, that is an interesting question. What exactly is "transitional formula?" What is the difference in the ingredients? Does this mean transitioning from breastmilk, or is it an age related thing? Either way, it sounds like a marketing gimmick to me. The more different kinds of formula they get a person to buy, the more formula overall that person is likely to buy, and the more money they make off each baby. Formula is formula. Unless your baby has some reaction to something in formula, just choose a brand you can afford. Formula feeding is likely to change how your baby digests the food, so be prepared for some difference in poops.
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:10 AM
    Right?!!! I sometimes wonder if we got here because men have been in charge of society for so long. We let men take over as childbirth attendants. We let men take over pediatrics. Until pretty recently, men were the arbiters of everything we "knew" about women's bodies, infant development, and infant care. And since men can never experience childbirth, or know what it is like to nurse a baby, maybe they can never really get it...? They always end up trying to tweak nature to be a little more the way they would like it to be. Like Dr. Joseph DeLee, father of the routine episiotomy, who declared that giving birth was akin to the perineum being damaged by a pitchfork. ('Cause he would know, right? :rolleyes:) Or the guy who was charge of English foundling hospitals back in the 1700s, who had the bright idea to have abandoned babies farmed out to local wet nurses, but then asserted that nursing just 4 times a day was sufficient. It's really not until the 20th century that some women started to reclaim the territory of childbirth and maternity, and to learn from each other what those things were actually like, and what actually worked.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 10:44 AM
    :ita The pediatrician sees your baby for 20 minutes every month or two. So how well does he/she know your baby's hunger cues? And if you try to space your baby's feedings out, who is going to be there to deal with the sad, crying baby who doesn't understand why mama won't feed her? Not the pediatrician! Pediatricians get a lot of training in how to diagnose and treat disease. They get almost none in what is normal for breastfed babies, when it comes to feeding frequency. That is one reason why La Leche League exists- to fill that knowledge gap. Your baby's feeding pattern is 100% normal. My kids fed every 30-90 minutes at that age, and if I was super lucky I might get a 3-4 hour stretch out of them at night. Your baby's feeding duration is also normal. Babies take all sorts of different amounts of time to feed. For example, my first kid took nearly an hour, my second took about 5 minutes. The best way to know how long your baby needs to eat for is to let her eat for as long as she wants. Milk supply is created and maintained by the frequency and duration with which a baby nurses. If you take your pediatrician's advice, and decrease the frequency and duration with which your baby nurses, your supply is also going to decrease. I don't want to be over-dramatic here, but this is the beginning of how nursing ends for a lot of moms. They get baby on a schedule, and due to decreased demand the mom's milk supply tanks, the baby stops gaining weight well, and...
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 10:16 AM
    Wow, that is fabulous!!! Good job, mama. I am so thrilled that you tried the experiment and saw the result you were hoping for. Sometimes all we really need to do is to trust our bodies and our babies to do what they should do! Now that baby seems to be doing well with exclusive nursing, I would start dropping pumps. But because I'm conservative by nature, I would drop them slowly, monitoring the baby's weight periodically as you do so. I'd drop one today, and keep doing weighed feeds- maybe not weighing the baby at every feeding, but a few times a day. If things seem to be going well, and milk intake and diaper output continue to be normal, I would drop another pump session after a few days. But if you see milk intake or diaper output drop off, that's a sign that the baby still needs help maintaining supply, and you'd want to add pump sessions back in. Don't worry about longer stretches or baby sleeping through the night right now. First of all, the idea that all babies eventually go longer stretches without nursing during the day or night is a myth. Babies under a year often continue to feed every 1-3 hours during the day. I know mine did! And the definition of "sleeping through the night" is actually a single 5 hour stretch of unbroken sleep, not the 8 hour stretches we adults expect and crave. My kids both continued to nurse at night until they were 2 years old, and during their first 12 months they went through many periods of increased night-waking...
    11 replies | 321 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 10:01 AM
    Based on the information provided, it's impossible to say what this is. On the one hand, since it's on the areola it's more likely to be a clogged Montgomery gland, since those are on the areola and blebs generally occur on the nipple. But on the other hand, we just can't tell without seeing it! When you picked at the spot, what came out? And have you been using any sort of cream or antimocrobial agent on the area?
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:56 AM
    Non-metric mamas, I did the conversions and this baby has been gaining about 1 lb per month, up until the 3-4 month window during which baby gained about 3 oz. OP, from 0-4 months most babies gain an average of 5-7 oz per week, or about 0.14-0.2 kg per week, or about 0.56-0.8 kg per month. So it seems to me that something happened in the last month that took your baby from normal gain to very low. Given that her nursing frequency and diaper output are normal, I would be looking into 2 possibilities. The first is measurement error. The second is that the baby isn't well- is she perhaps still suffering from some sort of illness that is causing her to have trouble gaining weight? The fact that your doctor doesn't seem to want to investigate the latter possibility makes me think it would be a very good idea to get a second opinion.
    6 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*rel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    Wow, 2 to 3 hours is quite normal for a 2 month old. If the baby is hungry, feed her. And 20 to 30 min is what my son did at that age! At her age, breastfeeding on demand is so important...for her growth and for your supply. As for her fussiness, it's possibly reflux or gas. Is she tooting?...it may be something you're eating causing her a little tummy distress. If it's reflux, you can place a small towel rolled up UNDER her crib mattress when she sleeps so she isn't completely flat which may ease her discomfort. Ultimately, you do what you feel is best mama...don't let anyone, even a doctor, get in the way of you doing what you feel is best for baby!
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*rel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:33 PM
    Hey all... So a few weeks ago I started experiencing pain when my 10 month old would nurse on my right side. Before long I realized there was a small bump on my areola, next to my nipple- this is what was causing my pain. I mean excruciating, toe curling, tears in your eyes pain! I did a little research and concluded I must have a clogged Montgomery gland. Over the next few days I pumped and did warm compresses and it seemed to help, the bump came to a "head". Not sure what to do, I gently picked at it and, like a pimple, some stuff came out. It immediately felt better. I went back to nursing but it hasn't completely went away and is now painful again. Not only that but I am now getting one on my other breast!! The lactation consultant I called was trying to tell me it's a milk bleb and how to go about treatment for that. Now I'm more confused and at my wits end. Is it a milk bleb or are they clogged Montgomery glands?? And how can I get them to heal? Exclusively pumping would be hard, as my little one gets out way more milk than pumping. Help!!!
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*habiba's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:07 PM
    How is your baby now? Have same problem please help.what did you do.
    7 replies | 1490 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:37 PM
    Thank you so much! Your posts gave me strength and convidence to go and try few days without supplementing. And he was just fine! Never called for more and slept really well. We still got 3-4 h stretch at night which was great. Scales show that on average he does take 60-70 ml (2 oz) with it being around 100 (4 oz) at night and 40-50 (1.3 oz) towards the evening. I have been feeding him a lot more as well. Maybe my boobs aren't so bad at producing milk after all. I just have one more question. Now that I know we are getting somewhere I would like to drop the pumping. How quickly would you drop the pumps? Drop one a day or one a week? Or maybe just pump at night and drop day pumps? Also as he gets older I understand he will get longer stretches during the day and eventually start sleeping through at night. Is it possible that his lessen demand will cause my supply drop? I know you had a similar story my Mommal - how did you find your supply working once your LO started sleeping through the night? I'm scared with less stimulation my boobs will go back to their inefficient themselves Thank you!
    11 replies | 321 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:15 PM
    I have been thinking about this and just need to get it out. I think it really crazy and appalling that there is such a lack of information about breastfeeding out there, and MISinformation, especially by some doctors! I have been reading through the forum and see so many of the same issues come up. It is mind boggling that some medical professionals as well as family members can be so unsupportive of literally the most natural thing we can ever do. And also that we are so un/misinformed about this process. How did we get here as a society?? It makes no sense. I am so grateful to have found this forum that provides support, encouragement, reassurance, and factual information. It really makes a difference. If i had listened to the one family member who gave me bf advice I wouldve done a huge disservice to myself and my baby. I was advised to space feedings and let my breasts fill up so that baby can get a full meal, and was told that feeding on demad was causing my baby to not eat enough. Luckily I knew better by doing my own research. I think it is so strange that we are a formula society when breasts were made for feeding babies! What the heck! Sorry, end of rant.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:11 PM
    Sorry I cannot think in metric. I will leave it to someone else to figure out what those weights might mean. Generally: It is typical for rate of gain to slow after 3 or 4 months. Simply dropping down percentiles is not necessarily any cause for alarm. What evidence aside from slow gain is the doctor using to diagnose low milk production specifically? Pediatricians (or any other kind of doctor) receive no training in assessing and solving lactation issues of any kind, unless they seek such education for themselves. A different medical opinion might help, but you may get more of the same. If the doctor is not being clear about how much formula to give baby each day, and what they expect from the formula, and is not going to be closely monitoring gain after putting baby on formula, and is suggesting solids at 5 months as a matter of course rather than looking at this specific baby and figuring out if that might be appropriate, that is red flag in my opinion. I would suggest seeing a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) and discuss with her how to best ascertain if there is any breastfeeding-related issue and what it might be. Professionally, an IBCLC will not be able to override a physician's directive to supplement with formula. But you could use her findings to discuss options with your baby's pediatrician. I agree with esthervegan that that the possibility exists that some underlying illness is going on that is being overlooked in the rush to blame...
    6 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:55 PM
    At the age of 2.5 months she suffered from diarrhea and since then has been having problems gaining weight. Perhaps the diarrhea is a symptom of an underlying problem completely unrelated to breastfeeding. It is not common for an exclusively breastfed baby to get diarrhea. So I am wondering if your pediatricians had an alternative explanation. I can understand if you do offer your baby supplemental feeds and she still does not gain suffiicent weight. Then you will know you are dealing with an metabolic issue not a lack of breastmilk issue.
    6 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:45 PM
    " Just not sure if I should use supplement formula or just the regular that I'm going to use." This is a good question. What does your pediatrician recommend?
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 PM
    My own working theory is that your "over-supply" is a evolutionary anachronism when humanity relied on women like you to nurse more than her own infant to insure the survival of the group. For modern mothers oversupply is bothersome because her own infant can not suckle for comfort and therefore miss out on the sweet spot for nursing..when it feels good for both mother and child. I have known mothers to express and donate because of oversupply. Is that something that might work for you?
    2 replies | 83 view(s)
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