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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:55 PM
    It's normal. And there is nothing in any way wrong with breastfeeding, it is an entirely healthy activity. Just as there can not be too many hugs or too much healthy food, there cannot be too much nursing. That said, nursing is a two way street! If you are feeling like you need less nursing, then it is entirely appropriate to set limits as you wish. See to me, this is a great time for nursing. Because again, nursing is good for your daughter and candy is not, nor is jumping if it is in a dangerous place or way. It sounds like she is toughing it out, if toughing it out means learning to handle disappointment. She is not only not getting the candy but you, her mommy, giver of all goodness, are the one denying her the candy! Of course, kids need to hear and learn no, but they will have natural, normal feelings about being denied. Wanting to nurse and reconnect with you makes perfect sense in such a scenario. I would also suggest, maybe look at how you are saying no. I can get pretty impatient and sharp with my kids and have found my kids needing reassurance and comfort more due to how I say things than what I am actually saying, if that makes sense. The recommendation is that weaning happen gradually and with love. The gradually part is of course going to vary, but in my experience, the more gradual, the better.
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:25 PM
    It really sounds like you have made progress. That is great. I know you have a long way to go, but it really sounds like you are doing excellent considering the challenges. I will try to offer some ideas for some things you mention in order. This is a lactation aid otherwise known as an at the breast supplementer. The most common brands (maybe only brands) are the Medela SNS and the LactAid. Some moms also home make a lactation aid. If you want to explore this idea further I can link several informative articles. But basically, a lactation aid is used when mom does not make enough milk so baby can be supplemented at the breast. Of course it may also be quite helpful keeping baby interested in sucking if baby is having difficulty extracting milk. The down side is they can be fiddly and there is certainly a learning curve. The upside, aside that they may help get baby nursing better, is that using a lactation aid can help with time management, as nursing and supplementing happen simultaneously. They can be used with a shield or not. When I was using shields with my eldest, my LC gave me a syringe with a skinny curved tip I could insert under the shield - so baby got instant reward. It was fiddly and the syringe or the milk might make the shield pop off and I had to start all over again, however this method really helped tremendously with keeping baby interested and trying to latch. That is excellent milk transfer! Really- 2 ounces for the entire feeding...
    4 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*vzijl01's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:21 PM
    Hi there moms. Lo will be 4 months old on wednesday and we got the go ahead from dr to start with solids. I was not fortunate enough to attend the "do this not that" classes before hand...time constraints. Iam a bit freaked out about WHAT to start with, WHEN to give it, and some rules that go with it. Internet searching isnt making the process any easier. Advice and guidence will be much appreciated.
    0 replies | 10 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:14 PM
    Thank you both!!! This is vastly reassuring!
    3 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*cjuch's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:37 PM
    Thank for your reply! I do agree with you about the assumptions. I was disappointed to hear that I would have a hard time nursing even before we go the tongue tie fixed especially since she didn't even work with me and my baby to see for sure. I have had some progress since I last posted but still struggling. I met with the lactation consultant again and we tried having my LO latch on without a nipple shield. It didn't go so well, unfortunately. But, we tried at the beginning of the consultation after talking for a bit and we kept trying after my LO was scream crying. The consultant used a syringe with some of the milk I brought and was shooting some in the corner of her mouth while I was trying to get her to latch on. She would suck for a few seconds but then push away and start crying. This went on for about 5 minutes or longer (or at least it seemed long) and I was getting so frustrated cause my baby was crying so hard, so we stopped. Seems like we need more time with the nipple shield before transitioning. The consultant recommended using something else (I forgot was it is called- but you would use tubing and milk while trying to breast feed) but we decided to wait on that. We were then able to get her latched on with the nipple shield- it took some time because the nipple on the shield is so big she was only sucking the nipple but eventually she did latch and seemed to take about 2 ounces on my right side- according to the weigh in. So I was happy...
    4 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:44 PM
    I am hoping you are perhaps turning a corner. Hang in there, I know it is so hard. I was a madwoman the first 4 weeks or so of my oldest baby's life. Getting those little stretches of sleep can be tremendously helpful!
    18 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:39 PM
    Mastitis can be cleared up without abs in SOME cases. Since you have caught this early, especially, there is a chance. The cure is simple- empty breast, lots of rest. This means, encourage baby to nurse frequently, hand express or pump if needed- do what you can to keep milk flowing out of the breasts. Rest means get horizontal and stay that way. You are sick and need help, get whatever help you can. I never had mastitis with my first two, even though I had OP. With my third I had it three times and did have to take abs every time. I know it is frustrating. Oversupply usually fixes on its own, given enough time. If not pumping is leading to mastitis, then maybe you want to approach an op resolution and reduction in pumping in a much more gradual manner.
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:29 PM
    Hey again, and thanks for the recommendation and advice. Having had some sleep (sooooo much easier when I don't have to make a bottle every feed!) I feel a bit more confident again. The crying earlier was at it's height in the late afternoon/evening which I think is actually not so abnormal. Hoping that he will be more alert and also get some daytime sleep tomorrow. One thing that I think has played a part in all this is how well he sleeps at night. I read before he came that babies are born with reversed night/day cycles. My little boy has not been like that at all since he was born, he has consistently slept really well at night and been more awake and alert in the day. It's been hard to wake him for night feeds from the start. Tonight I did manage to wake him to feed at 11 and he came off on his own accord from the second breast after 20 min looking pretty satisfied in his sleep. I feel better seeing that - and sleeping myself, although I actually can't sleep now. It's been such a crazy week worrying about his weight. The first few days of his life I was still kind of processing the trauma of giving birth (I had 2 nights and 3 days of back to back labour followed by a 20 minute pushing stage one hour after the hospital told me to try staying home a bit longer because it sounds like latent phase, then because he came out really fast and sunny side up I had lots of tears which led to the blood loss I had, after he was born there were no beds on the maternity ward...
    18 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:49 PM
    Yet another post. So I was trying to control the oversupply, and stop pumping as much... and I woke up this morning with painful right breast. I took my temperature it was 99.1, so I fed baby as much as I could.. took him to bed with me and relaxed. I go to take temp again, it's 99.5. Also, as I squeeze my breast, I can feel a part that is more sore.. as I squeeze that part, the milk that is coming out is yellowish. If I squeeze any other part, it's the normal white. I have had mastitis in my left breast, and had it probably 4 weeks ago. Except that time I had the chills, I felt like a bus had ran me over. This time the only symptoms I am having is a slight temperature, and tender breasts... and the color, if that is a symptom? Oh, also.. it is red (the breast).. but that could be because I am trying to hand express. Does this sound like mastitis? I HATE antibiotics. Is there anyway I can fix this (if it is mastitis) without antibiotics? Breastfeeding is seriously the hardest thing, in the world. I feel so defeated EVERY time something else comes up. How do I fix my oversupply if I can't go without pumping and getting this? I just want to curl up and cry!!! Baby has really bad gas, and occasionally green diapers.. and I know my oversupply is causing him the gas pains.. which is also upsetting. I'm so frustrated and upset :(:(
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:04 PM
    Baby is what- about 2 or three weeks old now? That is the age a baby typically kind of "wakes up" and starts nursing like mad, wants to nurse all the time, and cries if they are taken off the breast. I do not know what is going on with your child's milk intake, but I am just saying, what you are describing would describe many babies at this age, even those gaining very rapidly It does NOT mean your child is suffering. Let's imagine, for the sake of argument, that you never make enough milk, and baby continues to need supplements as a result. There is great value to breastfeeding no matter how much baby gets 'exclusively' at the breast. As long as baby is supplemented if and as needed, breastfeeding can continue with no harm, no suffering, and no starving, and only with benefit to your child. A good book that addresses the situation you are facing is Making More Milk. Yes it addresses in detail milk production issues, why they happen and what to do about it, but it also includes much insight, real world coping suggestions, (how to nurse, supplement and pump without losing what is left of your mind, etc.) and encouragement for the mother who is facing the difficult situation of a baby who is not gaining normally at the breast. I strongly recommended it.
    18 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    So an update, they came and weighed him again today and he had gained about 160g in the past two (formula stuffing) days reaching 3340g. We discussed the ideas that the breastfeeding woman from the hospital said (2 full formula feeds, pump during them, breastfeed the rest of the time) and they said its ok to try it and we'll reweigh in two days. Since the midwife left I've been mostly keeping my son on my breast (we took a car ride to the shops when he was in his car seat but that was basically it). When he comes off he wails so pathetically and I am suddenly very unsure of myself and this idea. I feel like he is starving, I clearly can't satisfy him at all, my heart bleeds for my little boy. One part of me hopes he'll still gain, but he seems so hungry I am very pessimistic. I don't know what to do, I really want to keep breastfeeding but I don't want him to suffer or starve. When I was showing "look there is milk in there" I actually squirted it accidentally on the midwife (it tended to drip before) so I felt like, hey maybe it *is* getting better, now I am not so sure.
    18 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:56 AM
    Your child is not going to go hungry if you pump an ounce or two a day to freeze. I assume you want to do this to build up a freezer stash ahead of returning to work? Just try to pump is soon after baby nurses as possible. If baby wants to nurse right after you pump, do not worry about it. Let baby nurse. The body is always making milk, so baby nursing again right after pumping is usually going to simply result in another letdown of milk. IN any case, this is not likely to cause any issues with your child's overall intake. If anything, pumping here and there as well as nursing with normal (high) frequency is likely to help milk production if there are any issues there. Just be careful it sounds like your pump itself may not be working all that well for you.
    7 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*luz3stelar's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 AM
    That is good to know, I will definitely keep that in mind. I think I will stick with the dairy/soy free diet since I already started - might as well see it through. Then when/if she gets better I can reintroduce them to see if they were the cause after all. Maybe I will hold off on eliminating nuts for a while unless things don't improve. Ugh, I just don't want to do something if there's a chance it's hurting her, but I will feel silly if in the end it was nothing I could control at all! I've tried a lot of things to reintroduce night nursing but they are so hit or miss. If I offer to nurse when she stirs/wakes, a lot of times she will latch/unlatch, thrash her head around and cry until I give her the paci. OR she will drain both breasts and want to party for the next 90 minutes for some reason (I guess she associates feeding with daytime?). Whereas if I give her the paci she usually falls right back asleep. So it's very tempting to not offer the breast at all as you can imagine. :) However, I am trying to be more persistent about offering the breast. Since I had my first period and my supply has regulated, I can tell how quickly my supply decreases when she doesn't nurse frequently. She becomes frantic during feedings as if I'm starving her (I know I'm not, but it's still frustrating). We've made some progress, but it's slow going... I mentioned in my first post we've been bedsharing more. It works sometimes, but not all night. We definitely both sleep better when...
    5 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:40 AM
    The general recommendation is that a bottle of breastmilk that has been drunk from can be put in the fridge and used again "for the next feeding." I think the concern with using it beyond that is bacteria from the child's mouth colonizing in the milk or in the bottle nipple (or cup rim or spout, I suppose- guidelines all assume bottles) Of course, these are guidelines for very young infants, not one year olds who are putting who knows what in their mouths on a regular basis, and routinely carry around the same bottle of water or juice all day. (Not saying the latter is a good idea, just saying, that is a common practice and I don't know of any dire health warnings.) However I would suggest, to be entirely 100% safe, if you want to keep the milk for several days in the fridge, keep the milk in something else and serve small amounts at a time in your child's cup, rather than giving your child it all at once with the idea of saving leftovers in the cup your child has already drunk from. I also would not suggest freezing milk from a cup that has already been drunk from, mainly because it is so easy to avoid having to reuse "used" milk by simply keeping the expressed milk in one container and serving it to the child in small amounts in another. This may be an excess of caution, but, that is what I am thinking. Perhaps another way of looking at it is the popsicle test. If your child sucked on a popsicle, but did not finish it, would you wrap it back up and pop it back...
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 AM
    I think everything suggests a schedule because people are in general more comfortable with schedules. You are absolutely correct that overall frequency of pumping/hand expression is what is important and there is no reason to stick to pumping in some "every such and such hour" schedule. Before pumps, people - including grandmothers, when needed- relactated by nursing the baby, and those babies were not on any schedule. I have no idea if what you are experiencing means your milk production will return nor to what extent, however the changes and feelings you are having in your breasts certainly indicate something is going on. About all I can say about some of what you report is "hormones do some wacky things" whether due to hormones of lactation or peri-menopause or some combo I have no idea.
    11 replies | 6915 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:17 AM
    Hi cjuch, I am glad you bumped your post as it was clearly missed. That said, it is a week old. Is everything exactly the same? Overall, I think it is obvious the nipple shield is not working. There are other brands of shields that might work better, and I do wonder if this one is not only too big but not being put on correctly (this can be tricky to learn but LC should have shown you) but I wonder, Has your LC worked on latch at all with you and baby WITHOUT the shield? There is no reason to assume a baby needs to use a shield after tongue tie release or after having bottles. The idea that some babies will "refuse flesh" after bottles is entirely theoretical. Every instinct a baby has compels them to nurse on the breast. So I think there have been many assumptions going on here that I think may not have served you to well. For example, are you saying LC decided off the bat before your baby ever tried to nurse, that you would have a hard time nursing your baby? Tongue tie or no, that was a huge assumption. If your nipples come out ever, they are not truly inverted. Have you always seen the same LC? Is she an IBCLC? Do you know what her actual experience and training is?
    4 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*cjuch's Avatar
    4 replies | 151 view(s)
  • @llli*lmxo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:07 AM
    Hi- i see the other person who replied said its not necessary to overhydrate. But for me, drinking a TON of water was the only way i was able to increase my milk supply. (But this was when my daughter was an infant so it may not be the same scenario). I also took the Fenugreek herb.
    2 replies | 515 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:57 AM
    Check on pump manufacturer website or customer service (or an IBCLC, best) but yes, that sounds like they may be too large. Here is a graphic on flange size from Ameda (one pump company) http://www.ameda.com/breast-pumping/getting-started/flange-fit How many sizes came in your kit? Just one?!? They used to come with two I thought...I mean, moms come in all different sizes- Some moms even need different size flange on each breast! Look a flange can be cleaned pretty darn well, it can even be boiled and thus sterilized if I am not mistaken. If a new set of flanges is a financial hardship, I wonder if you can find used ones free or cheap...
    18 replies | 393 view(s)
  • @llli*dolphindance's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:55 AM
    Not sure what else to call it but I cannot remember the guideline for using breastmilk after baby has already drank from a supply. I thought I remember that if you have leftover milk in a cup/bottle the saliva will start to breakdown the milk - right? My 1yr old doesn't want to nurse first thing when awake in the mornings now - he signs for food immediately and started nursing only like 2 minutes. Then pops off and signs for food again. So I guess he is just ready to get on with the day and chow down some breakfast. I pumped this morning while he ate and plan to give him the milk in a cup or sippy with his food instead of water which he is used to when eating. (He has never had a bottle so no need to introduce at this point right?) If there is leftover milk can it still be stored for 3 days in fridge and used again? And can it be froze if he has drank from it?
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:46 AM
    Hi and welcome! It is normal for weight gain rate to slow down after 3-4 months of age. If it did not, toddlers would be enormous and 5 year olds would rule the earth. It does sound like the gain rate has dropped perhaps overly dramatically, but it is hard to say. The average (meaning normal gain can be both lower and higher) is for gain to be about 1/2 pound a week (or two pounds a month) and then when it reduces, it reduces to about 1 and a quarter to one and a half pounds a month. But that is not the whole story, because to understand better whether gain is normal or not, you have to look at a longer period of time than a week here or a month there. Can you give us your baby's weight check history? We would not need everything- just maybe birth, ( I see you gave that already but we also need to know how much baby weighs now so we can compare the two.) Also, lowest weight after birth (assuming there was a lower weight in the first week or so) and then every month or so since then? I do not know how often babies are weighed where you are...Also, is length and head circ also measured? And are those showing normal growth? Also note any different scales used. Unless baby is always weighed on the same digital infant scale, unfortunately, the weight checks cannot be trusted 100%. Also, who is weighing baby? Are they rushed, distracted, are you always checking the numbers too? We place so much trust in what the scales say and forget the rather strong possibility of...
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*lmxo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:14 AM
    Hello! My daughter is 27 months old and she wants to nurse constantly. Shes always been this way but now that shes this old im getting a little concerned that its too much. She eats and drinks alot throughout the day with her normal meals. We co-sleep and she nurses 1 or 2 times during the night. I only work 1 day a week so im with her most of the time. When im at work, shes fine and takes cows milk from a cup. She wants to nurse in any kind of situation (not just to sleep, out of boredom, when shes upset) but just all the time throughout the day. So I would like to know 1) Is this normal and do I need to cut down her feedings? 2 ) There is one scenario in particular that I would like some advice on: When I tell her "no" about something (no candy, no jumping etc..) she immediately wants to nurse. Sometimes I let her but other times I think that she needs to just tough it out and I should NOT let her nurse in this situation. 3) I want to wean her soon. (Not sure when bc im dreading it) Is it ok if I just continue as is until I start the weaning process? I guess Im picturing weeks of screaming tantrums if I try cutting down on feedings now and then again later, weeks of screaming tantrums with the real weaning. (Ugh)
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*longtalltexan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 AM
    I wanted to give an update for anyone who might find this thread useful in the future! Around week 10 is when everything started to settle down for us. He got big enough to handle the heavy milk flow, and I stopped spraying with every single letdown. By slowly increasing the time, based on his reaction, the feel of my breasts, his grassiness levels, and the quality of his poop, I ended up settling into 4-6 hour nursing blocks, which I have to track with an app because otherwise I will never remember which side I last nursed on and when. I also found that I had to use other forms of comfort or ways to get him to sleep sometimes if he gets too overtired or upset. Then, once he's asleep, I can get him to nurse much more lightly, which helps him stay latched and drinking. And of course, I probably could have done none of this and time still would have corrected most of it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ We're at three months now and nursing is a dream! I still have spraying let downs sometimes (I don't go anywhere without a diaper or burp cloth), but he's gaining great, his gas is much reduced, and his poop is generally curdy and yellow.
    6 replies | 435 view(s)
  • @llli*1sttimemummy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 AM
    Hi everyone. I am new here, desperately need your advice :) My son is 18weeks old, EBF. Starting around 11-12weeks he doesnt have much interest in feeding. He can be on a breast just3-5min and thats it. I dont have any problem with milk supply, i always check after his refusal by pressing and there is always a good flow. Then I offer him second breast, sometimes he can take it for another couple of minutes but mostly he refuses it. During the nights he can be longer as he is sleepy and not distracted by anything. Day or nights I feed him by demand and it is usually every 3-4hours. We get around 4-5wet nappies and usually 1dirty nappy daily. Sometimes he can pass wet wind which is yellow mucusy. For the last month his weight gain was under 400gr which less than 1pound. And I weighed him yesterday to see the difference since then he gained only 30gr for the last week. I am very concerned about weight gain and loss of appetitte as he used to gain up to 120-180per week before and there is a dramatic change, only 30gr. I tried to feed hin in a quite room with closed curtains, for the last 10days cbedsharing (as I read somehere bedsharing babies tend to gain more weight:shrug), talk to my HV who says it can happen to some babies they just gain weight very slow. Even if it happens why he used to gain min 120gr each week and went down to 30gr now. What can cause this? I very concerned about it and desperately want to ebf but started to think about formula top up(( just for...
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*yum24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:30 AM
    Im currently using large. I gave my son 2 bottles of expressed milk for past 2 days and he is pulling at breast.doctor said it could be because of bottle(nipple confusion) so, I stopped pumping all together since yesterday. I'll try small shields when possible & update you. Also, is there a way you can suggest I can pump (even if it is 1oz/day) & freeze it and breastfeed at the same time. My son feeds every 2 -2.5 hrs.if I pump in between, he will go hunger so, I'm confused. Thanks for the responses !
    7 replies | 202 view(s)
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