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  • @llli*helbk's Avatar
    Today, 03:26 AM
    Thanks Maddieb. I'd quite like to keep the morning and bedtime nursing sessions so fingers crossed. Great to hear some reassurance regarding nursery and nap-times!
    5 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:04 PM
    What did your LC say about this new concern? One month old babies will nurse in the pattern you describe, there is nothing abnormal about it as long as baby is gaining normally. So, How is weight gain? Also, how is output (poops)? Weight gain number one, and poops number 2 (sorry) is how you tell if your baby is getting enough. And there is no reason a bout of mastitis or taking abs should cause anything other than very temporary drop in production. Another thing to consider is that mastitis is often caused because mom is overproducing, and the body naturally lowers production from too high to enough, in order to protect the mother from more illness. Babies this age are trying to gain weight as fast as they did while in the womb, when they were fed literally constantly. So it is 100% normal for a baby to want to suck and suck, to suck in their sleep, to air suck when the breast is removed, etc. You hear this concern all the time, but in fact it is really is not normal or common for a baby to become 'frustrated they cannot get the milk out" when there is clearly more milk in the breasts. A baby who is not getting milk because there is none is one thing. But that is not what you are describing. Is it? Why would the pump be able to get more milk but not your baby? Humans were born to get 100% fed this way. If there is milk and baby can latch and suckle normally or even close to normally, it is not really hard to get the milk out. However, if a baby has a poor latch...
    1 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:37 PM
    Thrush- have you read the Newman candida protocol? I would suggest use that as a guide, he explains how to treat both mom and baby with increasing levels of aggressiveness. http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-CP Thrush can be a real pain and hard to get rid of, and if your doctor is willing you might just want to jump right to diflucan (Fluconazole) for both of you, because it has tested basically 100% effective for fighting thrush...but I do not know what potential side effects there may be. Here is more info on that medication from Newman: http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&id=18:fluconazole&Itemid=17 Shorter feedings can mean many things, not only that baby is getting more efficient. My first guess at this age is that short feedings means you are making lots of milk and there is a fast letdown. While some moms have issues when they overproduce and some babies object to a fast letdown, there is nothing inherently wrong with this situation and in fact it is very common at about 4-6 weeks which are the usual "high water mark" weeks for production. If it is not bothering either you or baby, no worries.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:32 PM
    So I know that you're never technically empty.. but I can tell my little guy gets frustrated and starts screaming when I am almost empty and he has to work harder to get milk. I should start off by saying 1. I had mastitis and I am still on antibiotics. I got that last Tuesday in my left breast. 2. I'm using a nipple shield. I've seen the LC numerous times and before mastitis he had NO problem transferring milk and they were impressed and said that if the shield works for me for the time being, to use it so that's what we are planning on doing for now. Since then, I feel like I am not "making" enough for my little guy. He is 4 weeks old. Today for example, this was his schedule. 1:30am - fed him, and then pumped 50 mL. 2:43am fed him 6:45 fed him 9:00am fed him 10:46 fed him and he was literally on and off the breast until 4pm. (I don't work and I don't mind while I get some work done on the computer so I just kept him on my brestfriend and just let him go back and forth from eating and sleeping for those 5 hours). Also I've been told comfort nursing is good... so I just let him do it.
    1 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob626's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:02 PM
    thanks ladies. The doc didn't give him an iron test at his recent 9 month appt.--he is gaining well and very energetic and happy. In terms of lead, the Dr. just rec. iron to offset any possible exposure to lead in our new home--iron off sets the absorbsion of lead... Well, I guess I am going to dose him for peace of mind--the lead thing has been so scary, with an old house, we didn't think and ripped out some shelves....granted we cleaned up and baby was never in that room, but it's so scary!
    4 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*harini-ram's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:53 PM
    Hi all, My LO is 4 months old. I've been BFing her and supplementing the feed with alimentum formula (milk allergy and a long story). Now, some days her poop is green in color. My ped told me it could be bcoz of iron in d formula, and she wasn't worried about it. But, I am afraid I am giving her more iron than she required. like I eat lot of iron rich food (BFing) and at the same time give her more formula too. is it fine? or should I reduce the supplements? I dont think there is a alimentum without iron. apart from this she seems to have some tummy pain and spits up a lot lately..Just please help me figure out this. Am I doing it rite?
    0 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*evolvingmama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:17 PM
    My baby is 4 weeks + 3 days. about a week ago, I noticed several white spots on her lower, inner cheek. GP confirmed oral thrush and prescribed Mycostatin oral suspension for her. I was asymptomatic but he suggested I use OTC Clotrimazole on my nipples. We're finishing day 6 of treatment and the spots in her mouth of only very minor improvement (though, she seems in less pain). My nipples are feeling a bit more itchy and painful when touching towels, etc. but not too bad -- I'm not really sure if there's thrush there or not, tbh. Should we stay the course with this treatment or try something else? GP happy to write a script for whatever I want! I had thrush with my first but it was both long enough ago and in a different country that I can't remember what we did -- only that we had several bouts! On an unrelated note....she's been a good eater all along (gassy and spits up loads, but a good eater). I'm not a clock watcher but have notice the last couple of days, the feeds have been MUCH shorter than usual. No more frequent really, just shorter. Is it too early for her to be getting so much more efficient? Output great and she's very alert and well. Just finished a growth spurt a few days ago, I think. Had a long journey with my first to get things well established and "easy" so don't have a good reference point on what's in the range of normal.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:29 PM
    Ok in that case, maybe a good weaning book will give you some ideas? The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning or How Weaning Happens are two good ones. Unfortunately, the to-sleep and good morning nursing sessions are usually the last to go and hardest for the child to leave behind. I still am not convinced that you nursing your child at home is likely to prove any issue at daycare. In my experience working in daycare, it really made no difference if a child was nursed or not. Some cried at nap time, and some did not. If there was some correlation to being breastfed it was news to me. Same with my personal parenting experience. My three kids all nursed for several years (one is still nursing) and all nursed/are nursed to sleep as the usual routine. When it came to being cared for by anyone else, my oldest usually cried the whole time we were gone, middle was a bit fussy but mostly ok, and third loves being babysat so much she is sad when we come to pick her up and does not want to leave.
    5 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:20 PM
    When I examined the fluoride yes or no issue, I discovered that in the town we live, fluoride occurs naturally in the water in amounts that are considered adequately protective. We drink and cook with that water, not bottled water. So my kids would not have needed fluoride supplements in any case- and this was complete news to our pediatrician and pediatric dentist, both of whom are located in the next town over that uses a different source for tap water. I only found this out about the local water source and fluoride by calling the water company. I am sure there are naysayers about fluoride, and they may have good evidence. But for what it is worth, here is the recommendations and precautions from Dr. Sears who appears solidly pro-fluoride. Now that I think about it, it was probably from The Baby Book that I learned to call the water company about fluoride.
    4 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*wdestani's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:07 PM
    Hello all, a little background for everyone. I wasn't able to BF my first due to inverted nipples and bad handling by the lactation consultant where we delivered, I tried but gave up shortly afterwards due to frustration. When I found out I was pregnant again I debated the entire time about even trying to breast feed the second, after all my first is a smart healthy toddler and I don't have anything against formula feeding (to each their own) . I finally decided to give it a shot moments before my second was born, with a few moments of skin to skin using the breast crawl method my baby latched on perfectly and almost entirely on her own. We spent the next 3 days in the hospital with her attached to either one breast or another, it was awesome. After a horrible first experience I was in love with breast feeding. Then we went home... juggling a toddler and newborn and trying to build a strong nursing relationship became an exhausting battle that only got worse once my husband returned to work and I was left with the two alone. So needless to say after 3 weeks I surrendered to the bottle and have been there ever since. Now, after a 6 week hiatus from nursing I desperately want to try again. I started pumping every 1.5 to 2 hours yesterday and taking fenugreek and drinking mothers milk tea. I am looking into a SNS and have been having as much skin to skin contact as possible. Nothing yet except for a few drops here and there although my breasts are feeling more firm and...
    0 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:18 AM
    I am due any day now. My employer will allow me to take 12 weeks off, but the entire time I am gone I would have to pay for or pay back my insurance that they usually pay for while I work (they give a health benefit that pays for insurance, but they will not be giving that to me while on leave). That would translate into half of my paycheck until the end of the year and we just can't afford to pay that much. So now I will only be taking 6 weeks. My first child was born with a severe cleft lip and palate and was unable to latch. So I am extremely familiar with pumping and maintaining a supply. I'm not worried about pumping. My worry is that this baby will start to refuse the breast when I have to go back to work. All I ever wanted to do as a mother was breastfeed. I wasn't able to the first time around. Anyone go through this and have success maintaining the breastfeeding relationship with their baby? My goal is to reach at least 1 year breastfeeding or longer if baby wants to.
    0 replies | 51 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:14 AM
    There are many opinions about when and how a mom should introduce bottles or start pumping. And mostly they are just that- opinions. I think that it is helpful for a mom to do some research and understand the possible pitfalls when it comes to bottles and pumping. There are several and they are not always what you might expect. Good resources are The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding 8th edition and Kellymom.com. If you understand the possible pitfalls and adjust your practices and expectations accordingly, you are much less likely to fall victim to them. Otherwise, here are a few general tips: You can offer a bottle at any point your want, as long as breastfeeding is going well and there are no pronounced issues. Most sources say wait until baby Is 4-6 weeks old, but that is because it is presumed that by that point, breastfeeding is going well and there are no issues- and this is not always the case. There is no magic window for bottle introduction. This has actually been studied and age of introduction is not a primary issue in bottle resistance. Some babies resist bottles and some do not. Lucklily, it is very rare for that resistance to be something that cannot be overcome. Before you go back to work, bottles are just for practice and can consequently be both small and infrequent. So, bottles of an ounce or so, given once a day or less often, would be my recommendation. Otherwise you are 1) pumping lots of extra milk just for practice when it is not needed and...
    1 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:30 AM
    My son's ped sent a Rx to my pharmacy for vitamins with fluoride and said he will need to take that kind until he is 12 years old. I know I took them when I was a kid because my mom is into them, but I stopped taking them after childhood. I never went to pick up the vitamins from the pharmacy mainly because I kept forgetting, but I wasn't sure I wanted to give them anyway. I don't know how necessary they are. My son never had blood work to check levels of anything so I don't know that he is lacking in any vitamin or anything like that. And he does get some formula 5 days a week when I'm at work. Does anyone know anything about the fluoride issue? I haven't looked into it because I have other things going on at the moment. I think it should be a personal decision whether to give vitamins to kids, and I'm not sure why pediatricians push them so much.
    4 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*helbk's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 AM
    I guess a little more information for context would help. Whilst my husband can eventually get our LO down at night, there are tears, and he's not as successful with naps. I'm returning to work for 3 or 4 days a week (on alternate weeks) and have always had difficulty expressing so not planning to do this. There isn't space in our bedroom for co-sleeping, and I also don't really want to go back to this as he has been in his own room for quite a while now. Unfortunately I can't lie down with him and slip away as he has a fixed side cot so it'd mean sitting in a chair in the dark holding him whilst he sleeps. As lovely as it would be to snooze with him every nap time it means I'm not able to get anything done, like have a shower! I think I'm anxious for a few reasons; that my LO will end up very distressed at nursery around put down for a nap (though I am hopeful they will crack this for me!), that I want to reduce to just 1-2 feeds a day for my own comfort in regards to milk supply and that he'll then be confused why I'm not feeding him during the days he's not at nursery, and finally that other people won't be able to look after him for the evening without a lot of tears at bedtime.
    5 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*sak184's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:34 AM
    I did hand expressing. Pumps are not used even in hospitals here. An electric pump will be too expensive and i can't afford one. I can buy a normal manual pump but have heard it's not as effective as hand expressing.
    11 replies | 396 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:49 AM
    DS is nursing with the same frequency, except right after daycare. Previously, he would be extremely eager and excited to nurse right after I collect him. Now he will nurse for a couple of minutes if I offer, and if I don't offer he is perfectly happy to wait an hour or more. I have only been pumping for 2 months, would I hit a slump so soon?? I'm not sure on the exact quantity of solids he is taking. I do my best, but the communication is not ideal with the carers because I am not fluent in the local language. He eats puree and is spoon fed. He doesn't get huge quantities of fruit I believe but his lunch (veggies+meat/fish) is up to 120g. They tell me he loves to eat and is eating better (more?) than babies who are 9-10 months old. Rewinding to 1 month ago, when he was home with MIL, he was only taking 3-4oz milk and a couple of tablespoons of solids, although I was going home to nurse him at lunch time. The increase in quantity of food/milk seems insane! Also, he sleeps for 3 hours (1hr & 2hr naps) so he is only awake for 4 hours, and it seems a lot to me that he would need 8oz milk and 3 solids meals during 4 hours awake. He must be eating constantly! I feel pressure from all directions regarding solids. Pediatrician, daycare, MIL, DH. I keep saying that milk is fine for him until 1 year but I think people think I am trying to avoid giving solids and maybe it is selfish of me to favour milk over solid food. It hasn't been said openly, but I think MIL thinks I am...
    2 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*mab's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:59 AM
    I will be going back to work in about 9 weeks. I have been breastfeeding my 3 week old since he was born. I plan on pumping when I go back to work but I'm not sure when to give him his first bottle. I haven't really been pumping yet either. I read that 3-4 weeks is a good time to start? I know I shouldn't give him his first bottle and that his Dad should right? After he has his first how many bottles should I give him a day? I just want to make sure he gets used to them well before I go back to work! Also when should I pump and for how long? Directly after feeding him or right before feeding him? Should I pump the same side I feed him or the other side or both? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    1 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:01 AM
    scoob626, have you researched lead poisoning? I am sorry this is not my area, but a quick look at some reliable medical websites, I am not seeing the connection between lead exposure and vitamin drop recommendation... And If the test was normal, I mean...why the heck is she scaring you with lead concerns anyway? Odd. Has your child's iron level been tested? How is his overall health, growth? I had one child who did test a tad low for iron at 9 months, and in the case of that one child, on the recommendation of the pediatrician we saw at the time who was not our usual one, I did give him supplements of iron (not a multi) But he spit at least 90% back up, so we gave up after a few weeks. A few months later he tested normal. And our regular pediatrician was back by then and told me he never would have worried about the Iron at the levels it was for our son anyway, given his obvious robust health otherwise. He also told me he did not typically suggest multies or even vitamin D. So, doctors are not in agreement in this area. But I do think that actual low iron is one reason to seriously consider iron supplements. I forget if your child is exclusively breastfed or also gets formula? Formula already contains added vitamins and iron. Breastmilk has vitamins too, of course. But not added to it, obviously. The drawback of giving vitamins to any person who does not need them, is simply that they do not need them. Generally the body takes in the amount of a vitamin it...
    4 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob626's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 06:35 PM
    Hi ladies, with no debate or equivocation, my new pedi told me to dose my 9 mo with polyvisol. Partially she did so because we have been a bit concerned with lead with renovations on our 1939 house...his lead test came back normal btw. I don't like the chemicals in the polyvisol I saw, so I bought a very popular natural multivitamin on Amazon, forgot the name. I have heard constipation, but are there any other drawbacks? I know natural iron filled solids are ideal, but my son is inconsistent with eating too much. All in all, Kelly mom seems against iron supplements for healthy babies, which is why I don't know why my pedi. Is so unequivocal...but then Kelly mom doesn't exactly spell out the drawbacks, other than the vitamin isn't needed or may block absorption? Ahhh another thing for me to obsess about haha...but really it just interests me...thanks for any comments!
    4 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 09:36 AM
    What's the difference again? I am trying to remember if I ever nursed in a cradle hold. With my oldest, I nursed in the football hold for the first 5 months at least. With a breastfeeding pillow. Even in public. With my next two, I had discovered laid back nursing (me leaning back with baby kind of coming to the breast from underneath more so than directly from the side) and seldom held any child in what I would think of as a directly across the body cradle hold. (And yes I also nursed in the laid back style in public, on a regular chair or bench, it is not a requirement that the mom be in a reclining chair or couch or bed, that is a misunderstanding of that positioning.) I would suggest it may be easier and more helpful in both the short and long term to rethink your clothing or positioning (as in, are you more comfortable in a corner, can you half turn your back) when NIP than to master a hold that has eluded you even to this point. Cradle holds are fine if and when they work, but they are based not on any natural nursing position but are instead a mimic of the position a mother might hold her child to bottle feed. So there is certainly no shame in not mastering what is essentially an unnatural position. Also, it is very possible that as your baby grows, cradle holds, cross or not, will no longer work anyway. Cradle holds tend to cause 'longer' babies to tuck their chin, causing baby to either be uncomfortable and squirmy or to make latch hurt mom- or both. I...
    1 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 08:28 AM
    :ita with Zachary.smommy- everything you describe sounds quite normal! Just one question- was the omphalocele associated with any other issue? Cardiac defect, chromosomal abnormality, any of the conditions that are sometimes associated with an omphalocele?
    6 replies | 190 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 08:24 AM
    What sort of pump do you have? Or are you hand expressing? If your production has dropped, it is reversible. The more often you remove milk from the breast and the more completely you remove it, the more you will make. The way I coupled nursing and pumping was to nurse the baby first, top her off with a small supplemental bottle, and then pump for 10-20 minutes. It was a lot of work, but it did increase my supply to the point where I could nurse exclusively.
    11 replies | 396 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 08:21 AM
    "Evolutionary Biology of the Human Microbiome" sounds like an NSF winner to me. Though if I thought of it, 100 different labs are doing it already. :lol Speaking as someone who intended to wean at 12 months and instead allowed her kids to self-wean, I have to say that nursing the older kids is just so... convenient! It was my go-to tool for distracting a toddler who was getting into something she shouldn't be touching, for comforting a kid through sadness or tantrums, for getting a hyper kid into a more relaxed mood, for getting my kids to bed when they were cranky but not sleepy, for dealing with a screaming kid in a restaurant... My personal feeling was that nursing a baby is investment, but nursing a toddler is the payoff.
    6 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 07:59 AM
    I have to say that everything you are describing sounds pretty normal to me as far as behavior goes at this age. And I am by no means an expert, just another mom with a 7 month old! My LO can be very distracted by every sound, every thing he sees, the dog passing by, daddy coming home, etc. The world is just too interesting! In that case if I feel like he is too distracted and is not eating enough I will turn off the tv and lower the lights and try to keep everything calm and see if that helps him focus more. Also, if you are able to hold him and walk around to nurse, that will also help focus on nursing, I found. I think one of the problems here is you are reading information about what babies SHOULD be doing and what you are experiencing isn't matching. Well, basically what you are reading is a bunch of bologna! A lot of info out there is geared towards bottles/formula. But 4 hours is a really long time to go without food/water regardless of how a baby is fed. Imagine you were thirsty but you were told to wait hours to take a drink! Plus, nursing can be also just about comfort or connection. So these time limits that the "experts" on all these books and blogs put out there, just don't work or make much sense at all. And try not to worry about a set pattern of napping and feeding. I think naps will become more patterned when they get older, but I think it is normal for all the variation now. Also, it is perfectly okay to nurse baby to sleep. Sometimes when they wake...
    6 replies | 190 view(s)
  • @llli*sak184's Avatar
    June 26th, 2016, 06:50 AM
    I can start expressing again. But the problem is my milk production has dropped down. And with all the expressing i am really afraid that my baby wouldn't be able to nurse ever again.
    11 replies | 396 view(s)
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