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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:50 AM
    Why would you quit rather than supplement as needed while continuing to nurse? Can you please explain how much baby has gained since last checkup and when that was? Also, same scale both times? Also, I suggest clarifying with doctor exactly how much supplement per day. 1 ounce after every feeding session is very inexact, as nursing frequency is so variable.
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 11:44 AM
    If the baby isn't transferring milk well, the mom will pump to maintain supply and she'll give that milk to baby to make sure he's getting enough to grow and thrive.
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Today, 11:40 AM
    My breastfeeding goal is 1 year and my plan is to start weaning after a year- so I imagined that I would breastfeed for 13 months. My daughter is 11.5 months old and we are so close, but recently she has been biting a lot more and my supply has dropped dramatically and my let down has slowed greatly. (I used to have an oversupply and overactive let down, so that's what she was used to). She loves her solids and nurses well in the middle of the night and first thing in the morning. All other times she is too impatient for the milk and if she gets really angry about it I get bit (i.e. she screws up her face and angrily bears down and I'm bleeding). I work full time, but take her to work with me or work from home, all but one day a week, that is until this week- this week I have to go into the office 3 days, then we will be back to our usual schedule then at the end of the month we are taking a month off and I won't have to pump and she won't see a bottle at all. My question is should I just go ahead and start the weaning process now? I've got plenty of breast milk in the freezer to make it another month (from oversupply problem). Or should I just 'suck it up' and make it the next 3 weeks? (Also she is healthy, lots of wet diapers 1-2 poops/day-EBF she is also slightly small for her age around 30th percentile, but nothing anyone is concerned with)
    0 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 11:38 AM
    I have read instances where babies are breastfed and also supplemented with breastmilk to promote weight gain, how does that work!! If mom nurses then gives breastmilk that she has pumped previously, what is the difference???
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*katy77's Avatar
    Today, 11:09 AM
    Fwiw nursing had no effect on my fertility at all. My doctor told me I would not be fertile but my periods came back 8 weeks postpartum despite demand feeding. I also wanted to get pregnant more quickly because I am older -I am 38 - and became preggers after a year. I waited that long on purpose because of the pressures of taking care of a newborn. Everyone has their own story of course. I like to think that sometimes we don't get pregnant when we want to because it has to be that particular egg and that particular a sperm meeting to make the special being that is to come I to the world. A bit soppy but it feels right.
    4 replies | 388 view(s)
  • @llli*nirebear's Avatar
    Today, 10:20 AM
    Thank you, that's really helpful. Since my last post I think I've managed to wean off the shields. Really focussing on latch, had a few lipstick nipples but hopefully correcting them and have two hickeys on my areolas, not sure if that is bad or not?? My main concern is that my feeds have become very short. Before implementing frequent feeds they were 5-10 mins long, then I did more frequent feeds as you suggested and they got to 20-30 mins long and far calmer, now (without shield) she's just taking 2-3 mins, then comfort sucking and falling asleep. I'm worried about whether she's just not getting anywhere without the shields and giving up?? I've read they can become more efficient but 2-3 mins?? Seems awfully short.
    5 replies | 221 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Today, 10:02 AM
    bxlgirl- Anytime! Yes, the thyroid is interesting. I had high antibodies but normal thyroid levels prepregnancy, and as soon as I became pregnant, my thyroid levels shot up 70x! Then postpartum it shot down 70x to almost 0.0, now back up. I have another appt today to have my levels rechecked as they can rebound slowly postpartum. I am hoping that these ups and downs are the reason for my lack of weight loss, but my hope for a quick fix is likely futile! Wouldn't it be great if the weight just fell off, like it does for some other women?? But I am glad to know I am not alone!
    11 replies | 535 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 09:31 AM
    Well didn't get the news that I wanted!! Baby weighs 8 lbs 10 oz!!! Dr wants me to give an oz of formula after each feeding!! I'm torn!! Might have to quit breastfeeding again!!! It is what it is and the Lord will take care of it!!!
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 09:13 AM
    Medications and Mothers' Milk gives lidocaine a lactation safety rating of L2 - Limited Data-Probably Compatible, and says that the amount that transfers into milk is low. The relative infant dose through breastmilk is 0.5% - 3.1% of the mother's dose. It also says the oral bioavailability of lidocaine is less than 35%, so the baby wouldn't absorb much of what he does ingest. No adverse effects in breastfed babies have been reported. It gives the typical dose range as 50-100 mg, and says that normally less than 40 mg doses are used for local anesthesia. If you were going to get an exceptionally high dose for some reason, that might be another factor to consider. Lidocaine is metabolized quickly -- the half-life is only 1.8 hours. You're probably fine going with whatever you're most comfortable with. But if you want to be on the safe side, it might be worth calling InfantRisk at (806) 352-2519 to see what their take on it is. Good luck!
    2 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 08:28 AM
    Here are some excerpts from the Medications and Mothers' Milk entry for DROSPIRENONE + ETHINYL ESTRADIOL: At 21 months, impact on milk supply might not be a big issue. With any medication during breastfeeding, it's important to weigh the risk versus benefit. The impression I get from your post is that there are known benefits for you from this medication, since you've taken it before and you're familiar with the effects, and the risk of decreased milk production itself could actually be a benefit. And if you decided to stop taking the medication, you probably could bring your supply back up.
    3 replies | 160 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:04 AM
    You might also want to try some visualization and relaxation techniques when you are pumping at the office. Do some deep breathing, take a used onesie that belongs to your child and smell it while you pump, close your eyes and imagine milk flowing. The hormones of stress and anxiety can slow letdowns and decrease pump yields, so you want to do what you can to banish those feelings as you pump.
    3 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:00 AM
    Thinking some more about your situation, and I thought of a fourth possible explanation for your pain. So, there are 2 types of mastitis: the kind which is impossible to miss because it comes with all the symptoms- the pain, the redness, the flulike feelings, the fever- and then there's subclinical mastitis, which is an infection that is simmering along at a low level, causing pain but not necessarily bursting out into a full display of symptoms. Sometimes what happens is that subclinical mastitis flares up into full blown mastitis, and mom goes and gets antibiotics- but not quite the right ones for the strain of bacteria she has. The inappropriate antibiotics beat the bacteria back but don't fully kill them off. The infection continues to simmer, and may once again flare up; it's quite common for moms to experience repeat, closely-spaced bouts of mastitis when they are being given the wrong antibiotic every time they get sick. So if you happen to get mastitis again, you might want to talk to your doc about the antibiotics you are being given- you might need to try a different antibiotic, or a stronger one.
    12 replies | 247 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    That is terrific! Keep going, mama! :cheer
    7 replies | 577 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:45 AM
    :ita What MaddieB said. Embrace your baby's frustration if you can- it should lead him to nurse more often and more assertively and thereby boost your supply right back up. A lot of moms seem to panic during cycle-induced supply dips and try to compensate for frustration by offering their babies more solids and alternate forms of liquid. IMO, you want to avoid this route because it means the baby has less incentive to nurse and boost supply.
    2 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 05:24 AM
    Today at 9, is her 2 month checkup! I will find out how much she has gained in 5 weeks!! I'm hoping it is a good gain, but like I said previously, she was slow gaining in the beginning!! It was a week to week thing, not knowing if I was gonna be able to continue to breastfeed or not!! I was worried about a failure to thrive diagnosis!! And she feeds on one side per session! Not being satisfied was a concern because after nursing she would still be a little fussy, like she was still hungry!! But yes I believe she is a comfort nurser, but I don't know what to do if her comfort nursing is causing her to spit up!! (Getting too much milk) And earlier I referenced DD2 which is this baby!! DD1 July 10, 2006 breastfed 5 weeks quit due to mastitis, had inverted nipples so they were extremely sensitive and she literally sucked a chunk out of my nipple!! Couldn't handle it and gave up! DS October 2, 2008 breastfed 7 weeks quit due to failure to thrive diagnosis but was upset because I was determined to make breastfeeding work!!
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*crest's Avatar
    Today, 05:22 AM
    Most of the time a mother can breastfeed her baby easily but some issues can be encountered suggesting the use of either the breast milk alternative or the use of a breast pump. http://www.healthgenie.in/baby-care/feeding-and-nursing/breast-feeding-aid
    4 replies | 385 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 05:12 AM
    Today at 9, is her 2 month checkup! I will find out how much she has gained in 5 weeks!! I'm hoping it is a good gain, but like I said previously, she was slow gaining in the beginning!! It was a week to week thing, not knowing if I was gonna be able to continue to breastfeed or not!! I was worried about a failure to thrive diagnosis!! And she feeds on one side per session! Not being satisfied was a concern because after nursing she would still be a little fussy, like she was still hungry!! But yes I believe she is a comfort nurser, but I don't know what to do if her comfort nursing is causing her to spit up!! (Getting too much milk)
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:17 AM
    Supply drops due to period are common and usually very temporary. Milk production should react well to baby nursing more frequently, and you can encourage baby to nurse both sides each time as well. Just as block feeding reduces milk production, doing the opposite increases it. Some moms find herbal galactagogues helpful when they have a drop in production, but I do not know any more about that.
    2 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:12 AM
    How is this baby doing as far as weight gain? Does baby typically want one or both sides per session? Baby not being "satisfied" is a concept that really trips moms up. Many babies who are getting plenty of milk like to nurse for a long time because nursing is comforting to them. But if baby never nurses for shorter sessions or is not thriving, or nursing is not comfortable for you, then the long sessions may indicate a milk transfer issue. But your baby is still pretty young, and I think in general, even sessions of 25- 45 minutes as a typical feeding would still be normal.
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    I was thinking low milk because she never seemed satisfied!! Nursing every 2 hours pretty much but anywhere from 25-45 mins!!! When she nurses for 45 mins and on a 2 hour span it just seems like she is constantly attached!!! I am probably just overly worried because of the issues I had with my first 2 children and not being able to successfully breastfeed!!! And DD2 was jaundiced for about 4-6 weeks and also slowly gaining weight! Was having to do weekly weight checks the first 4 weeks!!
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:11 PM
    Does baby sleep swaddled, with a pacifier, or in another room than where you are? These are sleep lengthening techniques, and if they are removed, baby may wake or cue on own in a more frequent pattern. Every mom and baby is different. If you are home with baby and will be for the first year at least, baby sleeps near you without being pacified or swaddled, baby is encouraged to nurse frequently and for as long as baby wishes during awake hours, and is gaining well, and you are not feeing overly full overnight, then this current pattern may be perfectly fine for your milk production and your baby. Otherwise, I agree completely with littlecavemomma. Why use the pump as a middle man? Baby needs milk and you need the milk removal. Just nurse overnight. If baby will NOT nurse, and you are starting to feel uncomfortably full, or for some other reason you are concerned about your production, then you can pump or hand express as needed. Don't assume that will happen! Many babies take longer stretches early on and shorter ones later.
    2 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    I would suggest trying a different bottle and nipple if you have not already. While you might want to stick with a slow flow nipple, any nipple brand should work fine as long as paced bottle feeding methods are being practiced. And no nipple, no matter how much the manufacturer claims it is 'like the breast" will make feedings as much like they are at the breast as using paced bottle feeding technique. It worries me that every picture on the front page of the munchkin website shows gravity feeding. It makes me wonder if this is a bottle that requires that type of position for baby to get the milk out? Generally you do not want that... Most lactation consultants suggest paced bottle feeding with up right baby and horizontal bottle positioning to prevent breast refusal and also to make bottles a calm experience where baby is in more control of the flow and 'pace' of the feeding. If trying to get baby to take a bottle is stressing you out, I would suggest stop all bottles for now. The research has shown that introducing a baby to the bottle sooner rather than later does not significantly change rate of eventual bottle refusal. So, there is not really any rush. When you reintroduce, start with letting baby play with and mouth an EMPTY bottle. If baby seem ok with the nipple in his mouth, progress to a weensy amount of milk in the bottle, like a quarter ounce- a sip! but no pressure, no insistence baby take it. Go from there as baby appears comfortable with. Let's say...
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:18 PM
    Instead of setting an alarm to pump, I would set an alarm to nurse, especially if your baby will dreamfeed. A few weeks after I returned to work (11 weeks PP) my baby started randomly sleeping thru the night. My supply took a big hit. For the next couple of months I would set an alarm for once or twice a night to latch her on to nurse. Most times she would semi-wake before the second alarm would go off anyways. And then one day she stopped sleeping 6+ hours and would wake herself to nurse throughout the night. Your baby won't nurse the second side in the morning because she so quickly fills up on the one "full" breast. I think nursing is so less disruptive to sleep than pumping. Plus you're less apt to create an oversupply issue if you let baby "take the edge off" a few times throughout the night versus pumping to empty.
    2 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*danielle.gephart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:00 PM
    Hi! I just got my first postpartum period back at 10 month pp. My supply has seemed to drop overnight. Like REALLY drop. I'm trying to remain calm and know that it will bounce back (right?!) We are doing strictly baby led weaning at my son's pace, and he eats a ton of solids. It hasn't affected my supply, more or less regulated it if anything. He also breastfeeds frequently (about every 2-4 hours depending on how he feels) and drinks a lot of milk during the day and usually once at night. I figure he eats between 25-30 ounces a day. I typically produce a lot of milk (had oversupply for quite a while and block fed for months and months) and can pump 5 oz. from one breast in the am after my son eats a completely full belly of milk from the other. I can get 1-2 oz. from the other breast. I don't regularly pump though. He was born at 9lbs 20" at 41.5weeks and is currently 22lbs and 31.5" in case that's relevant. He's certainly not struggling to get enough nutrition, but I hope my supply bounces back. Any advice for what to do to help my supply out? Is this normal? WILL my supply bounce back? I've felt empty all day and he's been frustrated with the slow letdown.
    2 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:56 PM
    Sounds like you got great info from pp. I just wanted to add that APNO was a lifesaver for me and I had to bring the idea to my doc. She has since thanked me for it because she now uses it with other patients. http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&id=12:candida-protocol&Itemid=17
    12 replies | 247 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:46 PM
    If you baby is getting so much milk, baby is spitting up, and choking when nursing, why would you think that the issue is low milk production? Assuming normal weight gain, I think you can safely rule low milk production out, and keep eating lactation cookies only if you like them. Frequent nursing is entirely normal. It sounds like your baby nurses about every 2 hours for 18 hours of the 24 hour day. This would mean baby nurses abut 9 or maybe 10 times a 24 hour day. Anything from 8-12 times OR MORE in 24 hours is entirely normal, and frequent nursing is the best way to handle the issue of fast letdown. Spit up is usually normal and is not harmful, just messy. The frequency with which baby nurses the rest of the day is at least in part why baby can go so long at night on occasion. Many 2-3 months olds never sleep anything like 6 hours at a time! I guess I am wondering what kind of frequency you think baby should be nursing at? Some people will tell you that if a baby is getting enough to eat, baby takes longer between nursing sessions, and that if baby is not getting enough, baby will nurse more. But this is not how breastfeeding works at all, because babies nurse for many reasons, all important. It sounds like you are nursing baby when baby wishes, and that is exactly the right thing to do. Sometimes nursing sessions are unusually long, or mom is uncomfortable, or mom has problems nursing baby as much as baby needs and handling her other responsibilities. If any...
    7 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*quill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:35 PM
    My baby is almost 11 weeks old. We introduced a bottle around 5 weeks so that my husband could help with a night feeding or the occasional bottle while I am out of the house. About 2 weeks ago, he started to refuse the bottle. It doesn't matter if the milk is freshly pumped or from a previously refrigerated bottle. I am returning to work in 5 weeks and I am worried he still won't be taking a bottle by then. I was so hopeful that we were on the right track because he took a bottle for about a month with no problems at all! I have tried leaving the room while DH feeds, I have tried leaving the house. We have tried at all times of the day, when he's hungry, when he's nearly full....nothing is working so far. We have been using the Munchkin Latch system, if that makes a difference. Any ideas??
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:42 PM
    Yes the UK has lactation consultants. You can find them by going to the website www.ilca.org. If you do not find anyone there, try contacting you county coordinator listed here (UK at bottom) http://iblce.org/iblce-country-coordinators/ Or you can see if there are any Breastfeeding Coalitions in your area. There should also be La Leche league groups there is a look up function on the main page of this website. Is there any way you can get a better pump? A double sided as described above? A single side electric is just not the right pump for what you are needing to do. The general rule of thumb is to pump each side at least 15-20 minutes, some moms go longer (no more than 30 or so minutes a side I would suggest, but you will have to see how you are responding.) Because a double sided pumps both sides at once, it cuts pumping time in half. All newborns are very hungry, yet they do fine nursing at the breast, where the milk flow is not constant and the milk flow will be slow and fast depending on what baby is doing. I suspect he drinks quickly because there is no other way to drink from a bottle using the gravity method of bottle feeding. Baby must "drink or drown." Also, if the feeding is very fast, baby will screan because they need to suck longer, not because they actually need more milk in their tummies. Your babies physiology is designed for breastfeeding, and nursing at the breast takes time and effort. This is why babies have a deep compelling need to suckle...
    4 replies | 200 view(s)
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