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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:47 PM
    So, not familiar with bottles. Curious if baby this age even needs a bottle rather than maybe a cup? Paced bottle feeding properly done is going to be your best bet for slowing down flow. All nipples drip. I suspect paced feeding is not being properly done as far as how baby and bottle are positioned. HOWEVER. A baby this age should really be able to 'pace' themselves. Paced feeding is really more for younger babies, I am not even sure it will work with an almost one year old. But I would suggest have caregivers making sure bottle and baby are being positioned properly (so the nipple is never full of milk and rate of flow is reduced by gravity) and that pauses in drinking (by tipping nipple up/bottle down so the milk drains out of the nipple, in order to stop flow all together for a few moments) are being encouraged. If baby wants more, bottle can be re-tipped up just enough so there is a little milk in the nipple. Sometimes the key is to not totally remove the nipple from baby's mouth, but to instead stop the flow for a bit to see if baby really wants more or not while tip of nipple rests on baby's bottom lip or gently in the mouth. If baby does not start 'reaching' to take the nipple again, then bottle can be gently removed. If this is not making sense let me know, may be I can find a video. I suspect perhaps a little laziness is going on, and baby is being fed bottle after bottle rather than caregiver engaging in other comfort measures or baby entertaining...
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 PM
    Unfortunately there have not been good studies on the impact on breastfeeding from tongue tie nor lip tie and whether surgical correction helps. Even the definitions/diagnosing criteria of tongue and lip ties is not agreed upon. What appears to be the consensus among breastfeeding experts including doctors who are also breastfeeding experts is that tongue tie CAN (but does not always) cause issues for nursing- meaning primarily, pain and injury from latch for mom and/or poor milk transfer by baby, and that surgical correction CAN (but does not always) improve the situation. There is less such consensus as regards lip tie. There is also consensus that properly performed surgeries are not likely to cause any harm. But no harm does not mean there will be improvement. I would suggest talking to whoever is recommending surgery and whoever is going to do the surgery for the experience of their clients and their recommendations for after care. This protocol on treatment of tongue tie from the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (doctors writing for doctors) may also be helpful to you: http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Protocols/ankyloglossia.pdf I do not know anything about gag reflex tongue tie, but certainly a nipple shield might cause a baby to gag if it is too big (the tip is too long) for baby. A nipple shield would also cause air swallowing, particularly if it is too large. Colic occurs in babies with no feeding issues. It is very common. I know that some say air...
    3 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob626's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:50 PM
    Hi, how long has your work situation been going on? I am just wondering if he is still adjusting to your absence? And just to clarify, everyone is doing paced bottle feeding techniques, right?
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Does baby ever nurse at night? I'm asking because it helps us know how much milk baby needs during the daytime hours. (night nursing babies typically need less than babies who sleep through.)
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Waking a baby in order to feed him more cannot hurt him. If you've ever heard "Never wake a sleeping baby", just remind yourself that that adage should really go "If baby is feeding often enough and is growing well, then mom can let him sleep long stretches as long as she is comfortable doing so. If baby is not feeding or growing well, or mom would like to nurse, there's no reason not to wake the baby." It's not as catchy as the first version, but IMO a lot more accurate!
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:52 PM
    My daughter did at 7 weeks or so. They had a baby restraint jacket and quickly clipped it, no anesthesia because then she was able to nurse afterwards , small amount of blood . Sadly it didn't help her milk removal issues but at least we tried. Her baby brother has similar oral structures and nursed 2 yrs without it causing a problem . I know moms who have immediately noticed a difference though and it absolutely helped . P.s. I don't think a shield should help her latch. I would really try to get away from them. Are you working with an IBCLC ?
    3 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*charlie2015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:53 PM
    I don't know anything about this topic, but just wanted to say good luck! You sound well informed.
    3 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:43 PM
    Hello helpful LLL ladies! I need some guidance on a handful of related issues. I'm writing a lot but want to be as thorough as possible, so please read on and bear with me :) I have returned to work and am home with my LO (now 11, almost 12 months) one day per week plus weekends. On the other 4 workdays he is bottle fed my breastmilk by husband, childcare, or family. He enthusiastically eats solids 2-3x/day - we don't push it, but he really enjoys food. If we happen to miss or skip a meal every once in a while, we don't worry about it. Up until about a week ago, he was nursing 6x/day on a typical day with me: wake, before AM nap, after AM nap, before PM nap, after PM nap, and bed, with meals in between. For about a week and a half straight he fought his PM nap and pushed back his AM nap to the extent that I think we've entered 1 nap/day territory. So he only just recently is nursing more like 4x/day - wake, before nap, after nap, and bed. Sometimes a little extra in between :) When I pump, I usually pump anywhere from 4-6 (sometimes 7) oz. 1. Everyone says he "whomps" the milk down from the bottle. I know it's common for BF'd babies to take milk faster via bottle than breast and that paced feeding, sitting upright, switching "sides," etc., can all help with this. People have tried all of the above. I'm working on getting a slower-flow nipple also, though the ones we use (LifeFactory) are Stage 1 (on that note: anyone know the slowest nipple out there??). The tough...
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*asingleton5's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:52 AM
    Okay good. Ya my right side could literally keep pumping more in the morning! That's a good point worth a try anyway maybe I'll try that. Thank you!
    2 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:26 AM
    This is just how it is, not just sometimes, most of the time. Most moms produce more on one side than the other. What you are pumping total is an entirely normal amount to be pumping, even maybe on the higher end of normal, and if you are otherwise exclusively nursing your baby and baby is gaining normally, that all indicates your overall production is entirely normal and does not need to be increased. However you can always try increasing production on one side by increasing the frequency or effectiveness with which milk is removed from that side. Effectiveness I mean- For example you might think about if your pump is perhaps not fitting as well on the left. Some moms need a different size flange for each side.
    2 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:18 AM
    The vast majority of the time, milk production reduces because milk is not removed with high enough frequency. After a bout of mastitis or plugged ducts there may be a temporary drop in production, but in that case it is usually easily gotten back up with normal nursing frequency. In other words I suspect that if your milk production is low, it is because of the extreme infrequency that your baby has been nursing more than anything else. And really the only way to counteract that is to increase the frequency with which milk is removed from the breasts. Galactagogues may help, a little, and for some (but not all) moms, pharmaceutical or herbal galactagogues in high enough dose helps fairly dramatically. But by far the most important practice is frequent milk removal. Frequent meaning at least 8 times in 24 hours. So, my suggestion would be, if you really have low production (see article linked below, many moms think they have low production when in fact all is normal) would be to dramatically increase the frequency of milk removal from the breasts both by encouraging baby to nurse more often and by pumping and/or hand expressing. If, rather, milk production is normal, you can concentrate only on increasing the frequency with which baby nurses to a normal amount so your production stays normal.
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*cw591's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:42 AM
    Thanks for the comments all. I'm working on it. My supply has gone down quite a bit (esp on the side that had mastitis) so I'm working on getting it back up to what it was before. ie: more stimulation on that side, oatmeal and mothers milk tea (which has been helpful in the past when I've felt low). I can't really remember how long it has taken in the past to get supply back up but hopefully a couple days? Any other suggestions are welcome. I'm also just watching him a little more closely to see if there is something i've been missing cue wise. Opinions on waking a sleeping baby to feed? I've also talked to the public health nurse, went to a breastfeeding clinic yesterday and will see the lactation consultant next week.
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*asingleton5's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:27 AM
    I am EBF but have been pumping once in the morning for back to work storage or a bottle for my husband if he's home with her while I'm out. My right side always produces more than the left. I'm pumping about 2.5-3oz total. Usually if I do 3 I get about 1 from the left and the rest I'll get from the right. How can I increase the left supply? Or is that just how it is sometimes?
    2 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:12 AM
    :ita with MaddieB and Krystine. I think one thing that throws a lot of mom for a loop is the concept of demand feeding. We're told that we're supposed to feed the baby whenever he "demands", and while that is great it's only half the equation. We can also pay attention to the demands of our own bodies. Feeling full and uncomfortable? That's your body demanding to feed the baby. Need to get off your feet for 5 minutes, while still entertaining the baby? That's your body demanding to nurse. Need to run to the store without worrying about the baby needing to be fed? That's your body demanding to feed the baby ahead of the baby's schedule.
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*isla.smommy's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2016, 09:25 PM
    Hi. Thanks for the response. I think I was guilty of letting her have a lazy latch when this all started, but with the discomfort we've really worked on latching properly again. No teeth right now, but some cut when the pain first happened early August. I was also very guilty of inconsistent nursing frequency. There were days when we were out and about and she wouldn't ask for it so I wouldn't offer besides morning/nap/bed. Other days she would nurse off and on all throughout the day, especially while teething. I'm trying my best to keep it consistent now.
    2 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2016, 09:01 PM
    I would interpret sucking thumb as a feeding cue.
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*kiwi.mama's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2016, 09:00 PM
    My daughter is 12 weeks old and after a lot of problem solving, I have discovered she has a posterior tongue tie and mild upper lip tie. I have had vasospasm caused by bad latch, thrush in my breasts, and badly damaged nipples. I breastfed exclusively for nearly 4 weeks then had a 3 week break to get my head together before trying again. I returned to feeding with shields (in a bid to widen latch), and as soon as I did so she began to reject the bottle. We've been feeding with shields for nearly 3 weeks and her gag reflex is getting more and more hyperactive. Now if I touch even the tip of her tongue she gags, which may lead to nursing strike at some point? She's also developing colic type symptoms from her inefficient, air gulping style of feeding. So...seems that tie release is warranted, but I want to know what I'm in for. Would appreciate advice/info from anyone who has had a posterior tongue tie released. Was it worth it - why/why not? What kind of after procedure 'stretches' did you use? How did baby cope? Did you get back to EB? Particularly interested to hear from anyone whose baby also had a strong gag. Thanks in advance.
    3 replies | 110 view(s)
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