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  • @llli*bk12's Avatar
    Today, 02:09 AM
    My baby is five months old and breastfeeding has always gone pretty well. She has had teeth since the end of her third month, but as of this week, she has begun to bite... hard. She bites me almost every time we nurse during the day, and only her night nursing sessions while she is half-asleep are bite-free. When she bites me, I shout “Ouch” and tell her “No” in a severe and scary voice, but she just grins and laughs. Even when I look and sound upset, it has no effect on her and she just finds it funny. Ending the nursing session doesn’t seem to bother her either, since if she had her way, she would never nurse at all during the daytime. During the last few weeks, Baby has decided that she is not interested in eating or sleeping, and she fights against both with all her might. She resists until she is fussing and crying with hunger and exhaustion, yet still refuses to nurse or go to sleep. As a result, we do a lot of nighttime nursing to make up for what she misses during the day. She nurses fabulously and often during the night. She has plenty of wet and dirty diapers and is still at the top of the growth chart for height and weight, so I’m not too concerned with this behavior. However, the biting is getting out of control. As much as she would prefer it, I can’t let her go all day without eating, so I have to nurse, and she bites. Even the rare times when she is willing to nurse while awake, she bites. Often, when she clamps down, she will not let go. She...
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*minimuls's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:42 PM
    I am currently experiencing my second case of Mastitis (started last Thursday) and I have had reoccurring plugged-ducts. My little one is 9 weeks and is my second baby. I had BFing issues with reoccurring plugged-ducts in this same side with my 1st baby... so I am not sure if there isn't some sort of trama from the first time that has caused these issues. The plugged ducts basically feel like a ball, that I am able to work down to individual little strings that have little beads that I cannot get to go away. I have been taking lechthin, garlic, Vitamin C, a probiotic, B-Complex, and GSE to help combat prevent the plugs (no luck) and to prevent thrush. I am pumping, feeding often (we have a comforatable lach), I have him lach in different positions, iceing, constantly massaging and taking hot showers to help drain, dangle feeding, and have tried every suggested method to drain. It never seems that I am able to complely drain. With both cases of Mastitis the fever and symptoms came on extremely fast, the striping, fever, and flu like symptoms have gone away but I am still having breast sorness where the lump and beads keep showing up. Any advice would be greatly appricated.
    0 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    The key to increasing supply is always the same: remove more milk from the breast more frequently. That means adding in more nursing sessions and more pumping sessions until you get where you need to be. That approach is going to be labor-intensive, but it's going to work a lot better than herbs, teas, cookies, etc.
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:08 PM
    I find this puzzling! If a baby has reflux, why would the doctor think that medications used to treat reflux wouldn't help? The way I see it, reflux meds have the potential to treat 2 problems: discomfort, and poor weight gain stemming from discomfort. Maybe the doctor's idea is that if weight gain is okay, there's no need to treat discomfort... But I don't understand why that would be the case! I guess I am left wondering whether or not the doctor is actually sure that the baby has reflux? :eyebrow At this point, I'm thinking that it might be worth it to see a different doctor. Let's say your baby's fussiness does worsen. Why not treat her with meds at that point? Why point mom down the path of more difficult dietary eliminations? It just doesn't make sense to me!
    7 replies | 276 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:53 PM
    Yes I do not like having to confront doctors either. I got the whole "low iron means baby is nursing too much" speech from a doctor we saw when my middle child was 9 months and a little low on iron. Our usual doctor was on paternity leave so we saw this other person at the same clinic. When we saw our usual pediatrician for a follow up, he basically contradicted everything the other doctor said and pretty much apologized that we had gotten such poor advice. Breastmilk contains the biologically correct amount of iron. Breastmilk contains the iron a baby needs unless baby is low in iron for some other reason. Your baby has a reason to be low in iron- baby was premature. My son was born via C-section and his cord was clamped very early. He also was not eating solids much at all, but again the assumption that a baby will eat more solids- or "iron rich" solids- if they are not nursed as much is just that- an assumption. If a baby is low in iron, baby can have iron some other way- in iron rich foods or, if needed, iron supplements. In neither case is there any evidence that withholding breastmilk or breastfeeding from that child is needed to raise iron levels. This article covers the iron guidelines from the AAP. As far as I can see, reducing breastfeeding is not one of the recommendations from the AAP when a baby is low in iron. http://babygooroo.com/2010/10/aap-releases-new-guidelines-for-preventing-iron-deficiency-anemia/
    5 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:24 PM
    Hi and welcome. Wow that sounds like a really nasty experience with the abscess. Ugh. PP has excellent questions it would help to know the answer to. I have a few more, sorry. - when you say baby is "sleeping through the night" can you please explain what that means- how many hours? How long has baby been doing this? Also, is baby nursing during that time but staying asleep, or are you pumping during that time? Babies this age do not typically sleep long stretches. Once a day of 4-6 hours is about all a 6 week old is usually going to sleep at one time, and many babies do not even do that yet. Babies need to eat frequently and milk removal has to happen frequently, and that includes overnight. - Baby cannot nursing on one side- is this since the abscess? or before as well? I do not want to pry but I am wondering if your nipple shape is really one no baby could latch onto, or if you just need more help with getting baby to latch? Many moms are told they have nipples that a baby cannot latch onto when in fact they can, with better help. -Have you ever seen a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC?) if so, when and what was discussed? Was it helpful or not? -Your husband convinced you you do not make enough milk...do you mean you are not sure this is true? There actually are ways to diagnose low milk production, but it is something that not many people inherently understand how to do.
    2 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*juliadw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:20 PM
    Thank you! She's doing better, accepting the 1.5 hour stretches now.
    2 replies | 217 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:28 PM
    Thank you so much! What you wrote made a lot of sense to me. Paced feeding was an eye opener as well :)
    9 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*sprocket's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:39 AM
    I would look for a new pediatrician honestly; this advice is not in line with modern recommendations. My understanding is that breastfed babies in northern latitudes should have a vitamin d supplement however. In the winter months especially it is very unlikely that any of us are getting enough sun to keep up adequate vitamin d levels. Have you tried the Carlson D drops available on Amazon? I think Nordic naturals also makes one. They are concentrated so that it is literally only a drop. You can drop it onto your nipple before nursing or just into babys mouth anytime. I would use an iron supplement before introducing cereal at 4 months, but term babies should have iron stores to last the first year or so.
    2 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*tinkypears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:30 AM
    Last week my 3 month old baby came down with a stomach flu that both my husband and I ended up getting. It was very bad and led to both of us not being able to stomach much food for the past 6 days. We're getting better, but still not at 100% (baby was over it in 2 days, go breastfeeding!) I've noticed a significant decrease in my supply since then. I've lost about 6 to 8 ounces of milk during the day (known from pumping), and I can see this during my weekend of exclusively breastfeeding with baby as she was constantly hungry. I think the biggest problem is my nighttime supply; baby is only waking once a night, and whereas this use to result in me waking up pretty full every morning (which was great because I would pump a ton for baby's bottles in the morning) I'm waking up with soft breasts that baby then sucks the rest out of and I have nothing for pumping at work. I've been taking fenugreek for the past 5 days to try to increase my supply, and whereas that used to work wonders, I don't think it's able to counteract the fact that I still can't stomach a ton of food, which I think is what is depleting my supply.
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 AM
    I just wanted to update people in case anyone else reads this thread - as I've noticed I'm not the only one with a side lying nurser! Everyday I've been gently offering breasts in different positions. She'll now nurse a couple of times a day lying across my tummy. And I nearly cried the other day when she nursed in my arms sitting on a sofa when we were out! It was short but first time in months. She then had a small feed on sofa at home later in the day. Very proud of her.
    5 replies | 356 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:05 AM
    Thank you for ideas ladies :) we had a busy couple of days there and I think maybe with everything going on she was less interested in nursing, quieter day today and more nursings happening! Also paying more attention I noticed that if she is eating less in the day she is definitely making up for it at night so at least I know she's getting the milk at some point!
    5 replies | 274 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 AM
    I am confused. I thought the problem was baby did not want to nurse? Oh I see, baby wants to nurse a lot and now you are nursing short meals. This is actually very good for fast letdown issues, and is also good if it keeps baby nursing rather than you pumping and giving baby a cup of milk which is time consuming and not really going to solve any breast refusal problems . But why does that mean you cannot leave the house? Are you not comfortable nursing in public yet? Ok, here is what I suggest. If you have fast letdown, then it makes sense baby objects to certain positions. So along with nursing frequently, try positions that help with fast letdown. And yes you can do these positions in public, (some moms think they can't) but you can. They do not require that you lay down, only that you lean back. Believe it or not I agree with your doctor about one thing, but it is not insisting your well gaining child takes bottles, which is exactly the wrong way to solve most breastfeeding issues. But, If your baby is gaining well, no reason to be so insistent that your baby nurse at some specific time if baby is objecting. Also no need to cup feed or bottle feed. Comfort baby another way and Just try nursing again later. Both fast letdown and baby being 4 months old can separately lead to much shorter nursing sessions then before. There is nothing wrong with this. So no reason to insist baby keeps nursing some specific amount of time, either. Why are you doing diet...
    7 replies | 276 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:29 AM
    Hi I'm really sorry you are having a hard time. I have a couple of more questions to ask, if that's okay. How often is baby actually nursing? How many times per day? Are you pumping after feedings, in between, or in place of nursing sessions? Are you giving him everything you pump, in addition to nine 4 oz bottles of formula? Because that is 36 oz right there in just formula and my understanding is 20-30oz is typical total daily intake. I've seen 25-35oz as the typical total daily intake amount as well. In my opinion, you could probably cut back on the formula as long as he is gaining well and diaper output is normal. One thing that always sticks out to me when people write about their 5-6 week old, is that is a huge growth spurt age! Is he getting a 4 oz bottle after nursing for the 10-40 min?
    2 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*mamad's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 10:29 PM
    I had my son 6 weeks ago today. I was exclusively breastfeeding him for the first 4 weeks until I developed abscess in my left breast which cause horrible swelling and made it impossible to release milk through pumping, nursing or by hand expressing. I had to have surgery to removed the fluid and abscesses which left me in the hospital for 3 days. My son was then introduced to formula because I was unable to breastfeed due to the medications. I have been able to feed on the right and pump off of the right, but my nipple on the left is slightly deformed and is in a shape in which my son cannot latch, but I can still pump. I want him to get off of the formula now that I can pump and feed him but when I feed him off of my right, he'll eat between 10-40 minutes, unlatch himself and then refuse to re latch no matter how much time I try to wait or position I try. He'll cry and eat his hands and so we feed him formula to make sure he's full because my husband has convinced me I am not producing enough milk to feed him on the one side. I am actively pumping, but can barely produce a 3 oz bottle per day. I have been making "boobie smoothies", lactation cookies, taking fenugreek and trying to make my son actively latch more with lots of skin to skin but nothing is working. I want to breastfeed my son 100% again. Every time I give him a bottle of formula, my heart breaks and I feel like a terrible mother. (Not saying that giving your child formula makes you a terrible mom,...
    2 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*opalita's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 09:58 PM
    Mommal, I love your advice about giving the kind of answers that avoid the issue of breastfeeding and bedsharing altogether! Also to bring up what I want to talk about, and ask questions about. This puts me in the driver's seat and also allows me to at least utilize her as a resource on topics that she has knowledge about. And yes, I agree about the doctor being a good diagnostician first and foremost. I wish she was more. :(
    5 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*opalita's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 09:50 PM
    Yes, it IS frustrating that she doesn't support or understand breastfeeding. She assumed that since I nurse at night, that was the reason he had low iron. I feel unsupported by her. Thank you for your input, Maddieb. I needed confirmation that our choice to allow our son to wean when he's ready was a good choice. I much prefer he have my milk than cow's mulk, and we love the connection nursing gives us. For now I am going to live with ignoring her when I know what she says is wrong. It's disappointing, though. I fantasize after the fact about challenging her. I wish I had the chutzpah to do it.
    5 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*briley.lutes's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 09:44 PM
    Her doctor said that medication is just something extra that will be added to my daily routine and it won't help her reflux. My DD is in the 84%ile for her weight so the fussy nursing hasn't slowed her down. Because of this, her doctor said that he doesn't think I have to change anything (since I've already eliminated dairy) but I could eliminate wheat, soy, and eggs if it continues to get worse. I showed him how she arches her back and cries when I try to feed her in the cradle/cross cradle position and the doctor blamed it on her not being hungry. Even didn't seem very concerned about how much I'm struggling to nurse her. I have been nursing her smaller, frequent meals. She never seems to eat enough to fill up completely making it impossible to leave the house for more than an hour. My LO still refuses a bottle and the doctor advised me to be more persistent about trying to get her to take it. I think I may have overproduction because I definitely have an OALD. I'm not sure if my supply has taken a hit over the past month or if my daughter just wants to constantly comfort nurse.
    7 replies | 276 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 09:28 PM
    Poop frequency will normally decrease at any time after 6 weeks or so in many babies. Sometimes dramatically. In other words, a lack of poop is not as reliable an indicator as before this. So weight gain may have to be your measure. Sorry I have zero exp. with sns. I am sure you can find info online and might try Medela customer support? You also might try making a new thread here with that in the title to draw out a helpful lurker.
    21 replies | 991 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 09:18 PM
    I am sorry, you must be very frustrated. If you like, can you explain exactly what happened with the weight loss and how you know baby was losing weight? Were checks all done on the same scale, etc? I am just curious. If you are not wanting to go into it, I understand. Yes, possibly. Also, sometimes the issue is not the surgery per se but whatever the reason for the surgery was. Have you gotten the making more milk book yet? They explain the circumstances where a mom might not make enough milk. Of course sometimes no cause can be identified. I would suggest do not worry about how rare or not rare making enough milk is. No one really knows any precise answer to this. Biologically speaking, obviously the vast majority of human mothers have made enough milk for their babies or we would not be such a successful species. But when people start talking this percent or that percent that is in fact only theoretical. This is talked about mostly because so many moms are told they do not make enough milk, or fear they do not make enough, when in fact all is well. Also, it is important that it is understood that poor breastfeeding management (Moms being told to nurse only every 4 hours, as they were for many decades, or to supplement unnecessarily etc.) is probably the most common and obviously entirely preventable cause of low milk production. But if a mother really does not make enough milk, then it does not matter how rare it is, really. Because what matters is you and your...
    21 replies | 991 view(s)
  • @llli*sprocket's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 07:59 PM
    Thank you!! Yes this makes sense and gives me some confidence to go with my intuition here. Pumping here and there when/how it feels right makes sense Also, my baby gained 2 oz in 2 days at his first pediatrician appointment so I think that letting him regulate my supply is going to be more or less ok. He goes back this week and if he is still gaining appropriately I think I may mostly put away the pump and let him do his thing. I am amazed at how well he nurses already because my first baby (born at term) didn't catch on until she was a couple of weeks old so then it was essential to pump. Today I pumped after he slept for three hours and then nursed only on one side. Weirdly I didn't get much out of the other side and it is my big producer. And what I did get was very opaque, creamy milk like hind milk. I know I have plenty of milk though because he is nursing frequently and with big gulps and swallows, looks very satisfied after nursing and then sleeps well, my breasts get full and hard between feedings and feel empty after he feeds, and he is producing 8+ poop and pee diapers per day, and seems to be gaining.
    3 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 07:01 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the baby! Thanks for sharing your story- it's an interesting one! Though I suppose you'd probably have preferred a less dramatic experience... The key to reducing flow speed in this case is going to be to reduce supply a bit. On average, exclusively breastfed babies need about 20-30 oz of milk per day. It sounds like you are producing around 48 oz per day, so roughly 1.5-2.5x more than you need. So you're going to aim to slowly throttle back on pumping. Instead of taking 8 oz every time you pump, I would shave about 0.5-1 oz off that amount. Give it a couple days, then throttle back another 0.5-1 oz, and so forth. Eventually, you should be pumping closer to what you need. You can decide for yourself when you're ready to stop trying to cut back on pumping and start focusing on maintaining your supply at the desired level. Only wanting the slower-flowing breast makes perfect sense considering the amount of milk you are producing and the fast flow generated by the hgh supply. Work on taming the oversupply, and she will probably come to nurse on the other side.
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 07:00 PM
    Hi and welcome! It sounds to me that you and your baby are making great progress with getting baby back to the breast. I think it might help if you could be a little more patient with yourself and baby. Transitioning for bottle to the breast is usually a process and it can take a while. It's ok. Try not to see every time you use the bottle as a defeat. Rule number one is always, feed the baby. As baby begins nursing more, you can reduce the bottles with more confidence. Babies learn to nurse by nursing. My first suggestion is to start offering the breast/trying to get baby to latch more often. This does not necessarily mean give baby less in the bottle yet if that does not feel right yet. Babies nurse for many reasons and encouraging "comfort" nursing is a great way to encourage more nursing. BTW "comfort nursing" does not mean baby is not getting milk! This is a common misconception. It just means baby is nursing because nursing feels good and not only because baby is necessarily hungry. Do you need tips for encouraging baby to nurse more often? To get a better latch? Let us know. What strikes me about your post is how much of it sounds like normal newborn behavior. Nursing, almost going to sleep, or going to sleep for just a moment or two, and then waking and wanting to nurse again shortly in order to comfort into a deeper sleep is very normal. Since your baby is not very used to nursing yet, baby may not be able to latch as well when baby is tired and...
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 1st, 2016, 12:30 PM
    Hi! I am sure this is very frustrating. Please know that babies have been brought to the breast (or back to the breast) at this age, and much older. If you want your child to nurse again, it is most likely possible. It is also a very understandable desire. It is never easy and the fact that your baby must get bottles part of the day due to regular separations is likely to make it more difficult. But, not impossible. I have seen children brought to the breast in remarkable circumstances. Your story explains your situation quite well, but I still have a few questions. Before your returned to work, was there any period of time that baby was exclusively nursed and gaining ok? If not, what was the highest ever nursing frequency verses bottles, and when was that? Did you and baby ever work with an IBCLC? If you did, how was that? When did you last work with one? Have you tried or considered trying an at the breast supplementer? (Lactation aid) Have you tried the ideas in this article? It often takes trying the same things multiple times. http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/
    1 replies | 118 view(s)
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