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  • @llli*cmazza22's Avatar
    Today, 07:31 PM
    I am currently nursing my third baby, and just like her brothers, she refuses the bottle. It's happened the same way with each: We started out great, then around 5 weeks, they started refusing, choosing to chew on the nipple instead of suck on it. I then just gave up on the bottle (I'm a stay-at-home mom, so it doesn't really matter). Can anyone give me any suggestions how to help DD take the bottle? She is four months old and hasn't been offered one since she was 5 weeks. When given one, she just chews on the nipple. The reason I'd like her to take a bottle is my cousin is getting married at the end of September, and he has said I cannot bring her (which is frustrating in itself but it's his wedding, so I have to go with his wishes). Normally I just wouldn't go, but if there is a way I can get DD to take the bottle so I can attend, I'm willing to try.
    0 replies | 2 view(s)
  • @llli*nap's Avatar
    Today, 12:47 PM
    Thanks for reading and for your reply. I'm striving to be ok and I repeat to myself that I am doing everything I can for my baby. I'm still trying, every day I pump twice at work, which is what my schedule will allow me, I don’t get much, but I thought it's better than nothing. While I'm with her in the evenings/nights I breastfeed on demand. I wrote to Dr. Jack Newman and he recommended me to try domperidone which I started today. I wonder if I could take some herbs too or whether I should try the medication and see the response. I would like some info on increasing pump output, I tried with power pumping and had no results. I wish to continue until she consumes solids and need less milk so I can cover her needs. I'll keep working on me and our breastfeeding (:
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 PM
    Being played for a fool, eh? :rolleyes: Too bad "working with kids" is not the same as "knowing what is normal when it comes to breastfeeding"! Kudos to you on being the one who is willing to be weird. That's the trailblazer's way. The next mom who is still nursing and pumping at a year may not have the same issues as you- maybe someone will see her with her pump and say "Still doing that? Just like Jen.r24!" And then that future woman won't feel so alone in her decision. :D
    7 replies | 658 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:33 PM
    :it's with MaddieB. In particular, I think it's a very good idea to ditch the "eat, play, sleep" 3 hour schedule. That sort of schedule sounds great when you read about it in a book, but it's not how real babies really behave. Real babies might have a schedule that goes more along the lines of "eat, fuss, eat some more, quick cat nap, eat, fuss, poop, fuss, eat, longer stretch of sleep", etc. That sort of pattern is how babies get their required number of feedings per day, and it's how they get lots of attention, soothing, interaction, and closeness to mom's body. The idea that a young baby could or should eat just for food and then play independently- that was invented by people who saw the behavior of intensively scheduled formula-fed babies as the gold standard- which it is not!
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:31 AM
    good to hear, thanks for the update!
    12 replies | 370 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:27 AM
    I think your baby is being overfed at the daycare, and fed too much at once. This is linked to breast refusal which is why people have come up with ways to try to prevent this problem. This means baby is fed when baby shows hunger cues and not on a schedule, it means appropriately sized meals, and it often also means adopting a special method of bottle feeding called paced bottle feeding. Your day care probably has no idea about any of this. They will need to be educated. I will post some links below. Size of baby has little to nothing to do with expected intake or average needed intake. Feedings of between 2 and 4 ounces each are the norm for this age. Assuming baby nurses overnight a few times as would be typical at this age, the total amount that is appropriate for a 12 hour separation is between 12 and 18 ounces for the entire separation. Why appropriate amounts, cue feeding and paced bottles are important: If baby is fed more, that can cause disinterest in nursing. If baby is fed large bottles at a time spaced out evenly, baby becomes used to that which is not typical at the breast. If baby is fed with a gravity bottle technique ( how bottles are typically given) with a rapid but steady milk flow, baby becomes used to the milk flowing into baby's mouth with no effort whatsoever from baby in getting the milk to flow and then controlling flow, as baby normally must do at the breast. This is why caregiver feeding method is SO important. It needs to be right or...
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*ldivanna83's Avatar
    Today, 06:26 AM
    I have a 3month old baby and am nursing exclusively. We have had some issues with her--- pediatrician has diagnosed her with colic and reflux. She receives zantac twice a day and has been doing great with nursing for over a month until I went back to work. I work 3 days a week, 12 hour shifts each day. She does great with the bottles. She was getting 4 ounce bottles but the day care told me she was hungry so I caved and let them increase to 5 ounce bottles which seems to satiate her and also let her go longer (3 hours instead of 2.5) until she needs another bottle. (She is a big baby, came out at 10lbs 1.5oz and was 13lb 2oz at 2 months)... When I have her at home on my days off, she will start to nurse and then screams and freaks out after initial let down. I'm guessing it's a forceful let down/over supply..? I don't really want to try to decrease my supply since we JUST increased to 5 ounce bottles- I want to be able to keep up with her. I've read about hand expressing prior to nursing her, and block feeding..? I tried to express a little bit from the other boob after she starts freaking out but it's too late at that point and she won't even try the other breast. But then she will take a bottle gladly... I'm not really sure where to start to trouble shoot this. Also, she is spitting up A LOT when she nurses and not at all when she eats from a bottle. It absolutely kills me when she screams and pulls away from my boob. Please help.
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Today, 04:49 AM
    I'm in the lucky position that my husband has a family friendly contract and will be off all August, which would give me time to pump once during the day at some point while she is being minded and maybe I will sit with a cuppa and a book! Yes I'll look into a car adapter and a hands free bra, makes sense! I would imagine some of my co workers would be freaked out by breast milk in fridge, but aside from that our work fridge is really rather disgusting I don't even like putting my lunch in it to be honest. So I may go for a cool box under the desk. I only know one other person in my office who pumped in work, mostly because we are lucky enough to all have taken 9-12 months maternity leave. Any other women who breastfed in my office moved to combi feeding or weaned to formula on return to work. So I've no one really to ask for advice about it. I'm not sure I'm going to tell anyone since I mentioned it to a coupe of co-workers yesterday and got told that since she'll be 1 I should wean and that I was getting played for a fool because my little girl still feeds 3-4 times at night (on a good night). I have a feeling pumping and feeding at her age will be considered weird. Which a bit strange given that we all work with children !
    7 replies | 658 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:20 PM
    Hi, well again I get it. You saw improvement with this formula, I understand, and am not arguing with what you experienced. I am just telling you what the experts say about switching formulas. "GentleEase" is marketed as a special formula for colic, gassiness and fussiness. Ok, so it does not sound like there is overproduction, as in that case, baby would be gaining quickly, typically. But is does sounds like the milk is flowing a bit quickly at least sometimes, and that may mean fast letdown and the "lactose overload" that can happen with that. This is helped by taking shorter breaks between nursing sessions- in other words, nursing more often, because milk has less time to build up in the breasts there is less of a letdown. Another cause of too much foremilk is baby nursing both sides at every feeding. However, since baby is not gaining as well as you would like, and also because nursing session are relatively infrequent, baby taking both sides at this point is probably necessary. If you can encourage baby to nurse more often, baby may choose to nurse one side at a time at some feedings and that may also help. When a baby has reflux, it is usually recommended that baby nurse frequently. This allows for smaller meals which are easier to digest. Also, nursing is typically soothing when a baby has reflux so the more nursing, the better. So also for the reflux, nursing more often would be indicated.
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 PM
    It's very common to have differences in supply between breasts. Sometimes these are quite mild, but sometimes they are so extreme that one breast will be supplying most of the baby's needs and the other will be producing a very small amount. As long as pee/poop output and weight gain are normal, and the baby's pee is generally pale and mild-smelling, you know he's getting enough to eat even if it seems like one breast is dry and barely being nursed on. If lopsided supply bothers you, you can increase supply in the underperforming breast by removing milk from it more often and more completely. So pumping that side is a great way to get a better supply going. You might also want to nurse more often on that side. Even a 5 minute session is great for supply!
    1 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:26 PM
    Are you located in the USA? Thanks to the Affordabale Care Act, breast pumps are now covered under many medical insurance plans. Check with your insurer before you buy! :)
    2 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    I like your once-per-day pumping plan- not only do I think you'll end up with some useful milk, but I also think you may spare yourself some discomfort from overfull breasts. I would store the milk in whatever is most convenient for you. If that means a cooler with ice under your desk, fine. If it means you get your own mini fridge, fine. If it means putting bottles in the office fridge, also fine- you may find it useful to put them in a bag so that co-workers don't get all weird about breastmilk sharing fridge space with their precious sandwiches. ;) Any chance of getting a hands-free bra and a car adapter for your electric pump? That sounds like an easier set-up than a manual pump. I think it's a great idea to add in a pump session in August- but only if YOU want to do that! I see it as a great way to build a cushion of expressed milk, good practice for you- but it's also a time suck and no mom needs that!
    7 replies | 658 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    The reasons to avoid soap are: 1. It removes protective oils from the baby's skin. 2. A lot of soaps contain nasty chemical ingredients that you don't want baby exposed to- this is particularly true of heavily scented and antibacterial products, and of liquid soaps that come in bottles containing phthalates. 3. It's just not necessary- warm water is generally enough for delicate baby skin. Washing with a small amount of mild, unscented soap can be reserved for the problem areas where poop, pee, spit-up, and grime can be a problem- like the baby's bottom and neck creases.
    6 replies | 255 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:01 PM
    Awesome! Keep up the good work, mama.
    3 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:01 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Based on the photo, I am not sure that I, personally, see a lip tie. That could just be a normal, albeit rather thick-looking, frenum. Because you suspect lip tie and your nipples are sore, your next step should probably be to get help from a professional lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC. If this IBCLC sees a lip tie, you may need to seek further help from someone like a dentist, an ENG doctor, or a pediatrician. The bad thing about lip ties is that they can cause the baby to have difficulty with latching, and may cause issues with lower transfer of milk. The good thing about lip ties is that they often stretch as the baby's mouth grows, and most babies grow out of a difficult latch even when they have a tie. So even if you do nothing to fix a tie, there's a good chance that your baby will hpgorw out of it. When it comes to concerns about baby getting enough, the way you measure baby's intake is by watching his output of pee and poop and his weight gain. If baby's weight gain is normal and he is peeing and pooing enough, and his pee is generally pale and mild-smelling, then he is getting enough to eat.
    1 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*merobader's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:57 PM
    My baby is 10 days old today for the frist week my nipplw was so sore I want to scream every time he touched it was black for the last 2 days things was getting better its still painful but much better still have lipstick nipple all the time but I thought its a matter of time he will have good latch soon but today I found that he have a lip tie and now I don't knowe what to do I used to think he is geting enough milk now I doubt myself Here is the photo
    1 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:21 PM
    Ok thanks for converting! Sorry about that. Ok, so here is what I see. Baby lost a few ounces the first few days and then began gaining. I wonder if baby actually lost more at first and that day 5 weight check shows gain already on the upswing? In any case, these checks show a normal situation. In the ~30 days from March 21 to April 22, baby gained 2 pounds and 6 ounces. Average gain for this period is 1/2 pound a week or 2 pounds per month, or 1 ounce per day. so this is good gain, a bit above average as it comes out to above one pounce per day. In the ~ 30 days from April 22 to May 20th, baby gained 1 pound 7 ounces, or about 3/4 ounce per day. So this is where we see the slow down in gain begin, during this period. I am pretty sure this is still within normal gain range. In the ~ 30 days from May 20th- June 24, baby gained about the same as the month before- 1 pound 9 ounces. In fact I would say the gain is just about exactly the same, as this was a slightly longer period between checks. So, baby still gaining 3/4 ounce per day approximately, or 5.25 ounces per week. (On average) In the ~ 30 days from June 24 to July 22, baby gained 12 ounces or about 3 ounces per week on average.
    5 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*hvn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:54 PM
    To maddieb: Thank you for your reply. The reason why we used Gentlease is because she had to be supplemented during her 1st week as my milk wasn't in and she was jaundiced requiring hospitalization. We continued Newborn Enfamil after going home for a few days but it caused a ton of gas so we switched her to Gentlease which we used with our first child. She did much better. By day 10, she was exclusively breastfed and that's when the problems started. There's nothing "special" about Gentlease except that the milk proteins are partially broken down making it easier to digest. It's still made from milk. Fast letdown has other causes aside OP. Here are some questions to see if it might be part of the problem: Does baby ever cough, gag, choke, or swallow with gulping, or swallow rapidly or very audibly when nursing? Yes, she does this sometimes when I let down or after she tries to latch after a bout of reflux. I think she swallows more air breastfeeding because while laying horizontal, she refluxes --> this causes her to pull away from the breast --> she gets upset --> then we latches on again she swallows air. I read that breastfed babies swallow less air but in my case I think it's the opposite because the reflux causes her to pull off multiple times. I've tried saddle nursing but her head control just isn't there. I'm going to see a lactation consultant to help me with it because I think it'll help reduce the reflux and consequently some of the air...
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*yum24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:51 PM
    Yes, I want to pump & store for when I go back to work.i don't get anything if I pump immediately after nursing.not even 2drops.thats why I had this question.if I pump after an hour of nursing & if baby wants to nurse after pumping, he has to work hard for let down.this is where the problem is.he dint mind nursing for long till last week but now ,once the flow gets slow, he's pulling away,fussing & crying.sometimes my breasts are still lumpier with milk but he doesn't want to nurse.he just pulls ,fusses & cries.this is very frustrating & almost every nursing session is resulting in tears for both of us. any suggestions to please help me.i dont want to give up bf.
    8 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:42 PM
    I get not wanting to take ABs. But it is possible the fussiness you are seeing is entirely coincidental. Even if the abs are causing some issue for baby, gut health balance will be rapidly restored by your milk. But if you need to take them, you need to. Certainly not everyone gets thrush, I had to take abs multiple times while nursing my kids and have never had thrush. Are you particularly prone to yeast infections generally? You could also consider taking probiotics to hopefully help restore your gut balance more quickly. On the other hand, since you have the abs on hand and (presumably) you are responsive to them and will take them if you start feeling the need, I also do not think there is a large risk of an abscess either. Mastitis can be tricky. When I had it the first time, my youngest was a newborn. I tried to beat it with no abs. I rested, nursed like mad, took a fever reducer, and walla, felt great. Husband left on a business trip leaving me alone with three kids and an hour later I was shivering, teeth chattering uncontrollably, and felt like a truck had hit me. I was very grateful I had filled the prescription for the abs "just in case!" In my case, that strategy did work. After starting the abs, I got over the mastitis rapidly without any further issue. But, Is it safe or would that be appropriate in your case? No one can answer that, unfortunately! After that, at the first sign of mastitis (Which in my case was always pretty unmistakable) I...
    3 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:34 PM
    I was shocked when they pushed cows milk as well. They are a highly popular chain of daycare/play school and I chose them because I believed they would have experience with EBF babies. Boy, I was so wrong! I did ask this question while touring their facility and they pointed to one baby who was EBF at the time and said they are very familiar with EBF & formula fed babies. I heard that her mother has hence switched over to formula, hopefully not because of the pushy nanny. Anyway, things are back to normal for now. Hopefully, this trend will continue.
    12 replies | 370 view(s)
  • @llli*1sttimemummy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:32 PM
    :) That's downside of living right next to a Children centre:)) Sorry for the inconvenience, here is the conversion: 16.03.16 6.1 21.03.16 5.15 22.04.16 8.7 20.05.16 9.14 24.06.16 11.7 22.07.16 12.3
    5 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*vzijl01's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:58 AM
    Thanx mommal. This gives me a great idea of what to do next. :thumbsup
    3 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*bluepolka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:38 AM
    Hi everyone. I have been EBF my 32-Weeker for 5 months now. He just got off the nipple shield 2 weeks ago. I began to notice that he didn't stay too long on the right breast. This has been happening for a month. Now when I try to pump the right side after nursing, i barely get 0.25-0.5 oz. I first thought it's because he empties the breast. But he barely stay on the right breast for 5 mins, after which I can't even hear swallowing. I'm really worried. I've been pumping post-nursing (about 2 times a day) for three days now. I take fenugreek. My left breast is working fine, so I don't pump it. Do t want to mess the system because I had an oversupply earlier. Is this common? What should I do? My body used to be very responsive to the pump. By baby seems content after feedings. His weight gain has slowed down and his diapers aren't that wet Anymore. He still poops 2-3 times a day. Should I continue to pump to stimulate? Should I get prescription drugs? How long before I see an increase after pumping? Thanks in advance
    1 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:26 AM
    Thank you, Maddieb! I'm learning that to be true for sure. :)
    6 replies | 255 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:14 AM
    Ok, wow, your baby was weighed ALOT! I am American. I do not think in metric so I will have to convert all those kg to pounds and ounces to make sense of them. I am sorry, but even those dates are confusing. Day first...help. Can you (or someone) take just these and convert them for me? Thanks. 16.03.16 2.76kg birth weight 21.03.16 2.70kg 22.04.16 3.84kg 20.05.16 4.51kg
    5 replies | 194 view(s)
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