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  • @llli*tinabear's Avatar
    Today, 08:33 AM
    You're right, I'll find a more positive response to their advice. They are just trying to be helpful in their own way. Having an average supply is better than too little or too much, I should be less concerned about it if the baby is happy and healthy. Sadly, my pediatricians are not my greatest source of information, nor support. I spoke with them regarding frequency and durationc of nursing when LO was born and they handed me information regarding formula feeding and told me I should be bfing 7-9 times a day. Thank you for the support. I'll just have to sneak in more than one pumping sessions a day to be able to stock up any significant amount.
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:49 AM
    I found this post and thread. This might be of assistance to you: http://hippieinside.blogspot.com/2012/02/breast-milk-yogurt.html
    3 replies | 834 view(s)
  • @llli*daliajesse's Avatar
    Today, 06:35 AM
    No, This is the first time I'm listening about this. Can you please share me one link about making yogurt out of breastmilk?? TIA!!
    3 replies | 834 view(s)
  • @llli*van.walker's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 PM
    Hello, My LO just started daycare yesterday. (I was a mess.) Anyway, I work an 8 hour shift and take seven, 2.5 ounce bottles to daycare. My daycare requires plastic bottles and will toss any breast milk not eaten within the hour. Sending large bottles wouldn't work in this situation because of the daycare policy. (I know my freshly pumped milk is good for longer than an hour but it's a non negotiable policy.) If you are using a daycare service, read through the manual carefully and be aware of their policies before making a selection. Good luck. :)
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:37 PM
    It sounds as if you're basing your concern about whether or not baby is getting enough at the breast primarily off of baby's behavior. But this can often be misleading. Has there been any reduction in output- poops -or any problems with weight gain? When mom is using nipple shields it actually is very important that she pumps after at least some feedings. Nipple shields are linked to poor milk production and it is thought might interfere with milk transfer this is why pumping is important not just to have expressed milk for your baby should baby need it but mostly to make sure your milk production is not impacted while you are using shields. In other words pumping is actually going to only help your milk production and consequently help your baby get more milk at the breast. It would help us to know how often baby nurses - how many times in 24 hours -as well and also what kind of pump you have etc. Also have you seen a lactation consultant, are you still seeing one or are you able to do so?
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*labrys71's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:26 PM
    Yes, and he doesn't have either one of those. That was initially what I thought the problem may have been as well.
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:51 PM
    If you're leaving baby with an actual daycare, make sure they allow glass. Just something to think about.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:38 PM
    If the occasional comments about frequent nursing are getting to you, I suggest taking the positive approach. You put on a big, confident smile and say something like "I know, isn't it wonderful? I couldn't be happier with her feeding frequency, and neither could her pediatrician. Breastfeeding is going so well this time around!" That approach can shut down criticism before it has a chance to get started. If, on the other hand, you complain about feeding frequency and being tired from nursing so often, you're likely to get a lot of unsolicited and unhelpful advice (use formula, use a schedule, make the baby wait, crying is good for them, etc.). There are a lot of moms who get freaked out by the amount that they can't pump, since everyone knows someone or reads about someone on the internet who can pump 5-10 oz at a time. But what most people don't know is that having that much milk is actually oversupply, and it's not desirable because it increases your risk of plugged ducts and mastitis, and tends to make nursing more difficult due to fast letdowns. Better to have just about the right amount of milk!
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    :ita I might err on the side of making more, smaller bottles, and buying 6 bottles for a day at work. That way you can send a mix of 2-3 oz "feeding" bottles and 1-2 oz "top-off" bottles. Sending more bottles is preferable because it forces the baby's caregiver to pause the feeding in order to reach for another bottle. Pausing the feeding gives the baby a chance to decide whether or not she's actually full, instead of absentmindedly continuing to suck, and thereby reduces the likelihood of baby being overfed. Rule of thumb for the amount you'll need to leave is 1.5 oz per hour of separation, and that is true throughout the first year. Some days the baby will eat less than this, some days more like 2 oz per hour. If the baby consistently eats 2 or more oz per hour, she's probably being overfed and you'll want to go over paced feeding techniques with her caregivers.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:16 PM
    Baby will probably eat every 1-3 hours at that ate so for 8 hours I'd probably get 4 bottles. 4 oz size is perfect because breast fed babies eat smaller meals than formula babies. 2-3 oz is a full meal so the 8 oz bottles woukd waste space. They don't eat more milk as they get older so you don't have to worry about them getting too small. I use the advent bottles but have no experience with the dr. Brown ones. Which eve is cheaper imo.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymunster's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 PM
    Hi! I'm a first time mom getting everything ready for my baby's arrival. I will be working one day a week (8 hours) when my baby is 6 weeks old. How many bottles should I have on hand to cover that? I am also looking at the Avent Natural Glass bottles and the Dr. Brown glass bottles. Does anyone have a preference between the two? Should I be getting them in the 4oz or 8oz so it lasts longer? I plan on breast feeding as long as possible! Thanks in advance! I'm totally clueless about everything. :)
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*tinabear's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:58 PM
    I had this same issue and still sort of do. I have a recurring bleb/blister on one of my nipples. I do a warm, wet compress before every feeding when I have a blockage and actual blister. In the shower, I'll use a clean cloth to help the blister "pop," but I also use the cloth to (very carefully) scrape the excess skin off. I try to get as much of it off with the cloth, because once I used my nail and accidentally caused a small tear which became an infection. Using lanolin helps it heal and keep it from drying up and clogging again. Definitely make sure to nurse often. I finally am bleb free for the last 2 weeks, but there's still a small scab that's slowly heeling. At least it doesn't hurt anymore. Good luck with your issue. I hope it clears up for you soon. I know what you're going through and I promise it gets better.
    3 replies | 432 view(s)
  • @llli*tinabear's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:37 PM
    Thank you guys for responding so quickly . I feel much better about the whole thing. I thought I was doing something wrong, because it seems like other mothers are able to pump so much more. I get weird looks and occasional comments from my family regarding the frequency of nursing sessions. My mom even once told me that I dont let the baby get hungry enough (my sister and I were formula feed, so she has no experience bfing.) This website is my main source of information. Thank you so much for the support.
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:22 PM
    :ita You could also try freezing her breastmilk and making slush that you spoon into her mouth, or put a breastmilk ice cube in one of those mesh feeders, or mixing breastmilk in with another food.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:20 PM
    Yes. Once supply and demand have adjusted to match each other very precisely, it's quite normal to have no extra milk to pump out at all. Also, different moms respond differently to pumping and to their particular pump. Probably not. Pumping tells you the minimum amount of milk available in the breast. Nursing generally yields more milk per session. That being said, 2 oz is a normal feeding for a young baby. This is why many breastfed babies feed so frequently- they take small, frequent meals which adds up to just as much as large, infrequent ones. 1. Use a better pump. 2. Make sure you have correctly sized shields.
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:19 PM
    At 10 months baby should be able to take milk other ways than bottle if she wants. Have you tried a sippy cup? Maybe letting her drink it herself "on the go" if she wants will help.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    Hi! I only have a few minutes, so I'll be brief but hopefully this will help. Yes, it is normal to see 1-2 oz per pumping session, and if you are nursing on cue, you are actually getting a lot of milk from your pumping. You get more if you are exclusively pumping or away from baby during the day. Pumping is also the minimum you can get out of the breast, so it is unlikely that baby is getting only 1 or 1/2 oz out of each breast. Is baby gaining weight well? Then you are producing enough, no matter what your husband says or what you get from the pump. To increase the amount you get per session, try massaging your breasts while you pump. You can get more if you do so, but be aware that in general, you get more in the mornings/night, so if you can focus on pumping then, that might help you get more. This kellymom article helps explain things. http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/pumping_decrease/ ETA: Oh, I see that you said baby is gaining weight well. Never mind that question . . .but, to add to this: baby is young. Baby needs to nurse 8-12 times per day. Baby is nursing at normal frequency at this age and it sounds like you are doing fine.
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:10 PM
    :ita after 6 weeks, infrequent pooping is normal in an EBF baby. Just nurse on demand and you should be just fine!
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:07 PM
    One option would be to wake her right before you go to bed, which I assume is between 9 and 11 pm-ish? That way you nurse her once when you get home, another time right before bed, once more at your bedtime, one more time in the middle of the night, and then once first thing in the morning- voila! You're up to 5 feedings a day.
    5 replies | 123 view(s)
  • @llli*sara.walthamstow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:20 PM
    i'll try to find the article where I read this. - your supply and your baby's feeding appetite balance each other. - number of milk ducts and storage volume in breast vary greatly from woman to woman (breast scans revealed). - amount pumped is much less than the amount baby sucks - to do with the unique physical and chemical/hormonal stimulus the baby produces in you.
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*sara.walthamstow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:07 PM
    Hi amygmar My now 5 month boy did sleep through the night for long stretches when he was 2 and 3 months old. His weight was fine and I was (and still am) feeding on demand and I did not wake him up for feeding. He continued to gain weight alright. I must confirm that the 'sleep regression' has hit us and he no longer sleeps like that... he now wakes up every 2-3 hours to feed at night but we transfered him to our bed :) Enjoy the sleep! S
    4 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 AM
    Breast fed babies start to poop less frequently starting around 6 weeks. Some babies go for a week in between poops! Wet diapers also start to slow down, though I'm not sure by how much exactly. How often does baby nurse? Do you pump at all? Can you post the entire weight history? Birth, lowest known, and any that you have after?
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*tinabear's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:28 AM
    Hello! I'm a sahm and ebfing my 12 week old; I would like to start pumping to create a small cache of milk in case I need to leave the baby with a caretaker for a feeding or two. Currently, LO nurses 9-10 times throughout the day and night. He has two 3.5-hour stretches see night, so most of the daytime I nurse him ~ every 2 hours. I also have a toddler to care for so my pumping time is very limited. In one session, I pump 5 to 10 minutes, and I don't get more than 1oz a breast. I've waited for more milk to flow, but I never see more than the 1oz per and that's only in the morning. Afternoons I get half an oz per breast. So my questions are: Is it normal to only see 2oz or less a session?
    6 replies | 132 view(s)
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