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  • @llli*lettismom's Avatar
    Today, 02:57 PM
    I think my two month old might have a feeding aversion. I'll start from the beginning... When DD was first born, she had an upper respiratory issue. It wasn't serious at all, but it made it really hard for her to breathe through her nose which made it even harder to nurse. She would latch and then just panic when she couldn't breathe. It wasn't like a normal stuffy nose where you can just use that snot sucker. She just had to cough it up and whatnot over time. It had cleared up by the time she was three days old, but by then she had lost 14 ounces and we were told we absolutely needed to supplement with formula. We were told to use SNS and a nipple shield (she has a latch like a piranha and I had blood blisters) and did that until my milk came in. At about day 7 or so when my nipples started to heal a little, I tried to ween Letti off the nipple shield which she seemed to have a pretty tough time with. By day 10, we were just down to regular breast feeding, but she fought me quite a bit during feedings and, this being my first baby, I thought it was normal. She would cry a lot and seem really frustrated when she nursed, but I would just continue to latch her thinking she'd work through it eventually. Boy, was I wrong. Things got progressively worse until at 5 weeks, she had a whole night she refused to latch. She would lock her jaw when I tried to push on her chin to latch her. She would cry and cry and root around like she was hungry, but would scream...
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*witkom's Avatar
    Today, 01:53 PM
    My 10 week old daughter has no real interest in eating, she'd rather sleep, and while I'm not complaining, I'm just wondering if I'm feeding her enough. She has been giving me about 8 straight hours at night. During the day, I average btwn 7-8 feedings. She'll only spend about 10-15 in total eating each time. Now, I know babies are supposed to get more efficient and time spent eating should go down, but 10 weeks seems a little early to me. I try to see if she wants to eat more often, but she just pushes me away or starts fussing. So when I do feed her, I'll leave her at the breast for almost a half hour more just to see if she'll relatch, and she normally doesn't. She's gaining well, and seems very content, and sometimes I think I'm just paranoid, as my son ate all the time, and had much longer feedings, and I know I'm comparing the two and shouldn't, but then I read that a newborn should be eating 8-12 times a day, and she doesn't come close to 12. Just looking for some other thoughts. Thanks!
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*rabbit7's Avatar
    Today, 02:51 PM
    My 11 week baby and I have been fighting to preserve our nursing relationship for 6 weeks now. At 5 week sit was discovered he was not gaining weight. We began using a SNS system and pumping. We are still here...At my appt today with our LC we were observed by a Speech therapist. It was determined that we have a good latch, my baby has an organized sucking pattern. They are both experienced and both stumped as to why he can't transfer milk. We had a frenectomy 1 week ago to rule out tongue tie...but there is some question as to whether he has a posterior tongue tie. Although I have seen him move his tongue more the past few days...it just doesn't transfer to the breast. I am so frustrated ...and scared this will never resolve! After 6 weeks of round the clock pumping and basically being homebound. I want to believe there is a light at the end of the tunnel but when we stump the experts I am scared! Any one have any thoughts?
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*sashaesq's Avatar
    Today, 12:55 PM
    Hello there, Our son was born 2.5 weeks ago 7 pounds 13 ounces. He lost a few ounces while at the hospital but at our two week appointment was only 7 pounds 5 ounces. Until that point I exclusively breastfed him. The doctor was concerned with his weight gain and told us to supplement with formula and check my yield. I yielded around 2 ounces every time. When I pump after breastfeeding him I'm yielding around an ounce so he is definitely not emptying the breast (hence the slow weight gain). When he breastfeeds he is very sleepy (I'm doing everything to wake him) and I take him off each breast after 15-20 minutes. Since the 2 week appointment he is getting 2 supplementation formula bottles a day and I'm pumping after each breastfeeding session which he takes by bottle. He is definitely gaining good weight. I'm not sure what to do at this point. How do I get him to eat enough from the breast so I don't have to pump or should I pump exclusively?
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*soblessed's Avatar
    Today, 06:04 PM
    I asked this question while I was in the hospital but the nurse did not seem to know how to answer my question and then said "not really" so I was wandering if you ladies had any input? Ive found more help here then anywhere else and i appreciate all the tips tricks and advise that yall have to offer. Also on a side note: I am feeding my little one on demand and its about every hour and a half right now but honestly for all the first time moms out there it does get better. Im a first time mom who never planned on bfeeding and I love it. Hang in there girls we can do it!
    0 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*nola's Avatar
    Today, 07:53 PM
    Thank you for the help! I do know that most medications are safe, however, I am a bit scared because a medication I was told was safe to take while pregnant with my first child is now listed as not safe...I didn't end up taking it while pregnant but I considered it...so I don't really know how much I trust them saying its okay to take this while breastfeeding when maybe one day they will have a different opinion on it. I am taking my time with weaning...I am just putting up with the pain in the meantime since I don't want to wean abruptly and for me the stress of weaning ranks similar to the stress of the pain so really I'd rather do this for her.
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*rabbit7's Avatar
    Today, 07:35 PM
    we have been working with a new lc for about 2 weeks. each visit she weighs before and after nursing (exclusively with sns at this point) never has there been any measurable transfer. We nurse with sns 8x perday with approx 4 oz per feeding. He had a frenectomy b/c the dentist said while it was not an obvious tongue tie, we could improve tongue extension.
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:21 PM
    I agree. A 2.5 month old is in a very different place than a 2.5 WEEK old, and may simply not need to nurse as often. the 8-12 nursing frequency suggestion is a general rule of thumb that seems to work for most babies. But there will always be outliers in both directions. For long sleep stretches, be aware of the things that MAY cause a baby to sleep longer than they otherwise would, and consequently may casue problems of baby missing feedings. These are, pacifiers, swaddling, and baby spending most of the night in a different room from mom. If any of these are happening, you could stop them and see if it makes a difference. If baby sleeps near you, is not swaddled nor given a pacifier for sleep, this long stretch is probably just normal for your baby. I agree no harm in encouraging a feed overnight especially for your own milk production going forward, but that does not mean this is needed. Also, sleep patterns change. So don't be surprised if baby starts waking more often at some point. It is hard to not compare babies! My oldest nursed every hour and my second one went 6 hours the night we got home from the hospital and scared the heck out of me. But not only are babies different, your body may be different. Not only milk production but also breast storage capacity can change baby to baby. For more on how the latter might affect feeding frequency, see: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/infographics
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:49 PM
    Breast compressions can help with slow letdown too and keep baby at breast. You say baby is gaining well... Are you able just to try and relax a bit and if she won't feed settling her other ways and then offering again a bit later? Is there a chance you just have a good supply and baby doesn't need to feed that often?
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:42 PM
    Everything sounds fine to me! Weight gain is fine, output is fine, and baby is content right? Tho if you are worried about the long sleep stretch you can always try to dream feed or wake them to feed... But honestly you may just want to rest as sleep patterns notoriously change and so it may not last!
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:54 PM
    So how many before and after nursing weight checks were done and how much transfer did they indicate? Does baby transfer with the sns? how many times a day does baby nurse and how much supplemental milk does baby get each day? a frenotomy to rule out tt? not sure what this means
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:43 PM
    has breastfeeding been assessed by a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) and/or has baby been seen by an ENT? Maybe whatever was going on shortly after birth, which sounded like a physical issue, is a clue to what is going on now. Also if a pump is working that poorly that milk is not extracted when you have plenty of milk, I would consider if the issue is the pump rather than you. You say baby is gaining well/ How well? Is it possible that after all the issues, you are at this point overly concerned about intake, (understandable) and overly stressing at each feeding? A two month old in some cases may not need to nurse as long or as often as a younger baby. I am a big believer that it never hurts to offer to nurse, however, Baby perhaps feeling pressured to eat, or eat longer or more than baby wants. especially when not all that hungry, might possibly cause or exacerbate the problem? tried fennel for slow letdown?
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:12 PM
    Hi. I think the very best option at this point would be for you to see a board certified lactation consultant if that is at all possible. I always suggest this is baby is not gaining normally when exclusively breastfed and supplements have consequently been ordered. It is early days. That means this is the time to find solutions for your problems before they get worse. It sounds like you have a good milk production (?) based on what you have been able to pump each time (you do not say how many times a day you pump, how often baby nurses, so I do not have all the info) But going forward, this may not continue to be the case if baby is not able to nurse well. Pumps do not extract milk the way babies do and exclusive pumping is difficult for many reasons. But as long as baby is ineffective at transfer, assuming that is the problem, which I do not agree is a certainty, then baby will need supplements. So getting help with that issue specifically is very important and that is what an IBCLC can probably help you with. I am concerned because I think you and baby's doctor are basing many of your assumptions about the problems on your pump output. But pump output does NOT reliably indicate the things you think it does. Pump output can only tell you the minimum amount of milk that might be present in the breasts (or the minimum that lets down) at the exact time you pump. Pumps may leave milk in the breasts, and in general pumps often do not 'work' as well as a normally...
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*crygenia's Avatar
    Today, 02:25 PM
    I felt the same way for the first 5 weeks or so. My LO would feed for 15-20 min then fall asleep, soon as I would move him he would start making hunger signs again, I felt like I was nursing him non-stop all day and night. I'd put him back on and he would suckle for about 5 min then slow down and fall asleep. This would repeat for an hour or more sometimes. My LC said the same thing, that he's just comfort nursing and gave me soothy pacifier to try. He won't really take pacifier but once he falls asleep now I take him off and comfort him back to sleep (he is normally head bobbing and hand to mouthing as soon as he taken away from the breast) by shushing and walking or bouncing him. If he continues fussing for more than a few minutes I'll put him back on, but he usually will just fall asleep and stay asleep for an hour or 2 after I do this. I realized my LO was making hunger signs but really just wanted to be comforted to sleep. Now I've figured out his sleeping schedule pretty well so when he starts fussing and rooting when he just fell asleep being fed, I immediately try comforting him to sleep which usually works. My LO also doesn't like being put down even when sleeping....Even with a full belly and sleeping, if I put him down he usually wakes up and will start crying and fussing with hunger signs. I can usually just comfort him and he falls back to sleep as long as I'm holding him. Just remember...if you are trying to comfort him but he keeps escalating from...
    3 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 11:38 AM
    For overactive letdown feeding positions where baby is 'uphill' work well and you can unlatch during forceful let downs and let it spray into a towel. You seem to be doing well to get your supply up again! Also check out Kellymom's back to breast article!
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 11:34 AM
    Oh this sounds hard :( It took DD til 4 months to latch effectively but for us it was worth it... That said if I had to do it again I would get better support earlier... What kind of support have you had to help with latch? Is there an IBCLC you can see who would work with you?
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:16 AM
    My LO does comfort nurse alot but there are times when around 6 weeks old or so, he just had to scream as he fought sleep like sleep was gonna kill him. I would try to nurse but at that time it wasn't working. Newborns are difficult and colic isn't uncommon, especially if you note the screaming fits tend to happen roughly the same part of the day regularly. Now days my son still wrestles with sleep but it usually doesn't involve screaming, instead he now fusses and struggles at the breast and really seems to need to grab and pull on the other nipple while he finally gives in to sleep while nursing (often happens a couple to tree times per day.)
    13 replies | 520 view(s)
  • @llli*soblessed's Avatar
    Today, 07:19 AM
    Okat sounds great to me! We went to the dr yest and are back at birth weight and have grown half a inch! Yay!!
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 07:16 AM
    Wow, what a great blog. There was one topic that my unscientific knowledge of nutrition always thought was missing from one "controversial" topic, as always seems to be the case with every food study I read. But she seems to validate what I suspected and was told by a macrobiotic nutritionist. Won't mention it here lest it start a debate! But since the OP didn't mention child's age, I would agree that testing is key. If your baby is truly of solids age, and is vomiting from the cereal, try veggies and/or fruit to start. Don't obsess about the iron yet if you're just starting out. Then you can try homemade grains down the road and see if there is the same reaction. If you need some advice on preparing them, you can PM me. As a vegetarian I had read and was told by pediatricians that iron might be an issue once we started solids -- boy were we wrong. My daughter's levels were always high. I started with banana and avocado, but moved on to vegetables and fruits for a while. Then later vegetables mixed with a grain (usually quinoa or millet) -- none of which she will eat now, BTW, at 3! We kept all dairy and eggs out of her diet until around 1, although egg yolks might be a good food once baby can handle them. She never has had cow's milk to drink (just occasional yogurt and cheese) which helps with iron levels. We stayed away from nightshades or acidic foods (potatoes, eggplant, spinach, chard, tomatoes, etc.) until after 1, also. If you have low iron in the...
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    Mama, if your supply is strong, as from everything that you've shared seems to indicate, would it be one less stress to just put the pump away? Of course if you need to create a bottle for a future separation, or remove milk while separated, then a pump can come in handy, but if you have the ability to be nursing on baby's cue's day in, day out (and nights!), perhaps its not something worth stressing about to worry about supply at this point? Because it sounds like baby and you are doing a really good job of responding to each other's cues, without any technical intervention. :)
    3 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 06:44 AM
    There is an easy toe-prick test that can be done to determine baby's iron levels, and if they are sufficient. As previous posters have mentioned, if baby is younger than six months, there is no reason to believe iron deficiency to be the case just as a blanket statement; if you and pediatrician remain concerned, due to family history or babe's behaviour or growth, etc, then the I hope that the test has been done to confirm this concern, or to set fears at ease. This test has results immediately, and does not need to be sent to a lab. If it happens to be your situation, we payed out of pocket for this test, and at least in our part of Ohio, it was $69. ((Personal anecdote, for what it's worth: I requested this test at our six month, just out of personal preference (wanted to pursue baby-led-solids route, and wanted to be able to do so in a low-stress way for me), and will likely have the test performed again at nine months, because my daughter too throws up frequently with solids (I didn't do cereal; she has this reaction with self-fed foods regardless of texture, though the throwing up is decreasing with time; her iron at 6 months was sufficient, but on the lower end of the spectrum), and is not too thrilled with them yet. With that knowledge, we'll do drops or not in addition to just focusing on iron-rich foods. All of that is just our own experience, for what it's worth. For her, I get the sense that the throwing up is more just a very strong and enthusiastic gag...
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:25 AM
    :ita If your baby is truly iron deficient and cannot get it from her diet, then she can have iron supplements. Not only does breastmilk contain the right amount of iron for most infants to be getting, Babies are typically born with a good store of iron, UNLESS (sometimes) the cord was cut too early at birth robbing baby of lots of blood cells. Even then there is no reason to think baby is low in iron, barring evidence or tests indicating baby is actually low in iron. Generally there is no reason to start a baby with cereal of any kind. When a baby is truly ready for solids, baby can pretty much eat anything. For a very detailed (and readable) discussion about myths and facts about what to introduce when, I suggest the book My Child Won't Eat. Get the latest edition as there are newer studies examined. One that may interest you due to the wheat sensitivities in your husbands family looked at gluten introduction timing and later sensitivities and is interesting.
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:12 AM
    Hi, couple ideas fast letdown has many 'symptoms' and not all are present all the time. So spraying or dripping need not be present to indicate ffld. Is baby gasping, coughing, choking when you let down? Do you feel any let down sensation? Does baby clamp at this point? is baby having very wet and/or explosive poops? Do you feel full between feedings? these are other signs of fast letdown. How is poop output? Weight gain? These are the most reliable ways for being sure baby is getting enough Is this possibly causing a delay between baby cuing to nurse and being brought to the breast? With many babies at this age, Any delay can cause a baby to get frantic and cause a disorganized latch. have you tried other latch and positioning ideas? Could positioning in general be part of the problem? Have you tried different positions? Laid back or side lying in particular seem to help with many latch issues. Good for fast letdown too.
    1 replies | 130 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:12 AM
    A pain-free latch is generally a good latch. No need to constantly relatch if you're not hurting and the baby is getting plenty to eat. Your baby is only a week old, which means he's still pretty tiny, uncoordinated, and weak. But he's going to grow bigger, more adept, and stronger as time goes on, so his latch should only improve. If you're already pain-free at a week of age, I don't think you need to worry! Just enjoy your baby.
    2 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:05 AM
    :ita If baby is less than 6 months, no need for solids no matter how interested she is in big people food. Give her a spoon and bowl to play with while you eat- that will be enough to satisfy her until 6 months. If you're concerned about iron, give her some baby vitamins, and after 6 months feed her some iron-rich solids (e.g. meats, fish, beans, spinach). No need for cereal, which is basically empty calories and, as the PP said, can be constipating.
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:59 PM
    :ita with Maddieb. Warm water for constipation used to be advised for formula-fed babies, who are prone to constipation. It is no longer recommended for formula-fed infants and is neither necessary nor healthy for exclusively breastfed babies. Although giving a baby water to drink is not recommended, putting the baby in a nice warm bath may relax her enough to make her poop, particularly if you bathe her right after nursing. It's something to try if she's uncomfortable.
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:53 PM
    Here are some things that helped me cut out unwanted sessions: - Distraction. Stay out of the house as much as possible and stay as busy and entertained as possible. The more fun your LO is having with new and interesting experiences, the less she will want to nurse. - Go slow. Don't try to drop all the sessions at once; eliminate the least favored ones first. Pre-nap and bedtime feedings are likely to be the last to go. - Get help. Have dad or grandma or a sitter or even a sibling take over at the times when your child is likely to want to nurse but you don't want to. - Communicate your limits. Preschoolers can understand things like "Not now" or "We'll nurse at bedtime" or "Let's have a snack instead". - Use time limits (e.g. "we'll nurse until I finish singing the ABCs") and countdowns ("We'll nurse until I count to 10") to cut down on nursing. - Offer lots of snacks and beverages; the less hungry/thirsty your LO is, the less likely she is to seek to nurse. - Avoid your customary nursing locations; kids are triggered to nurse by seeing you in their favored nursing spot.
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:51 PM
    First I agree with tclynx. You do not mention what medication you need to take nor if there is an alternative, but it is certainly true that most meds are safe for a mother to take even when a nursing a newborn, and, again typically, become more and more safe the older a child is. Typically meds go into milk in such tiny amounts that what a child gets is not measurable, Some meds do not transfer into milk or clear the system rapidly, and some meds are not bioavailable, so even if a child ingests it they are not exposed ... Plus there are benefits to nursing even at this age that must be weighed against the decision to wean. If you decide weaning is the answer, then how much time do you have? Abrupt weaning is probably best avoided but of course that is not always possible. "How" to wean depends on many factors. Ideally weaning is done with respect and love for both the mother and child involved, and so how to approach it with your child will depend a great deal on who your child is and what your relationship is like. The books How Weaning Happens and The Nursing Mothers Guide to Weaning are excellent guides for weaning at any age.
    5 replies | 104 view(s)
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