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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:40 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. I only want to add that for nighttime leaking, I suggest investing in a washable adult incontinence pad. They are less scratchy than a towel, they absorb better, and milk doesn't pass through the waterproof backing and get onto your bed. Plus, when your child is older it can become a waterproof pad you slip under their sheets. They cost about $20-30, but they are an investment I would make again!
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:30 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Tantrums are normal, and you can deal with them compassionately while also not giving in to a child's unreasonable demand. It takes mountains of patience! I just want to point out that hating being separated from mama even for the length of a bathroom break is totally normal, and one of the unheralded joys of motherhood. I vividly remember taking a much-needed bathroom break and having my child pound on the door. "this is mama's private time!" I yelled, desperately. She ripped open the door and looked me right in the eye and said "No. I need to see you." Ah, the memories...
    4 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:32 PM
    Thank you both. I called my lactation consultant today, she suggested to pump a couple of times a day and see if the milk intake drops too much in the next week, then maybe go to once a day. She also says that his latch is ok, and not to worry too much.
    5 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:12 AM
    Hi gagliano. What you are experiencing is pretty common for the newborn period. Your milk production has been increasing every day since baby was born. So this is a common time for feeling super full if it has been a while since baby nursed. Leaking is 100% normal and in fact, it is good your breasts leak as this will act to alleviate some of the pressure and issues of engorgement. Latching at night when everyone is more tired is also commonly more of an issue. Usually as both you and baby become more practiced at latch in general, this will improve. If baby is capable of having a comfortable latch during the day, she is capable of having one at night. It is just harder due to the tiredness and you may be more engorged at night. Certainly this is one way to help a baby get a better latch. But it is not the only way. Aside from trying different positions and latch techniques, another way to alleviate the engorgement being a problem is to encourage baby to nurse with high frequency. The more often baby nurses, the less full the breasts will get between nursing sessions. If it is helping, fine to keep hand expressing before latching baby. But there are two potential issues you just may want to think about 1), if you are hand expressing milk frequently, that is going to give your body the message to make even more milk. 2) hand expressing before nursing delays baby getting to the breast. If baby starts out hungry and eager to nurse, but then putting baby to the...
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*gagliano's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:02 AM
    Hello, I have a 10 day old baby. I've struggled to find a good latch with her since day 3 when my milk let down. She's gaining weight so she's definitely getting milk. Yesterday I was able to finally get a good latch on both sides in the side laying position. But then as we got into the night it didn't work anymore. Every night I have issues getting her latch correct and it's so painful. But I'm always so tired I end up just letting her eat since she is actually getting milk. Plus at night I'm super engorged. The last two nights I soaked two breast pads through to my bra and shirt and bed. I slept on a towel last night. Any ideas what could be going wrong? I hand express when I'm engorged before I feed her so that she can get a deeper latch. I try different positions and her mouth looks the way it should. I had a visit from a lactation consultant a week ago and of course things looked fine at that point and all she could tell me was to make sure I hand express before feeding so she can get a deep latch. I'm so discouraged and in a lot of pain. It feels like once I finally get something going and my nipples look healed for the day it gets bad again and I totally dread feeding my baby. :( help!
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 11:13 PM
    My oldest child never threw tantrums. Ever. I thought I must be an awesome parent, at least in this area. Then came my second child and I lost that delusion! Second son had such intense, scary tantrums I was afraid he might hurt himself. I was so freaked out I asked our pediatrician what to do. He was (and is) our third pediatrician who we love because he never acts condescending, is entirely positive about breastfeeding and bedsharing, is generally awesome. We trust him. He said "put him somewhere he cannot hurt himself and let him have his tantrum." I was amazed. Really? Not try to help him? Not try to stop it? I could not get my mind around doing nothing in the face of these terrible tantrums. So I kept trying to keep my son from having tantrums. Over time, I learned some things that helped prevent or avert tantrums. But in the end I also learned that it really is true that sometimes he simply wanted something that I could or would not provide for him, and there was no avoiding it, he just needed to have his tantrum about it. Then it would be over and we could go on with life. Third child also tantrums, at 4, she still does on occasion. She had one today over not being allowed to watch TV. She is funny, she will cry and scream and then be happy as a clam afterward. Basically, do not fear the tantrums, is my point. For many kids this is how they deal with discomfort, frustration or disappointment, until they are old enough to learn to deal with these...
    4 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 08:28 PM
    Yes I agree with mommal. Here is what I wrote earlier but did not post as I was called away from computer: It makes sense. This actually can possibly happen- a baby might have nursing issues that would cause poor milk transfer that are hidden because mom makes so much milk baby does not have to be nursing effectively to get enough. When her milk production reduces to normal, the problem with baby's ability to transfer milk is revealed. I would think yes, most likely this is a very different situation now. But I am afraid it is impossible to know for sure without more time going by or a trained person watching a nursing session and concluding that there is no problem with transfer. This is why I suggested seeing an IBCLC, but it is possible they would not be 100% sure either. If you would like to see an LC again, maybe there are low cost clinics or some other way you can see your LC again or a different one. Often there are more resources available than you might have heard of. It never hurts to ask. To find out what may be available, you can call your LCs, ask any local LLL or other breastfeeding support group, breastfeeding coalitions, etc. Also your LC may be able to talk to you on the phone for a follow up.
    5 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 07:17 PM
    That makes perfect sense! When a mom-baby pair has a rough start, it can be very scary to back off on pumping and supplementing and weighing, etc. I think MaddieB gave excellent advice- in your shoes, I would back off on the pumping but still retain a few sessions per day. Continue to weigh the baby, keeping a careful tally of his intake. If you get through a week with no appreciable decline in his intake, drop another session and continue to weigh him frequently. Continue the process until you have dropped all the pump sessions. I know a lot of moms who have been caught in the consuming cycle of weighing, pumping, and worrying. But there is a light at the end of the tunnel! it gets better, I promise!
    5 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 07:07 PM
    Definitely not time for formula- unless, of course, that is what YOU want to do! Breastmilk isn't hurting your baby's tummy. I know it can seem like that, especially when a bottle of formula seems to produce a calm, sleeping baby! In my experience, a bottle can "magically" take a baby from fussing to sleeping because a bottle can fill a baby to the brim with minimal effort on the baby's part. If I were in your shoes, I would toss the sample formula. The formula companies mail that stuff out hoping to take advantage of situations exactly like yours- the moment when an exhausted mom reaches the end of her rope and is willing to try something-anything!- to make the baby stop crying. Companies know that it doesn't take much frustration and self-doubt for the emergency bottle to become the supplemental bottle, and the supplemental bottle to replace the breast. Don't let the formula company win! :cheer
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 07:05 PM
    Thank you so so much. This is extremely helpful! I will try these suggestions and cross my fingers!
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 06:56 PM
    At 10 days, your milk still contains an admixture of colostrum. In my experience, this makes the milk appear more creamy and makes it less likely to separate during storage.
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 06:55 PM
    When you experience lumpy, painful breasts after weaning, it's probably a sign that weaning happened too quickly. When it comes to ending milk production, nature prefers a very slow goodbye. That usually means a slow decline to a few months of nursing just once or twice a day, followed by a period in which the baby nurses maybe once every other day, followed by the final weaning. Often moms don't even realize that their kids have weaned until a week or two have passed. So, what do you do? You could unwean your child. You could pump. Or you could continue to express some milk by hand. The goal should be to keep yourself comfortable, and to keep those plugged areas from turning into something nasty like mastitis. I would worry far less about perpetuating milk production than about comfort and health- so don't be afraid to take the milk out! Getting milk production to end is probably going to take longer than you would like, but trust me- it's worth it to go slow!
    1 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 06:44 PM
    Time for YOU to get some quality YOU time! You have gotten your baby to sleep for 31 months straight, while your partner checks his e-mail and plays Angry Birds or whatever. Really, it's your turn for some uninterrupted time with whenever you like to do in the evening!
    3 replies | 195 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 05:37 PM
    Ok thanks! So the one thing that jumps out to me is baby's nursing frequency which seems on the lower-average side for parts of the day. So not too low to be a problem for gain, but low enough that it might help with the gas to nurse more often. At this age, it is normal for a baby to nurse at least 8-12 times in 24 hours, with many nursing sessions in clusters, sometimes as close together as several an hour, with longer sleep stretches of 1-3 hours in between, with some babies also doing maybe one longer stretch of 4-6 hours per 24. This sounds like what your baby is doing pretty much, but going 4-6 hours between nursing with any regularity might be a little on the long side, at least for the early newborn months. The reasons this might matter is three- fold. One, the act of nursing is not only psychologically comforting, it also moves the bowels, possibly letting gas and waste move through and out more easily. Two, the more often a baby eats, the smaller each meal can be. It is easier to digest a smaller meal than a larger meal.
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 05:03 PM
    I would say I am producing average amounts of milk. His growth is right where they want it to be. Baby nurses anywhere from 1-3 hours apart during the day and 3-6 hours apart at night. He nurses 7-10 minutes at a time, typically one side but sometimes both. Baby poops typically once per day. It's mustard yellowish, runny. I fed him SimilacĀ® for Supplementation Ready-to-Feed Liquid Infant Formula-Looks like milk and soy? http://www.target.com/p/similac-for-supplementation-ready-to-feed-liquid-infant-formula-8-2-fl-oz-bottles-6-pack/-/A-16822167 Awesome to know about probiotics. I have never looked into trying that but certainly think it's a great option! THANK YOU!
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 04:35 PM
    HI Maddie, thanks for replying. Sorry, I know my message was a bit confused, and so am I. I actually met wit a lactation consultant twice since the birth. These were covered by the public insurance. The next meetings are going to cost quite a lot, and I cannot afford many, so I am trying to use them wisely. Of course I know that it would be the right thing to do. The consultant suggested in the first week that I weigh the baby before and after each feeding to know how much he takes. I am still doing it, so I know pretty well that my baby is drinking plenty of milk. What I am afraid of is that he is drinking so much because I have extra milk, and if I stopped pumping, he would not be able to get as much as he needs. I have no idea wether this makes sense or is just paranoia. But I kind of suspect that this was what happened in the second week when I first experimented with exclusive breastfeeding (but I had the shiekd back then). He gained a lot during the first four days and then lost a bit in the last three, damaging also my milk supply. Of course now he's much stronger, and we don't use the shields anymore, so it could be a very different situation. Does this make any sense?
    5 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 02:45 PM
    Well if you want to breastfeed, please rest assured that no medical organization would say it is better to switch to formula- gas or no gas! Ok here are a few questions. I may have more later but we have to start somewhere. ;) Do you think you might be making more milk than baby needs, less then baby needs, or about what baby needs? One pretty reliable way to tell would be weight gain- is it fast, average or slow? Does baby seem to have any trouble handling milk flow when you nurse- gulping loud, gasping, coughing etc. About how many times in 24 hours does baby nurse, and does baby take one side at a time or two (or does it vary.)
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 01:50 PM
    I desperately want to nurse him for all the benefits for him that it gives. I successfully nursed my other 2 until a year old. Though they had periodic gas initially, it was nothing like his. I was proud to nurse and even manually pumped one side at a time for a year when I returned to work to keep nursing. I loved everything about it. I absolutely would love to get to the bottom of what is causing all this gas for my little guy.
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 12:46 PM
    Hi jlr41709, welcome to the forum. And congratulatiuons! I am curious if you breastfed your older children, and if you did how that went, and if you did not, was it due to some particular issue. Any previous breastfeeding issues may not be relevant with subsequent babies but you never know. Of course only you can decide if formula is the right choice for your child. According to every medical source I know of, including the AAP, breastmilk is considered the most appropriate substance for infant feeding and consequently, assuming mom wishes to breastfeed, this is what is recommended. It is not recommended to switch to formula (or even, to switch formulas when a baby is already formula fed) due to gas. There is only one medically agreed upon reason to give a breastfed baby any formula and that is if mom does not make enough milk for baby to gain normally. And even then the recommendation is to continue to give baby as much breastmilk as is possibl while supplementing with formula. I realize you are seeing a difference with the formula, but this may or may not mean anything about your breastmilk. Even if it does mean something, it does not mean there is no way to make breastfeeding work for baby. Many moms who switch to formula decide later on that they wished they had continued to breastfeed, sometimes because of medical concerns in baby that only occur or become evident later. Unfortunately, once a mother stops nursing her child, it can be very hard to get...
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 12:22 PM
    Hi, I am brand new here. :) I have a seven week old little man. He is my third, though there is a 15 year age difference between him and my previous baby! Yep, my surprise baby! Anyhow, this poor little guy has been so gassy all day/night every day since he was born. But lately, it has been just relentless. The only place he is happy is at the nipple, yet it just seems to cause him more gas pain, more spitting up. I am pumping this poor guy with Mylicon and Gripe Water with little relief. The other night, out of desperation in trying to help him feel better, I took out some sample formula I was mailed before he was born and fed it to him. He ate 4 ounces and was so calm, so happy, slept a 6 hour stretch that night without all that pain and crying. It made me wonder if my want to bf him is worth what it seems to be putting him through. It breaks my heart.
    7 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 04:25 AM
    Thanks MaddieB, for your kind reply. Yes the problem is if I say I want to go to the toilet and leave, my son throws mini fit and becomes inconsolable (hopping this is terrible twos). Yes he stands outside bathroom door, waling and will not let anyone come near him. So this strategy is of no use. I will now give a shot at trying to give him more incentive to end nursing by offering more fun stuff like snacks, breakfast options. My husband is very less interest in taking over night time routine, so will convince him to partake some of my load. Will keep you posted on the progress
    4 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 04:15 AM
    Thanks Mommal, yes my son is 2.5 years 31 months precisely. As your suggestions I will now apply your strategy of milk free bed time, by including my hubby's to do the last leg of bedtime routine like a nice cuddle, back rub, boring long story etc. Actually my partner uses this time for quality me time( catching up on chats, mobile games etc) so yes there will be some resistance but will get over it. I had read your reply long back about weaning morning feed by actually taking kids to your parents place and bringing them straight from bed to breakfast table. Well it worked brilliantly for 15 days I was at my parents place, but he slipped badly when I went to my place. I think I will now bring more enticing stuff interesting snacks and stuff, to make nursing seem boring. Hopefully some of this will work keep you posted on updates
    3 replies | 195 view(s)
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