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  • @llli*lepetitmatin's Avatar
    Today, 07:02 AM
    I was going by swallows, and whether there are any swallows when using breast compressions. Breast compressions would still work on a soft breast if there is milk there right? A random off-topic question -- I was getting concerned with my LO's recent green stools... but then I noticed that the color looks different (yellow) in the daylight as opposed to green in artificial light! Has anyone ever experienced this before??
    7 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:12 AM
    The average time until return of fertility in a nursing mom is something like 15.5 months. You still have a month and a half to go, and there's every reason to expect that your fertility will return soon, especially as your child picks up his solid food intake and cuts down on his nursing. So I don't think you need to wean in order to get your fertility back. But there are still some steps you might want to take to give yourself the best shot of getting your fertility back and conceiving when it does come back. First, I would consider cutting out the daytime pumping. The longer you go without nursing or pumping, the more likely it is that you will ovulate. Going 6 or more hours in a row without nursing gives your body the best chance of getting estrogen high enough to provoke a fertile cycle. If your child can't drink cow's milk, he can have juice, water, plant-based milks (coconut, hemp, rice) at daycare, and get his "dairy" needs met by you when you are home together and nursing. It's often said that 3-5 nursing sessions per day are sufficient to provide for a child's RDA of dairy. I don't think you need to consider hypoallergenic formula, but you may want to talk to a different doctor and a nutritionist and see if they have the same advice as your current pediatrician does about your child's nutrition, the need for him to avoid dairy at this point, and the need for you to be on an elimination diet. Second, I would encourage you to get a copy of Toni...
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:55 AM
    If you are dealing with a grabby grandma, wearing your baby in a sling might help. People who will freely help themselves to a baby in a carrier are often a little more reluctant to pluck a baby off your person. And if they try, you can smile sweetly and say "Oh, I would looove to let you hold her but she's just so comfortable right now! Maybe later, when she Needs a change." FTR, I would have been massively unhappy if a family member took my baby out of my line of sight without clearing it with me, first.
    3 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:50 AM
    Yes, what Midnightsangel said. If the mom in this case was EBF until 2 days ago, she should be pumping and providing her baby with her milk rather than feeding the baby formula. Is that not happening?
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:46 AM
    I remember having this problem when my oldest was tiny. I found that some very silly relaxation techniques were helpful. When my mind was racing and sleep elusive, I would close my eyes and plan how I was going to redecorate my old dollhouse for my daughter, right down to details like how I would attach curtains to the windows. That worked to calm my mind and soon I'd be asleep. Maybe something like that would work for you? Alternately, there's an excellent app called Breathing Zone that guides you through a deep breathing session. I find that very relaxing and sleep-promoting, too. You're right: people with sleep disorders should not bedshare with babies. So it's not a good idea to have your husband in bed with the baby. But you could potentially bedshare with your baby elsewhere- a lot of moms decamp to the guest room for a while when sleep is scarce. You might also find yourself comfortable with a sidecar crib like the Arm's Reach. That way your baby is very close to you but not sharing the same sleep surface with you. No, you don't need anyone to check on you. :)
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 05:38 AM
    Just a little personal experience to the worry about rolling over on your baby - I'm a FTM, and I was a bit paranoid about sleeping with my baby too, but just to reassure you, those mommy instincts make you very aware of baby so you won't do something like roll on them. In fact, sometimes I'll wake up to feed her to find I haven't moved at all and my neck is killing me! =) And it is recommended that you NOT have baby between both adults, rather have baby between you and an outside barrier, so it shouldn't matter that your husband has sleep apnea. He won't be near baby. Certainly look up safe ways to bed share, if that's the route you choose to take, even if just for naps (those naps with baby were lifesavers for me in the beginning!), but as long as you yourself are not on medication that makes you sleep more deeply, have consumed a lot of alcohol, etc, you should be plenty aware to make it safe for you to sleep beside your baby without any worries. Oh, and to the fussy baby...my little one never sleeps in her crib - always wants to be held or lying beside me for naps. It can be frustrating, especially if I'm craving some time for myself, but I just keep reminding myself it's temporary; she won't always sleep like this, and I try to focus on the positives, like how sweet it is that she feels so safe with me.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    I should mention she also likes to pull back on my nipple and stretch it out - she will fuss and unlatch herself if I try to hold her head close with cross-cradle. It's not as painful as it was in the beginning, but it's still very uncomfoetable, and every few weeks it gets excruciating (like it is tonight) for no apparent reason.
    3 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Today, 02:20 AM
    Breastfeeding is going well, for which I am grateful. I didn't want to introduce a pacifier too early, and honestly, I prefer for him not to get too attached to it. I figure just using it in the car for emergencies might be ok, of course, that is, if he even likes it. SO far, my DH has been out with us for the outings. I think (and hope) the night after the in-laws was more of a circumstantial upset and not a constant. We have been out once more since then, twice before then, and he was great. I really think he missed a few feedings that particular night, and my MIL took him into another part of the house from where I was, which I think was too far away from me. I have already formulated a response to this when she tries to do it again. Thanks for the advice. I guess there's no easy way to leave the house with baby no matter what. And forget about being on a schedule!
    3 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 PM
    It's entirely possible and it would be beneficial to baby as well! I would just make sure it's okay with the parents of the baby and any care givers that are in charge of him. I am not an expert so definitely ask those people first.
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*livinghere's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:37 PM
    Hello, I'm inquiring about a baby that's 21 days old. He's lost a kilo of his birth weight. He was exclusively breastfed until about 2 days ago. He's now on formula and in the hospital while they try to see what's going on. They have seen there are liver issues but they are investigating what they are. I'm not an expert and I don't know what's happening, but I do have a 14 month old baby. Is it possible for me to pump and express milk and give it to their baby (like a bottle or two a day)? I have had recent thorough blood tests and everything came back as healthy and normal. My baby is still a very active feeder and I think he would be ok to miss a few feeds and pump. But I'm not sure whether this would be a help or would be recommended? If the age differences would be ok, etc. We don't have these networks were we live and I don't think there are any milk banks in our current area. Thanks for any help you can offer.
    2 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:26 PM
    Well I managed to get almost 4 oz total today. That's more than double what I normally get in a day so we're on the right road. I only want to get 3 oz reliably in one session so I don't over produce in the long run. Thanks for all your help ladies :)
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*bean161's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:48 PM
    I'm not sure what I want to do, but I could use some feedback and thoughts. Sorry but this is long! I'm a first time momma to our 14 month old son. He bf about 6 times in 24 hr, and is doing well on solids, despite allergies to dairy, soy, peanut, and egg. I have several issues I'm dealing with, and I can't decide what to do. First, I am 40 years old, my DH is 42, and we would really like another child. As of now, I have not seen any signs of my cycle returning. Second and biggest issue for me is that I feel kind of trapped by bf and pumping, as DS is dairy and soy allergic. He still takes 2 bottles while I'm at work (4 pm and 9 pm feedings) I'm sick to death of pumping, but what would we feed him besides that very expensive formula to meet his nutritional needs? pedi thinks it best to avoid dairy until age 2...I have some freezer stash, but I don't have enough to get us that far. Plus I think I'm beginning to have some nursing aversion (is it too early for that??!) There are some times I do NOT want to sit down and nurse him, and then the hitting, pulling, fidgiting etc, occasional biting :yikes drive me nuts. Plus a little more sleep would be lovely! Third, I still follow an elimination diet, although not nearly as strict as before, but it would be nice to eat "normally" again. (This bothers me the least out of everything)
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:54 PM
    I missed the other questions, sorry. My husband works full time so he tries to help in the evenings and at times has taken her so I can get a nap, but sometimes I can't turn off my brain and sleep. I'm concerned about bed sharing not because I'm against it but because I'm paranoid I will roll on her or something. My concern at night is my husband has sleep apnea and uses a CPAP so I don't think it's safe to keep her in bed with us. Napping during the day might be more possible but I'm home alone so not sure if I need someone to check on us or not; I will check out the Sweet Sleep info. Thanks!
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*skyanne's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:42 PM
    Holy cow! Why didn't I think of that?? Reflux is a bigger family tradition for us than Christmas dinner. Grandpa, mom, me, my brother, and both my kids have it. I guess because she doesn't have it as bad as DS I figured it was just a laundry problem.... I don't know. Of course, she actually eats and he didn't, and her weight gain is stellar compared to his. I feel kinda stupid now. And come to think of it, she gained fine her first month, when she was on a small dose of Zantac once a day. At her 1 month appointment she was put on a higher dose twice a day, and her two month appointment was the one with the poor weight gain. She had horrible gas and fussyness from even the low dose though. I took her off about a week before her two month, but a week without shouldn't make her weight gain tank that bad, right? ETA: I'm basically dairy free anyway. I've had ice cream once since she was born and I maybe have cheese once or twice a week.
    17 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:38 PM
    Yeah, I would also be more inclined to look at the reflux than any other factor! Have you tried reducing or eliminating dairy in your diet? I am ordinarily very reluctant to suggest that a nursing mom limit her diet in any way, but some people do seem to find that lowered dairy intake coincides with less reflux.
    17 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    The hormonal fluctuations and sleep deprivation of postpartum also bring a lot of increased emotion. What you describe does sound normal, but I feel like I should throw in a little public service announcement here: if you feel like your emotional state is veering into depression or anxiety, please see your doctor! Ditch the guilt if you can! Remember, sometimes even the baby doesn't know why she's crying! Crying is one of a baby's primary survival skills. A baby who cries gets more attention than a baby who is quiet, and attention means more nursing, more cuddling, more changing and less díaper rash. Your baby is probably driving you batty but she's just doing her best to keep herself cared for.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 PM
    It's not all about self-weaning, I promise! :) This does NOT make you sound like a horrible mum. The feelings you report seem to be fairly common- in my experience, anyway. This seems to be particularly true in moms of older toddlers/children. I know I felt similar feelings of aversion, impatience, and even revulsion when my girls were around 2.5-3 years old. I think that feeling of aversion is a lot more common than people realize- I grew up on a farm and often saw the cows running away from their adolescent but still-nursing calves, or the dog standing up and shaking off her litter of pups. Sometimes a mama needs her space!
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:23 PM
    Thanks, that helps a lot. I don't know that the BC is causing my mood changes--I've always been super sensitive and cry at the drop of the hat, especially when I'm tired, so I think I may give it a little more time. If I'm still feeling like this after a while, I'll stop the BC and do something else. I feel guilty when I can't figure out why she's crying and fix it in a minute or two, and I know I'm being hard on myself. I appreciate the support and will keep trying. Hopefully we'll figure out something eventually before I go back to work in a month.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mldevlin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:13 PM
    If you are: an experienced breastfeeding mom you live in Kentucky or Tennessee (USA) And if you would like to: support women who wish to breastfeed their babies find out more about what an LLL Leader does
    0 replies | 15 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:12 PM
    But the doctor doesn't in anyway think the reflux has anything to do with her gain? I have heard that it can be a factor in slower than average gain- but I think that may be because some babies have reflux so bad that it hurts to eat and so they don't eat enough. My oldest also had reflux. If was hard we had to hold him most of the time in a sort of an uprightish position. I have reflux myself and my oldest was also on medication. We had to switch him to Prevacid just because he wouldn't eat the Zantac. Prevacid is also what I started taking after I was diagnosed with Gerd several months after my son was no longer being medicated. But having it myself what shocks me is the dosage. They had my baby on the same dosage that I take as an adult! In fact I had to half my own dosage.
    17 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:09 PM
    Just remember that not feeling full is not the same as not having milk. When supply and demand are well-matched, it's normal to rarely if ever feel full. Sure, no harm in that! Getting into a pumping routine is about starting modestly, experimenting to see what works, and being patient.
    7 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:06 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Everything you describe sounds normal- exceedingly frustrating but normal! I only want to add that while progesterone-only contraceptives are not supposed to impact milk supply and are therefore commonly used in nursing moms, there are frequent anecdotal reports of women who find that supply goes down when they use contraceptives like the mini-pill or Mirena. If you feel like your birth control could be causing either a supply issue or a mood issue, there's no harm in stopping the pill and trying nonhormonal methods for a while.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:02 PM
    All new moms could use more sleep but just for the record I don't in any way think you're over dramatizing. It is normal to worry about our babies. Also unfortunately society tends to creates an image of new motherhood and new baby behavior that is not really realistic, and that makes us even more worried.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 PM
    That is what I do, once when I get up. It's the only time I pump all day, though. I'm going back to work in a month, and this is my first baby. I'm no expert.
    7 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:58 PM
    Let us know how it goes!
    8 replies | 222 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    Yes I've been taking the BC for a little over a week. My concern is the change in routine but if that's normal I guess it's my lack of sleep making me over dramatize.
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:14 PM
    you're not doing anything wrong. However I think you are worrying over nothing. You've described a normal healthy baby. Babies sleep in short stretches, they prefer being held most of the time, they sleep better when they are held, and a five hour stretch of sleep once a day is the most one can typically expect so young, and many infants of this age do not have stretches that long yet. Also it is normal for a baby to sleep more in the first few weeks then later. Sleep stretches do not typically move in a recognizable progression certainly not this young. this is just how it is with a newborn. of course it is helpful to eat as healthy as you want to for your own health, nothing you describe sounds anything like allergy in your infant to me. When you say you were recently prescribed birth control do you mean you have started taking it? I doubt the progesterone only birth-control is causing any breast-feeding problems. However any hormonal birth control might make a mom not feel so great. Hormones are hormones and they affect us, some of us more than others. There are other forms of birth control that do not have any side effects. How much help do you have at home? If you can't sleep with your baby at night maybe you would consider sleeping with your baby for naps so that you can get more sleep overall. If you want to try that look for the information on this website about safe bed sharing. If you search sweet sleep on this website you will find the sweet sleep tear...
    9 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*skyanne's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    She has reflux. On an average day she projectile vomits twice. All over my shirt, down the back of my pant legs, all over the floor, exc. We had her on Zantac for a while, but we stopped because the side effects were worse than the reflux. On the bright side, her reflux is nowhere near as bad as DSs was.
    17 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:57 PM
    Well I think your appointment sounds like the perfect example of why these weighted feeds can be very misleading. You have no idea how much your baby took in, it was just an estimate the LC came up with. I am not blaming her of course – waited feeds are incredibly difficult to do in part because yes of course they have to be done on an extremely sensitive scale, and also because any output by baby at an inopportune moment is going to affect the numbers. That is one of the reasons they are so tricky as a diagnostic tool. The other of course is that babies do tend to take in differing amounts at different feeds normally. I have to say I agree with Mommal if a baby's gain Is too slow it is because they are not getting enough milk it doesn't have anything to do with foremilk hindmilk. At least that's what the lactation resources I have read have suggested. But as you point out, while your lactation consultant mentioned foremilk and hindmilk her advice was actually in line with helping baby get more milk overall and didn't really have anything to do with insisting baby nurse in a way that they somehow get more hindmilk. Does your baby tend to spit up a lot? Any other signs of Gastrointestinal distress? (yes typically spit up is normal. However for a baby who is gaining poorly I think frequent or copious spit ups might be something to look at) Baby has green and watery poops. That is kind of interesting. That is not typically a sign that anything is wrong, although it...
    17 replies | 254 view(s)
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