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  • @llli*florida2001's Avatar
    Today, 05:03 AM
    hi, my baby is 5.5 months old and I'm breastfeeding only. I tried couple of times to offer bottle with formula(before we go sleep), because my baby is waking up during the night every 3 hours hungry. She is refusing bottle. I will travel next month and was hoping to give her formula on the long flight (11 hours) to avoid breastfeeding every few hours. Can somebody give me an idea how to learn her take bottle. I am happy to continue breastfeeding, its just the odd occasion when I need to go out without her, that it would be nice to leave daddy to look after her thank you
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*j323cole's Avatar
    Today, 05:23 PM
    As a first time mom I've been having a very very hard time with breastfeeding. We had issues latching at the beginning and I could only get him to nurse while using a nipple shield because I had very little to no help while I was in the hospital. We started having to supplement with a bottle at night and that one bottle turned into more as the weeks passed. My son is now 13 weeks and I'm not making nearly enough milk to keep him fed. I started taking fenugreek, drinking mothers milk tea, drinking as much water and Gatorade as I can stand, eating oatmeal and making lactation cookies and nothing is helping. I've talked with my family doctor and my ob and they are saying to do what I've already been doing for weeks. There has got to be a way for me to get back my supply so I can continue to breastfeed. I have been pumping every 3 hours and each time I seem to get less and less. The most I am pumping is 2 ounces from both breast combined. I don't want to give up but I'm almost to the point of just giving up and going 100% formula. :( any help would be greatly appreciated.
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:03 PM
    I know this seems counter-intuitive. But it only seems that way because people tend to immediately 'blame' poor gain on low milk production, or only low milk production, rather than looking at baby's ability to transfer milk- poor milk transfer will cause poor gain just as much as low production would! So, what you describe with weight loss would happen if for some reason, baby is unable to transfer milk efficiently. Of course baby not gaining normally might also happen if mom is removing so much milk when pumping, there is not really enough milk "left" for baby when baby nurses. So when a mom is pumping as well as baby nursing lots, it might make sense to try to have pump output and supplements "match" more precisely. And this is probably most helpfully done if pump output is reduced to what baby actually needs in supplements, rather then increasing supplements to match pump output, because the goal (presumably, not every mom has the same goal) but the typical goal is more nursing and less pumping and supplementing. Here are my thoughts on weight checks. One, is that since gain fluctuations, rather than steady gain, is the norm, daily weight checks are far too frequent and may be unduly concerning. It is hard because then what do you use for your guide? You have to use pees, poops (assuming baby IS still pooping daily, if not, then poops becomes not very reliable) behavior, and more or less, your intuition on a day to day basis, with accurate weight checks every...
    23 replies | 1087 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:37 AM
    So you mean if you lay down with baby in your bed when you want a nap, he will not fall asleep? What positions have you tried using when in the bed? (I mean during the day- if you prefer baby is in crib at night and that is working for you, that is fine.)
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:31 AM
    Block feeding is certainly tricky when trying to deal with plugs. Block feeding requires that the breast be "blocked" -left for a time without milk removal in order to get full- so that the fullness tells that body to reduce milk production- and of course, leaving the breast to get full is something that leads to plugs and/or mastitis, especially in moms who are more 'prone" to developing plugs or mastitis. I would suggest that while 'draining' or emptying the breast may help with clearing plugs, it is probably not needed in preventing them. Personally I got rid of an enormous plug without ever really 'emptying' the breast, using very frequent milk removal by baby, -enough so it could get the breast softer but not empty- and vibration. By frequent I mean I encouraged baby to nurse as much as baby would when awake, which was often more than once an hour, and set my alarm so baby would nurse every 2-3 hours overnight. Some lactation consultants suggest that if a mom is block feeding, she can lessen the risk of plugs by hand expressing or pumping just enough to slightly soften the breast even when that breast is being blocked. Genna talks briefly about it here- http://cwgenna.com/blockfeeding.html There is also something called Full Drainage and Block Feeding- a technique for battling OP that is not responding to regular block feeding- basically you do everything you can to 'empty' the breasts ONE TIME (and then only as needed-but not more than once a day-...
    3 replies | 130 view(s)
  • @llli*sef's Avatar
    Today, 10:56 AM
    I am frustrated for sure! We know he was losing weight because we were doing daily weight checks (no clothes, same time of day,etc.) on a scale our midwife let us borrow. However, the last few days, every time we put him on the scale we get three different readings! We tried changing the batteries but I think we need a new scale. Thank you for what you said about our situation being "rare." There is so much guilt when you are not able to EBF your baby despite every desire, intervention, and effort! And there is so much pressure to continue even if that means total and complete exhaustion ... When he was losing weight, I was pumping the same amount and he was nursing constantly but getting very few if any supplements of breast milk. I still can't seem to wrap my mind around why, if he is only receiving supplements of my own breast milk in addition to nursing, that he wouldn't be able to get away with no supplements. The book you suggested is in the mail! Right now I am nursing about 8-10 times a day. He gets one supplement before "bed" of about 2 ounces. Throughout the day he MIGHT also get a 1.5 supplement if he is showing signs of hunger after nursing (this usually happens in the afternoon). A few days I have pumped ONE less time. I've noticed my breasts feel fuller and he nurses longer. Every day I have more milk stored in the fridge than we will use that day (I am able to pump around 9 ounces lately). Thank you so much for your detailed response and suggestions!...
    23 replies | 1087 view(s)
  • @llli*minimuls's Avatar
    Today, 09:36 AM
    I haven't tried the indirect heat or vibration. I will try that. I have been on antibiotics for both rounds of Mastitis. Today is my last day on the second round of antibiotics. I have a history of Thrush and since I have been on antibiotics I have been trying to avoid. I definitely have an issue with over production. So when I have not been dealing with plugs I have been trying to fix the overproduction by block feeding. My LO nurses every 2 hours sometimes every hour and sometimes every 3. He starts feeding at 6 am then 8:30 am, 10 am, 12 pm, 3 pm, 4:30 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm, 9 pm, 10 pm, 11 pm, 12 pm--- then picks back up at 6 am. When I am dealing with mastitis I usually wake LO at 3 am for a feeding and try to keep our schedule at every 2 hours. It's been hard to regulate with the plugs that keep coming back. I have been trying to not pump to not encourage more production but have been pumping with plugs to try to empty breast. However, pumping does not seem to totally empty breast. Nothing really seems to empty this one breast. The other is not a problem.
    3 replies | 130 view(s)
  • @llli*etoile's Avatar
    Today, 09:22 AM
    Oh ok, I see you mentioned that earlier too, sorry I missed that part. :) I think the pp's have established that nursing to sleep is not going to give the baby bad sleep habits, but it sounds like the real issue is that you need more sleep yourself which I can totally relate! Could your parents come to your house and watch both kids for you so you can take a nap alone? Maybe just temporarily until you get a little more rest? Maybe your husband can take the baby too? It sounds like you have a lot of support and hopefully they can work with you on helping you get some extra rest. :)
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*csmf's Avatar
    Today, 08:39 AM
    We have not been bed sharing because he sleeps fine in his crib at night. I have no problems putting him in the crib at night. It's the naps where I can't put him in the crib. He needs to nurse to sleep but he won't lie in bed to nurse. I have to nurse him in the recliner but I can't transfer him to the crib after he is in deep sleep and stops sucking.
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*etoile's Avatar
    Today, 07:02 AM
    I noticed that you said that you have been trying to transfer to crib for a nap, but before that were you bed sharing? http://www.llli.org/faq/cosleep.html That is the one thing that has really helped me get a couple more hours of sleep. Granted it isn't still quite enough, I average 4-6 a night, less than that when we are up with teething and a cold like this last week or so. I really sympathize with the sleep deprivation, it is hard! But, that is great you have help with the house and your other child!
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:43 AM
    So, the way I see it, you have 4 different issues that require separate solutions: 1. How to get your child to take a bottle. 2. How to get her to take a bottle with formula in it. 3. What to do about the 11 hour flight. 4. What to do about the every-3-hours wake-ups. For issue #1, I would start by pumping or expressing some breastmilk and putting that in the bottle. Formula tastes pretty nasty, and babies will often reject it because of the taste. Try offering small portions, and try different timing. Offer the bottle before nursing, when baby is hungry. Try after nursing, when she's not. Try in the middle of nursing. Try different bottles with, nipples, and milk temperatures. And most importantly, try having someone who is NOT YOU offer the bottle, maybe when you are not in the house at all. Babies rarely want bottles from their moms, because they know she has the real thing millimeters away. For issue #2, once your baby is taking a bottle of breastmilk, start adding small amounts of formula to small breastmilk bottles (no more than 2oz). Start with a bottle that is 95% breastmilk and 5% formula, or something like that. When baby is accepting that sort of bottle, bump up the formula concentration until the baby will reliably take a bottle of plain formula.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*csmf's Avatar
    Today, 06:40 AM
    I actually don't have any housework to do. My husband takes care of everything and my parents take care of my older son at their home during the day. I'm solely responsible for the baby, but I'm so exhausted and want to nap during the day but I can't because he has to nurse to sleep and continue sleeping on me. I can't fall asleep on the recliner because I'm afraid of dropping him or suffocating him. I tired nursing him lying down in bed but he won't nurse in that position.
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*etoile's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    Hello! My baby is 9 months old and I have a 4 year old as well. We did baby-led solids with my 4 year old almost exclusively (no purées) when she turned 6 months old. This time around we have been doing some self-fed purées and some traditional baby-led solid foods. I have found that this site http://www.babyledweaning.com and forums were pretty helpful with food ideas and dealing with challenges. When I feed my 9 month old purées, I just load a spoon and put it on the high chair tray for him to feed himself. He sometimes eats it and sometimes it gets smeared everywhere. Very messy, but a fun intro to new tastes and textures. I also give him big hunks of soft fruit like a peeled pear or mango pit to gnaw on. We have tried cucumber spears, big pieces of banana, piles of roasted sweet potato and squash. We recently started with cooked beans that I lightly squish for him, but he is getting older now and is working on his pincer grasp, so I wouldn't recommend that right away. No meat yet, but we don't eat a ton of meat to begin with. Get a tarp, some bibs ( or go with a topless Bébé! :) ) because it will get messy. I would recommend reading about the difference between choking and gagging as well. There will be some gagging and that can be a little nerve-wracking! I think baby-led solids really helps the breastfeeding relationship as it allows babies to regulate how much food they eat and don't get too full on solids when they should be drinking milk primarily for their...
    1 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    Ha that is funny, and makes sense to me actually. Yes toddler acting as a "relief valve" is definitely handy! An old LLL saying is that "Every Weaning is Unique." I have found that to be very true. It is a story you and your child write together and there is no perfect or preferable "script."
    24 replies | 8126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:50 PM
    Not only is it ok, it is a great way to get a break. It's mom's secret weapon! This idea that we teach babies to need to nurse to sleep by nursing them to sleep is poppycock. Babies nurse to sleep because they are made that way, and when they have outgrown that need, it will go away, and if that is taking longer than mom would like, some other comfort measure can take it's place. If you need to be moving around to make dinner or care for your older child, will a carrier or wrap work?
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*etoile's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:21 PM
    Hi! Both of my children have nursed to sleep and have slept on or near a person for a good portion of their baby-hood. My 4 year old now sleeps like a champ in her big girl bed and I am hopeful this will be the same for my 9 month old, eventually. I know it can be frustrating when you are "stuck" and you need to do chores etc. but this phase will pass! I second the baby wearing recommendation. It is a great way to be a little more productive while baby naps. Hang in there!! :)
    8 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*searsmami's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Thanks for all the insight! Will look into children's books on the topic. Toddler will start preschool part-time in September, so that will be a whole new transition for everyone. If anything, tandem nursing is incredibly helpful when I'm experiencing a "backup" of milk (like today). I brought this up a couple of months ago to a LLL leader who said there were "pumps for that," (of course there are!) but being as I didn't have a pump at children's museum today, toddler was more than happy to oblige for a minute while baby was napping in stroller (unfortunately manual expression is not a technique I've mastered) So you're right maddieb that there could be that partial reluctance on MY part as well. As for being around toddlers who are weaned, he has plenty of playdates with kids who don't nurse and it's actually mortifying for me when he starts asking to nurse or tugs at my shirt in front of the other moms. I often find myself making excuses or hiding in another room with my child while he nurses for half a minute! Lately though I say to him, "We won't be nursing at _____, so you'll have to wait til we are back home..." And for the most part, he has adhered to this. I can see him start to ask, then stop himself. But if he's hungry or tired (I have to have snacks avail pre-emptively & make sure it isn't past usual naptime) or if he's gotten hurt, then he'll insist on nursing. So anyway, lately I prefer to be around moms who ARE nursing toddlers, like at LLL, and...
    24 replies | 8126 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    The RDA for iodine for lactating women is 290 mcg (micrograms). I assume the supplement has 325 mcg, not 325 mg- if it's mg, we're talking about a thousandfold overdose! This is an interesting read: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional. I found the following particularly relevant: Breast milk contains iodine, although concentrations vary based on maternal iodine levels. Infants who are exclusively breastfed depend on maternal iodine sufficiency for optimal development. In a study of 57 healthy lactating women from the Boston area, median breast milk iodine content was 155 mcg/L . Based on reported infant iodine needs and the typical volume of breast milk consumed, the authors calculated that 47% of the women may have been providing their infants breast milk containing insufficient amounts of iodine. During the weaning period, infants not receiving iodine-containing complementary foods may also be at risk of iodine deficiency, even in countries with iodized salt programs . To ensure that adequate amounts of iodine are available for proper fetal and infant development, several national and international groups recommend iodine supplementation during pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood. For women living in countries with weak, sporadic, or uneven iodized salt distribution, the WHO recommends iodine supplementation for all women of childbearing age to achieve a total iodine intake of 150 mcg/day. For pregnant and lactating women in...
    1 replies | 121 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    This may be kneading behavior (slightly poorly directed) and that is entirely normal. It might be exploring/learning behavior. At a certain point in development, baby's world becomes the world they can touch, grab, and pinch or otherwise feel, move or manipulate with their hands. Again, entirely normal and in fact important for development. In other words, babies (and toddlers) just do this! Some more than others, but it is pretty universal behavior. It is not because they are bored with nursing. I would suggest, give baby something to hold, redirect baby's hand, hold baby's hand or arm, distract baby by talking or singing, etc. Not any one thing is likely to 'work' for long, so you will probably have to switch up tactics. For the feet pushing, I suggest try different positions when nursing, and find other times that work for letting her exercise those leg muscles. I would sometimes loop my arm under the knees or play with my kids feet when they nursed if they were 'trying ot stand" when nursing and taking my breast with them. Of course you could also just end the nursing session if it is getting to uncomfortable for you and baby will not settle, and try again later. This is a good article that touches on this subject: http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/nursing-manners-2/
    4 replies | 157 view(s)
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