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  • @llli*msviolaceous's Avatar
    Today, 04:40 PM
    My nursing nest is more like a nursing island, a futon with a flat surface and fitted sheet. I can nurse her side-lying, then slip away and leave her snoozing there, and at least sit up, have a sandwich, try and un-melt my brain. I've even managed to pump during those times. Can you try something like that?
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*joshuas.mommy's Avatar
    Today, 03:15 PM
    Mommal, I appreciate your concern, truly. But I think I was actually selling my husband a bit short. Josh and I nursed again last night, with DH's blessing. We'd gotten home late from dinner, Josh had been sleeping in the car and woke up crying, and DH suggested I give him nu-nu because it would be the easiest way to get him back to sleep. So I did, and it was really nice for me and I think for Josh. He fell back asleep that way, just like when he was a little baby. I don't know what tonight will hold but I'm happy for now. I don't think we're altogether done yet, though we're close. I actually took a risk and did talk to DH last night about how I've been feeling about weaning and how I'm sad and he was more supportive than I thought he'd be. He didn't say a whole lot but he validated my feelings and didn't criticize me or use it against me. I was in a really low spot when I posted yesterday and I think I was seeing things as more negative than they really are. Certainly, the extended nursing has been a point of tension between us and has exposed done of the cracks in our relationship, but overall we're pretty solid. He was great and totally supportive about nursing until DS was two or so, it's only been as DS got "too old" in his opinion that that changed. I must say, I think that those of you who have partners who are supportive of nursing a 3 or 4 year old are very lucky. I think attitudes like my hisband's are very common in our society. Nursing into the preschool years...
    8 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*hah's Avatar
    Today, 03:13 PM
    Hi! I'm new here too and I have been and am still going through the same thing with my son. He's 4 weeks now and experienced a growth spurt. I've been nursing him for a solid 6 hours (seriously right now while writing this) with about a 15 min break. I use a Moby wrap to carry him which I am able to nurse on one side but not the other. I don't really have any advice to offer you except to relax and stick with it. I just wanted you to know you're not the only one going through this. Also, I had to supplement with 2oz of formula a day, per the pediatricians orders. It wasn't ideal for me but it did offer me a break (although I did pump during that time) and the opportunity for my husband to feed the baby. I also drink mothers milk tea, which I am rather fond of the taste contrary to popular opinion and take fenugreek. I responded well to these herbs but I advise you to check with your medical care provider especially if you have allergies (I think fenugreek is in the legume family but I'm not certain, so you could have a bad reaction if you're allergic to nuts). The constant nursing is basically telling your body to make more milk. It's a supply and demand response. do you know if she's latched properly? I have to use a nipple shield which is a hurdle I'm working on overcoming. I know it's easier said than done but relaxing is the best thing you can do. Using warm washcloths helped to soothe my sore nipples and it helped me relax. I hope this helped. ☺️
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 02:40 PM
    Have you tried using your Medela parts with your Hygeia pump? That's what works for me. I use Hygeia valves in the Medela flanges. If you have tried that, you may have to give some more info so we can try to troubleshoot.
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*ramom's Avatar
    Today, 12:11 PM
    It seems my blocked ducts were caused by milk drying in the tips of the nipple. Simply washing my nipples after I finish pumping seems to have stopped most of them. I also sometimes wash them in between pumping if I have a let-down. Just wanted to share in case other people experience this.
    0 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 12:05 PM
    One thing I found helpful for getting a little freezer stash while on maternity leave was to pump during my first morning nursing session. I would nurse her a couple times overnight, but during that first morning nursing session, when we were both up and awake, I would set up my pump, get her latched on, then pump the opposite breast while she was nursing. This way I could take advantage of baby inducing a let down (way more effective than a pump) and take advantage of the morning fullness.
    2 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:28 AM
    First, is it possible something else is going on? earache, a cold? These can cause a baby to resist feeding. Also many babies just get kind of fussy and nurse 'oddly' at this age. When this happens, the best course of action is to try to roll with it without giving a bottle (when you are there to nurse.) For nipple confusion: First, is it possible baby is being overfed while you are at work? The return to work is a tricky time for breastfeeding. So is the introduction of solids. So the first thing I would suggest is look carefully at how much your baby is being fed both milk and solids while you are at work. A baby who is being filled up with anything too much during the day is going to lose interest in nursing. Also be very sure baby is not being given water! Solids are just for fun and learning for about the first year of life, and at this age should either be given only infrequently and in small amounts, or not at all. The current feeding recommendation from the AAP is that solids not even be introduced until age 6 months and NOT before. This is in part because it is understood that early introduction of solids is very detrimental to breastfeeding in many cases. The "4-6" months window your pediatrician perhaps suggested is out of date, in other words. Was there some concern you or he/she was having that made them suggest solids so early do you know? The other big concern is that baby may be getting too much milk, and/or, the bottle is being given in...
    1 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:57 AM
    Sounds good. Since giving bottles requires that mom pump, and some moms find that to be extra work, here are some ideas for ways dad can comfort and bond with baby so mom can get a break without dad giving a bottle: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf and some general tips for fussiness that dad or others can try: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf paced bottle feeding: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf
    3 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:23 AM
    You currently have 4 posts on the forum. 1 asking for help with a newborn boy, 1 asking for help with pumping, and 2 regarding issues with baby girls. Pretty sure you are a troll, so please either prove you're not or move on.
    1 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:01 AM
    :ita Good advice from the PP.
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 AM
    Wouldn't it be great if the online source said something like this: "The night-waking you are seeing might be related to your baby's developing sense of object permanence. To put it in layman's terms, your baby is suddenly a lot more aware of when things are not where they used to be! That can be pretty upsetting for a baby: she wakes up all alone, in the dark, and thinks "Yikes, where's my mom?!". To see her through this developmental leap, it may help to bring her in closer to you at night. That way when she wakes up you will be immediately available to offer the consolation she needs."
    5 replies | 195 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:52 AM
    Nursing is a 2-way relationship. You don't have to give up in it just because your child isn't acting that interested. Keep offering when you're home- if YOU want!- and keep pumping at work if that works for you. I personally do not think you need to be pumping at work unless you want to be, since most moms wen from pumping at a year or even sooner if their kids are eating a ton of solids and drinking less milk. You don't have to offer breastmilk in a cup; you can also mix it into food or freeze it and make breastmilk ice cream or do whatever creative thing you come up with. I do think you have to come to grips with the idea that your child is weaning. But weaning isn't a single event! It's a process that begins the day you offer your child her first taste of solid food, and which may not conclude for years.
    1 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:42 AM
    Welcome to the forum! Questions for you: - Have you tried changing the shield size or starting the pump out on low and only gradually turning the power up? - Have you tried lubing the nipple with some olive oil before beginning to pump? - Can you describe the pain you are experiencing? Is it a chafing or pinching pain, is it more of a burning, does it persist after pumping? - Is there anything going on with nursing that correlates with the pumping problem? - If you inspect the skin of the nipple, what do you see? Are there any cracks, blisters, dry or flaking skin, or blanching after nursing or pumping?
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 AM
    :ita I have heard multiple reports of moms having milk outlets on the areola or on weird places on the nipple. In addition, moms with old nipple piercings sometimes have milk leak from the old piercing holes.
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:31 AM
    My girls both self-weaned at around age three. But self-weaning is highly variable. I've known kids who were still going strong at 4-4.5 years, and kids who went on permanent nursing strikes at less than 12 months.
    3 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:27 AM
    :ita My kids both nursed a few times after I thought they were 100% weaned. My firstborn nursed a few weeks after weaning, when she accidentally ingested some hot pepper flakes. I think everyone in that restaurant was grateful when I stopped the screaming! So in my opinion, "backsliding" is more than okay if YOU are okay with it and your child is into it. Mama, I hate to bring this up, but... You keep mentioning your husband's extraordinarily negative attitudes towards nursing- he doesn't understand your mixed feelings, he is certain that nursing is "about you" and not your child, you don't want to give him ammunition... I get it that relationships are complicated and even the best person can have some rough edges. But his attitudes towards you regarding nursing have been so negative that I kind of wish you would look into counseling.
    8 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:11 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! You should not be giving your baby formula unless there is a specific medical reason to do so. For the first 2-5 days after birth, it is normal for a mother to have nothing but small amounts of colostrum, which is the baby's first food. The newborn's tummy is very small- see this picture to get a sense of just how tiny a newborn tummy is and how little it takes to fill it: http://www.overlakehospitalblog.org/womenandinfants/files/2013/08/newborn-stomach-size1.jpg. Colostrum also carries vital antibodies and has a mild laxative effect, which helps a baby clear out his meconium (the first stool, which is black and sticky). The second reason you don't give formula "until your milk comes in" is that milk production is governed by the baby's demand. The more you nurse, the faster your milk comes in. If you skip nursing opportunities, it will take longer for your milk to come in and you won't make as much milk. The third reason you don't give formula is that babies suck differently on bottles and pacifiers, and those things can screw up a baby's latch. If the latch is already iffy, you do not want to be making it worse by teaching your baby how to suck on a bottle.
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*dhruti123's Avatar
    Today, 06:02 AM
    What do I do until my milk comes in. I'm putting her to breast but she is learning to latch and it hurts. I want her to have food so I'm giving formula. Thoughts.
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 05:54 AM
    I don't really have true advice to offer, just experience - that sounds exactly like what I went through with my little one last week. She'll be 4 months next week, and she suddenly started nursing MAYBE 5 mins one side, then would pull off screaming and crying or would just smile up at me with her "I'm done and I loved that" smile. I was so worried she wasn't getting enough, either, but I just watched her really closely for signs of dehydration and followed her cues - I'd offer her the other side, but if she started screaming or didn't act interested, I didn't push it and just waited til she acted hungry again (do you feed on demand?). She's still nursing for shorter periods, but not that short and seems to be doing better overall now (no more screaming and crying). There does come a point where they learn how to nurse more efficiently, so they will seem to nurse less even though they're getting more in that shorter period. If she's acting satisfied and still having enough wet/dirty diapers to indicate there isn't a major problem, I would just keep an eye on it. Also - the past couple of weeks I've had multiple plugged ducts and a couple bouts of mastitis. Is she only screaming on the side that's plugged? It can make your milk taste "salty," so she may just be protesting the weird taste. Be sure to drink LOTS of water, and if you're worried about mastitis, I've been able to avoid antibiotics (and sometimes head off mastitis) by taking garlic oil, vitamin c, and echinacea...
    2 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*macbookpro's Avatar
    Today, 04:44 AM
    Hello everyone! Hey ladies! So recently our little one has come out of his newborn coma as you could say and seems like the only two people he will be around without crying is myself or his grandmother (my mom). My husband i think is having a hard time with this. I started pumping today (only got a ounce) due to my little one started screaming and i was the only one home.but i hope to pump again in the morning so that my husband will be able to start feeding him once a day. With that in mind how many ounces should i have for that feeding? I just hope this feeding gives them that bond. He tries to soothe him but after so many minutes my heart cant take that pitiful cry. Is that wrong of me? Ill take him and usually let him comfort suck to calm down. Now also he needs to learn what works for him to soothe little man too. He took off some time for the holiday so i hope that gives them two the time to establish a connection again. Also i am only pumping once a day right now but should i pump more at the end of next week since ill be going back to work on jan 5th.
    1 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*macbookpro's Avatar
    Today, 04:37 AM
    Hello everyone! I'm sorry I'm not bringing any questions or advice to the table. I really just need to ge this all off my chest- again. In the beginning, LO and I had some serious issues with breast feeding. She was tongue tied, and needed to get her frenulum clipped, twice. Eventually she got better at feeding once that happened, and then we just yo yo'd with weight gain and loss. Her weight gain is finally steady, she's a frequent nurser ( like...all we do is sit at home all day and she nurses), and I'm kind of at the end of my rope with it all. And I feel awful. She and I fought so hard to breastfeed. and I'm kind of at the point where i'm done. Like I said, she's a frequent nurser. I don't get to pump so hubby can take her and feed her, there literally is nothing too pump as she's on me so often. So no break there. We've gone from every 2-3 hours to what feels like every 30 minutes to an hour. Going out is ROUGH. because it's like walking on egg shells: any minute, she's going to wail because she wants to feed again. So, we rarely go anywhere unless we have to.
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*macbookpro's Avatar
    Today, 04:33 AM
    Hello everyone, I'm a second time mom nursing a 4 month old boy. With my first back in 2012, I had severe oversupply and used the Medela Pump. This time around, I don't have oversupply issues but my baby is definitely gaining a lot slower. He isn't as demanding about the breast so I try offering it often. In preparation to going back to work in about a week, I started pumping today on my Hygeia Enjoye insurance pump. I have zero response to this pump, barely eking out a drop. I switched over to my Medela PISA (old from 2012) and was able to get about 2 ounces, which is a lot less than I expected but probably pretty normal. Questions: 1. Any reason why I'm not responding to the Hygeia? I got it because I liked that it was recyclable and was endorsed by LLL.
    1 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*macbookpro's Avatar
    Today, 04:30 AM
    Hi all! My daughter was born (6/10/14) at 7 lb 1.8 oz. At six months she is 13 lb 15 oz, but from month five to six she only gained 9 oz. She has always nursed one side per feeding and nurses about seven times a day. Her diaper output (bowel movements) is similar to what she was producing at three months. I think when she is "done" feeding she may just be distracted. She wasnt acting hungry between feeds, which is why this caught me by surprise. I've tried offering both sides for the past couple days and she does take both sides about half the time with some extra encouragement. I am scared that i have accidentally "trained" her to eat less and so decreased my supply at the same time. Im sure i can get my supply back up with feeding more frequently and using both sides, but how can i get her to eat more volume wise? She is getting no solids or any other liquids. (she doesn't seem interested in eating any yet) Nine oz in a month scares me, her gain had been good until now (just when i thought he could weigh her less often!). I currently eat oatmeal and take Gaia Lactation support. Thank you for any advice.
    0 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 03:32 AM
    I still nurse to sleep with DD at 14 months and I currently have 1 friend doing it at 18 months and another at just over 2. I also have a friend who did the rouse them after a feed thing from pretty young, around 3 months. I can't imagine nit nursing to sleep at this point, mainly because I like the easy life and in our house that is what is easiest :)
    5 replies | 195 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:01 AM
    I am a little unclear if baby ever nursed ok? Were things better or worse just before the mastitis? Also I am not sure what you mean here . Were you told to not nurse on the side with mastitis, or was it simply to painful to do so? Just so you know in case you get mastitis again, nursing can continue on both the affected and the unaffected side, and any milk that you pump from either side is safe to give your baby. Have you been able to see someone who is trained to provide lactation assistance, specifically for help with latch issues? Were supplements always given with a lactation aid? Have you tried positioning the aid differently or whatever needs to be done to reduce the flow from the aid? Basically I am wondering if the problem is a latch issue that has never been resolved, an inability to suck requiring suck training (I think you might want to see an LC for that) or breast refusal due to the introduction of bottles, or refusal due to overfeeding with bottles, or baby has learned to suck from the tube but not to nurse from the breast, or something else or a combo? Weak Suck after frenotomy: http://cwgenna.com/postfren.html Finger feeding to get a latch (Video) http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=vid-notyet
    1 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*joshuas.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    Thanks, DJ's mom. I'll hope Josh does the same :) that would be nice.
    8 replies | 242 view(s)
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