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  • @llli*kiki.tur's Avatar
    Today, 11:02 AM
    Posting for my wife because English is not her primary language. This is a long post:huh She has had some problems breastfeeding and the lactation nurse says we have been doing the correct things but she still feels guilty that she hasn't been able to breastfeed exclusively. Some background first. The baby is now a week old. Wife was in labor for 31 hours after her water broke. No complications. Umbilical cord fell off after 30 hours. Pediatrician said it was very rare but it looked fine and gave us some things to watch out for. She was in the hospital for 48 hours after the baby came out then discharged. In the hospital, the first day, the baby breastfed the first 4 times easily. The Pediatrician noticed the tongue needs to be cut underneath (very common in my family tree) so they cut it. My wife is hand expressing perfectly. During the night the baby has some problems latching. Baby has about 8 bowl movements. The second day the lactation nurse comes in and helps her. Baby is doing fine and within normal weightloss. Bilirubin test shows she is in the high-intermediate range so she is very sleepy and lethargic. Breastfeeding is touch and go. Sometimes she latches and feeds. Other times she latches then falls asleep immediately.
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*dolanah's Avatar
    Today, 10:58 AM
    Wow, some really good advice. I would add that my daughter also suffers from reflux as a result of low muscle tone. I tried Omeprisol also (prilosec). It did not work as well as ranitidine (zantac). Ranitidine tastes very strong, but it works wonders and is worth it if you can get it. It's also cheaper where I am. My oldest child was on it for about a year also.
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*kayleestock's Avatar
    Today, 10:07 AM
    -I had a natural vaginal birth, no IV, no medications, placenta delivered intact, with average blood loss. -birth weight 6.12, lowest known was 6.6 3 days PP, 1 week 6.7, 2 weeks 6.8, 3 weeks 6.10. So at 3 weeks we started supplementing and she gained 6 oz., the next week with little supplementing she gained nothing. So back to supplementing and she has gained an average of 3 oz/week. current weight is 9.1 -nurses usually 10 times in 24hr. i feed her on demand at least every 2 hrs during the day and on demand at night (3-5 hr stretches) -no latch issues, nursing is comfortable -i have the medela freestyle pump, pumping is fairly comfortable. i got back and forth between 21 and 24 mm flanges. i think the 24s are too big because of the amount of areola in the tube, but i seem to have more output with them. -no hormonal contraception -i usually pump 3-4 oz/day after feeds, i do have donor milk as well if i don't pump enough We have done weighted feeds for the last month at a breastfeeding clinic, she has taken 2oz each time. She tends to fall asleep often, i do breast compressions to try to keep her eating and empty my breasts.
    2 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    Every mom and baby pair is different. In many mothers, an overabundance of milk causes engorgement, plugged ducts, and mastitis (breast infection, potentially a very serious complication.) It may mean more copious leaking and overall breast discomfort. IN some babies, an overabundance of milk causes gastrointestinal issues, and unhappiness with the fast and forceful flow of milk at the breast that at its worst causes out and out breast refusal. If a mom has more milk than her baby strictly needs, but this is not causing any issues, then an overabundance of milk is not a problem. A very high per session pump output would indicate a large breast storage capacity, more than over production, although of course both could be present. If a mom has a higher than average breast storage capacity, she may well not experience the some level of discomfort that a mom who has a smaller breast storage capacity and over production might. In terms of breastfeeding longevity, by far the most important concern for the working mom is being sure breastfeeding is going as well as possible prior to mom's return to work, that mom has the time, space and equipment necessary to remove milk with reasonable frequency during her work day, and that baby is fed properly (rather than over fed) by baby's caregiver. How much milk a mom has stored in her freezer may help a mom feel more comfortable with the return to work, always a good thing, but is not going to significantly contribute to...
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*mlowe's Avatar
    Today, 07:50 AM
    My baby girl is almost 4 weeks old. Around 2.5 weeks I started to worry she wasn't getting enough because she seemed fussier and was eating much more often. So I pulled out my pump to see how much I could pump. And yes I know the pumped amount isn't always a good indicator of supply but I figured if I could get an ounce or two there was definitely enough for baby being made. Since day one of pumping I have pumped once daily (sometimes twice for comfort) always after a full feeding with baby and I usually get 4-5 oz total but have gotten as much as 7 oz. My question is I seem to see a lot that having a larger supply is bad in some way. I don't understand why that is. I have to return to work at 10 weeks and I want to make sure I can easily pump enough to keep her totally on breastmilk. So a higher supply now seems good to me. Am I wrong? Is it a bad idea to keep pumping once a day?
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    Welcome to the forum! It would help to know a bit more about what is going on with breastfeeding, so although I hate to answer questions with more questions, bear with me! - Can you tell us some more about your baby's birth- for example, were you induced, did you have IV fluids, did you have a large volume blood loss, did you have problems with the placenta, did you have any medications, did you have a c-section? - Can you give us a complete weight history for your baby, including birth weight, lowest known weight, and weight at each checkup? - How often does your baby nurse in a 24 hour period? - How does nursing feel? - How does pumping feel? - What make and model of pump are you using? - Are you using any form of hormonal contraception? - You've been supplementing with EBM- has it been hard for you to get enough milk for the required supplements?
    2 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:38 AM
    Welcome to the forum! Some questions for you: - Can you give us a complete weight history for your baby, including birth weight, lowest known weight, and weight at each checkup? - How often does your baby nurse in a 24 hour period? - How does nursing feel? - How does pumping feel? - What make and model of pump are you using? - Are you using any form of hormonal contraception?
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:29 AM
    Totally normal. The pediatrician's advice is- for lack of a more polite term- idiotic. Scheduled feedings do not make babies less fussy. They make babies and moms miserable- try imagining making your screaming, starving child WAIT for the clock to tell you it's time for him to be hungry. In fact, it is recommended that even exclusively formula-fed babies be fed on demand, rather than on a schedule. Scheduled feedings are bad for milk supply; milk is created on a "supply = demand" basis. Restrict demand and supply diminishes, often to a point which is too low for the baby to grow on. And if your pediatrician's concern is that your baby is gaining "too fast", then she/he needs to take a look at the normal growth patterns of exclusively breastfed babies, who tend to gain really fast in early infancy (as much as a pound per week is common), and then slow way down as they reach the middle of their first year. It sounds like you're doing things just right. Don't let bad advice throw you for a loop!
    2 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:21 AM
    :ita Great advice from the PP!
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:20 AM
    :ita with the excellent advice from the PP. I just want to mention that my kids nursed at least 12 times in a 24 hour period throughout the first year. It was just what worked for them!
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:17 AM
    :ita 100% with the previous post!!!! Since your baby's poop changes over the course of the day, here's what may be happening: most moms notice that they have more abundant milk overnight. Sometimes this means that the baby takes in more lactose during the wee hours of the night. That milk takes some time to travel through the baby's digestive system, emerging as greener and greener poops as the day goes on. As the PP said, this is NOT a problem! Just a normal variation. :)
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:10 AM
    Welcome to the forum! I think that if you have made any mistake, it's to think that your baby would continue to have that lovely sleep pattern of falling asleep in her cot and then sleeping a very long stretch. One of the most prevalent myths about babies is that as time goes on, they sleep longer and longer stretches and need less nursing/comforting at night. In fact, it's just the opposite! As time goes on, sleep changes. Sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. And babies continue to need some level of nighttime nursing and comforting, for varying periods of time- though few give it up before their first birthdays! So your baby is acting normal. The question is, what do you do about it? Here's what I suggest: 1. Adjust your thinking about bedtime. Your baby is demonstrating that she is not ready for sleep until 9-10 pm. So don't try to get her to bed much earlier than that. 2. Continue to build a routine into your evening. I suggest turning down the lights, turning off the stereo, maki everything very quiet and boring. Give her a bath, nurse her, rock her, take her for a walk, and then nurse her some more until she falls asleep. 3. Nurse your baby to sleep. Don't just put her in her gro-bag and then in the cot and expect her to fall asleep. It's completely normal for an infant to NEED to be nursed/cuddled/rocked to sleep. Not want, NEED! 4. If it is safe to do so, consider having your baby sleep in your bed. Check out guidelines for...
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:41 AM
    Glad to hear that things improved! Just want to wish your LO a speedy recovery. :hug
    3 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:40 AM
    Este es un excelente libro que explica la nutrición para madres lactantes! http://www.amazon.com/Well-Lose-Weight-While-Breastfeeding/dp/0345492595
    2 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:34 AM
    Welcome to the forum! It sounds like you're in an unusual situation- you actually got good advice about breastfeeding! I am in agreement with your local LLL consult- this does sound like an issue that will improve with time, as your baby grows and her mouth gets bigger and more able to get a deep latch. That being said, it sounds like something is suboptimal right now and there's a possibility it can be fixed, or at least improved. The nipple crease suggests that the baby is latching on too shallowly. If your baby is not tongue-tied, the most likely sources of a shallow latch are positioning (baby is unable to get/maintain a deep latch due to something about the position) or flow control (baby compresses the nipple in order to control the speed at which milk comes into his mouth). Trying different positions may help you find a solution to either of these problems. I suggest trying the reclined/biological nurturing position. It can help for 2 reasons. First, if the baby is ending up with a shallow latch because gravity is pulling her off the breast as she feeds, reclining will hold her on the breast. Second, if she's pulling off and compressing the nipple in order to control a fast milk flow, reclining will slow that milk flow and reduce her need to compress. Try it, and let us know if it helps!
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*butterfingers's Avatar
    Today, 04:07 AM
    Hi, new here. Finding this forum immensely helpful and hoping for some advice please. My dd is one month old and ebf. Feeding has always been painful / uncomfortable for me in varying degrees. I have had a dozen or so almost pain free feeds in total which I'm hopeful means that whatever is causing my discomfort can be solved! A few days in to feeding I developed cracked and bleeding nipples on both sides but they healed around 1 week or so. We began to get slightly less painful feeds and I thought things would improve but around 2-3 weeks I developed what I think may be vasospasm on one side particularly but now affecting the other to a lesser extent. My left nipple comes out with a slight crease down the centre and a white or purple tip. Cold does NOT seem to make any difference to pain however and I do not suffer any symptoms of Raynauds. My right nipple is more of a slight lipstick shape and also bruised looking and /or white. Both are painful during initial latch, to varying degrees during the whole feed and in between feedings. I am also still getting uncomfortably full at times. Dd has gained weight well and has lots of wet and dirty nappies, I am not at all concerned about her ability to transfer milk effectively and this is what motivates me to continue through the pain. Her latest gain was 19oz in 10 days and she was 3lb above her lowest weight at 4 weeks of age. She is content between feeds and sleeps well, she is now feeding approx 2-3 hourly in the...
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*sarah.louise's Avatar
    Today, 01:46 AM
    My daughter is now 5 months old. Background: Exclusively breastfed, weight 13lb (Always been small), had bad reflux since birth, suspected CMPI (why: bad reaction when I gave 1 bottle formula, eczema all over, bad colic and gas) I cut out all dairy until about 11 weeks, now I eat only small amounts like cheese no milk/yog/ice cream etc. She has mild eczema now, no other symptoms. She is still on omeprazole (in the US called losec I believe) to control the reflux, tried weaning her off it but she started coughing and hacking so she still needs it. Tongue tie discovered at 12 weeks after I saw my local health visitor about her feeding every hour throughout the day and clicking when feeding. This was cut at 14 weeks and she no longer clicks and her feeds are more efficient as my breast feels drained. From about 7/8 weeks to 14 weeks she slept 10-5/6am most nights..falling asleep on her own in the cot. Amazing. At 14 weeks it all just stopped and for the last 6/7 weeks she just does not sleep anymore. She will never settle until 9/10pm even though I have tried earlier, we have a routine, I feed her put her in her gro bag etc. She just lays there screaming (high pitched squeal not crying) until she finally dozes off. She will sleep for about 2 hours then she will wake again and won't go back to sleep until I feed her which is fine, only she will wake up and cry as soon as I put her in her cot again, or toss and turn for hours until I feed her again and the cycle repeats....
    2 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*abely's Avatar
    Today, 12:48 AM
    Hola Elisa ! Yo soy nutricionista y tengo que decir que a mí también me paso, en mi caso fueron 7 kilos que cogí de más, pero también me paso que no podía bajarlos... Te puedo recomendar una dieta muy buena y saludable que te ayudará probablemente a perder peso rápido aunque luego hay que seguir alimentándose bien para mantener el peso y no volver a cogerlo de nuevo. Esta dieta la hice yo y me fue muy bien, es la dieta de la manzana, puedes hacer click aquí para verla: Dieta de la Manzana Pues esta dieta se fundamente en la fruta de la manzana como fuente esencial de nutrientes pero no es sólo comer a base de manzanas. La manzana tiene múltiples propiedades, ya lo decía el refrán en inglés: "An apple a day keep the doctor away" (Una manzana al día te mantiene alejado del doctor).
    2 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:30 AM
    Don't worry about green poops, which are normal & not a sign of anything amiss unless accompanied by some other, more severe symptoms. If you have concerns about weight gain at all, do not stop offering both sides at a feeding especially if two sides is what baby prefers. If a foremilk issue was the cause, your baby would almost certainly be gaining faster than average, because "too much foremilk" is almost always linked to over production. The other possible cause of a foremilk issue is going a longish time between nursing sessions. (A 3 week old is usually nursing at least about 10 times in 24 hours.)
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Today, 12:26 AM
    I don`t have any solutions to offer, but my son did the "bobbing for nipples" thing when he was younger. Usually if I adjusted it and got him in a better spot he`d latch on. It might have just been for fun though - now he does the same thing while hollering, so he makes an Indian war cry =) (don`t know the pc term for that...) As far as how long he`s nursing, do you maybe have a nursing clinic near you? I was similarly concerned cause LO would only nurse for 3 min every couple hours, but in going to the clinic we figured out he was getting 3+ oz in those 3 min. If you`re pumping at work, maybe you`re inadvertently driving up your supply? My LO is now 11 months and we`ve run the gamut from nursing blitzes that never lasted more than a couple mins, to cycles of 45 min sessions every other hour.
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 AM
    Hi and welcome. It is entirely normal for a 4 week old baby to nurse as often as you describe. So if your ONLY concern is the frequency with which baby nurses, please be assured that is normal frequency. If you mean baby nurses more than 12 times in 24 hours, then yes, for a one month old, that may indeed by slightly more frequent than many other one month olds, but still probably nothing outside of normal, assuming weight gain is normal (without needing to supplement.) There are a couple ways to try to keep baby active at the breast for longer. One is breast compressions, and the other is switching sides. Both can be tried whenever baby starts to "slow down." But, there is no reason to think a baby must get 80-90 mils per session every time or even most of the time, unless baby is gaining poorly. A normal, healthy baby who is not experiencing breastfeeding problems is going to nurse as long as they need and get as much as they need, and that will vary nursing session to nursing session. If weight gain is a concern, Can you possibly post a complete weight history from birth, and explain when you started supplementing? There is no one specific weight a one month old should be, so knowing baby's weight now is not enough information. How many times in 24 hours does your baby nurse? Is baby always sleeping if not eating? Did a doctor instruct you to supplement baby with a bottle due to poor gain or some other reason? How many times a day is baby supplemented?...
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
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