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  • @llli*pteroglossus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:52 PM
    To keep a good latch I used to have to keep making sure baby was tummy to tummy with me, otherwise she seemed to swivel around and the latch would get worse.
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    Supplement of four ounces each day is not much, so I also wonder if it is needed. It may be, it's just something to consider. I agree with pp, if you are supplementing any amount and not pumping or hand expressing at around that time, your milk production will not increase and may reduce. Newborn babies are gassy. All people are to some extent! A newborn is eating frequently and constantly digesting food, and this is going to create gas. This is seldom a health concern. I could see tugging as a possible sign baby needs help burping, however. I do not see your baby's behavior as a sign of reflux or growth spurt, but maybe I am missing something? For the tugging, First, I would suggest making sure any supplements are given in a breastfeeding supportive way. This means, supplementing at the breast if possible, and if not, cup feeding or using paced bottle feeding. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf I would also suggest trying different positions. For this issue, maybe try laid back and side lying? http://www.llli.org/faq/positioning.html If baby is perhaps reacting to a slowing of the milk flow, what about breast compressions? http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-BC
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Yes I wondered if this was your concern. Fat does tend to get stuck to the sides of the container, but I very much doubt it would be enough to be a problem. You might find ideas for this issue in the work and pump forum.
    4 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:27 PM
    Hi, so I had to run before and posted without completing one of my thoughts. What I was going to add was that, even if you can only pump 4 times a day, or even less, one thing you can know for sure is that will be better for milk production than not pumping/nursing at all. In other words, if that is what you can do, do that, and your baby will certainly get more of your breastmilk, for longer, than if you did not do that. Ok, so I understand your situation is unique with your 15 year old. Every situation is. My point was, even in the best of circumstances, newborn babies require lots and lots of time and energy. Way more than anyone will tell you, way more than anyone can imagine prior to having a baby, or remember later. I have had three children, and every time, I am amazed again at how incredibly time consuming and exhausting newborn care is. And most siblings, while they survive the experience, experience jealousy of and resentment about a new sibling. Lots of new moms have older kids, older kids with special needs, important jobs, aging parents, ill spouses, etc etc... I would never say they neglected their families because they focused their attention on their newborns. So I will not agree that you are neglecting anyone. That was my point. There are many ways to make pumping more manageable, but I don't know if you want those suggestions or not. If you do, it would help to know what your current pumping routine is now, including how much you pump and how...
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Call them and ask if they can call you if there is a cancellation! That is how I managed to get my LO in to have his lip/tongue tie corrected, they didn't have an opening for weeks but I told them to call me if any opening popped up. They called me the next day and we had to rush to get there is it was a 2 hr drive for us and the opening was in 3 hours, but we did it. As to everything else, I hear you about grieving about loosing or even the possibility of loosing the nursing relationship. I've been having supply and poor weight gain issues and my LO does have a flow preference for the bottle but trying to use the SNS all the time is hard etc..... Trying herbs and trying to get domperidone. Yesterday I saw an acupuncturist and I'm cautiously optimistic about the results. One idea is since right now you are terribly wound up about this, you could set yourself a date as a goal and re-evaluate then. Like perhaps when baby is 6 weeks old, if you haven't found solutions you could wean yourself off the pump. Or you could start weaning yourself off the pump now with the goal of being done by 6 weeks or so depending on if you are really willing to continue or not. However, you might want to hold out till after his tongue/lip tie condition gets looked at/corrected. Keep in mind the result will probably not be instant since baby will have spent a fair amount of time learning to use those muscles in the restricted state. Get help from an IBCLC or speech therapist who...
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*chylab15's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:24 PM
    I am going through a similar issue with my almost 3 month old. I am having milk issues because the hospital gave me wrong info and my daughter would not latch when she was born. She's latching now, but gets mad and screams because the milk isn't instant like the bottle. I am a slave to the pump but not producing much milk... My heart is still in it, I refuse to give in just yet! Hang in there, and keep trying to get him to the boob! It can be done. Extremely maddening, but possible!!
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*lvander's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    I recently got my oversupply issue under control by block feeding but now I want to work on building my freezer stash so that my husband and I can leave our 3 week old daughter with family every once in a while. How do I pump without causing my supply to raise too much again?
    0 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*mammal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 PM
    Thank you, Meg. Let's see. I have talked to a LLL leader, and she was helpful and compassionate, but didn't really offer any ideas that the IBCLC and everyone else hadn't offered. She said situations like this are the kind that formula was made for and she has rarely seen a mother who tried harder than I have. Well, my 15-year-old was adopted from foster care and is already having a lot of abandonment issues coming up with the new baby. She does need me right now, and I'm tied to the pump. And because I'm tied to the pump, my husband (who works at home) is having to take charge of more infant care than his work will really allow, such as pretty much all of the feedings. These two situations can't continue much longer. I'm pumping about 20 ounces a day. I understand that pumping isn't a good metric for overall supply since the baby is more efficient than the pump, and I think that if I was nursing I might produce enough for him to get by on without supplementation, but he's eating more like 32 ounces a day. His weight gain now is good. I've tried nursing when he's hungry and when he's not and they both have the same effect: screaming. I am still using a hospital-grade pump. I am confident he's healthy now. He's not on antibiotics anymore. We got the thrush the first time because of antibiotics I had to take after his birth, and the second time because of antibiotics I had to take for the mastitis. I think the mastitis came up because of a lack of rest, stress, and...
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*cheer4182's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:18 PM
    Thanks! She loves yogurt so I make sure to give her some everyday. She likes cheese too!
    2 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:08 PM
    Hi, have you tried getting a LLL Leader on the phone to talk this out? I would suggest that. I will try to put my thoughts down for you but when a mom has a big decision to make, it is often very helpful to talk them out with someone who knows how to listen. You are welcome to pm me if you do not have a local group or cannot get help on the USA helpline. First off, No, you are not. You are trying to do something important for your infant's health, and your own health, something that is important not only to you but actually, provably, important, health wise and in so many ways. Your infant, whether they are breastfeeding or not, needs you much, much more than anyone else, simply because they are an infant. Your husband can take care of himself, he and your 15 year old can take care of the dogs (and you) and if your 15 year old needs her mom, she can talk with you while you pump and/or snuggle baby. You have had a very rough month, but it has only been a month. The first month of your baby's life. This is a huge, intense amount of time for your infant, (and for you) but a very short amount of time for a teenager or an adult, if that makes sense. No one can answer that for you because it is an unanswerable question. But maybe I can put it in perspective for you- in order to have normal milk production, milk must be effectively removed from the breast a minimum of 8-10 times a day in the early weeks. After about 6 weeks, IF normal milk production has been...
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:41 PM
    I've been reading a lot trying to find out info about acupuncture to help with breastfeeding and low supply, I've only found a little info about that but there seems to be a lot of info about using acupuncture to help with fertility even while still breastfeeding so if you are really keen to get pregnant and don't want to get silly with expensive western medical intervention or weaning then acupuncture might be worth a look.
    4 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*una.cao's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:29 PM
    thanks a lot, lllmeg and mommal! initially I was worried that the fat content did not get transferred to the bottle from the storage bag properly, since I cannot completely empty the bag when pouring. thanks for pointing out the bottle-feeding issues! I only learnt how to have a good latch-on but did not think of how to properly give a bottle...
    4 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:18 PM
    What is driving you crazy? Your baby, or the idea that you or your baby are doing something 'wrong?" or your child should be nursing less often for some reason? The whole "wake, feed, play' thing is not happening because there is literally not one shred of evidence that this is normal or needed. As mommal says, This is an idea someone made up out of thin air to sell books. It's a scam. What I did parenting-wise with my oldest child, when I had much more time and energy to focus on my child, because I only had one child, is not the same as what I did with my younger children. I am guessing this is a pretty universal experience. Nor do I think this is a bad thing! 4 months olds neither eat nor sleep on a schedule unless forced to do so, anymore than anyone else does. Every mom I know keeps snacks at hand wherever they go because toddlers and pre-schoolers (and even older kids) get hungry when they get hungry, and not on any schedule. Adults don't eat on a set schedule either. Personally I eat when I am hungry.
    3 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*mammal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:11 PM
    Hello. I have a month-old baby boy. We started out with some minor nursing issues—my nipples are big for his mouth, he didn't like it when I got engorged—but we quickly got into the swing of things in the first week. Then he started losing weight…and losing weight…and losing more weight. We also got thrush, which of course made it incredibly painful for me and I imagine for him as well to nurse. At 9 days, we ended up in the ER where he was tested for every possible infection. It turned out he had a urinary tract infection, which had decreased his appetite and made him listless. We ended up staying in the hospital for a week. At the beginning of our hospital stay, he was refusing to nurse, and we started finger-feeding him with an SNS or with a syringe and tubes. Meanwhile, I pumped about 10 times a day on the hospital's Medela Symphony. In the hospital, it was pretty much impossible to have any skin-to-skin contact and sleeping together was out of the question. I held him as much as I could and tried to latch him on every day with no luck. I eventually decided I would just focus on keeping my supply up and get him back on the breast when we got back home and were less stressed and uncomfortable. In the hospital, I saw four different lactation consultants, who told me we had a good latch, I was doing everything right as far as laid-back breastfeeding was concerned, and there was definitely hope that he could get back on the breast eventually, but they were no more...
    5 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:10 PM
    My first PP cycle with my daughter I went 95 days and did not ovulate. I didn't ovulate for a few cycles. You can ovulate before your first period but if you ovulate, you'll either get pregnant or have a period within a few weeks.
    4 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*rachiiee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:52 PM
    Okay great thanks! I will get that book! Yes I have taken hpt and a blood test, all negative. I'm going on CD 52 with no signs of AF D;
    4 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:43 PM
    Are you pumping to make sure you keep your supply up when you give the supplements? Just because you can only nurse with one breast doesn't necessarily mean you have to supplement, there are moms out there who nurse twins without needing to supplement and it is quite possible to provide enough milk with only one breast. However, if you are not signaling to that breast to keep producing more milk when you are supplementing then your body won't get the message to produce more so you will continue to need to supplement. There are many reasons babies can get fussy and start pulling at the nipple. Mine tends to do it when my supply is lowest. I've had issues with low supply and have been using an at the breast supplementer instead of a bottle most of the time when I need to supplement. I've mostly been supplementing with expressed breast milk that I pump right after feedings to help boost my supply. Saddly I haven't figured out any sure fire ways to keep baby from pulling at my nipples. Luckily mine seem to be rather stretchy and my skin seems to be tough enough that I've not experienced any bleeding, only vasospasm, creasing, and inflammation. I'm hoping that if I get my supply up enough he will stop the toffee pull behavior.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*canchola2183's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:30 PM
    I've been nursing my LO and supplementing 2oz twice a day if needed because I'm only able to use one of my breast the other was damaged when I had a lumpectomy. He weighed 7lb2oz when born we left the hospital he was 6lb 11oz and at 3weeks he weighs 8lbs 6oz he's gaining well .My problem is my LO recently started pulling at the nipple and fussing while nursing he'll nurse for a 5min then begins to tug and I have to break the latch this has cause my nipple to be real sore and painful at time to latch him . This doesn't happen at every feeding I say two to three times a day he nurses every two to three hours. He also is very gassy the supplement I use gerber soothe for gassy . I'm not sure what would be causing him to act this way is it something I'm eating reflux or growth spurt ....????
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:09 PM
    Yes, you can still ovulate without getting your period. You can also get your period and not ovulate! Since you've only had 1 postpartum period, I would suggest being patient for a while. It can take a few months before your body gets back into a regular pattern, and your first few postpartum cycles can be longer/heavier/shorter/lighter than your pre-baby average. But you also might want to go and get a pregnancy test, since the most common explanation for absent menses is pregnancy. If you're not yet pregnant and you want to know what is going on with your body, I highly recommend getting Toni Weschler's excellent book "Taking Charge of Your Fertility" and a good thermometer. TCOYF explains how to read your body's fertility signs, like cervical mucus, cervical openness, and basal body temperature (that's what the thermometer is for), and how to use those signs to determine what your body is doing.
    4 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:00 PM
    There's no "should" in this situation. Doesn't matter if your baby is a chunky monkey or a skinny minnie. Babies have erratic feeding frequencies because they have tiny tummies, because breastmilk digests fast, and because breast meets so many needs. Not just food but also thirst and comfort. Small, frequent meals (a.k.a. "snacks") are the normal feeding pattern for a breastfed infant. That's because it only happens in books. Imaginary babies always follow the program. Real babies are unpredictable! That's approximately what my kids were giving me at that age. 1-2 hours.
    3 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*rachiiee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:54 PM
    Hello! Long story short, I'm still BF my 19 m.o and I have only had 1 period in the beginning of June. Don't get me wrong, I loved it in the beginning! but now we want to start trying for #2. So can you still ovulate without having a period?
    4 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:34 PM
    Is he still hungry after finishing the right side when you try to put him back to the left? If your left side is suffering from lower supply you might try pumping or hand expressing on that side after breastfeeding which might help if he is fussing about slow flow on that side.
    2 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:28 PM
    Easy, Don't "schedule" Nurse on demand and additionally whenever you feel like it and whenever else it seems appropriate like before you go out or to get him to sleep or just because one or both of you want comfort. Of course if he doesn't want to, you can't force him to nurse and shouldn't try to force it but you can offer whenever it suits you. How long should a 4 mo old go between feedings? That totally depends on the mom/baby pair since there are many factors involved. Mom's supply and storage capacity, baby's tummy and metabolism, etc. Some mom/baby pairs may go longer between feedings as baby gets older but others maintain frequency like newborns. My 4 1/2 mo old is still getting fed every 1-3 hrs during the day and every 3-4 hrs at night. Exact timing isn't really necessary as long as baby is eating enough in the 24 hr period. If baby is gaining well, then just feed on demand and whenever you want to offer. If baby is not gaining well then perhaps also set the alarm to make sure not to go too long between feedings.
    3 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*ae80's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:27 PM
    Thank you all so much for your responses! It's really great to get reassurance that my instincts about overfeeding are likely correct. We had a teacher conference with the new daycare today and they said they'd really like me to be as specific as possible when it comes to his eating schedule. I think what I'll do, then, is plan on the following: 7:30: nurse 8:30: solids at daycare (maybe just 1 pouch instead of the 2 they're giving him now) 9-10:30 is usually nap #1 10:30: 4 oz 11:30 solids (1 pouch) 12:30: 4 oz 1-2:30 is usually nap #2 2:30 4 oz
    4 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*humsinger's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:07 PM
    I'm struggling with getting a decent schedule going with my almost 4 month old. Partly because I have a 3 year old and haven't been completely on top of things... He's pretty chunky, and I'm wondering how long he should be going between feedings... The whole wake up, feed, play, sleep thing isn't really happening...I try feeding upon waking...he eats one side sort of. Then, he gets angry before napping, so he eats the other side sort of (1 and a half hours later)...Decent naps...1 1/2 hours to 2... Can anyone offer me any insight on this? Thanks...kinda driving me crazy! (Goes down at 6:30, 6:45...up at 9 or 9:30...then again at about 3 am...just FYI)
    3 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*punkmuse2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:19 PM
    thank you so much for the responses. sorry it took me so long to reply again. i had crazy problems logging back onto the site to the point where i had to create a second logon. not sure what the deal is. let me explain a few of the things the dr suggested and why i was against them. i didn’t want my first post to be 20 pages long. ;-) first off my daughter has been developmentally on the slower end since day 1. she is 15 months old and isn’t walking yet (soooo close!) and doesn’t have any words other than mamamamamamamama but again she’s so close. she babbles a lot. so she has been consistently on the slower end of the developmental curve but still within normal range. i believe she has a strong gag reflect because at one point we were having issues with her gagging on the vitamin D. that seems to have stopped but i do believe she has a sensitive gag reflex. so i think her oral development is slow too. this is not a kid who has ever fit into any of the “normal” ranges of anything for babies. she is truly her own self on her own curve. when i mentioned to the dr at 9 (?) months about the gagging she wanted to do a barium swallow which i thought was extreme. i can’t even imagine how you do that to a baby. this kid doesn’t eat anything i would literally have to force feed her the barium which I’m sure is gross then to do the x-ray part i assume they have to take her from me and put her somewhere. this would not fly with her. and i believe it would be EXTREMELY...
    17 replies | 9710 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:34 AM
    It's way better for babies to get human milk, but many info sheets, like Mommal said, assume your baby has weaned. Even though it's recommended by AAP to nurse a minimum of 12 mos most moms don't make it that far and many abruptly wean at 12 mos which makes no sense to be because toddler nursing is when it gets much easier and more fun!
    7 replies | 203 view(s)
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