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  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 05:24 AM
    Today at 9, is her 2 month checkup! I will find out how much she has gained in 5 weeks!! I'm hoping it is a good gain, but like I said previously, she was slow gaining in the beginning!! It was a week to week thing, not knowing if I was gonna be able to continue to breastfeed or not!! I was worried about a failure to thrive diagnosis!! And she feeds on one side per session! Not being satisfied was a concern because after nursing she would still be a little fussy, like she was still hungry!! But yes I believe she is a comfort nurser, but I don't know what to do if her comfort nursing is causing her to spit up!! (Getting too much milk) And earlier I referenced DD2 which is this baby!! DD1 July 10, 2006 breastfed 5 weeks quit due to mastitis, had inverted nipples so they were extremely sensitive and she literally sucked a chunk out of my nipple!! Couldn't handle it and gave up! DS October 2, 2008 breastfed 7 weeks quit due to failure to thrive diagnosis but was upset because I was determined to make breastfeeding work!!
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*crest's Avatar
    Today, 05:22 AM
    Most of the time a mother can breastfeed her baby easily but some issues can be encountered suggesting the use of either the breast milk alternative or the use of a breast pump. http://www.healthgenie.in/baby-care/feeding-and-nursing/breast-feeding-aid
    4 replies | 370 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 05:12 AM
    Today at 9, is her 2 month checkup! I will find out how much she has gained in 5 weeks!! I'm hoping it is a good gain, but like I said previously, she was slow gaining in the beginning!! It was a week to week thing, not knowing if I was gonna be able to continue to breastfeed or not!! I was worried about a failure to thrive diagnosis!! And she feeds on one side per session! Not being satisfied was a concern because after nursing she would still be a little fussy, like she was still hungry!! But yes I believe she is a comfort nurser, but I don't know what to do if her comfort nursing is causing her to spit up!! (Getting too much milk)
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:17 AM
    Supply drops due to period are common and usually very temporary. Milk production should react well to baby nursing more frequently, and you can encourage baby to nurse both sides each time as well. Just as block feeding reduces milk production, doing the opposite increases it. Some moms find herbal galactagogues helpful when they have a drop in production, but I do not know any more about that.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:12 AM
    How is this baby doing as far as weight gain? Does baby typically want one or both sides per session? Baby not being "satisfied" is a concept that really trips moms up. Many babies who are getting plenty of milk like to nurse for a long time because nursing is comforting to them. But if baby never nurses for shorter sessions or is not thriving, or nursing is not comfortable for you, then the long sessions may indicate a milk transfer issue. But your baby is still pretty young, and I think in general, even sessions of 25- 45 minutes as a typical feeding would still be normal.
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    I was thinking low milk because she never seemed satisfied!! Nursing every 2 hours pretty much but anywhere from 25-45 mins!!! When she nurses for 45 mins and on a 2 hour span it just seems like she is constantly attached!!! I am probably just overly worried because of the issues I had with my first 2 children and not being able to successfully breastfeed!!! And DD2 was jaundiced for about 4-6 weeks and also slowly gaining weight! Was having to do weekly weight checks the first 4 weeks!!
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:11 PM
    Does baby sleep swaddled, with a pacifier, or in another room than where you are? These are sleep lengthening techniques, and if they are removed, baby may wake or cue on own in a more frequent pattern. Every mom and baby is different. If you are home with baby and will be for the first year at least, baby sleeps near you without being pacified or swaddled, baby is encouraged to nurse frequently and for as long as baby wishes during awake hours, and is gaining well, and you are not feeing overly full overnight, then this current pattern may be perfectly fine for your milk production and your baby. Otherwise, I agree completely with littlecavemomma. Why use the pump as a middle man? Baby needs milk and you need the milk removal. Just nurse overnight. If baby will NOT nurse, and you are starting to feel uncomfortably full, or for some other reason you are concerned about your production, then you can pump or hand express as needed. Don't assume that will happen! Many babies take longer stretches early on and shorter ones later.
    2 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    I would suggest trying a different bottle and nipple if you have not already. While you might want to stick with a slow flow nipple, any nipple brand should work fine as long as paced bottle feeding methods are being practiced. And no nipple, no matter how much the manufacturer claims it is 'like the breast" will make feedings as much like they are at the breast as using paced bottle feeding technique. It worries me that every picture on the front page of the munchkin website shows gravity feeding. It makes me wonder if this is a bottle that requires that type of position for baby to get the milk out? Generally you do not want that... Most lactation consultants suggest paced bottle feeding with up right baby and horizontal bottle positioning to prevent breast refusal and also to make bottles a calm experience where baby is in more control of the flow and 'pace' of the feeding. If trying to get baby to take a bottle is stressing you out, I would suggest stop all bottles for now. The research has shown that introducing a baby to the bottle sooner rather than later does not significantly change rate of eventual bottle refusal. So, there is not really any rush. When you reintroduce, start with letting baby play with and mouth an EMPTY bottle. If baby seem ok with the nipple in his mouth, progress to a weensy amount of milk in the bottle, like a quarter ounce- a sip! but no pressure, no insistence baby take it. Go from there as baby appears comfortable with. Let's say...
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:18 PM
    Instead of setting an alarm to pump, I would set an alarm to nurse, especially if your baby will dreamfeed. A few weeks after I returned to work (11 weeks PP) my baby started randomly sleeping thru the night. My supply took a big hit. For the next couple of months I would set an alarm for once or twice a night to latch her on to nurse. Most times she would semi-wake before the second alarm would go off anyways. And then one day she stopped sleeping 6+ hours and would wake herself to nurse throughout the night. Your baby won't nurse the second side in the morning because she so quickly fills up on the one "full" breast. I think nursing is so less disruptive to sleep than pumping. Plus you're less apt to create an oversupply issue if you let baby "take the edge off" a few times throughout the night versus pumping to empty.
    2 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*danielle.gephart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:00 PM
    Hi! I just got my first postpartum period back at 10 month pp. My supply has seemed to drop overnight. Like REALLY drop. I'm trying to remain calm and know that it will bounce back (right?!) We are doing strictly baby led weaning at my son's pace, and he eats a ton of solids. It hasn't affected my supply, more or less regulated it if anything. He also breastfeeds frequently (about every 2-4 hours depending on how he feels) and drinks a lot of milk during the day and usually once at night. I figure he eats between 25-30 ounces a day. I typically produce a lot of milk (had oversupply for quite a while and block fed for months and months) and can pump 5 oz. from one breast in the am after my son eats a completely full belly of milk from the other. I can get 1-2 oz. from the other breast. I don't regularly pump though. He was born at 9lbs 20" at 41.5weeks and is currently 22lbs and 31.5" in case that's relevant. He's certainly not struggling to get enough nutrition, but I hope my supply bounces back. Any advice for what to do to help my supply out? Is this normal? WILL my supply bounce back? I've felt empty all day and he's been frustrated with the slow letdown.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:56 PM
    Sounds like you got great info from pp. I just wanted to add that APNO was a lifesaver for me and I had to bring the idea to my doc. She has since thanked me for it because she now uses it with other patients. http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&id=12:candida-protocol&Itemid=17
    11 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:46 PM
    If you baby is getting so much milk, baby is spitting up, and choking when nursing, why would you think that the issue is low milk production? Assuming normal weight gain, I think you can safely rule low milk production out, and keep eating lactation cookies only if you like them. Frequent nursing is entirely normal. It sounds like your baby nurses about every 2 hours for 18 hours of the 24 hour day. This would mean baby nurses abut 9 or maybe 10 times a 24 hour day. Anything from 8-12 times OR MORE in 24 hours is entirely normal, and frequent nursing is the best way to handle the issue of fast letdown. Spit up is usually normal and is not harmful, just messy. The frequency with which baby nurses the rest of the day is at least in part why baby can go so long at night on occasion. Many 2-3 months olds never sleep anything like 6 hours at a time! I guess I am wondering what kind of frequency you think baby should be nursing at? Some people will tell you that if a baby is getting enough to eat, baby takes longer between nursing sessions, and that if baby is not getting enough, baby will nurse more. But this is not how breastfeeding works at all, because babies nurse for many reasons, all important. It sounds like you are nursing baby when baby wishes, and that is exactly the right thing to do. Sometimes nursing sessions are unusually long, or mom is uncomfortable, or mom has problems nursing baby as much as baby needs and handling her other responsibilities. If any...
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*quill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:35 PM
    My baby is almost 11 weeks old. We introduced a bottle around 5 weeks so that my husband could help with a night feeding or the occasional bottle while I am out of the house. About 2 weeks ago, he started to refuse the bottle. It doesn't matter if the milk is freshly pumped or from a previously refrigerated bottle. I am returning to work in 5 weeks and I am worried he still won't be taking a bottle by then. I was so hopeful that we were on the right track because he took a bottle for about a month with no problems at all! I have tried leaving the room while DH feeds, I have tried leaving the house. We have tried at all times of the day, when he's hungry, when he's nearly full....nothing is working so far. We have been using the Munchkin Latch system, if that makes a difference. Any ideas??
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:42 PM
    Yes the UK has lactation consultants. You can find them by going to the website www.ilca.org. If you do not find anyone there, try contacting you county coordinator listed here (UK at bottom) http://iblce.org/iblce-country-coordinators/ Or you can see if there are any Breastfeeding Coalitions in your area. There should also be La Leche league groups there is a look up function on the main page of this website. Is there any way you can get a better pump? A double sided as described above? A single side electric is just not the right pump for what you are needing to do. The general rule of thumb is to pump each side at least 15-20 minutes, some moms go longer (no more than 30 or so minutes a side I would suggest, but you will have to see how you are responding.) Because a double sided pumps both sides at once, it cuts pumping time in half. All newborns are very hungry, yet they do fine nursing at the breast, where the milk flow is not constant and the milk flow will be slow and fast depending on what baby is doing. I suspect he drinks quickly because there is no other way to drink from a bottle using the gravity method of bottle feeding. Baby must "drink or drown." Also, if the feeding is very fast, baby will screan because they need to suck longer, not because they actually need more milk in their tummies. Your babies physiology is designed for breastfeeding, and nursing at the breast takes time and effort. This is why babies have a deep compelling need to suckle...
    4 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*laura.farret's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:36 PM
    Thank you! I do try to pump at least 3 times when I am at work, but I'll try to do so every chance I get. When I pump on days when I'm at home, I usually get .5 oz because baby drains me. He is constantly at the boob. I am currently taking the mini pill but, being that we use condoms anyway, I was thinking about stopping anyway. Another thing that I think I've been neglecting is hydration. One of my coworkers has a 32oz mug in the kitchen so I made myself a 32oz cup of tea and my output was a bit better the second time. I'll keep at it!
    2 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*nowellina's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:32 PM
    This is wonderful, i feel like a huge weight has been lifted. I was going to give in and accept it's not at all possible as its too late but reading this it is clearly not impossible and so has given me hope, so thank you. In response to your question about pumping I am using a single electric pump by Philips avent I also use the manual but I only use the electric at the moment. May I ask how long I should be pumping at each session?? Also is there a particular brand/type of pump you would recommend? My baby drinks very quickly and screams straight away as he's a hungry baby. I put him at breast but he is too angry to even attempt a latch. Yes I think it's better I see someone in person. Not sure the UK has lactation consultants? I might be wrong.
    4 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*7preemiemum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:31 PM
    Thats just awesome progress Baby is the best pump so ur supply should be increasing naturally Wish ya all the best
    6 replies | 564 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:35 PM
    Here goes, my DD2 is 9 weeks tomorrow and EBF! It seems as if she wants to be attached all the time! It seems like if she is awake she wants to nurse! I have read on here that you can't over feed, but I feel like she is over eating cuz she spits up pretty often!! This is my 3rd child and longest breastfeeding experience!! I am trying to make 3 months then gonna push to 6 months hopefully!! I just don't know what to do!! I was thinking low supply, I've been eating lactation cookies. I do know I have OALD cuz she chokes while nursing!! Any advice is greatly appreciated!! I forgot to mention the nursing frequency is generally every 2 hours, sometimes 1 1/2 hours and very seldom can I make it 3 hours! I do get a 6 hour span pretty much every night but she don't always sleep that span!!
    5 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*158breastfeed's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:36 AM
    My LO is 2 months old. She usually will have her last night feeding around 11p and then will stretch until 4a or 5a. When she wakes to eat in the morning she only eats for a short amount of time (usually 5 min.) and only on one breast (she usually falls back asleep and doesn't want the second breast). I then have to pump because I still feel so full. During the day she feeds regularly every 2-3hrs. My question is should I set an alarm to pump every 2-3 hours at night since she has this 4-5 hour stretch to keep up my supply? Will my supply dwindle if I don't pump at night even as she gets older and her night stretches get longer?
    2 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:13 AM
    The further you go, the better. Thrush can be really stubborn. I personally think the way to go about this is to see if the LC confirms the thrush suspicion, and then see the doc and get meds for you AND baby. It's important that both members of the nursing pair be treated, since it is common for one member of the nursing pair to be asymptomatic even though both are colonized by the problematic yeast. Once you have meds in hand, THEN you make the all-out assault on the thrush, spending the duration of your treatment washing your sheets/towels/shirts/bras/burp cloths on hot, and sterilizing your pump, bottles, and pacifiers. That way you're not wasting your efforts, right?
    11 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:07 AM
    You're absolutely right that people don't just spontaneously dry up for no reason. So what is happening, most likely, is that being at the office and needing to rely on the pump is having a negative effect on your supply. Pumps are generally not as effective at emptying the breast or maintaining supply as babies are, and office schedules generally prevent moms from pumping as often as they would be nursing if they were home with their babies. But don't freak out! First, you're only at work for 3 days a week, so your baby has 4 days a week to nurse on demand and keep your supply where he needs it to be. Second, the average feeding for a nursing baby is just 2-4 oz at a time. So when you pump 2 oz, that's actually totally normal output. 4 oz at one go is actually very much on the high side for pump output. Here are some suggestions for improving things: - Pump more frequently at the office, if possible. - Pump in addition to nursing when you are home with your baby- adding sessions at home can make up for shortfalls in what you bring home from the office - Use a better pump - Make sure your current pump is functioning properly - Make sure your shields are properly sized - Nurse on cue when you're with your baby, and don't be afraid to offer more often than he seems to ask - Nurse at night. "Never wake a sleeping baby" is great advice when mom is having no trouble getting all the milk she needs, but night nursing is great for supply and can help make up...
    2 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*sunsetbean's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:03 AM
    Thanks again! I am using lotrimin today since pharmacy is closed and LCs are out of peds office. One more question...since I think we have a mild case of thrush, how much far do we need to go with boiling, cleaning, etc of things? A lot of the treatment sites on kellymom don't even mention these measures.
    11 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:30 AM
    Yes see this is why I part ways with the "gain is good let baby sleep" idea. Sure, from baby gain standpoint all is good. But breastfeeding involves both mom and baby. Long stretches of baby not nursing WILL decrease milk production. It is inevitable. Will it reduce it "too much?" Probably not, if there are no other production challenges coming along. But so often there are other production challenges, like mom working outside the home. That said, as I am sure you know, what you were pumping previously (5-6 ounces) was unusually high for per session pump output. 2 ounces is actually considered very good pump output for when a mom is nursing around the clock. It is likely that when you are back at work and settled into a pump routine, your per session output will increase, but whether it will be that high again is anyone's guess. It is also possible that once you are working, your daughter will seek to nurse more often on her own overnight. Since you are co-sleeping, she can do this easily and as you said, you can always encourage this. The great thing about milk production is that to a certain point it is malleable. If it decreases some due to less frequent milk removal, it can usually be re- upped with more frequent milk removal. I am really sorry you are not sleeping well...I am sure the hand pain is not helping. Here is a place encouraging your baby to nurse overnight my help you, as the hormones released when nursing promote deep relaxation and sleep. I do...
    6 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*laura.farret's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:15 AM
    I always rolled my eyes at women who said they were drying up as a cheap excuse to stop breastfeeding, but it seems to be happening to me. This is the second time that I come to the office and pump about half of what I used to. I used to et about 4 oz each time, now I'm lucky if I get 2. I work three days a week and my EBF. Baby feeds very frequently when I am home and I bed share, so he eats through the night. Baby is almost 4 months now and, aside from the fact that he appears to be teething, there have not been any changes. We also suspect that he may have GERD, and we will discuss that with the pediatrician in two weeks. Lately baby is been extra fussy but since he was born he has been gassy so we're used to him being upset. Baby is 3 months and a half and he still has a good number of wet/poopy diapers. He's about 16 Lb What is happening? I refuse to give up!
    2 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:08 AM
    Okay, that does sound like mastitis! The reason I asked is that sometimes health care professionals step in with antibiotics for something that turns out not to be masttis- for example, a mom with thrush-related pain might be given antibiotics because the doc thinks "pain in the breast = mastitis". And the last thing you want, when you suspect thrush, is to have unnecessary antibiotics further unbalance your microbial community. Excellent! I think hands-on help is a really good idea. Here's what I would do: - Nurse as much as possible but don't be too afraid to pump when you really can't stand to nurse.
    11 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*sunsetbean's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:34 AM
    Thank you. We just had an early morning feed and I noticed the glass "cut" feeling again AND for the first time ever I saw a slight flaky film on the areola after she came off the breast. This must be thrush!!!! And I've had a dull aching in both breasts since being on the antibiotics, which would also point to yeast I think. The mastitis came on very quick with severe flu like symptoms and incredible pain in my right breast that eventually made a big red area. It's all responded well to the antibiotics. I am meeting with a really good IBCLC this Monday morning. What should I do until then for the pain? It did hurt less to pump than it has to have her on the breast. I don't want to diagnose for sure until I meet with her, but if there are simple things I can do today to mitigate pain or start treating the yeast, I'd like to. In retrospect, I now believe the symptoms started to get worse after I finished my probiotics post birth, around 4 weeks. I bet we have had a mild yeast infection that has gone undiagnosed for weeks because we've had all these other TT issues going on as well, and I've been calling what I've been feeling fissures. This is making more sense now!!! As far as vasospasms, my nipples were always extremely sensitive during pregnancy, and with my first DD (who also had TT and was a winter baby) I remember having sensitivity to the weather and when I would open my deep freeze!! This summer weather has helped I think.
    11 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*7preemiemum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:25 AM
    Bumping up my post here Guys, just bear with me again and my world disaster probs;)aaaach i wish i could actually joke about it Anyways, so we r still pumping, i just have a few quests again, wanted to know what u all think As I prev wrote the combo of eping by day and nursing eve, night n early morning worked well until 8 months When i found dd suddenly "upped" her breast refusal by a few notches Happens to be this coincided with me cutting thru her medela teet which as its a tiny hole was driving me crazy by the lengthy feeds So cut it to make the hole bigger n suddenly the milk flooooooowed Im not joking that her breast refusal seriously became more sever from that point on Do u think its related? Also, there was absolutely no paced feeding going on. She takes between 3-5. oz a feed depending on her hunger state of the day, that very much varies by her, also her intake of solids does
    28 replies | 740 view(s)
  • @llli*katy77's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:44 AM
    Sorry double post.
    3 replies | 222 view(s)
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