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  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 AM
    It will have to be a c-section this time again. Last time it was at 38 weeks. Hopefully it wont be any earlier this time but we have to see how the pregnancy is progressing. I have a personal medical issue which would require a section anyway but also last time I had cholestatis of pregnancy so that determines how early I have to deliver. I didn't feel that out of it to be honest last time and once I was stitched up I was with my baby in the recovery room and could breastfeed straight away so that I was happy with. I am going to request the same again this time. Also I felt last time the baby should be dressed (in case they got cold - 1st time Mom :-)) but I know now that maybe I should just strip them down to their nappy and spend as much time skin to skin as possible? Would you be able to share a little of your birth plan because other than requesting to get my baby straight after the operation i am not sure what to ask. My consultant is very nice and accommodating so I can definitely run any requests I might have by him and see how I get on. Looking back I think it did take a couple of days for my milk to come in and I don't remember feeling the let down that everyone talks about. I will be more in tune this time for sure. Also last time my nipples were very sore and deeply cut the first 2 weeks, probably from poor latch from the tongue tie. From the start I could see my baby had a very shallow latch. It took a few weeks to heal, probably because I was...
    4 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    No, I never had Braxton Hicks at any point in any of my pregnancies. I am probably not much help there, I also never had a normal labor so I am not even sure what real contractions feel like. There is a lot going on hormonally in a pregnant mom, and the stimulation of nursing can cause many intense sensations in my experience, from great irritation to arousal. Tummy tightening and what you describe sounds familiar to me, but we are talking over a decade ago and I am not sure. I do not recall every feeling anything I thought of as a contraction. I would say kellymom is usually a very accurate source of information. When I nursed when pregnant, it was shortly after a miscarriage. As far as I know there is no reason a previous miscarriage would make nursing when pregnant unsafe, and nursing when pregnant does not cause miscarriages. What might be a concern...maybe, is previous preterm labor, or in a situation where preterm labor is suspected or threatened, and so mom is being warned off things that may cause a hormonal rush that could lead to preterm labor- namely, orgasm. Orgasm would cause a far larger hormonal rush than nursing.
    3 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 PM
    Here is a chart that can help you count poops. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/02_diaper_log.pdf As long as baby is pooping typical amounts, you do not really have to worry about pees. As far as counting nursing, when I had to do this, I just took a piece of paper and put the date on top, and made three columns- first column for time (such as 3:30 PM) In the second column I wrote what side (Left or Right, of course sometimes baby nursed both sides) and how long baby nursed (such as L:15 minutes) and then the third column was for notes if needed ('Baby fell asleep nursing', or 'baby was fussy after nursing', or "baby did not want other side" or whatever. You can skip that third column if you want I just liked having it for notes. Of course you can also combine a poop and nursing frequency chart. This way you have a record- not just for yourself, but if it becomes necessary, to show the doctor if they are wondering how often baby is eating. There is no reason to keep charts like this if baby is gaining fine, and your baby may be. But it can help you just to have a handle on what is going on (without charting how could you possibly remember, it is all a blur) and also if anyone is questioning whether baby is getting enough to eat. This is a article I think can be helpful during these early weeks: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*hannah.seed's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:29 PM
    Hi, thanks so much for your response. I realize how many details my post was lacking, sorry about that. I decided to go get the baby re-weighed in a couple days using the same scale and then ill be able to ask the doctor some of the questions and get you some better details. I also realize from some of your questions that i dont even know how im counting times he eats, and how to count his poos and wees, so let me get a better idea of some of this and ill repost a new thread with a clearer scenario- thanks so much for your help...
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:53 PM
    Hi, thanks so very much for the detailed reply. My pregnancy is normal and and my midwife has told me everything seems to be going fine. But I am wondering if my previous miscarriage might be a risk factor. I haven't talked to her much about nursing during pregnancy because unfortunately she is "old-school" and thinks toddlers should be weaned at a year old. A few minutes after she starts nursing, my bump tenses up and I feel a pulling in my pelvic region. This has only been the case in the last couple of days. I wlil definitely try drinking more water, and will also check out the book Adventures in Tandem Nursing. I read about the 4 contractions per hour on kellymon here (under the subheading "a primer on preterm labor"): http://kellymom.com/pregnancy/bf-preg/bfpregnancy_safety/#contractions I think that's the only place I read that. I've also read other moms say that they've experienced up to 8 contractions per nursing session with no issues and a full-term pregnancy.
    3 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:44 PM
    Hi, I am sorry you are having this concern that has clearly rocked your confidence. If it were me, I would suggest research this more. Perhaps your allergist can suggest reading material for you because I wonder what the basis of her suggestion is. Perhaps you can discuss this with an IBCLC and ask them to point you to the current info and what exactly it says. Even if early introduction is recommended for dairy in such a case, and I am not sure it is, isn't a whole meal every day possibly overkill? and starting when, exactly? Introducing potential allergens earlier rather than later is fairly new thinking based on limited studies, and I am pretty sure it is not like you should introduce the allergen in the first few months even so...but I honestly have not read about this for a couple years and may not be up to date. The studies I am aware of about early exposure involve peanut butter and gluten and I am not sure how complete the agreement is yet that even these studies are a solid basis for changing the previous recommendations or how to change them. Biologically normally, a human baby would not have any reason to have dairy for a year or more, yet while dairy intolerances are pretty common at least among some populations, isn't a serious dairy allergy fairly rare? I am pretty sure if there was any evidence breastfed babies were more prone to serious dairy allergies than formula fed babies, we would know about that. Also of course many people- whole...
    1 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*robinc308's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:50 PM
    My firstborn has a life-threatening allergy to dairy. He wasn't formally diagnosed until he had an anaphylactic reaction to some butter on toast when he was 7 months old, but while breastfeeding him, I had suspected a problem very early on, and had cut milk out of my diet from when he was about 3 or 4 months old, until around 6 months, when he seemed to tolerate milk in my diet again. It kills me to think what I put my son through in those first few months: he was miserable and I *knew* something wasn't right, and yet everyone kept telling me that it was normal and some babies are just fussy. Well, I'm pregnant again, and due soon. I really want to breastfeed this new baby too, but I'm terrified that she will have allergies too. I know statistically her odds are higher, since she has a sibling with allergies, but I am at a loss as to what I can do to prepare. I hate the thought that I might cause her discomfort and pain because of something I eat. My son's allergist told me that early and frequent exposure is the best chance I can give her to avoid developing allergies, and suggested I give her one bottle of cows-milk based formula a day to give her the best chance of not developing an allergy, and either way, making sure that cows milk is part of my own diet, but I consumed a ton of diary with my son, and he's still allergic. Does anyone have any thoughts or experience on how I can approach feeding this new baby to both give us the best chance of successfully...
    1 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:30 PM
    Hi. Generally speaking, nursing when pregnant with a normal (not at risk) pregnancy is safe. So I think the first thing to figure out is, are these feelings you are having actually benign or possibly a sign of early labor? In other words, is there any reason to think your pregnancy may be at risk? Have you called your doctor? I mean, how do you know this is Braxton Hicks and not actual contractions, or something else? I really do not know anything about BH. But in my experience with pregnancy, if some activity appeared to be the root of any contraction feeling or discomfort in that area, I would stop that activity. Not permanently, but certainly for the moment. Also I would drink water immediately. I wonder if what you are feeling may be related to becoming dehydrated when nursing?? Just a musing I really do not know, I just know that dehydration can bring on contractions and nursing can be dehydrating. Nothing I have read about or experienced- I nursed my then 2 year old when pregnant and he nursed frequently- would prepare me to give you an accurate answer as far as how many contractions in X amount of time would be "ok" And frankly I doubt anyone one else can either. If BH contractions when nursing has been studied in any way I would be very surprised. On the other hand, if this is info coming from a board certified lactation consultant or midwife or other health practitioner, perhaps there is more info out there I am not aware of. The most accurate...
    3 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:15 PM
    I had all 3 of my kids by C-section birth, so I could go on about that forever! But the first thing I have to ask is, is a VBAC even a possibility? While of course a mother can nurse her child after a C-section birth as I am proof of, there is no doubt C-sections tend to bring on a host of issues that are not typically present with a vaginal birth, especially a non-medicated vaginal birth. Also if scheduled C-section is needed, will it be scheduled for due date, before, after? Babies gain about a half pound per week in the last several weeks of gestation, so being born even a week or two before 40 weeks can make a huge difference in infant size and strength and again, while even premature babies can nurse, even nurse right away, even slight prematurity tends to bring on additional issues that it helps to be prepared for. Also can you tell me generally where you are? (what country?) How responsive to any special requests you might make regarding the birth do you think your hcps might be? one of the hardest things for me about C-sections was being out of control of my child's birth and loosing control of my birth plan. With my third child I designed a C-section based birth plan that helped me. In some ways that operation was the most traumatic and it helped tremendously to know that my husband and doctor were well aware of and capable of abiding by my wishes for the post birth experience of my baby, because for a while there I was too out of it to communicate...
    4 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:38 AM
    Hi all, I was wondering if I could draw from your collective wisdom about this issue. I am nursing a 2.5 y.o. and am in week 28 of my pregnancy (rainbow baby after a miscarriage at 9 weeks). The toddler nurses to sleep for naptime and bedtime. In the past few days, I experienced've BH contractions when I nurse. They feel intense and happen every 10 minutes or so. Last night I experienced 3 strong ones. I have read about this online and found different answers (a. that it doesn't matter, b. stop nursing, c. stop nursing only if I have four contractions in an hour).
    3 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:38 AM
    Thank you so much for your reply, what great advice. A lot of what you are saying I have thought myself but it is nice to have someone else repeat it back to you and just to know someone else gets where I am coming from. I actually downloaded a copy of that book so will buy it now on your recommendation. I am not due for another few months so I do have time. As for support, we have very little to be honest. My husband will hopefully be off for the first 3 weeks. He is a massive support and totally on board with breastfeeding. That was another thing that really knocked my confidence last time, my extended family didn't support me when breastfeeding. Mainly I know because they don't understand it. It was like we were just being silly new parents trying to breastfeed so much so when our son wasn't putting on weight I had my MIL tell me to give him a bottle and her sister ringing me telling me how MIL was worried sick that he wasn't putting on weight and would we just give a bottle. We were really made feel like we were starving him! Of course in the height of everything with all these different opinions you don't know what to think, looking back (and my husband totally agrees and is so cross over it) it was unacceptable and we should have said something. But look that is something I have to get over too. I don't know could I ever change their opinions anyway so I think I just have to learn to ignore these comments. I do think I will be much more confident this...
    4 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 11:57 PM
    Hi pinkmomof2. Yes it is certainly usually possible to get a baby back to the breast after bottle feeding. Of course you will need to get baby to latch better so you are not in pain or injured, that can take practice for both you and baby, and there are many positioning and latch techniques that help. It sounds like you have lots of breastfeeding support where you are so take advantage! Keep going to the LLL meetings and talking to Leaders on the phone. If you can see lactation consultants again, do that as well. Sometimes it takes time to get things back on track. Keep getting help and support! Actually, this very well could be at least part of the problem. If you are pumping 40-50 ounces of milk a day, that is almost enough for twins. This is called overproduction or OP for short. OP often leads to a secondary problem called fast or forceful letdown (FFLD for short) Many times OP causes no problems but other times it certainly can. For mom it makes her more likely to get plugs and/or mastitis. For baby, the problem is from the FFLD. All that milk coming all at once can basically panic baby, causing them to refuse to nurse. Also if baby DOES latch, the FFLD potentially causes baby to slip "down" the nipple (causing a shallow latch) and also causes baby to clamp down to try to stem the flow. The result could be latch pain and injured nipples.
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*pinkmomof2's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 11:16 PM
    I really want to breastfeed again. I had to give up from the awful pain of mastitis over and over, cracked bleeding nipples that became a scab and chunks falling off. So painful I thought I would pass out. Horrible anxiety attacks and panic when I had to feed. So I ended up exclusively pumping and feeding baby the bottle. I pump about 40-50oz of milk a day. I tried latching baby on tonight (6 weeks tomorrow) and she screamed and pushed me away. I exclusively breastfed her till she was 3 weeks. I saw lac consultants and had her check for ties etc. Went to lll meeting, breastfeeding support to try to get less painful latch. Now I am healed and I would like to try breastfeeding again. Is it possible? She roots for nipple but once she latches she sucks it like a bottle then screams and spits it out while clawing at me. Milk is going everywhere so that's not the problem. Help!?? Or should I give up on the boob.
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 10:03 PM
    Hi. So sorry you are having this concern. I will try to offer some suggestions, but first I have some questions, hope that is ok. Aside the weight gain, how are other growth parameters? Were all weight checks on the same scale? this almost never happens, but if you could note when it was a different scale that would help. Were the scales always digital infant scales? Any reason to convert the numbers (from grams to ounces, for example.) Was the person doing the weight checks always focused and careful? Baby only in dry diaper or naked? That sounds normal, but do you have a lowest known weight? In other words, do we have any idea how much baby lost after being born? So if these checks were accurate, baby gained 18 ounces in 21 days. Am I right? That seems like normal gain. What is the pediatrician expecting gain to be?
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 09:42 PM
    The nice thing about the 8th edition of the WAB is it is set up so you can start wherever you are. If baby is still having trouble with latch, you can start with chapter 4: Latching and attaching. You can skip chapter 5 but even if baby is over 2 weeks read chapter 6 because it has so much valuable info about normal newborn behavior. Then Chapter 7 is for 2-6 weeks where I guess you are at this point? You can also use the index to find info on whatever you are concerned about. For example tongue tie is discussed in detail on pages 428-430. Chapters 17 and 18 are basically about how to problem solve when there are issues. There is also a good chapter on sleep, but one of the authors realized this was a subject that needed much more attention so she co-wrote another book called Sweet Sleep and I also highly recommend that book as well. I am very glad you have an LC you are confident in. That is great and it sounds like they identified the tt early and treated it and that is fantastic. Sometimes when LCs are also doctors (and even sometimes when they are not) they are unable to spend the time needed with mom and baby because try as we might, a baby is not always going to nurse when expected to and it can take time- sometimes a great deal of time- to troubleshoot a breastfeeding problem. There is nothing inherently better about an LC who is a doctor or a nurse because it is an entirely different skill set. In my opinion what is most important is that the LC has...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*hannah.seed's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 08:27 PM
    This is my fifth baby, and all have been on the lower end of the weight spectrum. My pediatricion has told me to supplement with formula for all of them. I listened to him the first time, and that made the situation go from what was probably fine to bad to worse, and he ended up being exclusively formula fed. With my twins and my last baby i didnt listen to him and just kept doing my best exclusively breastfeeding, but they all remained at the lowest number acceptable. (they are all miraculously fine btw) So at birth my newest baby weighed 5 lb 7 oz. He was exactly at his birth weight at 10 days. Three weeks after his 10 day checkup he weighed 6 lb 9 oz. It took him a full week to learn how to latch (two weeks early, knot in cord and wrapped around neck, weak for first week) and he still doesnt SEEM like he nurses that well. He has good output (5-6 wet, 1-2 poo) and is relatively happy besides being impossible to keep sleeping due to horrid reflux/vomiting. My ped isnt happy with his growth (as usual) but i dont know whether his concerns are valid or if my baby is fine though at the lower end of the weight chart. I nurse him whenever he wants... sometimes every hour (mornings and evenings) and sometimes he goes 3-4 (warm sleepy afternoons and nights). Some days i think he is feeding so good and other days im wondering if hes forgotten he needs milk to survive?? Can somebody just let me know if his weight is okay and if im doing okay breastfeeding (to you know, calm...
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*erc45's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 06:59 PM
    Sorry for the confusion, baby did NOT nurse before formula, but was given breastmilk via bottle. So the green poops were with bottled breastmilk. The ONLY actual nursing we have done has been maybe 2-3x before this recent doctor visit (last Monday) and 2-3x this week (2-3 short nursing sessions that were more for comfort it seemed as they were b/w feedings and she seemed sleepy I worked with an IBCLC who is also a neonatologist, she is who performed the release and we saw her one other time to evaluate latch, but baby wasn't hungry so it wasn't a productive visit. I will definitely make an appt with her this week to re-eval latch and do weight check. Regarding the doctor, I guess my brain was just in overdrive and I was not convinced it was nothing, but am glad to hear reassurance that this just may be more normal than my gut is telling me. I am going to try a full nursing session later tonight and see how it goes. I really appreciate all of the other advice, I found that all very helpful and reassuring. I actually had started The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, but it was at the very beginning and since baby wouldn't latch (she literally could not latch at ALL before the tongue tie release) I think I'd lost hope and stopped reading.
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 05:54 PM
    Ok, so did baby ever "just nurse?" I am sorry I am rather confused. I assumed that before the formula, baby was breastfed - nursing- and gaining fine but that was when you saw the green poops? Were the green poops rather while baby was being bottle fed your milk? Before the tongue tie treatment? After? If baby has never nursed exclusively, then it may be that baby cannot transfer milk normally, although it is unlikely. I would strongly suggest see an IBCLC and do some before and after nursing session weight checks. If your baby is capable of transferring 2 ounces or more in one nursing session, they can transfer milk normally. But you need to do more than one check because it is normal for baby to take less sometimes too. Here is info about what to expect at an appt with an IBCLC: http://cwgenna.com/lconsult.html Aside the question of whether baby can nurse normally or not, I think what may be happening is you are thinking entirely normal newborn behavior indicates something is wrong, and that is very common for new moms- and even many of us "old moms" when something out of our experience happens. However what surprised me was that the pediatrician's reassurance did not reassure you...I am certainly not someone who thinks doctors know everything, and I believe in mom's intuition...but what you are reporting as far as the poops and the behavior does not sound unusual to me in the least. I would suggest, as long as doctor says it is ok, and you want to, start...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*erc45's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 04:37 PM
    This is my first my first child so I definitely think a lot of my anxiety about what is normal is due to not having any experience. Her sleep actually has improved (no idea if due to change in diet or not), but there have been nights where she cries until 4,5, 6 a.m. For the past week or so she has slept 4-5 hour stretches. There are times where she seems very difficult to calm down and occasionally she wakes from deep sleep crying a very high pitched cry like she is in pain. My doctor said that usually mucous is in indicator or dairy intolerance (not an allergy), but she is growing well so he said i could try to cut dairy from my diet if I wanted to try that, but I already feel so stressed that I don't know if adding that stress would help or hurt (hence me wanting to do a trial of formula before I change my diet drastically). She had a tongue tie diagnosed at 2 weeks and her latch has only just improved since the release, but that has been a major source of anxiety for me. I've done only a few occasional nursing sessions during this trial phase this past week when nothing else would calm her where it seems like it is more for comfort for her than feeding so I have no idea how much milk she transfers. I guess my first time stressed out mommy brain desperately wants to fix her. I do have lots of friends with babies and I DO think she is more fussy than any of their babies, and I guess I am trying to connect the green mucous poops to her unusual fussiness. I guess...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 02:09 PM
    Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Thank you!
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 11:15 AM
    Hi erc45, welcome to the forum. You say your baby seems particularly fussy- are you comparing her to other children you have had? Were they breast or formula fed? Can you explain a little more what you mean? In my experience newborn babies are normally very fussy, and the baby who is not is the more unusual baby. Green is a normal poop color for many babies and "mucous" is, as far as I know, not proven to indicate allergy or any other issues at all. I am confused. Aside the poop look and newborn rash, was there some other problem- like slow gain? Or breastfeeding hurting you or not feeling right for you perhaps? What you are describing with the green "mucous" poops, baby acne, and fussy baby all sounds entirely normal to me and as long as baby was gaining ok and nursing comfortable for you, then I am not sure why you would think you had to give baby formula? Your baby's doctor told you baby was doing fine on breastmilk, and you are not finding there is any significant improvement with the switch to formula...right? So, I am not sure why you are not just tossing the formula and going back to nursing baby? It would be a lot easier than what you are doing now.
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*erc45's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 10:55 AM
    So long story short, baby girl has consistent green mucous poops with breast milk. She also seems like a particularly fussy baby. Only other symptom is flesh colored bumps all around her temples and forehead (could just be sensitive skin or baby acne). 2 week checkup doc said "it doesn't seem to bother her, she's fine". Wasn't convinced so started Alimentum 1 week ago with occasional comfort nursing (maybe 1x every day for a few minutes). Her poops are now brown green but still SO slimy and shiny looking. I'm pumping to keep up my supply, but I'm so emotionally exhausted racking my brain on what to do. I really really want to BF, but feel like I should continue the formula to experiment. Does anyone have experience with dairy intolerance or mucous poops? I wonder at what point I should just stop pumping and accept that she might need formula. Or should I resume BF maybe this week and see if her fussiness and poops change?
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 10:48 AM
    Hi bettyb, many moms who were not able to breastfeed as long as they liked (or at all) with one baby find things go completely ok with the next. So it is possible all will be fine with this baby as far as breastfeeding goes. Since your oldest child was tongue tied, that alone may have accounted for the slow gain. There is evidence that tongue tie can run in families. If you find new baby is not gaining well, do you have a path to have tongue tie diagnosed and treated where you are? When tongue tie is the issue, early treatment makes all the difference. But tongue tie may not have been the issue, or only part of it. If you have any breastfeeding difficulties in the early days, do you know if there is a professional IBCLC you can see? Volunteer LLL Groups or other breastfeeding support near you? My first suggestion is to build your support network NOW rather than scrambling for help in those crazy early days with a newborn. If you find your baby truly needs supplementing, this can be done in a way that is less negatively impactful on breastfeeding. We can provide info here in that event. There are things you can do to get breastfeeding off to a great start. You do not say when baby is due, but if you have time, my best suggestion is the get the book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition) and read the first 6 chapters (they are not long) or read as much as you can. Bring it too the hospital too (assuming this will be a hospital birth.)
    4 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 08:54 AM
    4days is really early to give up. It sounds like your milk just came in right now. And they aren't supposed to gauge the weight until you are a lot farther in then 4days. They dont' expect the baby to be back up to birth weight until the week point? Maybe the 2 week point? And a newborn can live just fine on Colostrom alone for days. My milk didn't come in for 5 days. I nursed on demand and he was fine. Although that 1st 5 days he didn't gain anyweight. My nurses werent' alarmed so neither was I. They said as long as he had wet diapers we were fine. He did. I didn't trip. Cluster feeding isn't every 2hours. That's NORMAL day to day breastfeeding. Cluster feeding is the baby wanting to feed non-stop for hours. Like every time you try to take the baby off the breast, the look like this :eek::eek: Wide eyes wide mouth. It happens in the very beginning when they are working to get your milk to come in and every time they have a growth spurt and they are working to get your supply to increase due to their growth. Don't confuse the way formula works for satisfaction on the part of your baby. Formula is not as easily or as completely absorbed as breastmilk. It is harder for babies to digest, it takes longer and creates more waste. So, the baby DOES go longer between feeds but those are the reasons. Nipple confusion is real. And it sounds like your baby might have it. But at 4 days old you can totally get your baby back on track. Have a nurse in. Stay skin to skin with the baby...
    3 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    July 24th, 2017, 08:07 AM
    Hi all. I am wondering if any of you have been in a similar situation as myself. I am expecting our second baby and hoping to breastfeed. I tried so hard to breastfeed our first and it just did not work out as I hoped. He was very slow to put on weight (took to week 4 before he was back to birth weight), he had a tongue tie, he had severe silent reflux and at the time it just felt we were fighting a losing battle. At 2 weeks we supplemented with formula which looking back now was the beginning of the end. We did not have the knowledge to come back from this at the time. In hindsight supplementing with formula didn't even help with his weight because it took another 2 weeks for him to get back to birth weight so then it was assumed he was a baby who was naturally slow to put on weight. Followed by a trip to A&E and overnight stay in the hospital because he was vomiting blood and they couldn't say for sure if it was from my nipple (no obvious cuts) or from his oesophagus from the reflux. At 6 weeks our breastfeeding journey ended and it was one of the saddest times for me. I'm sure that sounds crazy to some people but it really was like I was grieving. To this day I still feel guilty thinking what if or if only I had know. What helps is we have the happiest and thank God healthiest little baby now so at least there is that and although much shorter than I had hope I do think him having had breast milk even for that short time has really helped So I am due my...
    4 replies | 126 view(s)
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