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  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 06:59 AM
    If milk transfer is still a problem, or there is any pain still with latching, see if your IBCLC can give you excersizes or find a speech therapist with experience with babies and breastfeeding issues. Oral motor therapy can help if there is a latch problem that isn't related to positioning. My LO got his tongue/lip ties corrected at 8 weeks but we still had problems and I found a therapist who helped and we went to her from about 12 weeks till just past 4 months. My supply still had issues because I didn't get good advice about pumping at first and fenugreek didn't seem to work for me so I'm on Domperidone now, which has worked and we haven't needed any formula since about 4 months and I haven't given any Expressed Breast Milk at all since 6 months and we were using very little since about 5 1/2 months. We used the Lactation aid or SNS for supplementing from the beginning but did wind up using some bottles as well. The Breastflow and Lanisinoh mOmma nipples seemed to be the best ones for us to avoid making his latch worse. It was a bit challenging when he had gotten used to always having bottles or the SNS and was unwilling to work a little bit to get a let down but doing weighted feedings I discovered that the more I supplemented the less he took from me so that encouraged me to wean down to as little supplement as possible. He is now able to nurse quickly though he still nurses very often. Pumping, instead of doing it at a set schedule of 3 hrs or...
    7 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*ayanchus44's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    Hi All, I have had a pretty easy time breastfeeding with really little to no complications up until these past 3 days. Every time I breastfeed and afterwards I get a burning pain which sometimes can be sharp. I noticed that my nipples are always hard and it feels worse when its cold. I have tried to pump more than breastfeed because that seems to hurt less. My daughter is 10 months old and is starting to get her top teeth. One thing I have tried is to apply some dry heat before and that seems to make the actual pumping a little easier, but the after pain is a killer. I am in such pain as I sit here and write this, which makes me dread pumping/breastfeeding next. There doesn't seem to be any infection. My daughter doesn't have any white spots in her mouth so I do not think it is thrush b.c she hasn't been on any medications both over the counter or prescribed... I do not have a fever, I don't feel any real "bumps" in my boobs. Any tips or advice on how to stop/sooth the pain would be greatly appreciated. I obviously want to continue to breastfeed my daughter, but after 3 days of this pain I do not know how much longer I can take it! Thank you for your help in advance!
    0 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*ramom's Avatar
    Today, 06:34 AM
    Thanks for your responses, everyone. I was a bit unclear -- we started the bottle because the latch was very painful and because she was dehydrated/jaundiced and losing too much weight by the 5th day. But we don't believe she needs supplements anymore because the latch is less painful and at some weighed feedings she did ok (1 - 2 oz in 10-30 min). It's just that she now prefers the bottle over the breast, even though we usually do paced bottle feeding. Sometimes she completely refuses the breast, or will take it but then will pop off at some point and cry for a bottle. We tried to "force" her to use the breast when she refuses it but she screams. Also, if I have recently pumped before her feeding (say, she was asleep and just woke up during the pump), it doesn't make sense for me to refuse to give her the bottle, since my breasts are then mostly empty. The only feedings where she does breast *only* are sometimes when we are in bed at night, and she is very sleeping and not very hungry. We are working with an IBCLC. I asked her if there was any chance of getting her only breast only. She said she didn't know, but would "never say never". I asked if an SNS would be useful for this. She said it could be but she didn't know for sure. We have ordered one but I'm worried it could make things worse if she decides to start refusing the breast without the SNS. Should we expect more help from the IBCLC?
    7 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*jabeena's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 AM
    I am breastfeeding my son who is 1month5weeks old. I am experiencing a sudden decrease in supply. My breast are not full anymore. After delivery i had bleeding for 21days and in the next 12days my mensus returned. I started bleeding again after 10days,bleeding is very minimal though. The second time when my mensus started, from the same day iam experiencing drastically reduced milk supply. Earlier i was so full that i used small towels to sock the milk that would leak during feeds. Now i have to give my son formula as he is feeling hungry even after feeding. Is it normal to bleed like this? Y is milk reduced? What are the reasons for this?
    0 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*jabeena's Avatar
    Today, 05:29 AM
    I am breastfeeding my son who is 1month5weeks old. I am experiencing a sudden decrease in supply. My breast are not full anymore. After delivery i had bleeding for 21days and in the next 12days my mensus returned. I started bleeding again after 10days,bleeding is very minimal though. The second time when my mensus started, from the same day iam experiencing drastically reduced milk supply. Earlier i was so full that i used small towels to sock the milk that would leak during feeds. Now i have to give my son formula as he is feeling hungry even after feeding. Is it normal to bleed like this? Y is milk reduced? What are the reasons for this?
    1 replies | 2643 view(s)
  • @llli*ccb52914's Avatar
    Today, 04:49 AM
    Thanks for your response! The nanny is using paced feeding - we shared that same video with her before she started, and my husband works from home so has worked with her to make sure it's being done properly. I'll suggest your ideas of cold bottle, location change, etc. Though baby is not on a schedule by any means, up until I went back to work (and on weekends now), she feeds every 2 hours during the day, almost like clockwork. She was also following this pattern with the nanny up until she started the midday bottle refusal. When you say that it's not really cue feeding if she's waiting for hunger cues - do you mean that the nanny could be missing early cues and feeding her too late (and therefore she should offer the bottle earlier)? When she does offer the bottle, if the baby fusses, should she stop and try again after some time has passed, rather than trying to calm her and encourage her to eat then? I worry about too much time passing and my daughter becoming frantically hungry.
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*oncemorewith's Avatar
    Today, 03:50 AM
    Hi Mommal and tclynx I use a medela swing to pump. The most I've ever got at one session is about 20mls. If I pump more than 10 times i.e. straight after feeds and half way between feeds, I might get 50-70mls that day. I've been given some info on combining hand expressing with breast compressions and pumping so I'll try that too. I've thought about renting a hospital grade one but I'm not sure how much difference it will make. I'm not sure what you mean by how does pumping feel. I don't get a let-down which I do when I feed him. I've swapped quite a few of the pumping sessions to give him a snack instead. I figure that's as good if not better. His weight gain is good now I'm supplementing - over 200g last week and he gets around 300ml of supplement a day. I managed to track down a good LC at a local support group and I taer amounts, keep checking whether he's till hungry after each bit and stop when he's full (rather than the recommended 60mls every 3 hours). He has a big feed every 3-4 hours and a snack in between. I pump when I can and try to do at least 2 or 3 a day. This may not be strictly enough but it has made a huge improvement in my mental health as I can leave the house :)
    7 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 AM
    This is a myth that has a little fact in it. The grains that some beer is derived from act as galactagogues in some women. But alcohol dehydrates so that will tend to lower production. Of course, on the other hand, one (real) beer is perfectly safe, probably won't dehydrate you, and some moms find it relaxing and that never hurts. Rather than non-alcoholic beer, which I have never understood the point of, I would suggest, Look into eating oatmeal: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/oatmeal/ Other grains that have reported galactgogue properties: Barley and brown rice. Lately I have heard of many moms taking brewers yeast. Good resources in low milk production generally: The book Making More Milk and http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/low-supply/
    1 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:55 AM
    Have you seen this article on reoccurring mastitis? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/recurrent-mastitis/
    3 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:51 AM
    If baby is truly being cue fed, she may want to eat twice some days and 5 times other days. I would suggest, discuss with nanny if she is using paced bottle feeding techniques. Also, cue feeding does not necessarily mean it is always best to 'wait for hunger cues." Depending on baby and time of day, that may mean too much time has gone by baby is now very hungry and upset. This can particularly happen if the feeding is right after nap or after a period of activity or distraction. Just as it is ok to offer the breast, it is ok to offer a bottle, assuming the bottle is given correctly, and only in the amount baby wants, including, no amount. Also, maybe at that particular time, baby wants something different than the other times. Nanny can try cold milk, different room, go outside, etc. paced bottle feeding: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf and video: http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+paced+bottle&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 AM
    I agree with mommal. Breastfeeding does get easier. But pumping every three hours will pretty much be just as hard on day 100 as it was on day one! This is why rigid pumping schedules like this often do not work. They drive moms crazy so it is unsustainable. WHY are you being told to pump every three hours? That is NINE times a 24 hour day. That is more than many moms who are exclusively pumping-no nursing- would be pumping! Also, there is no need to pump every such & such hours. This makes something that is already hard basically impossible. Say a moms goal is to pump 8 times a day (just as a for instance.) Such a mom could pump like this on Monday: 8 am, 10 am, 2 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 8:30 pm, 10 pm & 4 am. This would give her time to sleep on either side of the one overnight pump. Of course on Tuesday, she could pump at entirely different times, just keeping in mind her goal of trying for 8 times. Babies do not nurse on set schedules, so there is no need to pump on them either. If on Tuesday she can only pump 6 times, that is not the end of the world. She just resets her goal and tries again for 8 on Wed. I have no idea how often you actually 'need" to pump. But if you could set your own flexible schedule, would that make it more doable for you? When pumping due to supplementing, generally a person will want to aim to pump to counteract how much baby is being supplemented. This does not necessarily mean you will express that exact amount, usually this will...
    7 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:57 AM
    Nursing 6 times a 24 hour day would be on the low end of normal for a 2 month old. However, for some babies, it would certainly be enough. This infographic explains one reason why different babies will nurse with different frequencies: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/infographics It sounds as if you have some concerns about your milk production. This is understandable due to your breast surgery. Yet a pump output of 4 ounces is on the HIGH side. Many mothers have an unrealistic expectation of what is normal pump output. Being in the 10 percentile on a growth chart is perfectly normal. Growth charts measure the varying growth rates of normal, healthy children. What is a sign of a potential issue is if a baby stops gaining to the point she is dropping off percentiles. This confuses me: Do you mean she nursed very well an hour later, took the bottle very well, or nursed very well after getting a bottle? I think it is a good idea to pump a little in order to relieve pressure if you are getting full between nursing sessions. But I would suggest, don't then give that milk to your baby with a bottle. Freeze it and save it. Also, avoid pacifiers as much as possible. You want to encourage baby to nurse for comfort. Maybe try stopping bottles entirely and pacifiers as well for a couple weeks (think of both as For emergency use only.) see if this encourages your baby to nurse more often. Give it a little time. If baby has no interest in nursing more often, and...
    3 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*mommele's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 PM
    Problem is when I offer when she's not hungry she gets upset withme....she'll latch for 3 or so minutes then get upset and refuse....then I don't know if I start counting from that super short feeding or the previous. And the whole day is thrown off because I keep on trying throughout the day and I never get a good feeding from her. Today I let her ask me (when I say that I don't mean crying...I never wait till that point....I mean a little complaining)...one stretch went 5 hours!...but I got a good feeding from her when she was ready. Feedings were at 8:30pm, 3am, 7:20am, 12noon, 5pm, 8pm (being this last one). Does this sound ok?
    3 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*laurennn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:33 PM
    I've heard that drinking a beer will increase milk... I feel uncomfortable doing that, but would a nonalcoholic beer do the same thing?
    1 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*ccb52914's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:50 PM
    No, unfortunately we can't do a mid-day feed at work (although I would love to!).
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    ohh okay, no discomfort before or after spitting up. Actually she smiles. Thanks!! I was getting a little worried.
    3 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    Okay, this is likely not possible otherwise it probably would already have been happening, but just in case-- would nanny be able to bring her to you for her middle meal during your lunch break?
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    "First of all, in posting this, I presume that the baby is gaining weight well and is generally a happy baby. If that’s the case, spitting up and aspirating are not a bad thing. In fact, probably they are a good thing. Breastmilk is full of immune factors (not just antibodies, but dozens of others as well that all interact) that protect the baby from invasion by bacteria and other microorganisms (fungi, viruses etc) by lining the baby’s mucous membranes (the linings of the gut, respiratory tract and elsewhere). A baby who spits up has double protection, when the baby drinks the milk and it goes to the stomach and then when he spits it up. I frequently use this example of how breastfeeding is so different from formula and bottle feeding. Spitting up formula, if all else is going well, is probably not bad. Spitting up breastmilk, if all else is going well, is probably good." Dr. Jack Newman, found here: https://m.facebook.com/LLLAndover/posts/571889979565552
    3 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 PM
    Does your little one seem in pain or discomfort during or surrounding the spitting up? If not, I believe that spitting up is really normal and not to worry about. My little one is alms of seven months old has been spitting up from the start, though it decreased in amount and frequency around three months.
    3 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:16 PM
    My 1 month lately has been spitting up. She is EBF, Their has been no change in my diet. Is it thats she's over eating?! :confused::confused:
    3 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:15 PM
    :ita with the PPs. The most common reason for evening fussiness is just the baby being a baby. They get tired and cranky just like adults do! The best thing you can do is get a stack of novels or a Netflix subscription, and spend the fussy time glued to the couch, nursing and nursing and nursing....and nursing some more! That's what I had to do with baby #2, and while it was frustrating at the time it was nevertheless infinitely easier than trying to soothe her in other ways. 6 weeks was the maximum fussy time for both my kids. But it gets better, I swear! By around 3 months they start turning into little people, who interact with you and have more predictable rhythms.
    3 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    Don't let anyone tell you that you'll regret it if you quit. Only YOU can judge whether or not this is true. Yes, a lot of women do regret it, but there are a lot who don't. I agree with the PPs that hands-on help from an IBCLC is a really good idea right now. Maybe the problem here is something simple. Or maybe it's not, but help from a LC will enable you to see a clear path forward. It sounds like your biggest issue right now is sleep, or rather lack thereof. Since that seems to be the case, I would think about dropping some or all of the nighttime pumps. If you get some more sleep and are better able to function during the day, maybe the whole pumping and nursing thing will seem more doable. And maybe you'll have more energy to focus on getting baby to nurse more.
    7 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*valentina0813's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    First try and relax, I have a 1 month old and BF, i from time to time bottle bf and have given her formula, only thing was that she seems to not be satisfied with the formula and was drinking wayy to much like 5oz and was still fussy, it wasn't gas either.:shrug She needed that comfort from nursing. I am no longer pumping unless i need to. ( going out and leaving her with daddy). Try different positions to BF her , that might help her latch better. I put her to bed around 10:30-11pm, change her diaper and i make sure she's in a milk comma :) . She wakes up one time around 3-4am. feed her again and straight back to sleep until 8-10am. Also i find that going to bed as soon as she does works for me. She even has gone thru the entire night without getting up. I couldn't imagine pumping so much. its too much time consuming. Most babies adapt well to formula, all my friends BF for maybe 1 week or 2. They couldn't take it anymore. They are on formula and doing great. Try and pump as much as u can now and freeze it if you would still like to give bm and introduce more formula, this way once you go to work u don't have to worry about pumping as much. Good luck!
    7 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Provided all weight gain and medical is good. Get a sling or carrier and wear him during the afternoon/evening during these days when he wants to comfort nurse or be touching mamma all the time.
    3 replies | 126 view(s)
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