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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    if your baby has a medical need to have supplements, (which could be donated breastmilk or formula) supplements can and should be given while breastfeeding continues and problems addressed as needed. It is not a one or the other situation. A mother could nurse her child for the duration while also supplementing as needed if it was necessary. Also, even mothers who make very little or no milk sometimes choose to supplement at the breast with a lactation aid so that they can still nurse. There are any number of things that can be tried as needed. ' Formula supplements when NOT needed cause needless breastfeeding issues. So that is the scenario it is smart to avoid. But when they are needed, there are ways to give them and things to do such as pumping to minimize any additional harmful impact on milk production or breastfeeding longevity. Be careful where you get your info. There is lots of outdated and flat out wrong information floating around. Breast shape and family history is not always the whole story by a long shot. I strongly suggest the books Making More Milk and The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding-8th edition. www.kellymom.com has good articles on milk production. You also may wish to talk to a board cert. lactation consultant (IBCLC) about your concerns. We know much, much more about milk production and breastfeeding then we did even a decade or 15 years ago. Yes you may have issues with production, but you have no idea how severe they may be. You also may have...
    1 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 AM
    A growth spurt is not going to happen in one day. If baby eats more from the bottle one day then usual, that may or may not indicate a growth spurt, but if it is, baby will continue to eat more frequently for a few days at least is my guess. growth spurt or not, being able to pump only once during a separation of 9 hours is potentially a problem-(not so much for your overall milk production as you are not working every day-I assume the 12 days are not consecutive?) But I would be more concerned about you getting engorged and getting plugs or mastitis. do you tend to feel full if its been 4 or 5 hours since baby last nursed? does your husband know about paced bottle feeding?
    1 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*babymm's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:59 PM
    If you suffer from low supply or no milk at all because of medical issues, how long do you try before either supplementing with formula or stopping breast feeding all together? My mom received a lot of pressure to not breast feed from the nurses when she had me and I am worried about being pressured as well because it is likely that I will have issues due to my tuberous breasts but I really want to try to breast feed. I am just afraid of giving up too soon but I do not want my baby to starve either. So how long do you wait before deciding to do formula?
    1 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:59 PM
    I agree not to beat yourself up. AND You did do something that is very important, YOU FOLLOWED YOUR INSTINCTS and pursued multiple second opinions until you got the help your baby needed. MOM INSTINCT IS IMPORTANT. If what the doctors are telling you doesn't seem right to you, trust your gut and seek another opinion. (which you did and got good results so good for you.) Let us know how it's going. Don't get discouraged if it takes a little bit to really get back on track.
    33 replies | 1332 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 PM
    I am going back to work in a few weeks, and my husband will be bottle feeding my baby pumped milk. Let's say baby has a growth spurt on a day when I am working. Obviously my husband will feed the baby more than usual as needed, but can this be made up later? In other words, when baby is back at the breast, will baby nurse more frequently to "make up" for my supply not increasing while I was away? I will be working 12 days a month, 9 hrs a day from 9 weeks of life. I am working overnights including baby's 6 hour stretch of sleep at night. I will only be able to pump once at work, but am willing to add extra pumping sessions at home. As a follow up question, do you think that this setup will likely be conducive to EBFing? I went back to work with my son at 5 months, so this is scary for me.
    1 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*eltrix's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:54 PM
    You should not beat yourself up for listening to 3 pediatricians! We go to doctors because they're supposed to have expertise in the health-related areas that we don't. Usually, going against doctors' advice has the potential to be much more harmful for your child than listening to them. I'm glad things are getting better now.
    33 replies | 1332 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    My home seems to get a lot of power outages. We have a chest freezer in the basement, and have had several outages around 4 hours. I don't worry about those. I know we have had regular food in there for 72 hours without power and it was fine. I have had milk in my regular freezer during a 2-3 hour outage. I checked after power was back on and everything still seemed frozen. I did use that milk soon rather than moving it down to the chest freezer for long term storage. The weekend before I first went back to work, we took a vacation. I pumped the couple of days before we left and then took my pump and pumped while we were gone. When we got back, I was prepping the bottles for the first day of day care, and the ones from before our trip smelled off. I tossed them. Fortunately I had pumped enough over the weekend for that first day. I talked to a neighbor and found out that we had lost power for ~7 hours while we were gone! I have a friend who stores milk at several of her friends' houses just in case of outages like that. I also have a non-breastfeeding friend that is so paranoid about outages that anytime they loose power, she tosses everything in the refrigerator, including ketchup, soda, fruit, etc. It all comes down to what you are comfortable with.
    5 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:49 PM
    ok if you are pretty sure it is not thrush, then I think having some sensitivity due to your fertility returning makes sense. But thrush is notoriously tricky to diagnose. Another common cause for nursing discomfort in later babyhood and toddlerhood is needing to adjust positioning to make room for growing child. You want to make sure your son's chin is not tucked, that he can tilt his head back a bit to get a comfortable latch. Adjusting positioning may help with breast refusal as well. Whatever it is, going back to latch basics may help. Also at this age you may be able to get him to latch better by showing him how to open wide and to 'nurse slower' or "nurse softer' etc- whatever words he might understand.
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*eltrix's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:48 PM
    From what I've read and my doctors have told me, methods containing estrogen can cause problems for breastfeeding, but ones using only progesterone, like the mini pill and Mirena IUD, have not been shown to have negative effects. There are some anecdotal examples but no effects found in testing and studies. So yes, in theory any hormonal BC can have possible effects, but scientifically progesterone based ones are much safer for breastfeeding than estrogen/combination ones. I think ortho tricyclen is a combination, as are most versions of the pill, so that could potentially affect milk supply. If it's the method that you feel is most right for you, that's a risk that might be worth it to you to take. But I'm not sure what the acne-related effects of other types are so that's definitely something to ask your doctor or try to look up, so you know all your options.
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:57 PM
    Do you use a boppy pillow? if so what kind of cover do you have? LO get's heated sometimes when we nurse. Part of it is that she's like her father- constantly warm, the other part is the velour boppy cover we have. She doesn't seem to act sick or look sick , and is otherwise normal, for her. But if you *think* something may be wrong, go a head and call the doctor. They'll tell you what to do and what to look for.
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:54 PM
    it's sleep related. :(. I'm glad to have gotten the idea and figured it out...but there isn't much I am able to do to calm her down until she calms herself down. I think the worst part is after we're done, if I MOVE her, she'll wake up again, rinse repeat. So if any one's got any ideas on how to move a light sleeper, lay them on me!
    9 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*carmofrap's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    I'm hoping someone can help me or have some ideas. About four days ago my nipples were a little sensitive and one was a little painful, my 19month son also abruptly stopped nursing that day. He nursed twice in the morning and then once in the entire night that followed. which is very rare for him, he nurses about every three hours in the day and every two at night. The next day he was right back to normal only my nipples got worse. The left got quite painful but only during latch on, after he nurses for a bit it goes away and just feels like he's tugging or sucking extra hard, The other one was a little slower but is now almost as sensitive right at latch on and for a lilbit of nursing then goes away, as the other one. There is no pain when he is done. they are a little red but not itchy or shiny like they say thrush is. There is no pain deep inside my breast either. They feel maybe heavier but I've taken three pregnancy tests in the last week and half and all were negative. I'm still experiencing lactational amenhorrea and really have no idea where in a cycle I would be so could this be a sign of my period returning? I've been taking raw garlic since my spouse got sick with a cold and I didn't want to get it and I've also been taking probiotics so I'm not convinced it is thrush or bacterial since that sounds like it should be a much stronger, lasting pain and should have responded to both from what I understand. I'm just dreading latch on every time he wants to nurse and...
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:30 PM
    Wow that is really hard. I am sure both you and your daughter are struggling with the new normal. I have a couple of suggestions. My first thought is, you have been trying to wean for a year, but the weaning is not working and seems to be stressful. What if you temporarily stopped trying to wean? What if, when you and your daughter are together, you nurse as much and as long as she wishes. Maybe it is the being encouraged to wean and the fear of losing something at something other than her own timetable is causing her to cling to the nursing and insist on nursing more than she would otherwise. If you don't like that idea, have you tried limiting the length of nursing sessions? This worked well for me when my son was about this age. I told him he could nurse for the time it took to sing one of two short songs. I let him choose the song. Or a count of 20, and he chose 'what' I counted (trains or dinosaurs) or I would say 'we can nurse until I count to 10 or 20' and again, he would choose.
    1 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*mango.lily's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:02 PM
    To ruchiccio, Thank you very much for the suggestion! After seeing your post, I brought up this question in our most recent visit to lactation specialist. She checked using her finger and said our baby has neither tongue tie nor lip tie. Although the specialist may not be an IBCLC, since Stockholm area only has one IBCLC according to their website.
    12 replies | 385 view(s)
  • @llli*mango.lily's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:56 PM
    I tried both size of nipple shield (20mm and 24mm). Nipple still looks flat after nursing 5-10min, and will get wounds if nursing too long and too often. It seems that nipple shield is not helping much to reduce the pain in my case.
    12 replies | 385 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:20 PM
    I forget-did you ever try a nipple shield? Or tried one lately?
    12 replies | 385 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:16 PM
    First off, this is completely normal. I do not know if that helps any, but when oldest was 17 months old and nursing very frequently day and night it helped to know it is normal and I was not doing anything "wrong." There are many techniques to try to partially wean baby or to move the weaning process along. I would suggest your child is very young so not all these ideas are going to work in your case. You may find trying to wean or cut down on feeding frequency far more trouble than it is worth, or it backfires, as you found with the day/night situation. Some moms find teaching nursing "manners" helps them feel more in control of the situation and comfortable with nursing again. Again I think your son is a little young but ymmv. There is no reason for a 15 month old who is nursing to drink anything aside from water. IN fact he might not even need the water. Many 15 months olds eat very little. A wonderful book about kids and eating I suggest for all parents is "My Child Won't Eat" by Carlos Gonzalez. If you think your child is nursing so much due to need for calories, have you considered trying to increase your milk production with galactagogues? This might lead to less nursing if he really is needing more calories.
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*boogabbalucky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:45 PM
    Also - she takes 14 ounces while I am gone 10 hours, so it doesn't seem like we are overfeeding with the bottle while I am gone.
    1 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*boogabbalucky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:43 PM
    Hi. Up to now, my nursing/pumping and bottle feeding relationship with my baby has been really great. I went back to work at 5 months and have been able to pump and bottle feed breastmilk only (with the help of my freezer stash) and nurse while I am at home. It has always been important to my supply to nurse extra on the weekends. The difference between my Monday output and my Friday output is marked. This is ok - I have enough in my freezer to make up for it until she is 12 months. However, the weekend nursing is essential. All of a sudden, except for first thing in the morning - this kid is not interested in nursing. She bites me (no teeth, but the gum clamp can be amazingly painful) and won't even latch for a second. I have tried to get up in the night and nurse her (she sleeps through the night), but she DOES NOT dreamfeed, and instead I have woken up my peacefully sleeping baby to wage a nursing war that I lose... She fights and screams and won't nurse and it takes me an hour to get her back down. Any advice? If I have to just pump bottles I won't make it to 12 months with BM only (this is what I am doing right now). I sit in a dark, silent room with her and she just refuses, and makes a statement with the clamping. :(
    1 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:41 PM
    You may find that your skin clears up after having baby. I had serious acne and something that looked like rosacea for years prior to having my first child, and after wards my skin completely cleared and I only get the occasional outbreak around my period. Well the safest forms of birth control hormonally speaking are barrier methods such as condoms that use no hormones. Any woman using any hormonal birth control may experience side effects, and sometimes the side effects are very serious. But if a barrier method is out of the question, here is some info about hormonal BC and the possible effect on milk production. http://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/meds/birthcontrol/ Since there is no way to be sure how a bc might affect an individual, daily pill form contraception that can be easily discontinued are probably safer for milk production than implanted devices or shots. But again, this will depend on what will work or not work for you and your lifestyle. For details about a specific medication and breastfeeding including all hormonal bc, you can call these folks : www.infantrisk.com
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:34 PM
    well you are right 99 is not considered a fever. I think it has to be over 100. But if your instincts are telling you something is not right, maybe call the doctor? http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/health-concerns/childhood-illnesses/fever Sometimes an overbundled baby gets overheated.
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:08 PM
    pumping every nursing session? this sounds very odd, who told you to do this? Unless you expect to have some serious issues with very poor milk producition, this is terrible advice. Pumping with some frequency might be an appropriate protocol for a mom with low milk production or if a baby cannot nurse or nurse well. But this kind of frequency of pumping is not only usually unneeded for building a stash for work, it is potentially going to cause many serious breastfeeding issues especially if done in the early weeks. A newborn is likely to nurse as often as 12-15 or more times a day. So trying to pump every nursing session is not really realistic anyway. As pp says, the best way to get nursing off to a great start is to nurse, and nurse only, for as long as you possibly can. There are many other things to think about, as far as birth goes, early mother and baby togetherness (meaning mom holding baby, against her bare chest, as much as possible) Avoiding unnecessary separations in the hospital (for baths, etc- bathing baby after birth is not needed, and most needed procedures and tests can be done while mom holds baby) and positioning ideas that seem to help breastfeeding get off to a good start. Unless there are serious breastfeeding problems, pumping is NOT needed and may cause many issues if done when not needed. You do not have much time, but I suggest order or have someone get you the book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition) ASAP. It is available as a...
    2 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:38 AM
    And seeing as the improvement was noticeable and immediate, the damage for the delay is to you more than to baby, baby will recover now with your diligence. Good job for being persistent.
    33 replies | 1332 view(s)
  • @llli*mrslg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:43 AM
    I need some advice. My 15 month old is still nursing every 1-2 hours. I am getting really burned out but I don't want to completely wean him. I just want to get him to cut back some. He was down to twice a night but was nursing every hour or so during the day. I tried making him go longer during the day but then he increased at night. And he was really upset. I really think he needs the calories because he doesn't eat much food. He eats a bite or two per meal and sometimes nothing at all. He will usually take a couple of bites and then ask for nah-nah. I don't know how to get him to eat more table food. He drinks water from a cup but he wont drink anything else. My older son self weaned at 9 months because I was pregnant so I didn't have this issue with him and don't know how to deal with it. Any advice would be appreciated! :)
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
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