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  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Today, 09:53 AM
    Maddieb I agree with you too, when you said that I am in a transitioning stage from a mom of a baby to a mom of a little girl. This is probably where all my feelings are coming from and like you said, also there is something unique with babyhood. I am truly grateful for moms like you who take the time to give to moms encouraging words and help who just need someone who has been there before and know what it's like to go through so many emotions when your a breastfeeding mom.
    7 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Today, 09:37 AM
    Mommal thank you for the last post. I had tears in my eyes. It is so true that all you want to do is bottle up those precious baby days. Yes ,I can see the fleeting days dwindling to weaning and my little one becoming a big girl. It is the hardest thing I have had to go through. It just breaks me down everyday. As a mommy we have to try hard to enjoy each stage of our childs life...but that is so easier said then done!
    7 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Today, 08:52 AM
    I couldn't agree more. I don't see anything wrong with a baby being comforted by breastfeeding, whether its to eat or just suck. Its completely natural. My son definitely taught me quite a lot in our journey. And yes I heard the term non-nutritive sucking, I preferred it to comfort nursing. It killed me he wasn't comforted by being at the breast. This one will just be so different and I just worry that I won't be prepared enough, but then again I feel like anyone hardly is ever prepared enough. Thanks again for the support and advice!
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Today, 08:52 AM
    Thanks! I understand. Will do!
    4 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Today, 08:50 AM
    Thanks for your response! Yes, nursing is comfortable for me. I think I'm mostly just surprised by how much of my day is spent nursing. I enjoy the closeness with my son, of course, but I can definitely understand how mothers joke about being a "milk machine!" I do have one other concern that I forgot to include.. Sometimes, when my son is nursing, he latches, and sucks for a few seconds. Then, he'll literally push the breast away and begin screaming. I've noticed this typically happens during nighttime feedings. Could his behavior just be because he is overtired? Or gassy? I know that he is still getting milk, because it usually runs out of his mouth.
    4 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:42 AM
    My gut says it's safe to nurse with elevated liver enzymes as long as they don't indicate a case of Hep C, but for the real answer I would contact Infant Risk: http://www.infantrisk.com. Rapid weight loss after pregnancy is normal and nothing to worry about, and your weight loss wasn't really excessive. Most women lose around 15 lbs the day they give birth- the weight of the baby, placenta, amniotic fluid, etc. Another few pounds of water weight usually follow in the next few days. The toxin thing is both true and not true. Metabolizing fat cells does release stored fat-soluble chemicals, some of which are toxic. But again, most of the weight you lost was baby, placenta, and water. It's not like you lost a huge amount of fat, so whatever toxins have been released were probably very minimal amounts. Especially because we live in a less chemically toxic environment than humans in the not-so distant past. When is the last time you got doused with DDT, or used arsenic-based paint to freshen up your living room, or applied a lead-based cosmetic to your face? Your body is probably less toxic than your mom's, or your grandma's. And even if you did release lots of stored toxins, and wanted to avoid feeding them to your baby, your options are not great. You can avoid giving your child toxins via breastmilk by feeding her formula- which is full of the same environmental toxins that are in your milk, not to mention other weird stuff you probably don't want your child...
    1 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*jtmmh's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 AM
    So it's my 3rd child, he is 10 weeks old and I have always had minimal trouble breastfeeding, which is such a blessing! But this time I'm scared... I went to the dr for some routine bloodwork for our insurance provider. My blood work all came back normal except my ALT Liver enzymes. the range for normal they gave me was 6-29 mine was 53. The dr could give me no explanation for this result. I take NO medications and drink NO alcohol. I had a bad stomach virus two weeks before my test and I'm pretty sure I became dehydrated. I've tried to catch up since then, but it's hard to drink a ton of water. I am in a very monogamous relationship, so I know hepatitis isn't a concern. The only other factor that is odd is that I have lost a lot of weight quickly. I was back down to my pre-pregnancy weight in 8 weeks. I lost like 35 pounds. I know I didn't get enough calories in because I was chasing two other kiddos and didn't stop to eat. I have heard that losing weight too quickly in the beginning can release toxins in the body and possibly into breastmilk. Could this be happening? Is it safe for me to continue breastfeeding with elevated enzymes... Any insight anyone? I'm afraid I'll have to stop breastfeeding and it means so much to me and my family. Help please.
    1 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    :hug Puja, you are such a good and concerned mother. I completely understand why you are worried about your little one, even though I don't think you should worry. I still think the way forward is to let him come to solid foods in his own time. Are you allowing him to experiment with them, put them in his own mouth, squish them with his hands, feed them to you? All those things can help him build a good relationship with solids. Until then, keep nursing him as much as you can and give him formula milk to supplement.
    1 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    Welcome to the forum! I think the way you get your baby back to the breast is to take a deep breath and either take the bottles away or reduce them as much as possible. The way I see it, bottles started out looking like the solution to the baby being fussy and maybe not nursing enough, and have now become contributors to that problem. I know it means that baby may act even more fussy than before- she wants to get fed and clearly she has developed some strong preferences about the way her meals are delivered. But I think what you do in this situation is to power through. You nurse the baby and if she comes off the breast and and refuses to nurse any more, you let her do that. You let her fuss, you find other ways to comfort her- rock her, take her for a walk, give her a quick bath. My guess is that after a while, she will get hungry again and decide that nursing is better than starving. Of course we don't want to starve her for real, but allowing some fussing in order to gain more nursing sessions sounds like the way to go- to me, at least!
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:35 AM
    :ita with the PP. In particular, I second her point that you have to be careful what you google- if you want breastfeeding info, it's generally best to stick to La Leche League and Kellymom.com. It,s not that other sites are always wrong or always have bad information, but there is a ton of bad information mixed in with the good and it's hard to distinguish between a site giving reliable information and one that just looks reliable but is peddling total hogwash. Stick with the trusted resources and you won't go wrong!
    4 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*puja's Avatar
    Today, 06:29 AM
    I have lost my patience n my peace ....all the day I only think ,,how to put solids to his mouth...I have gone through all the advices of not force feeding,no special feeding schedule ,sharing own meal time but I failed...I could not bring his interest to food....doc said stop feeding meal let him feel hunger he will eat and I did that too.I didn't give him any milk for 4 hours but he was still happy and refused food....it's even not that I give him too much of milk he drink about 14 oz formula milk and breastfeeding twice..plz tell me what shall I do..
    1 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:26 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. Totally normal to feel sad when your baby is getting closer to weaning and all of a sudden you see that precious, fleeting stage of infancy and nursing disappearing. It's not that you don't want your baby to grow up. It's that you simultaneously want to see her grow and change and thrive and also want to freeze time so that you can keep enjoying the baby stage. My husband and I often talk about how much we wish we could have bottled moments of time when our kids, now 6 and 10 years old, were babies. We would uncork those bottles from time to time, just so we could smell their baby heads and enjoy their baby ways. Fand then recork the bottles before we had to change any diapers!
    7 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:21 AM
    :( What a bummer! I am glad you have a good boss, at least.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:20 AM
    :ita with the PP. Would it be possible to see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC? It's not that i think something is wrong- most likely baby had a week of low gain after being sick, and is generally a slim, petite baby. But a trip to the IBCLC might he,p you spot a problem if there is one.
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*mrsjessnelson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:13 PM
    Hi Everyone! I'm hoping someone can offer me some help and reassurance. My sweet girl is 7 weeks old and we are still struggling to breastfed. She was doing great eating the first 4 weeks (although I did have some cracked nipples). She would eat on each side 5-10 minutes. Then we got mastitis, which led to thrush and everything went down hill from there. When she got thrush, she started fussing at the breast so I offered her a bottle. She started only spending about 5 minutes on each breast. Then at 5.5 weeks she started popping on and off the breast and pushing away, so I had to offer her bottles more frequently. I think she was coming on and off and refusing to nurse because I have an over-active letdown. I see milk squirting out when she pops off. I tried the laid back position but she still comes off and after going on and off a few times she gets frustrated and refuses to continue. Now at 7 weeks, she will only nurse until the letdown or after a pump but she gets mad when the milk is too slow as well. So she is currently only nursing a few times a day for a few minutes. The LC I met with a few times mentioned she has a stretchy posterior tongue tie, but wasn't sure that was the problem. Now I'm stuck pumping and almost battling her to take the breast. How do I get back to BF full time?! Would an over-active letdown start at 4 weeks- because she seemed to be fine with the flow then? Can I get her off bottles and to stay latched? Is the tongue tie part of the problem?...
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:49 PM
    Hello and welcome! Yes everything sounds 100% normal. Is nursing comfortable for you? The vast majority of the time, if nursing is comfortable for mom and baby is gaining ok, all is well. It is not only normal but preferable that nursing is "inconsistent." It is no more normal for a baby to eat at precisely spaced intervals in precise amounts in precise amounts of time as it is for you or I to. The difference between a baby and an older child or adult is that baby is trying to gain as fast as baby did while still in the womb, when baby "ate" basically constantly. So there really is no way for a baby to nurse too often. But wanting to nurse shorter or longer, shorter or longer times between sessions, etc. are all entirely normal. Also, babies nurse both for comfort and for food, and the great thing is, both are happening at the same time! As long as you are following baby's lead (and also offering as much above that as you like) and baby is nursing with a good overall frequency, you should be fine. Here is an excellent article about nursing habits in the early weeks that may help: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/ Bottles in the very early days are usually not suggested because both pumping and bottles can interfere with the normal course of breastfeeding in multiple ways. If company is preventing you from nursing your baby, maybe it would be best to limit company. If bottles are needed, I would suggest keep them as small, infrequent, and slowly...
    4 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:31 PM
    Hi, there! This is my first post, & I hope I'm doing this right.. I'm a first time mom to an 11 day old. So far, he has been predominantly breastfed, but I have had his father feed him a bottle of expressed milk a few times when we've had company over. (No formula) My concerns: 1) My son has developed "little boobs" in the last day or so. When I googled it, many people say this is caused by hormones in my milk, it's common, & will subside after some time. Is this true? 2) Nursing is inconsistent. I realize that as a newborn, he is trying to get the hang of breastfeeding just like I am. Sometimes, he will nurse 30 min on each side and be content for a couple hours. Other times, he'll "cluster feed" an hour apart several times in a row, feeding as little as 5 or 10 minutes, and only on one side. It seems like it may be for comfort sometimes.. he will fuss and cry, frantically trying to get to my nipple. Then, as soon as he's there, he sucks for a few minutes, and becomes drowsy. His pediatrician said this is "normal." *Note: My son is meeting or surpassing the diaper guidelines. His urine is pale yellow and stools are typical as well. 3) My son sleeps much of the time whilst nursing. Even if I take him off and have him relatch, he will fall asleep again. He sucks pretty continuously, with only short pauses. Is this acceptable? I'm just amazed at how much he can consume! His stomach is only supposed to be the size of a ping pong ball at this age. There have been times...
    4 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:40 PM
    Yes I do not like the term either. I only use it because it is so often used in a way that undermines breastfeeding, (as in, "Oh, he is ONLY comfort nursing." but it really is a silly term. Presumably all nursing is comforting, and even if all that is happening is comfort (no milk transfer) why would you not want to comfort a baby? Often people use comfort nursing as another way of saying "non-nutritive sucking." You may have heard that one with your older child who had a physical barrier to being able to nurse. But that is another term that is often misunderstood. There is nothing wrong with non-nutritive sucking if it is comforting and the baby is getting enough to eat somehow! It sounds like you are way ahead of the game with your already deep knowledge and understanding of breastfeeding from your previous experience. Sometimes it is the babies who have the most trouble nursing or just can not nurse despite all efforts that teach us the most.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:28 AM
    Thank you MaddieB, that is actually very reassuring. And yes, my first had to be bottle fed from day one. He couldn't form a seal even remotely no matter what we tried, position, breast shield, his lip and palate were just way to open. Trying to hand express into his mouth didn't work either. Even with an SNS system he refused. He was only able to get roughly half an ounce from breast when he would try to nurse, and that was mostly due to my letdown reflex. I had no problem letting him, he just wouldn't. With this one I will definitely let him nurse as long as he wants, for both nutrition and comfort. I hate to use the saying "comfort nursing". I believe a baby needs comfort just as much as they need nutrition. I am familiar with paced and cup feeding. We did paced feeding with my first and some cup feeding after surgeries. I am so excited to breastfeed, now if only the little firecracker would make his appearance. Thanks for the advice and reassuring words. It does put my mind more at ease.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:58 AM
    Is it normal to feel sad to see baby grow up? Oh yes. You are transitioning from the mom of a baby to a mom of a young child. There is a natural grieving period for that baby and that time of new motherhood - of course, that can make anyone sad! Yes there are also many joys to be found with any age, and you will find them when you are ready. But there is something special about babyhood that is truly unique. Also as a child grows up, the challenges are very different, and some stages are much harder than others. And some are impossible and you just hold on for the ride. Is it normal to feel very depressed, ever? I would not say so. If you feel truly depressed, you may want to talk to your doctor. Depression can have a chemical cause. Like mommal, I think it is fine and certainly may help to encourage your child to nurse more if you like. I do not have time to hunt them up now, but you may be able to find some good articles about weaning and mothers feelings. Yes it is normal to feel sad, doubtful, etc. during this time.
    7 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:39 AM
    Try to remember this is a different baby and things will be different, one way or another! Breastfeeding is normal, and most babies love to nurse. It actually takes some doing to get a baby to not want to nurse and instead "prefer" bottles. This baby will be a breastfed baby who gets a few bottles a day when you cannot be with baby. That is very different from your older child. I assume your older child was bottle fed basically from day one, correct? This would mean that baby was not only acclimated to bottles from very early on, they also possibly could not latch or nurse well enough to get milk at the breast at an amount that would keep them interested. When a child nurses for comfort, they are still getting milk- Basically, all nursing is both for nutrition and comfort. The reason I stressed "comfort nursing" is that moms are so often discouraged from letting baby nurse as much as baby wants, or from nursing to sleep, etc. And limiting time at the breast to avoid so called "comfort nursing" can be detrimental to breastfeeding longevity. Aside from paced feeding, you could also talk to your caregiver about using an open cup instead for at least the first several weeks. (or always) I can link info and videos for paced feeding and cup feeding should you like.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:27 AM
    Hi foxystoat. It is normal for weight gain rate to vary (not be the exact same every week.) Like you, I think it is also normal for gain to slow or very temporarily plateau if baby is ill. But we do not really know if the vax made baby ill, or baby simply caught something at the same time. My guess is the pediatrician will look at overall gain, other growth indicators, and overall health, and not just focus on one or two weeks of gain. At least, I hope so. I do not know what kind of growth charts are used in UK. Generally it is suggested that the more recent (2006 I think?) WHO charts are more accurate as they are based on healthy, normally gaining children from many different populations around the world, (and so, allows for genetic differences in growth) and was based entirely on breastfed babies. If since baby was born slightly over 2 months ago, your baby has gained a tad more than two pounds total, I do think that is very possibly going to raise alarms about gain no matter what chart you use. If this occurs, The question then is, what do you do about it? Ounce per ounce, formula is no better than breastmilk in helping a child gain. If a breastfed baby is not gaining normally, then it could mean baby is not getting enough overall milk to gain normally, or it could be that baby has some underlying health, nutritional or growth issue going on. The problem is, all to often when a baby is breastfed, formula is thrown at the problem rather than working with...
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:11 AM
    Thanks for the quick response maddieb. I think you touched on my the major issues I am having. It is all normal that she nurses frequently on some days and less on others when she is distracted. I am depressed because I would rather her nurse more frequently then not because when she is not I become so depressed. I am really starting to think it had something to do with her losing interest in nursing. I am concerned because I feel like I should be happy that she is growing up and instead I'm not. Is it normal to feel this way? Because I am wondering if anyone else has felt so unsure of the nursing cycle??
    7 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*foxystoat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:36 AM
    My baby is 9 weeks old and is has dropped below the 0.4 centile on the charts but has still been gaining at least 4oz a week up until now. She was 5lb 5oz at birth (41 weeks) and currently weighs 7lb 9.5oz. A week ago she got her immunisations, and since then she has had diarrhea and has been sick a couple of times a day (real sick, not spit up, we can tell because it smells). She is also sleeping a few hours more and so feeding a couple of times less than usual - more like 9-10 feeds instead of 11-12. I am not concerned about her in the slightest, when she is awake she is all smiles and laughs and is very active and wriggly and is meeting all the milestones. She feeds brilliantly and I have been offering both breasts and swapping as long as she wants to feed. She is definitely full at the end of a feed which usually takes 40 minutes. She is having plenty of wet and dirty nappies and her poo is normal, apart from the diarrhea this week. My husband and I are both tall and very slim (my usual BMI is 17.5, I eat like a horse!) and his family has a history of small babies. I also have petite adults in my immediate family. This week she has only gained 1oz and we have been referred to a paediatrician by the GP. The Health Visitor was pushing me to supplement with formula a few weeks ago but since the weight gain has been steady until now she had stopped. I really would prefer not to supplement if there's no need, obviously if my baby was showing signs of...
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:44 AM
    Unfortunately I've only been with the company for 10 months so I do not qualify for FMLA. That's my biggest issue. They typically give a health benefit of $165 added on to our check to help pay for insurance, whether we go threw them or choose a separate plan. I will be receiving short term disability at 60% of my 40 hour work week, but I will not be receiving any other form of income or the health benefit while I am out. They don't offer paid maternity leave to any employee. Also they normally would have someone who is not protected under FMLA pay for insurance while they are out. However, my boss fought to have them pay for it while I'm gone and I will pay them back after I go back to work. They legally have to keep me on the insurance, but they don't have to pay for it while I am gone, but they have agreed to as long as I pay it back when I return.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:40 AM
    Thank you for your reply! I have started ready the Womanlh Art of Breastfeeding, one of the books that inspired me to do a natural birth for the sake of my breastfeeding relationship. I have also started going to LLL meetings as often as possible. So I have a relationship with the leader, so I will have easy access to her. Unfortunately the closet LC is 4 hours away, which I used her with my pumping journey when I lived in that town. There really isn't too much help in my current area. I know it can be done, I just worry that he will refuse me after going back to work so early. After being so heart broken that my first baby couldn't latch, I would be devastated if this baby started refusing. We tried comfort nursing with my first baby and after awhile he became so frustrated not being able to keep suction that he started crying and refusing every time I tried putting him to the breast. As for my pump, I still have my old one but I will only have it as a back up. I'll be getting a new one for this baby. I used a Medela Pump in Style and this time I will be springing for a Spectra S2, I've heard a lot of good things about it.
    9 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:26 AM
    I never personally had a baby who was hooked on a shield, but my understanding is that when you have a hardcore shield lover, getting him off it is likely to take time, patience, and many, many repeat attempts at nursing without a shield. I'm really sorry the folks back home are blaming you for this issue- it sounds like you have worked really hard to nurse your baby and your friends and family should be your biggest cheerleaders! Regarding sippy cups: doesn't really matter what kind you use, though I strongly suggest buying something with a valve you can take apart and really clean (all sorts of mold can grow inside the spout!). Introduce one at 6 months (corrected age ) or even later if you're not feeling ready. Put an oz or two of water in it, and give it to your child along with his solid foods. A with solids, at 6 months the purpose of the sippy is fun learning experiences, not nutrition or hydration.
    1 replies | 84 view(s)
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