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  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 04:06 PM
    Baby is getting enough, but I have been in pain the full 5 months (started out with cracked/bleeding nipples due to ties). On rare occasions I've only felt a tugging or nothing at all, but that's happened less than 10 times total.
    2 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Today, 03:59 PM
    I am a new mom to a 7 week old whom I am EBF. I am wondering if anyone can offer some advice for leaving the house. The few times we have left the house, we nurse and change diaper before leaving and nurse whenever we get where we are going/before we leave where we are. So far it has been working out, but we had kind of a disastrous car ride home from my in-laws the other night when DS screamed bloody murder (first time he has ever cried so hard, like he was going to burst a lung) and I promptly pulled over into a parking lot to nurse him back to sleep before driving the 15 minutes home (even though I nursed him before we left their house, I think he missed a meal or two while we were there, because my MIL seems to like to stall our on-demand feedings, as she is reluctant to give him back to me, but that topic is for another post). Anyway, the experience prompted me to think about other ways in which he can be soothed if I can't nurse and "know" he is full. We do not have a pacifier, because when he wants to suck, I just figure I'd rather give him the boob, and we don't have any bottles, because I haven't started pumping yet (I go back to work in 9 weeks). How do you manage this when you're trying to get somewhere? Eventually he will be able to go longer stretches without needing to nurse? Should I just keep pulling over until that happens, within reason? Should I introduce a pacifier, just for these emergencies like car rides (I read this article...
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:52 PM
    :ita Definitely limit bottle size and used paced feeding techniques mentioned above. You're exactly right, it is easier to get milk from the bottle. One strategy is to instruct the caregiver to give baby a 3 oz bottle. Then leave frozen 1 oz "toppers," if he still seems hungry after a few minutes, add an additional oz. In the meantime the milk needs to be thawed so it introduces a break into the feeding. Also you may suggest other soothing strategies like holding baby, rocking baby, walking with baby etc. Or perhaps a pacifier (if baby will take it) if baby mainly is wanting to suck.
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:47 PM
    That's great news! :)
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*lepetitmatin's Avatar
    Today, 03:31 PM
    On a couple occasions I pumped after the morning feed to relieve fullness but then felt like I barely had any milk the rest of the day! What about pumping on one side in the morning while feeding on the other?
    4 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:30 PM
    From what you say it does sound like a letdown problem - stress definitely inhibits letdown. I think your plan to distract yourself by reading or TV is right on target! In terms of flange size, your nipple should be able to move easily back and forth. The flange is too big if your whole breast is getting sucked in, and too small if the nipple cannot move back and forth easily with each suction cycle.
    3 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:24 PM
    I agree with isabelofmti, there's no way to know really whether cutting down on the pumping would bring it back or not. Sometimes moms keep pumping out of habit and/or out of concern that baby will stop nursing if they stop, but I can see why you would want to keep pumping since you're donating (lovely that you do that!). I guess an intermediate solution would be to keep the one pump you are donating and cut out the pumping session you give to your son, since it sounds like he is nursing plenty (rule of thumb is 3-5 nursing sessions/24 hours to meet his dairy needs in toddlerhood).
    5 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    4 replies | 157 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:04 PM
    Is nursing painful and/ or is baby not getting enough milk? My best suggestion for latch is that feel tells you more than look.
    2 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:34 PM
    Do you mean baby spit up and pooped between the two weights?
    11 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:14 PM
    Nursing pain means something is off, even if it is only on one side. If help is available, I strongly suggest getting help. It sounds to me you have done what you can on your own with trying different positions and latch techniques. Pain for mom is just as "real" a breastfeeding issue as poor weight gain.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*shannonfbc's Avatar
    Today, 02:14 PM
    thanks guys ive made a doctors appt to make sure its not a thyroid thing
    7 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 PM
    Is there any reason to pump aside from relieving the fullness? For example are you building a freezer stash for when you are back at work? Any pumping at all, assuming baby is exclusively breastfed, increases milk production. Because that is the removal of extra milk. Nursing more frequently does not. Pumping is only needed if it is needed, in other words.
    4 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*lizpuff's Avatar
    Today, 02:04 PM
    I posted before about feeling down about pumping but I have had a breakthrough! A week ago multiple things happened. The smaller pump shields arrived, i got on Reglan, and I was diagnosed hyperthyroid so stopped my medication. Since then I have gone from nothing to several ML a day! Things are only getting better! So if you ever want to give up please please do not! Things do get better and you may need to change things you never knew you had to. I thought I was using the correct sized shields but I was not. :thumbsup
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*jmparker54's Avatar
    Today, 02:01 PM
    Thank you both! Lactation suggested nursing both sides and pumping only for comfort max 15 mins. Went to family doc today and she agreed and added to pump no more than 3 times a day.
    4 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:20 PM
    I am not liking this LC's advice. Block feeding is NOT a good idea if you suspect the baby is having trouble with weight gain or milk transfer. Block feeding adjusts the foremilk/hindmilk ratio by reducing supply, and when it comes to weight gain, milk volume is far more important than milk quality (I.e., foremilk vs. hindmilk). So in your situation, I really would not consider block feeding a good idea, I would not worry about foremilk/hindmilk ratios, and I would immediately go back to nursing on both breasts. I absolutely would not take a sample of your milk to the hospital for a fat test; those are generally useless because the amount of fat/calories in milk varies naturally throughout the day and based on when and how often you pump. A single milk sample will not tell you anything worth knowing.
    11 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:13 PM
    You could start pumoing to create a stash now. But since you have a couple of months before you need to return to work, you probably want to do a very limited amount of pumping so that you don't pump yourself into a problematic oversupply. The way a lot of moms start is to pump 1x per day after the first morning feeding, and store what they get. Remember that you need just about 1.5 oz of milk per hour of separation, and that once you are back at work you will be bringing home fresh milk every day. So an acceptable freezer stash might comprise only enough milk to get you through the first day back at work, with a little extra to cover spills or a delay in you coming home. You could also create a larger freezer stash- get yourself several days or even a week or two ahead. But that's a personal choice and a lot of moms would say it's unnecessary. "Schedules" are generally understood to be somewhat rigid. Machines run on schedules. Babies run on routines, and routines are naturally more flexible and less predictable. At 7 weeks, a baby might not have any routine at all, or her daily routine might consist of a few somewhat predictable naps, a somewhat predictable bedtime, and frequent but often erratic feedings throughout day and night. None of those things- napping, feeding, sleeping- will happen at exactly the same time every day, and there will be days when your baby completely changes her usual habits! But that's okay because you're not a machine...
    4 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*yana.yana's Avatar
    Today, 12:47 PM
    I asked the same question just two weeks ago. Scroll down the main page to find my thread. In a nutshell, my baby used to cry for 2-3 mins after he finished a 4 oz bottle and my nanny insisted he is still hungry and that he should be getting bigger bottles. I decided against it (he is gaining beautifully) and asked her to learn to feed him slowly using the paced feeding techniques. That reduced the crying. I think he cries because he needs time to realize he is full. Bottle feeding feels too short to baby who is used to hanging out on the breast as long as he wants.
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 12:21 PM
    Long story short, my little family's been sick for almost 3 months (and still sick) with one thing after another, so I've gotten kind of "lazy" about working on baby's latch (she had tongue/lip ties revised a month before we starting getting sick), because I just haven't had the physical and emotional energy to tackle one more thing on top of caring for everyone/keeping everyone fed and clean (ha). I've noticed this week as I've tried to get a bit better about correcting bad latch that, when she's not latching onto just my nipple (always struggled with a shallow latch), she's taking in more of the areola above than below - I seem to recall it should be the other way around? I'm hoping to be able to see our IBCLC once we're well (if that ever happens! =/), but any tips for working on her latch now?
    2 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Today, 12:01 PM
    So I got The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding! Great book so far! Thanks for the recommendation!
    16 replies | 440 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:38 AM
    Great news! fyi, scales can be so tricky- even the same scale may have been recalibrated between visits. Also, human error happens, whether in reading the number wrong, putting baby on the scale wrong, conversion mistake or math mistake. The 'incorrect' check may have been the 2 month, also. if the next or any future weight checks seem in any way seems questionable, have baby weighed again. I think it is entirely possible your baby has not been gaining as well as baby should. What I doubt is the complete absence of gain for so long going unnoticed. Growth rate is normally slower the 2nd half of the first 6 months than the first. Don't let that alarm you.
    17 replies | 536 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 11:36 AM
    I appreciate the tips. Maybe I'm not getting enough breast tissue into the flange. I have a similar chest size and if I use the large flange it's nearly impossible to massage my breast while pumping. I also might be too focused on getting the milk put and tensing up. It's hard to relax whike you're thinking about making sure you have enough milk for the baby haha. Maybe I'll read or watch TV next go around.
    3 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*skyanne's Avatar
    Today, 11:33 AM
    She's having me do breast compression, she says judging by looking at baby's poop (ever so slightly greenish and pretty watery) she's not getting enough hindmilk. She nurses almost constantly, I'm only able to put her down for 10 minutes at a time if I'm lucky. I told her I tried doing a two hour block feed for a few days and it seemed to help a bit (though it was probably my imagination), she said that was good because it would help baby get more hindmilk. However, she also encouraged me to feed on both sides during a feeding so baby gets more volume. I'm sure the weight was a bit off because baby did decide to poop and projectile vomit while we were there, and she was pretty angry about having to be weighed so the scales were acting weird due to her moving. LC said she would be very interested to see my pumping output (I got a little over 2 oz after our morning feed), and to call her back next week and tell her how everything goes. She really was baffled by that 1 oz intake though.... ETA: She also mentioned something about getting the fat content of my milk checked, but I would have to get that done at our local pediatric hospital.
    11 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*victors.mom's Avatar
    Today, 11:33 AM
    medela pumps have 2 phase expression, a first "letdown" phase that does small fast light stimulation and a second, regular pumping phase. I found the first phase doesn't do much for me to stimulate letdown, and that I just tend to go more or less right to the second phase. I have 3 different kinds of pumps (long story) two manual medela Harmony pumps, a medela single side electric swing pump, and a double electric medela pump I also found for some reason, a manual pump was easier for me, but then again, I'm only pumping occasionally, and my baby liked to play with cords too much when he was in the combat crawl phase so plugging it in did not help me. A few things you might try. 1) relax and think about the baby's face while pumping. 2) go immediately to the second phase and turn up the pumps suction. 3) check to make sure your breast is fitting into the shields properly, creating a seal. Really squish your breast into it. I'm a 34 C (34 B pre-pregnancy) and I found I had to make sure I go the breast into the shield good. 4) You could try a manual pump, they are fairly inexpensive. I found once I started it with the manual pump the electric pump worked better. 5) You could try a different sized breast shield, never did this myself though.
    3 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*alysandrasmom's Avatar
    Today, 10:47 AM
    Well, things have progressed and baby is gaining! We have been keeping an eye on it at home. So it was a volume issue. Had a rough night a couple nights ago when he refused to nurse! So I said THATS IT!! I'm not going to stop nursing! I tried and tried that night and no luck. Gave him a bottle but of breast milk! He did great! Woke him up a few hours later and he latched on with no problem! Last night, tried again and he latched on for about 10 minutes and then wasn't having it anymore and got super fussy! Bottle after that. Nursed before bed and them up a few hours later and he nursed again! I know this is going to be a process and I'm very determined to make sure I don't have to stop breastfeeding early! We go to the doctor tomorrow so we will see what he has to say... I'm sure he will be happy to see weight gain... No tests have been ran... This week was a test to see if it was my milk causing him to not gain weight but as we have determined from the advice here, it's the quantity not the quality... We haven't checked on the scale. It's the only one in the doctos office and the same one they always use. Thanks again for all the advice and encouragement! I was super hard on myself last weekend and you all have turned that around! :)
    17 replies | 536 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 10:28 AM
    I return to work in a week and a half. I'm trying to get used to pumping and trying to get a stash going just in case. My sin is currently 9 weeks old and when he was younger I pumped a few ounces to get him used to a bottle. Well I'm hardly pumping anything out. I've read a lot of previous threads and tried a few things - pumping through multiple let downs, hand compression and expression. I've tried pumping in the morning and at night. I've tried puming before he eats and after. Any other tips? I know I have a lot of milk in there but it isn't coming out :'( I'm using the medela single side electric pump. I bought it new and I've changed the membrane recently.
    3 replies | 37 view(s)
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