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  • @llli*mjenness's Avatar
    Today, 01:06 PM
    Hi Everyone, I am a FTM and my baby girl is 6 weeks old now. I have oversupply with forceful letdown. My baby was diagnosed with foremilk/hindmilk imbalance. My poor LO Is miserable with gas and bloating. She couldn't sleep and you can feel her stomach churns. She would doze off only to wake up screaming in pains. The only way to get her to sleep in on her stomach on top of me or my husband (I'm afraid to let her sleep on her stomach in the crib) We tried little tummy gas drop which help but only lasted about 2 hours or so. The gripe water seems to help immediately but 10 mins later she would scream in argonize pains. We tried the gripe water twice and same reaction both time so I stop using gripe water. My LC recommend block feeding. I did the block feeding for 7 days (3 feeding per breast) which help bring my oversupply down some. I still pump for 2-3 mins before switch side to help her get the hindmilk ( I get 2-3oz of foremilk in those 2-3 mins of pumping) At the in person consult the LC concerns that since LO is only 6 weeks old she doesn't want me to diminish my supply too much. She suggest to stop block feeding or reduce to 2 feeding per side. It seems like it been helping. I nurse her roughly every two hours. Is it ok that a 6 weeks old still eat every two hourse? My LC seems shock when I said she feed every two hours but didn't say anything. However now I hit another wall. She only wants to nurse for 5-10 mins on the boob she would unlatch or fall asleep. I would...
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*ise410's Avatar
    Today, 09:37 AM
    I have been pumping since my son was born (4 wks 1 day) and storing in the freezer and occasionally for short periods in the fridge first. I noticed today we had some moldy foods in the fridge and I also noticed something in our freezer smells. Apparently i have questionable housekeeping skills....but I'm wondering if it would affect the milk? The stored milk is in sealed glass bottles or jars and obviously not touching the milk in any way. I don't want to throw out my entire stash, but I'm a huge germaphobe so I also worry that it'll contaminate the milk in some way.
    2 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*francismum's Avatar
    Today, 08:08 AM
    Hi All, Thanks so much in advance for reading and taking the time to answer. :gvibes I was hoping some of you would have some advice for me and my lil one. My ds is just about to turn a year old...(where has the time gone! :lol) and we are still exclusively breastfeeding. He is doing great - he weighs almost 22 lbs and has not been sick at all other than being congested twice. (Thank goodness for Nose Frieda!) He took his first steps at 7 mos and does the low crawl :clap He is incredibly smart and very interested in everything. However, my dh is a father to two others from previous marriages and is a bit skeptical that ds is not on solids yet. I am a big "go-natural" proponent and others joke that I would have better lived in the pioneer age ;) so I take comfort in the fact that God made our bodies to do this and I have researched A LOT as well as contacted some people about him not being on solids yet. He has eaten some banana around 9 mos, but it messed with his digestion and poo pooing so we discontinued. He was more interested in playing with it and smashing it anyway. I am not having any issues with supply, thank the Lord and love breastfeeding my ds. How do I handle the criticism and disdain? Some feel I am depriving him or making him too dependent on me. I know this isn't the case, but how do I overcome the pressure? I have researched much on attachment and bonding as well and know the solid foundation that it lays for our children. Seems most...
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*lenarx's Avatar
    Today, 09:59 AM
    My LO is almost 10 weeks old and EBF. I return to work in a week and a half and in anticipation, I've started bottle training with expressed breast milk. She absolutely refuses and is hysterical when the nanny or DH offer it to her, regardless of whether I am in the room or out. We've tried 4 different bottles and nipples and no luck. I would usually break and offer the breast after 20 minutes of struggle or so but these last 4 days, the nanny and I buckled down and only offered bottle during what would be my work hours. She would sometimes take an ounce, maybe 2, with great struggle and only in a side-lying position (how I normally breastfeed her). She seemed to mostly be holding out until I offered the breast at 4 pm. Now, over the past 2 days she seems to have developed total oral aversion and screams hysterically at bottle, breast or pacifier. She wants nothing to touch her mouth and hates being put in any of her preferred feeding positions. I am only able to feed her now by offering breast while I stand and dance around the room while shushing frantically. I absolutely have to return to work, and am heartbroken at her refusal to eat. Does anyone have any ideas, advice, or tips? Or a clue of a specialist or someone I could see? My pediatrician just keeps saying "She will eat once she is hungry enough" but she has held out for period of 6 hours or more at a time. I don't want to see my baby failing to thrive or losing weight. Please help! :cry:cry
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*umg's Avatar
    Today, 10:33 AM
    Hi, this is my first time posting. I'm sorry the post came out so long, but if you could just take the time to read it and help me out I would appreciate it so much. I've had lots of issues with breastfeeding. I had to supplement my first baby and with the second I did everything I could so I could exclusively breastfeed. It has been really hard. I've had low supply, had to pump and feed a lot, had blisters, latch issues, etc. Now she is 3 and a half months old, sleeps 8 hours at night on average and naps twice a day (around 2 hours each nap). She feeds only 5 times a day every 3 hours but seems satisfied, is happy and has been doing great gaining weight. I pump once a day about 3 hours after her first feeding in order to have a better supply and also to have breastmilk stored in the freezer if there is the chance I need it (have only given her a bottle about 4 times when she was around a month and my supply was low). I usually pump around 70ml from the left breast and 35ml from the right one. 3 days ago I only got about 35ml from the left breast which worried me, and later in the day I had very big lumps on my breast and saw a white spot on the nipple. That spot grew and grew throughout the day and at night it was a huge bleb or milk blister. My breast hurt a lot and the lumps were even bigger. I tried everything to get rid of the clog and blister: massages, heat, pumping, breastfeeding in different positions. Nothing worked. Until I finally told my husband to try and...
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*umg's Avatar
    Today, 10:35 AM
    Hi, this is my first time posting. I'm sorry the post came out so long, but if you could just take the time to read it and help me out I would appreciate it so much. I've had lots of issues with breastfeeding. I had to supplement my first baby and with the second I did everything I could so I could exclusively breastfeed. It has been really hard. I've had low supply, had to pump and feed a lot, had blisters, latch issues, etc. Now she is 3 and a half months old, sleeps 8 hours at night on average and naps twice a day (around 2 hours each nap). She feeds only 5 times a day every 3 hours but seems satisfied, is happy and has been doing great gaining weight. I pump once a day about 3 hours after her first feeding in order to have a better supply and also to have breastmilk stored in the freezer if there is the chance I need it (have only given her a bottle about 4 times when she was around a month and my supply was low). I usually pump around 70ml from the left breast and 35ml from the right one. 3 days ago I only got about 35ml from the left breast which worried me, and later in the day I had very big lumps on my breast and saw a white spot on the nipple. That spot grew and grew throughout the day and at night it was a huge bleb or milk blister. My breast hurt a lot and the lumps were even bigger. I tried everything to get rid of the clog and blister: massages, heat, pumping, breastfeeding in different positions. Nothing worked. Until I finally told my husband to try and...
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*roya2015's Avatar
    Today, 06:52 PM
    My daughter is 11 weeks old and I've been mixed feeding from the beginning. She started crying really bad the second day of birth and the nurses could only calm her with formula. I think that lead to my low supply. I've been pumping and taking herbal supplements to increase my supple and I could increase it but now baby is taking anywhere between 4 oz to 8 oz a day. I would love to wean her off the formula if possible but if not I don't want to give her more than this. Her weight gain at her 2 months checkup was great (77 percentile). Any advice would be appreciated.
    0 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Today, 08:58 PM
    Here is an update on my situation. I would appreciate any feedback! So today hasn't been great in terms of nursing- my little guy has been super fussy at the breast all day. He normally nurses for 20 minutes each side. Every feeding today he has nursed for 5-8 minutes where I can hear him swallowing. Then he either falls asleep or starts batting my breast whil grunting and squirming as if nothing is coming off. I try to get him to relatch, but usually to no avail. Basically he seems super hungry and can't wait to get back to eating. Sometimes I take a break to burp him. He often whines for a minute, but then is fine. If he needed more to eat, he wouldn't be calm after I've pulled him off, right? We had some difficulty putting weight on him intially, and the ped attributed it partially to long nursing sessions where he was just sucking but not taking in milk and burning too many calories. I don't want that to happen again so I am hesitant to keep feeding. Could his sleeping be because he has expended too much energy? To link this back to my last post, I haven't started my period and when I have pumped, there is still milk coming out so There is something left he just isn't getting it. Diaper output has been fine, but I also supplemented with some bottles this morning. Sorry this is so rambling, but I'm nervous!
    9 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*francismum's Avatar
    Today, 08:30 PM
    Thanks Maddieb for your reply. The disagreement is about both. As far as compromising on offering solids, I have not offered them due to my personal feelings that it is best for him to be EBF to a year before introducing. I have done the research and feel confident that it is what his body needs, esp considering the very small amounts that are taken in anyways. I don't worry about him knowing how to eat, he is very smart and picks up on things extremely fast. I am certainly not worried about the mess! :lol I love seeing him explore and his favorite thing right now is digging in the mud ;) I know bm is the superior food and he is doing very well. I just struggle with the lack of support as well as criticism. I am human after all ;) I am aware of baby led solids and plan on doing just that after the 12 mo mark. Have you read any on Mayim Bialik? She is one of a few that I know that also waited until 12 mo to introduce solids....I have read some great reads on Attachment Parenting. One of which is titled Attached by Robert Karen as well as works by the legendary John Bowlby and also am reading Nisa, a story about a Kung woman. I am shocked about how much is portrayed about breastfeeding in the media and by doctors or peds. It is saddening to me that it is so hard to find the support you need and info that you are looking for on such an important part of a baby's life. Thanks for the book suggestions! I will pick them up, I love to read ;) Also, have to mention...
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*luvmy.munchkins's Avatar
    Today, 07:02 PM
    I never thought about being sneaky. Prolly wouldn't work for me either. Hahaha. There is always hope.
    13 replies | 319 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwarrior's Avatar
    Today, 07:00 PM
    I just saw your post. How are you doing? Still having trouble with plugged ducts? I have been struggling with constant plugged ducts for the past 2 weeks. I am also on a total elimination diet (little man is allergic to milk and corn so far!). I know of one other mom who was on an elimination diet and began having a lot of issues with clogged ducts. Could it be a side effect of our diet??? I'm really struggling with my resolve to continue breastfeeding. This is my third child and the first time I have ever considered using formula!
    8 replies | 322 view(s)
  • @llli*roya2015's Avatar
    Today, 06:48 PM
    I have almost the same situation. My daughter is 11 weeks old and I've been mixed feeding from the beginning. She started crying really bad the second day of birth and the nurses could only calm her with formula. I think that lead to my low supply. I've been pumping and taking herbal supplements to increase my supple and I could increase it but now baby is taking anywhere between 4 oz to 8 oz a day. I would love to wean her off the formula if possible but if not I don't want to give her more than this. Her weight gain at her 2 months checkup was great (77 percentile). Any advice would be appreciated.
    12 replies | 535 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Today, 05:49 PM
    Yay! That's great news! I think we can all look back at that 3rd and 4th day after coming home from the hospital and remember how confusing, emotional, exhausting, TERRIFYING it was. Like the others said, it's a roller coaster when you're figuring it all out, but once you've got it it's such a beautiful thing. Good on you for being so supportive!
    8 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*harrisds's Avatar
    Today, 05:34 PM
    Thank you everyone for the input. This week has been a roller coaster but even though my wife's milk was very white by Tuesday it came in yesterday fully, like opening the Hoover dam. She said it is now flowing very well. I was able to come home this weekend and walked in the door and she was sitting on the floor breast feeding just fine. The week was very stressful for my wife but things are much better now. Again thank you for the help.
    8 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Today, 05:32 PM
    Ahh, I hadn't even thought of the fact that baby is nursing more thoroughly at times when compared to other times. That explains a lot then. I don't know why I was thinking the amount left over from a nursing session would be a constant! Thanks for pointing that out! once I return to work and am pumping in place of nursing and if I find that my storage capacity is small (ie only getting 2 oz), should I try to pump more often at work? I will probably have to in order to maintain demand. I hadn't thought about the fact that a low suction can also pump the milk efficiently. I have to say that it is less tender the more often I have pumped. Maybe it was just getting used to it like you said. I might just see a IBCLC anyway, just to make sure I'm doing it all correctly Thanks for your help!!
    4 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*lind3's Avatar
    Today, 04:59 PM
    Couldn't have said that better myself mama7008! I live in Virginia and I agree with everything you said. Good luck to you as well. :)
    15 replies | 402 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:10 PM
    These are some good resources on plugs and blebs: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplebleb/ There are also tips in these links on dealing with that remaining skin. One concern I have is that you are not nursing very frequently. Usually babies will nurse at least 8 times in 24 hours, and usually 10-12 times or more. So your frequency of 5 nursing sessions a day is very low. This has two potential consequences. First, your supply may be affected. Second, plugged ducts tend to go along with inadequate milk drainage. You may find that nursing more frequently helps with better milk drainage and is preferable to nursing plus the pumping you are doing, since pumping often does not drain the breast as well. It never hurts to offer the breast more frequently. Baby will not overfeed at the breast so if she doesn't want to nurse, she won't.
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:04 PM
    I'm pretty sure my husband would not read it either.
    13 replies | 319 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:01 PM
    So at this point you are pumping IN ADDITION to exclusively breastfeeding. This is very different from pumping INSTEAD of a nursing session. When you are pumping right after nursing, you will see variation depending on how thoroughly baby has just nursed. Whereas when you are pumping over the course of a workday, you will be replacing nursing sessions with pumping, so optimally you will be getting about what baby would have been drinking had he been nursing over that period of time (and it will be more than what you are getting now, usually around 2-4 ounces per session but depends on your storage capacity). Yes, coconut oil or other oils (eg olive oil) can be used to help lubricate. That may be less practical once you start working, though. Don't worry about not turning it up high enough. Letdown is a finicky thing and can be affected by stress (including psychological stress) as well as pain - that is, turning the suction up higher, to the point you are in pain, is actually counterproductive by inhibiting letdown. Some moms do need the very lowest level of suction which is why it's nice to have the option to adjust. And, it might not hurt to try out a different flange size - it sounds like the breast is getting sucked in? So maybe you need a smaller flange? This can be a bit tricky to figure out on an internet board, if you are still having pain you might consider a visit with an IBCLC, who should be able to properly fit the flanges. Pumping does take some getting...
    4 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:54 PM
    This is a great thread, thanks for reviving it! A lot of the posts really resonated with me. My guess is that most moms who work outside the home go through this struggle - either at some point or continuously - and it's interesting to see the various ways in which moms figure out how to resolve this internal conflict. m11612, I'm so glad you found a way that felt right for you and your family.
    21 replies | 4969 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:43 PM
    Absolutely! It's all about prioritizing, prioritizing, prioritizing and figuring out what you absolutely have to do (as opposed to someone else). How nice for you that you have a husband who's a chef! Though perhaps it means he has enough cooking on the job? Yes, I think all those little things can really add up - ten minutes here, not making the sandwiches etc. Showers can be tricky. Some ideas: if you have some kind of seat or chair that you can put facing the shower (if you have a glass door to see through, for example), baby can sit in the seat for a few minutes and at least be nearby; sometimes the flow of water can actually be soothing to baby (I have a very distinct memory of my oldest actually falling asleep this way as a very young infant). Or, if baby likes being IN water/bath, having a bath seat that you put baby in so that baby can be in the shower (or bath) with you - ie you bathe together, but the bath seat helps so that you can also bathe yourself. I also went through prolonged phases of always bathing babies this way. If neither is a go, then you have to use the precious nap time or someone-else-holding-baby time to shower.
    8 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:36 PM
    So if I understand correctly, you have seen a decrease in pump output. This is not the same thing as low milk production nor does it necessarily indicate low milk production. At the around the same time (or before?) you are seeing plugs. Here are my thoughts. One common cause of plugs is infrequent and/or not effective enough milk removal. Of course, infrequent and/or not effective enough milk removal also will cause low milk production. Your child nurses remarkably little for a three month old. As you say baby is gaining fine, so that is not a problem so far, at least as gain goes. However, if this is causing low production or plugs, then it IS a problem now and may actually lead to a not-enough- milk production problem. So my first thought is, would baby be willing to nurse more often? If baby sleeps swaddled or with a pacifier, trying nights & naps without those might encourage baby to wake to nurse more often. Baby being in same room as you are for sleep is also a good idea if you are not currently doing that. Pumps are not typically as effective as baby nursing for milk removal. And an ill-fitting or malfunctioning pump is possibly going to cause plugs, blebs, and breast damage. So I would also suggest consider slowly eliminating pumping and instead, encourage baby to nurse more often. If this is not possible or desirable for some reason, then I would suggest that the problem may be with your pump. Pumps do malfunction and parts wear out. If you are relying...
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:33 PM
    I think it's a great idea to educate them about paced feeding. You might also consider sneaking in a dream feed (ie, nurse while baby is sleeping, which is something baby will instinctively do) to break up that long stretch at night. One way to do it without you having to wake again at night is to nurse baby when you go to bed.
    5 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:59 PM
    EDIT: (Ok I am probably repeating mommal here, but I wrote this whole thing so I will post it :D) Hi. I also had overproduction and fast letdown with all my kids. So I understand your concerns. However, I think you may be getting some confusing ideas from somewhere. First, please be aware that while severe overproduction and the accompanying fast letdown might cause baby to have more gas and to be overly fussy, and of course can lead to mom having engorgement, it is NOT a disease that a child can be diagnosed with. There is no such thing as a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance "diagnoses." You do not need to worry about your baby getting "enough" hindmilk, ever. That is not the problem. A baby who got nothing but foremilk, if that were even likely (which it is not) would still be healthy and gain fine. The issue is when there is fast letdown that creates an overabundance of lactose into baby all at once. Lactose is healthy and something your baby very much needs. But If you have a fast letdown, baby may be getting more of this than she can handle easily all at once, but please know that the gas and discomfort, while upsetting for everyone, is not harming her, and does not cause any actual damage to your baby. ALL of your milk is good for your baby. Everything you describe as far as feeding frequency, preferring to nurse on one side, and short nursing sessions is normal for a baby whose mom has some overproduction going on. Some things (Like nursing every 2 hours (and...
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:49 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby and on making it to 6 weeks of nursing! The first thing to know about foremilk/hindmilk imbalance is that it's pretty much the biggest non-issue in breastfeeding. It's not bad for a baby to consume more foremilk than hindmilk, and it doesn't mean that your baby is getting a poor diet or a diet which doesn't have enough fat in it. It might make her more gassy and more uncomfortable than average, but babies are typically gassy and fussy creatures regardless of their diet. The second thing to know about foremilk/hindmilk imbalance is that it is pretty much exclusively a product of oversupply. Take care of the oversupply and the problem- such as it is- will vanish. Your LC gave you excellent guidance about how to handle this issue. Block feeding takes care of oversupply, and once the oversupply is pretty much managed it is best to stop the block feeding and simply let time and baby's demand fine-tune your supply. There are a few more things you could be doing at this point, which are: 1. Avoid the pump. Every time you pump, you are telling your body to continue to make excess milk. 2. Continue to feed very frequently. There is nothing surprising about a 6 week-old baby wanting to eat every 2 hours. Many babies nurse more frequently than that! Frequent nursing is particularly useful when mom has oversupply because it prevents the breast from getting too full. The more full the breast is, the...
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 PM
    This happened to me too. Grrr!! My DD is 10 months old and I am so tired of these last 5ish pounds of baby weight. But as soon as I buckled down and cleaned up my eating habits, my supply dropped. So frustrating. I think yes and yes. Frankly, I personally would never block pump unless it aggravated your oversupply situation to a level that caused difficulties for your baby. I figure, if you're going to pump might as well do both boobs. It never hurts to offer.
    2 replies | 99 view(s)
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