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  • @llli*kanneki's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:34 PM
    My daughter is 22 months old and at daycare 5 days a week. We are nursing about 4 times during the evening, night and morning. We have been working on getting her to sleep without nursing. My husband cuddles with her until she falls asleep. That's been working ok. But when I get home from work, all she wants to do is nurse. She has ripped my shirts when I asked her to wait. Everything I've read about weaning seems to suggest that the other parent should step in for awhile to break the habit. I feel I'm abandoning her when I go to the other room so my husband can soothe her. She doesn't sleep through the night. I nurse her back to sleep, but there are times she'll nurse for over an hour or more. My husband complains that I should stop letting her nurse in the middle of the night. So I've asked him to take care of her. But she'll just wake up 30-45 minutes later. And we repeat this until he finally just brings her into bed with us and she screams and cries until I nurse her. During the morning we can often distract her, but the night nursing and right after work are the sessions I had hoped to drop first. To me these seem like the times she is most stressed and needs comfort. Any ideas on how I can still be giving her comfort without nursing? if I could I would hold her in my arms all the time, but I'd never see a vegetable if I left it to my husband to make dinner. I struggle to get a good night sleep and it hasn't helped my patience. I love nursing's...
    0 replies | 4 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 PM
    Hi and welcome. I am curious. Is your child nursing overnight? Anyway, this nursing frequency is not excessive or in any way abnormal. Does every one year old nurse this way? No, but plenty do, and if they do not nurse this way during the day, they do so at night. Also it is likely not about appetite entirely, but rather a combination of need to eat or drink and also need for comfort, connection, entertainment, etc. Nursing is a 100% healthy activity, and there is no reason to not nurse baby with high frequency unless YOU do not want to nurse so much. If that is the case, then you can begin to set limits. While limits might push a child into a nursing strike or early weaning, it is unlikely that gentle limit setting would do this. If you would like your child to nurse less often, my best suggestion is to get out of the house lots and do other things. Basically, distract your child from nursing. To say "not now, but later", try simple phrases your child can understand. "We will nurse after lunch" or "after I unload the dishwasher" or whatever. And yes he may have a tantrum. If I had a solution for how to avoid tantrums when you tell a child "no", I would be a rich woman. This article may have other ideas: http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/nursing-manners-2/
    1 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:22 PM
    First off...:hug for sticking it out - it can be so frustrating and all-consuming trying to puzzle out what's going on, and doing all the treatments and washing that come along with thrush. I've definitely been around the block with it, and it really does suck...but can be beaten. So I'll share what I did with my 2nd baby, cause it did take some figuring out. I recognized the symptoms fairly early on because I'd had it with my 1st baby, so I asked my doctor for diflucan and he was good enough to prescribe it. My daughter didn't really have any symptoms, though she did always kind of have a whiteish tongue, but no thick white patches or anything. Anyways, I did a few two week courses of diflucan and it would help a little, but never all the way. My doctor also didn't want to do any treatments with the baby, so I was sticking with the diluted GSE swabs, and the GV, which helped a bunch the first time we did it, but again didn't get rid of it all the way. On subsequent attempts I didn't find it to be as helpful. I tried those silverette cups, vinegar, airing out, you name it, I tried it! Sometimes it would feel like it got a little better, but then would come back in full force. I should mention that we did have issues with tongue/lip tie and did get those revised around 8 weeks. It didn't make a huge difference right away, but I think over time it did. I think it is a good idea to see an IBCLC, for a couple of reasons -1) they can help determine if there are any mechanical...
    6 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:14 PM
    Oh my...And here I thought I had heard everything. Yikes. Milk cannot "go bad" or sour in the breast. it is not like milk just sits in the breast for weeks on end. It is 100% safe to nurse your baby. At this point, after only bottle feeding so long, it is possible baby will not seem interested in nursing or may even refuse to nurse. but this would be because baby became habituated to bottles and not because there is anything at all wrong with your milk. Please be careful where you get your breastfeeding information. There is lots of bad info out there, from mistakes or poorly explained information to out and out lies. It sounds like you were having some kind of issue with baby nursing, and I think it is possible whatever that issue was may still be there. If that is the case, I would suggest consulting with a lactation consultant. Also, since you are seeing a drop in pump output, it is possible that your milk production has reduced and you will need to take steps to build production back up. Luckily this is very possible, but it may require some effort. To increase milk production it is important to encourage baby to nurse frequently and you may also need to pump. For more info on increasing milk production, this is a good article: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/low-supply/ Nature made breasts so a baby could be comforted as well as fed by them. Your baby wanting to nurse for comfort is entirely normal and healthy, and is good not only for your baby's normal...
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*pumpkin2016's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    I'm a SAHM to a 16 month old who still nurses all day, 9 times on average but as much as 13 times within 10 waking hours when you exclude his two-hour nap. He's always been a high-needs child who's relied almost exclusively on the breast for comfort. He adamantly refuses pacifiers and other comfort items (e.g., lovey) we've tried. The frequency might go up slightly if he's teething or hitting a milestone, but he basically just never slowed down from infancy-level nursing. I'm not ready to wean and really enjoy this time with him, but there are times when only 30 minutes has passed since his last nursing session and he will have a full-blown tantrum if I resist nursing that instant. To paint a picture, when he wakes up, DH brings him to me in bed to nurse, which he does for an hour. Then he eats breakfast—and this kid eats, like teenager eats :lol. Then, we'll clean up, I'll change his diaper and clothes, and he immediately wants to nurse again :confused:. This means he's either nursing or eating table food from 6:30 to almost 9:30 a.m., and that's just our morning. My first question is, has anyone experienced this type of toddler appetite? And if there are times during the day I don't want to nurse and he doesn't NEED to nurse, what's the best way to say "not right now" without 1) sparking a toddler meltdown and 2) inadvertently pushing him toward weaning? And if I say no, and he has a meltdown, how do you on-demand mamas handle that? Is there a happy medium between...
    1 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*killiansmommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:15 PM
    Hey guys. I stopped breastfeeding my almost 2 month old about 3 weeks ago. Reason being is that we introduced a bottle once a day for about a week (with breastmilk) because I wanted him to get used to it before going back to work. After doing that it was a constant battle to get him back on the breast. He would kick and scream, latch, unlatch, continue screaming for about an hour or more EACH feeding. So I threw in the towel and decided to pump and bottle feed. At first I was pumping up to 12oz a session depending on the time of day and then the amount started going down each time. It got to where I could not get enough pumped to sustain him and started supplementing with formula after feeding him what breastmilk I could get out. And then I couldn't get any out. I know some women respond better than others to the pump but I am wondering if it is normal to be able to pump so much and then not be able to get anything? He has been on formula only for about 1 week now but today I noticed my breasts were leaking and it feels like I have clogged ducts and I was able to hand express some in the shower. Would it be safe to try and Latch him again? I've read contradicting things online about milk going bad or sour while still in the breast. Do I need to pump and dump? if I am still producing I would like him to get the benefits of my milk but I don't want him on the breast using me solely as a pacifier.
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*lslinkard's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:13 PM
    I'm going through the same thing. We have had thrush since my baby was 2 weeks old as well. I was treated with diflucan which works and my son was treated with nystatin. It didn't work. I finally convinced the piediatrician to give him diflucan as well and if cleared us up. Well my son had an ear infection, got on antibiotics and the thrush returned. I'm now struggling with getting rid of it again and the doctor will not give my son the diflucan again because his toung isn't white anymore so I keep getting reinfected. It seems like an endless battle. My son will not take a bottle though so I will not be giving up breastfeeding nor do I want to but it is just so frustrating. My son is now 4 months old.
    6 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*lslinkard's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:04 PM
    My EBF baby is almost 4 months old and has always been colicky. he seems to have trouble pooping and passing gas. He fusses and pulls his legs up and grunts and strains and he will pass small amounts of gas at a time. But he always still has more making him uncomfortable. He seems to feel better after passing gas or having a large poop. What can I do to help him? I've asked his piediatrician about it and she doesn't seem concerned. She says it is normal and he will get it figured out in time. He's gaining weight and thriving otherwise I just want to help him not be in pain and uncomfortable. He's such a happy baby when he isn't so gassy. Also, I've tried food elimination and that doesn't seem to help him either.
    0 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:56 AM
    Ventian Violet often works when the anti-biotics don't or won't. Or will work in combinataion with them. I am going to have Carm come talk to you. She and her 2nd baby had it pretty continuously for the 1st few months. Please don't give up. If your baby is happy and healthy and it's not bothering him, don't let it be the reason you quit nursing. And don't focus on a remedy that your docotor is hesitant to give you. If the doctor is concerned that your child is too young or there are possible side effects-take that advice. Especially if NEITHER of you are experiencing pain or symptoms right now and you ARE being treated. I would 2nd the reccomendation to see an IBCLC simply because you are putting a lot of thought and worry into his white tongue and it could be thrush, but it could not be. Either way, if it is thrush, adding Venitian Violet to the mix can't hurt. Although you will both probably be a little purple for a bit.
    6 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:53 AM
    No.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:46 AM
    Great. Keep advocating for your self. Too often moms have to fight to get the care they and baby need. But it is a fight worth waging. A breastfed baby cannot overeat in the sense that breastfeeding, being the biologically normal feeding method, in no way leads to obesity or any other health concern, while there is evidence bottle feeding might. Also, breastfed babies learn to control flow and thus intake at the breast, and a bottle fed baby will not be able to control the milk flow from a bottle and thus may be overfed if caregiver is not giving the bottle in a breastfeeding supportive method. But when a baby is a newborn and not yet able to control flow very well, and mom is making lots of milk causing a forceful letdown, this can certainly lead to baby getting lots of milk all at once and spitting up that milk and it can be quite dramatic. My oldest once had a spit up like that all over a him, me, and a friends leather couch. Ugh. That time was memorable because of the couch, but this happened several times. I am glad you brought your baby to the doctor so they could ascertain nothing was actually wring with baby. To help baby with the fast letdown, frequent nursing helps, positioning baby so baby is more on top of you while baby nurses helps, and holding baby upright for at least a half hour after nursing helps. In fact most newborns are most comfortable and content being held by an adult, snuggled against a chest or shoulder, with their head above their...
    5 replies | 278 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:26 AM
    Yes, as far as I know a plug can last indefinitely if the issue is not addressed. I believe that the reason this one is lasting so long is that you are allowing your breast to continuously get so full that it is actually getting hard- engorged. There are many reasons to try to avoid engorgement. To avoid discomfort, to avoid or resolve plugs, and to avoid mastitis, you want milk to be removed from the breast often enough that you do not become so full and hard. Also, continued fullness like this is telling your body to make less milk. If you have OP, then that is a message you may want your body to get, however, you want to be in control of how full the breast gets and for how long. Going so long with regular daily fullness of several hours overnight is likely to reduce production too much, unless mom was making way to much to start. And even then, it is not a situation you want to go on and on. I understand your baby gags and is not wanting to nurse at the hard breast. But this is another reason why you want to do what is necessary to (as much as you possibly can) prevent the breast from becoming so engorged baby is having this trouble! It may take several days of working on this before you can easily get baby to nurse more overnight on that one side, but since baby is perfectly capable of nursing on that side other times, this is certainly possible. I understand your baby is already nursing every 2-3 hours. I am saying it sounds to me as if you need to...
    29 replies | 2224 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:52 AM
    I avoid nursing from that side during night since she almost always gags and refuses that side (only during night time) may be because it is a little firm and hard. During day time however i do nurse from that side, but i do have hand express before nursing to decrease the firmness. (I am hoping now my supply has gotten adjusted and hand expressing wont cause supply to increase) I am nursing frequently (2 hrs during the day and from night 9pm to morning 8am it is every 3 hrs) I have tried some of the options listed in the article attached, but I still feel the lump. Is it normal for it to continue for so long?
    29 replies | 2224 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:11 AM
    Just a quick check - do i need to wash my (.)(.) when i pump after nursing?
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 11:41 PM
    Yes. While a plug might clog one duct (passageway)within the breast, mom has many. And ducts are not the same thing as nipple pores where the milk actually comes out (although these can sometimes be blocked as well, in which case it would probably present as a bleb.) Nipple pores vary in number so you could see milk coming from several even if one pore was completely blocked. Also, a milk duct might be plugged but some milk still can come through. Sometimes the plug is like a dam with places the milk can come through, but more slowly, and other times acts more like a totally blocked tunnel. In either case, although not an emergency, it is probably best to be proactive in trying to release any plugs and practice prevention going forward. Are you avoiding nursing from that side so you will get very full, telling your body to reduce milk production? Of for some other reason? Generally when dealing with a plug, mom wants to avoid the breast becoming too full, usually by encouraging baby to nurse more frequently. If baby is having trouble latching onto or with the fast flow with a very full breast, nursing frequently helps prevent that problem as well. Here are other plug ideas: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    29 replies | 2224 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 03:04 PM
    Hi, thanks for replying. I can still feel a ball kind of lump inside the right breast. I am nursing from that side too, however i have to hand express for a few minutes to cause it to soften before i start nursing, else it feels little hard my lil one gags when starting to nurse. when i do hand express milk does flow and flows fast and sprays 4-5 ways. would this be called a plugged duct still? As i mentioned in the earlier post, pumping output from this side was low. I havent tried pumping again. It doesnt hurt while breast feeding but when i hand express i can feel the pinch. At night I avoid feeding from that side since it becomes full with the longer gap between night feedings. Any help to resolve the issue is appreciated
    29 replies | 2224 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 09:59 AM
    Actually I now recall this has been reported before. I think the culture of the particular institution may just be getting passed on by everyone connected with it. If the LC and midwife were from two different places, then I have no idea. Unfortunately what seems like a benign suggestion can cause so many issues. The results of OP can range from a bit of a bother to a serious health issues (for mom) so telling a mom to pump to build a stash is potentially dangerous. Also it implies that all moms will not be able to nurse their babies long term and so need to stash tons of milk in the freezer! Of course this is not true and even moms who will need a stash because they are going back to work only need enough for the first day, plus a "cushion."
    5 replies | 213 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 09:49 AM
    great. I suggest bring pump to the consult as well, as she can give you tips on that. Most IBCLCs are also very familiar with alternative feeding methods (such as bottles) and so she may have ideas on that for you and your caregiver as well. Since the reduced rate of gain happened well prior to baby moving to the crib, it was obviously not caused by that. On the other hand, usually the simplest method to improve weight gain is to increase nursing frequency. If you are liking that longer sleep stretch the crib is giving you right now (and who wouldn't) maybe you can find other times to encourage baby to nurse more. Also be aware that sleep patterns do change and sometimes sleep stretches get short again for periods of time. This is normal and not a reason to be more alarmed.
    5 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 08:02 AM
    Thanks so much for the updates! Your experience may well be the a-ha moment for other moms to get their levels checked if they're seeing the same kinds of signs. I'm so glad to hear treatment is working and breastfeeding is going better! :gvibes
    17 replies | 1426 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 07:53 AM
    It certainly sounds like you had plugged duct there. :huh I realize this post was from a couple of weeks ago, so hopefully the situation has resolved by now. How are you feeling?
    29 replies | 2224 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 07:48 AM
    Welcome, destwards! I'm afraid your post got overlooked initially because it was attached to the end of an older thread. Sorry about that! Are you home with your little one now? How are things going?
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 07:23 AM
    With gradual weaning and no engorgement, you may not get any plugged ducts. If you hand express often, that's signaling to your body that there's still a demand, so your breasts will keep producing milk. I'd suggest not expressing unless you start feeling uncomfortably full, and then express just enough to ease the discomfort, or if you feel like you're starting to get a clog. Most moms can express a little bit of milk for months or even years after weaning. You mentioned you're pregnant? How far along? Most moms see their supplies decrease or disappear at some point during the first or second trimester, so hormones might take care of the problem for you.
    1 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*ilikefood's Avatar
    May 27th, 2017, 02:29 AM
    Baby has not been great with bottles from the start (I had to try many many different bottles/nipples to find one he would actually take). The past week while away from he me will sometimes take a bottle when hungry but he does prefer the breast so in order to be fed caretaker is feeding him when groggy so he intakes enough milk. He was cosleeping and I would offer whenever he was stirring and nuzzling and it tended to be every 2 hours. Just started putting baby in the crib two days ago and he has been feeding after one 5 hour stretch then every 3 hours until the morning. But yes he does get easily distracted now that he is more aware of everything going on around him. I am not sure about his slow weight gain the only difference is that I went back to work and the first 2-3 weeks he didn't drink much during the day. The weight check was done by the same doctor on the same scale so I am assuming it's consistent and accurate. I will definitely contact a lactation consultant because I am worried about low production. Thanks for the info!
    5 replies | 154 view(s)
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