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  • @llli*undergroundmuse's Avatar
    Today, 02:46 AM
    Thank you so much for reply mommal! Yes, husband and I are aware that fecal transplant can be done, but it seems like medical professionals don’t do it here :(. I probably cannot be a donor due to the Clindamycin treatment I had in past. Pedi said they don’t treat Clostridium unless it’s symptomatic. But we give her probiotic/Lactobacillus drops for babies, it cannot harm in any way. She poops less and it’s not green and bloody any more at least. I hope it won't return. So we had a checkup yesterday, LO is apparently feeling better and she gained amazing 400g in past two weeks! She now weights 9355g. However, her hemoglobin could be better, it’s 116 now. I don’t know about the unit but the lower limit is 106. She used to have 124 two months ago. Time to introduce beef into her diet I guess. She felt so much better that she learned how to crawl the other day and she actually took a ball made of beef and rice I gave her, put in her mouth, “chewed” and swallowed! I think I will give her more solids from now on, I don’t know for how long I can keep this pumping schedule, I am so stressed. LO gets frustrated whenever I offer breast :cry. My pumping output is lower in the morning now, I went down to 160ml today but I consistently pump 100ml every third hour after this. Could it be that LO eats more at night? She wakes up twice at night lately and still takes about 400ml EBM in a bottle. I use Ardo Calypso pump and it’s the best I ever tried, 26mm shield. I have Medela...
    2 replies | 183 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 12:49 AM
    You are doing a difficult but wonderful thing providing your wonderful momma milk for your baby despite the issues you have had. Just FYI, babies this age and even much older have been taught to nurse. If working on that again ever appeals to you, let us know. It's not too late. Theoretically it is never, ever too late to increase milk production. Yes, adding extra pump sessions should help! Milk production increasing depends on milk being removed from the breasts FREQUENTLY. As far as how many more sessions, as many as you can. One more session each day is better than none, 2 is better than 1, 3 is better than 2 and so on. A 3 month old would typically be nursing at least 8 and probably more like 10 or 12 times a day. If 8 times is not doable for you, I get it. You do what you can. But 8 times would be a reasonable number to shoot for if your goal is to maximize your milk production. This is going to be entirely unknowable and unpredictable. Every mother is different. But here is what I am thinking. Right now, pumping only 3 or 4 times a day, you are getting 10 ounces! This is actually quite good output for that amount of pumping. When you increase the number of pumping sessions, you may not get quite so much each time, but the overall amount should certainly start to go up. If a very set scheduling works for you, then 'pump every three hours' means 3 hours between the start of each session. But I suggest that there is no need to pump on such a regular...
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 12:08 AM
    LLL's tear sheet toolkit has many helpful tipsheets. Some I suggest for now are "Laid back breastfeeding and other ideas" (about positioning and latch) , "Diaper log", "waking a sleepy newborn," and "feeding cues" Here is the link to the toolkit: https://www.llli.org/toolkit This is a very nice article about the early weeks: http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:59 PM
    HI and congratulations on new baby! So the simple answer is that as long as baby is nursing often and starting to get something, there is no need to supplement, and if you are not supplementing, there is absolutely no need to pump. Supplements and pumping is for when a baby cannot nurse at all, or cannot nurse well, or milk production is lacking. (Some times a mom may need to pump or hand express if she has extreme overproduction and is getting engorged even when baby is nursing well, but that is a different concern.) It is entirely normal for colostrum to be very very scant. Many mothers find hand expression works better than pumping in the very early days when expressing colostrum, but even then it is going to be a tiny amount. Drops at a time. This is entirely normal and does not mean there is anything wrong with your milk production or that baby is not getting enough. Remember your baby was born well fed and hydrated, so in most cases there is no need to be overly concerned about how little there seems to be. Nature designed us this way so baby and mom can start to get the hang of nursing before there is lots of milk to deal with. Baby nursing often will help your milk production, but it will increase anyway due to normal hormonal changes in the next few days (if it is not already.) If baby is being supplemented, How much is baby being supplemented at this point? While of course in some instances supplements are needed, they should only be given in very small...
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*kohomelani's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:39 PM
    I've done it all, gripe water, gas drops and eliminating foods. I was even on a vegan diet but removing gluten has given me a completely different baby! He is so happy and peaceful. So far its worked for us. :) your story sounds similar to ours.
    11 replies | 4193 view(s)
  • @llli*payal1341's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:14 PM
    Hi--a couple of questions. My LO is 3 months and I am looking to rebuild my milk supply. Here are some questions have. 1) Is it to late? I am currently pumping 3 to 4 times a day and get a total if 10 ounces. Will adding extra pumping sessions help? Or do I have to do tag least 8 sessions a day to rebuild supply? 2) if it is possible to rebuild supply by adding in extra sessions, what is the average time before I see an increase? 3) When pumping 8 sessions a day it equates to every 3 hours. Is that 3 hours from when you begun pumping or when you stop pumping? 4) how long should a pumping sessions last? I have read about 20 min but on some websites it also says to keep pumping until 5 minutes after the last drop? If I pump until after the last drop then each sessions is around 45 minutes, which means trying to fit 8 sessions in a day becomes difficult to manage. My little one received a bottle early on in the hospital and we had to supplement with breast milk at around 2 weeks since he wasn't gaining weight back quickly. I have worked with several lactation consultants on his latch and nothing seems to help. Therefore, I started to pump and then also supplement with formula since I couldn't produce enough by just pumping. Now as he grows it seems like he is getting significantly more formula than breast milk and if possible I want to reverse that. Any additional information and advice would also be appreciated. My goal is to get from 3 to 4 sessions to at least 6...
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*avesnovuelan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:56 PM
    Or waking baby for one extra nighttime feed? 2-4 ounces of formula is so little I bet you could cut it out completely and just do one extra nursing session. I have read on here before that the average baby takes 2-3 ounces per session on the boob. Just thought though, obviously you have to do what feels right for you.
    52 replies | 1516 view(s)
  • @llli*rileysmommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:41 PM
    Ok first time mom here! My baby girl was born on Monday the 14th! Everytime I tried to get her to nurse at the hospital she would latch and fall asleep. On our second day they had me start pumping and supplement with formula. The longest i ever got her to nurse was 10 and 15 minutes on the same feeding. We came home today! Our first feeding was 28 minutes on each side. On this feeding we are up to 30 on both sides. (She's telling me what to type. This is Riley's daddy!) when I would pump at the hospital I would barely get any colostrum in the bottle. Now at home she's still nursing on this session. How long should I let her go? She's still latchedu and sucking. Should I still pump? The reason at the hospital for it was to stimulate my milk? What should I do? How do I know if she's getting anything. Please help!
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*carott.black's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    thanks this gives me hope. about her feelings its complicated. she and me actually got pregnant at the same time and we have shared almost every experience, when she was forced to stop breastfeeding she was really upset, i offered her to try and share mine but she was kinda set on providing for her own daughter even if it had to be formula but i know not beeing able to breastfeed is something that has beeing very frustrating and sad for her I wanted to investigate first if there is hope for her to get it back, now that you told me there is options im trying to figure out how to introduce the subject to see if this is something she wants to try... i know its a very delicate subject and im not quite sure yet how to inform her so she can make the decition
    2 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*annie.st.cyr's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:13 PM
    That's right! I have about 8 oz extra a day! Ok I will stick to 2 sessions. I haven't been having any issues so far, definitely don't want to create any! I love that he is basicslly attached to me from the second I get home! I miss him so much! Thanks for your help and advice!
    7 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*elliemommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:02 PM
    Thanks! I am hoping to be off the pump by Memorial Day. I have a manual pump and if I could get to the point where I could use that on days when I have to work late I would be thrilled. Ellie does not seem to care about a bottle at day care and I want to drop the bottle before she is old enough to ask for it :)
    4 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:56 PM
    Here is what I think 1) A LLL Leader cannot diagnose tongue or lip tie. Or anything else. We are not doctors (or dentists) 2) A board certified lactation consultant cannot diagnose tongue or lip tie. Or anything else. They are not doctors (or dentists) But, both may be able to suspect tongue or lip ties and suspect that they may be causing issues. And you already had a suspicion because your doctor mentioned it as well. Personally I also would feel hesitant to do anything in the absence of more obvious issues (such as painful nursing, difficulty latching, slow gain or inadequate production.) But I agree with pp, sometimes it's about more than breastfeeding, and sometimes breastfeeding is fine early on but issues with the tt crop up later. Anecdotally, it appears to me that the majority of parents are pleased with the results of having a tongue tie revised, but in a number of cases they see no improvement. or at least no immediate improvement, and, at least according to two different posters on this forum over the last couple of years, the procedure made things worse at least temporarily (as far as I know they never followed up to tell us what happened later.) my understanding is there is a very informative facebook group that helps moms who are looking into this that may help you. If seeing the dentist is not a hardship for you, I see no reason to not look into this further. After hearing what they say, you can make your decision from there.
    5 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:35 PM
    It's never too late to start producing milk again. The way is works is that stimulation to the breast by a nursing baby or a pump sends a signal to the pituitary gland, which then pumps out a hormone called prolactin which causes the breast to produce milk. So any time a mom desires to make milk or to make more milk, what she wants to do is to nurse or to pump frequently, aiming for 8-12 times in a 24 hour period. If the baby will not nurse, the mom should use an excellent pump, preferably a hospital-grade rental with correctly sized shields. She should also be patient. Getting a milk supply back means investing a lot of time and effort! It sounds like you're really interested in relactation- but how does your sister in law feel? This can be a really sensitive subject for a lot of moms, so I suggest approaching this very gently. Your SIL has been through a lot, and she might not feel like investing more time and energy into breastfeeding.
    2 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:27 PM
    Why not go and see the dentist and see what he/she says? As the PP mentioned, above, tongue ties can cause issues aside from nursing problems- in particular, speech and dental problems. It might be worth getting the tie clipped for those reasons alone. (Let me tell you, I dearly wish that someone had picked up on my older daughter's lip tie when she was a baby. Fixing it then would have been a breeze! Now at age 8, we're looking at the possibility of braces, and she is totally freaked out by the idea of the dentist clipping her frenum.)
    5 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:09 PM
    on the one hand I think dcp should do as parents ask whenever possible, whether they agree or not. on the other, this may simply not be possible in practice depending on age and number of other children being cared for. personally I am also doing baby led solids (daughter is now 20 months) and I keep offered food very small in amount and usually no more than 2 or 3 items on her tray at a time, usually a tiny sampling if what I am eating myself, although now i know more what she likes and keep those items on hand as well. If she eats it all, or all of one thing, or drops it essentially accidentally and clearly wants more, she gets more. I don't see any harm in offering a wide variety of items at once, and in fact it might be great to offer that exploring opportunity. But the resulting waste in food, prep time, and clean up time would make me nuts. I think you can get more adventurous in what you offer baby at other times. But if this is really bothering you, perhaps there is some compromise? Is the food prepared by you or your dcp? If you want, you could perhaps provide a few already prepared food plates each day, with the variety you want, but perhaps with very low portion size to eliminate waste?
    3 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:48 PM
    meIt's normal for babies to nurse to sleep. Whether your baby 'should' sleep every breastfeed would depend on a number of things... How often are you feeding? Is the baby napping without a breastfeed? How much total sleep is your baby getting in a 24 hour period? How many bottle feeds does your baby have per day and how much each time? I'm not qualified or experienced enough to say what is going on even if answered all of those... What I would say is make sure (as best you can) that baby is getting enough sleep and not refusing to nap without the breast and then being exhausted when the breast is offered. If your baby sleeps every breastfeed if sounds like a great way to get nap times into a vague routine. Make sure your babies bottle intake is such that your baby is hungry for breastfeeds... I don't mean make them go hungry but check out the paced feeding guidelines for bottlefeeding and feed small and often (compared to regular formula guidelines) to mimic breastfeeding. I hope there's someone here that can help in more detail than me :)
    3 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*rebekahb's Avatar
    3 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:11 PM
    Okay, so it sounds like you have 6-8 oz extra per day? Am I getting that right? In that case I think I might continue with the current schedule and add in a third pumping session if he starts eating significantly more or if you notice a big drop in how much you are pumping. It is possible to do too much pumping and get yourself into an oversupply situation. With oversupply you deal with fullness/engorgement/leaking, risk of plugged ducts and mastitis. Not to mention that you will quickly run out of space in the freezer! But the way you are cycling through your freezer stash is perfect. It is definitely possible for baby to eat less during the day and make up for it at night. Of course you are right to keep an eye on things but in my mind it makes it a lot easier on a working mom when baby behaves as yours does. First, it's easier for you to meet his expressed milk needs, and second all the nighttime nursing makes it so much easier to keep up your supply, because baby nursing usually is a better supply stimulator than the pump.
    7 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:04 PM
    Glad to hear you are doing better! :)
    5 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:03 PM
    :ita I think it's really normal for baby to nurse a lot at night, he wants to be with you. Are you co-sleeping? That helps a lot of moms deal with the frequent waking. Even if you don't want to co-sleep, bringing baby to bed with you to nurse and nursing in a side-lying position so you can kind of doze while baby nurses. Also, all that nighttime nursing is GREAT for maintaining your supply. How long is your workday? Unless you are working just a few hours a day most mothers cannot maintain a full supply with pumping once a day. And definitely look into getting a double electric pump, it's a lot quicker to pump with a double electric and then maybe you can do more pumping sessions to better maintain your supply. Otherwise is there a supervisor you can talk to about getting more pumping breaks? Also, depending on the kind of work you do, there are some kinds of work you can do with a hands-free setup (for example, doing work on a computer). Your milk should be fine in a cooler pack for a 3-4 hour drive home. Here are milk storage guidelines: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/milkstorage/ https://www.llli.org/faq/milkstorage.html
    4 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:56 PM
    Yes, I'm done pumping. It sounds like you are on track - I think the "uncomfortably full" feeling will subside with time as your supply regulates to match her demand. It sounds like both pumping and nursing right now are concentrated in the evenings if you are pumping (sometimes) right before you leave work, at home, and nursing a couple times at home as well. So that may be why you feel a lot more full at that time? It's a process but I'm pretty sure you'll be done before the end of the century... :)
    4 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*elliemommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:51 PM
    My dcp does the same thing. I send the food and note what is for breakfast, lunch , snacks. They feed it as they see fit. Remember that kids often act different at home and dc. Your son may be great at home, never throwing food, etc. and may be the opposite at school. They presumably have a number of children in their care and have to have some rules to make their lives a little easier. I would be pretty upset if my dcp allowed grazing because they would not be able to control which child ate what. I prefer them having a more controlled environment then what I have at home.
    3 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*elliemommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:45 PM
    I feel full in the morning when I wake up and then all afternoon starting around 4 or 4:30 until she nurses for bedtime. You are completely done pumping, correct? I want to make sure there is a chance I will still feel fullish in the AM and for bed time nursing. During the day on the weekends she snack nurses but not too much lately. It is really a 3x a day thing for her. Early AM, early evening and bedtime. Other than that she is way too busy for mama :)
    4 replies | 60 view(s)
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