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  • @llli*goli79's Avatar
    Today, 05:56 PM
    I've finally gotten to a point where breastfeeding doesn't hurt and my daughter latches easily, but my doctor has recommended I stop breastfeeding and switch to formula. My daughter had (not visible) blood in her stool - one week there, then negative two tests in a row, then positive again. Her stool is also very watery, has mucus and alternates between yellow and greenish yellow, but never any seeds. I have been off dairy and soy for 6 weeks. The doctor said there is no substance to her stool and that this means she isn't absorbing nutrients - milk in, milk out. My daughter's weight gain had been acceptable. Most recently she has alternated between screaming at my breast and bottle of breastmilk and taking it fine with no problem (I may be trying to feed when she isn't hungry), and we recently picked up Zantac in case it is reflux. She goes crazy until she poops (explosive) and then calms down...but often won't eat again after she passes stool. Eating triggers what seems to be a painful bowel movement that prevents her from eating comfortably. This is new in that she would eat through the discomfort before. Anyway, I'm a little upset/disturbed that my daughter may not be getting nutrients she needs despite gaining weight and I'm also surprised and upset that the best is thing per the doctor is to stop breastfeeding. I know I have an oversupply that I've been trying to manage, and while it isn't under control, it's better than it was before. Anyway, I'm at my wit's...
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:54 AM
    My LO will be 11 months next week. :o Currently she eats breakfast and dinner with a snack or two in between. I'm not sure how much she eats - we're doing baby-led solids so I let her eat until she indicates she's done (usually by trying to toss everything on the floor lol). I nurse her before offering solids, and other than that, she nurses probably 4 other times during the day and anywhere from 3-6 times at night (mostly for comfort/to get back to sleep...). I actually have a couple questions: 1) How often should I offer her solids? She's pretty enthusiastic and wants to eat every time she sees food anywhere 2) After a year, how does offering solids change - our goal is to make it two years, though right now we're having so many challenges I'm just concentrating on making it to one year. Ideally, I'd like her to transition to just nursing before naps/bedtime and maybe once or twice during the night after she's a year old, though I don't really want to risk her weaning completely. She's very attached to the boob, and we're having difficulty with a very strong nursing sleep association, so I don't think that would happen.
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*zinzielizabeth's Avatar
    Today, 10:42 AM
    LO just turned 3mo last week, so behavior could be growth spurt related? Anyway, he'll latch, maybe take a gulp, maybe not, come off the breast, look around and then dive back at me. Over. And over. And over again. What do I do? He doesn't take a bottle, so there's no drama there. Could it be supply? He's not crying, so if he's underfed, he's not complaining about it! Help—so annoying!
    2 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 PM
    Today I was using my pump and the motor noise sounded like it slowed for a few seconds, then resumed normal "rotation" (the cycling noise the pump makes as it sucks in and out). It did this several times throughout the pumping session. The suction seemed ok, and I pumped the normal amount as I would during this session. It just sounded weird, like the motor was slowing down or going out. I have a Medela double electric pump (like the PIS only the cheaper version they give to health insurance companies and WIC, which is where I got mine). I used this pump part time with my first baby, but now have been using it to pump 4x/day for the past 2 weeks for baby #2. I just wanted to know if anyone has experienced this problem. My thoughts are that it could be a few things: 1. the electric current from the outlet is fluctuating and pump received less power for a few seconds, 2. the AC adapter is going bad; it does make a rattling noise like something is loose, but it's been doing this for awhile, or 3. the pump itself is going out. I suspect it is 2, the AC adapter is going bad, but this is only a guess. Does this part go bad sometimes? If the whole pump was going out what would happen? My insurance company won't cover the cost of a breast pump (is grandfathered in and thus does not have to comply with the new ACA regulation). I also don't want to buy a new pump if it is just the AC adapter. But on the other hand I can't have it just quit on me because I need it...
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*veggiemama's Avatar
    Today, 07:09 PM
    Nursing my first born has been easy peasy so far following guidance from my midwife, until my 8 month old caught a cold. The first night she was up all night nursing and then for a few days she's been nursing much less. I've taken her to the pediatrician and it's just a cold and she's doing better but now I'm stuck with this oversupply - what is the best thing to do? I pumped a little this morning because I'm afraid of getting mastitis but I don't want to pump too much and make things worse. I'm sure she'll go back to eating more soon but I am at capacity again and she is not interested. Any advice how to deal with a short-term oversupply? Please help!
    1 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*butterfingers's Avatar
    Today, 05:23 AM
    I posted previously about shallow latch and pain and this issue is still going on to some degree though getting better. Baby is now 5 weeks, I think I have a reasonably quick letdown, baby can often splutter, choke and click at the breast and when she pulls off milk will drip freely. I am trying reclined nursing. I am feeding on demand and not pumping, I am very reluctant to try methods to reduce supply since I know that "oversupply" is normal at five weeks and I just wish to leave things alone to regulate of their own accord. Problem is baby is now becoming very fussy and feeds are rarely longer than ten minutes, if that. Ten minutes of nursing at the breast will actually routinely take 20-30 minutes as she comes off every minute or so (sometimes seconds) and then refuses to re latch. She also rarely demands to be fed. She seems like 4-5 minutes on one side is enough. She does not comfort nurse :( How can I get her to be a happy, fuss free nurser again, it feels like a battle every time.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 PM
    I called Medela to help troubleshoot my pump, and after no immediate change in pump function they sent me a new one no questions asked. It was weird because the customer service rep said she would send me a new one BEFORE verifying my name or anything first. I could have been lying about even having a pump! She never took insurance info or anything either, just my name and address. My point is first thing I would do is call Medela and they'll help troubleshoot. See where it goes from there and they may replace your whole pump!
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*goli79's Avatar
    Today, 07:44 PM
    Thank you - I didn't expect to have such an emotional reaction at the idea of not breastfeeding. I was really worried she wasn't getting the necessary vitamins and other nutrients after our doctors visit. I am hoping, strangely enough, that working will finally lower my supply to match my baby's needs. I'm pretty convinced that MPSI is over diagnosed, as every other person I know has an allergic or intolerant child. I will keep trying until her 4 month appointment on 9/24 and see where we are then. My hours at work are pretty terrible, and breastfeeding is something I want to continue so I can keep at least that bond between me and my child. Granted, she is often not a happy camper at my breast these days, but the overnight feeding usually goes without incident and I hope I can hang on to it.
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 07:43 PM
    Flexibility sounds great right now. We've been through a lot of challenges (and still going through them...have an appointment with a new breastfeeding specialist Friday, actually), so having the pressure to primarily feed her breastmilk gone will be a huge relief. Thankfully she's taking to solids really well so far. =) Thank you both for your input!
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:27 PM
    Hand express until comfort is restored, and trust that your LO will maintain your supply where she needs it to be. You want to pump only if your baby is truly not nursing enough to keep the milk moving.
    1 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:24 PM
    Of course you have been crying your eyes out! I don't even like to imagine what I would have done if someone had suggested I stop nursing due to bloody stools. Probably something that would have landed me in jail... :/ Here are 2 very useful links on bloody poop: http://kellymom.com/health/baby-health/bloodystool/ http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Protocols/Protocol24_English_120211.pdf (this is the important one if your doc is trying to convince you that you need to wean because your baby is allergic to something in your diet- note that it does not recommend switching to formula unless the baby is truly not thriving despite an elimination diet) Luckily, having an oversupy is often something of a blessing when a mom needs to return to work and rely on the pump for a lot of her day. Working moms tend to have trouble making enough milk when relying on the pump, and oversupply can compensate for that challenge. Foremilk/hindmilk "imbalance" is actually the biggest non-issue in breastfeeding. A high lactose intake from oversupply can make your baby more gassy and fussy than average, and could cause bloody poops, but it is in no way harmful to the baby.
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:02 PM
    After the first birthday, you can offer solids whenever it is convenient. If 3 meals a day is convenient for you, great. If you want to do 3 meals a day and some snacks, great. If regularly scheduled meals doesn't work for you, you can just let your kid snack at the erratic times when she is hungry. After a year, the primary way in which your approach to combing solids and nursing changes is that prior to a year, you nurse first and then offer solids so as to maximize your baby's breastmilk intake. After a year, you can continue to nurse first or you can offer solids first, your choice. If a nursing session is particularly annoying to you, you can either put up with it or you can choose to wean from it, or you can set limits around it (e.g., no twiddling, time limits, location limits, etc.). Again, your choice. I personally think it's best to avoid idealizing some particular nursing pattern. You want to empower yourself to nurse in a flexible way.
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*goli79's Avatar
    Today, 06:56 PM
    This helps ease my mind...as I've been crying my eyes out. Her poop is very watery, and has been for some time. She had seeds in the first few weeks of life. And I had been pretty convinced that I had an oversupply that was the culprit. But the doc told me oversupply would not cause mucus and blood and would not be the cause for watery stool (the diaper absorbs all her stool, so there is not really much to scrape off if I wanted to scrape it off...other than leftover mucus). I have been pumping and storing because I have no choice but to return to work for financial reasons. I will stop storing as I have reached 20 ounces. I do still pump and feed bottles for practice. But I also am caught in a place where I went nuts doing block feeding, mint eating, oat/almond etc. avoiding, and full drainage and block feeding trying to lower my supply. Because pumping is an unavoidable part of my life, and all my attempts at controlling it failed, I feel like I'd rather pump and dump foremilk when I do have the chance to breastfeed. The convenience of bf only just isn't an option for me. The big question in my mind is: do I at some point say formula is better if I can't get the foremilk hindmilk balance under control, or is she still better off on breast? I would die for an old school pediatrician.
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:45 PM
    I wouldn't worry about it- yet. I would, however, call Medela and ask them what they think this sounds like. I also think that your three hypotheses each make a lot of sense, so maybe it's time to explore how much it would cost to replace the AC adapter and swap out the replaceable parts. You also might want to shop around and talk to friends and your local LLL about getting a backup pump. Decent lightly used pumps seem to be more widely available than they used to be, thanks I think to the ACA. So many moms who in the past wouldn't have bothered to get a pump now get one because it's free or cheap with insurance, so why not?
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 06:38 PM
    ok, I now believe they hand out medical degrees in cracker jack boxes. this is the second post today where the doctor's reported remarks were totally out to lunch! "No substance to poop means baby is not absorbing any nutrients" WHAT the !!!!!!!!!!!:banghead
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:34 PM
    Welcome to the forum! I rarely say this, but it sounds like it is time for you to switch doctors. A baby who is growing at an acceptable rate is a baby who is absorbing nutrients, period. A baby who was experiencing "milk in, milk out" wouldn't grow or develop normally. That baby would quite literally DIE. Your doc is either unfamiliar with bloody poop issues in breastfed infants, expressing himself poorly, or- and I'm sorry that there's no nice way to put this- an idiot. Doctors vary widely in the way they respond to green, mucousy, and bloody poops. If you're lucky, you get a pediatrician like mine, whose response to my kid's visibly blood-streaked green poop was "Meh, garden-variety proctitis. Usually peaks around 3-5 months. Eliminate dairy if you want, but she's growing fine so there's no need." If you're not lucky, you get a doc who demands rigorous dietary changes or pushes formula on you. The most common cause of green poop- and likely bloody poop as well- is intestinal irritation stemming from lactose overload, which is turn stems from oversupply. If you know you gave oversupply, and eliminating major allergens from your diet changes nothing, it's a fairly safe bet that your baby's poop issues are caused by nothing more complicated or troublesome than oversupply. The nice thing about oversupply is that if you can simply nurse on cue and avoid unnecessary pumping, oversupply should eventually wane and your baby's poop issues should disappear. ...
    5 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:08 PM
    Are you in the US? The American Academy of pediatrics has policy statement on infant feeding that counters every ignorant falsehood your child's doctor told you. I would suggest find that policy online, print it out and mail it to your child's doctor with your letter explaining why you no longer trust them with your child's medical care. Do this after you have found another pediatrician. Obesity and cavities are caused by poor eating habits, poor dental care, heredity factors, and not enough physical activity. Not breastfeeding, which is 100% beneficial and healthy. Any pediatrician that does not understand these basic facts is a menace.
    4 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 12:48 PM
    :ita with midnightsangel. Although I have to laugh about the knocking teeth out by a rock thing. Never thought of it in quite that way, really. :lol I personally think teeth issues are more genetic and food related. There's a lot of conversation on this forum about it, actually, if you want to know more. Seriously, I think you just experienced a culture clash. I don't agree with your doc at all, and actually both the World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend breastfeeding after one year. So . . .doc is really behind the times, but that's normal in our culture unfortunately. It's safe to ignore the doc about breastfeeding and do what you feel comfortable. Do you feel comfortable with this doctor for your child otherwise? If so, ignore the advice about breastfeeding and move on. If you don't like this doc overall, maybe it's time to obtain a new one for your child. You are not hurting your child. Children breastfeed beyond 1 year and are fine, and actually have better immunity to childhood illnesses, which is partly why breastmilk is so beneficial. Case in point, here's a kellymom article recommending it. :) http://kellymom.com/ages/after12mo/aap-breastfeeding-past-the-first-year/
    4 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 12:37 PM
    Hi mama, has baby come back to the breast yet? Could anything else be going on? Is he feeling ill, et cetera? Have you looked at the suggestions in this kellymom article and tried some of them? http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ Babies who strike can come back to the breast, and although I know as moms we feel guilty a lot, you're doing the best you can, and really, that's all you can do. Good luck!
    1 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 PM
    :ita It is totally normal . . . and totally annoying. My daughter did the same thing and it drove me nuts, but I tried nursing in less distracting environments, and if she would pop on and off for more than 5 minutes, I learned to take a break. She and I would go for a walk, play, whatever, then I'd try offering again in another 1/2 hour or hour. Eventually, the phase passed. She still sometimes gets really distracted, and recently her main thing has been rolling over then trying to nurse, but these phases do pass. This kellymom article might help . . .and the links are helpful too. :) You are doing great, I promise! http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/distractible-baby/
    2 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*alex87's Avatar
    Today, 11:51 AM
    Around 12 months I started offering breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack, and dinner to my toddler. I don't stress about nursing first anymore. The best thing about hitting 1 year of breastfeeding was losing the stress about it all! My daughter is 18 months old and still nurses frequently. I just follow her lead. The sleeping thing is more difficult. We have been slowly (and I mean slowly!) trying to cut out some night feeds. As soon as progress is made she gets a new molar in or something.
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*alex87's Avatar
    Today, 11:43 AM
    Between 3 & 4 months babies become aware and interested in their surroundings. It sounds like your little one is entering the distracted nursing phase :) I found that my daughter would stay latched if I would sit in a darker quiet room and sing to her when she went through this phase. Just keep working at it. This too shall pass!
    2 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*cascos45's Avatar
    Today, 11:30 AM
    Hola,mira yo tengo ahora mismo 45 años de edad y mi ultimo hijo,llevo ya 5,lo tuve a los 40,decisión un poco arriesgada. Afortunadamente todo salió bien,pero si que es verdad te me cuidé mucho. Sobre todo las mujeres maduras de una cierta edad deben cuidar mucho la alimentación después del parto. A esas edades se hace mucho más difícil perder peso y no son todas las dietas las que acepta nuestro cuerpo. Lo mejor como dice arriba abely es acudir a un experto,quien te puede proporcionar mucha mas información que cualquiera de nosotros aquí.
    3 replies | 169 view(s)
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