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  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Today, 12:06 PM
    I'm hoping so. So, yesterday the LC returned my call. She thinks it's a growth spurt that happened. Since my LO is playing catch up and everything still. Today we spoke to our regular LC and she also agreed it was a growth spurt. LO also Lost an Ounce so she was 7.6. She ate, and then was weighed again and weighed at 7ilb 7.9oz. So no, I'm presently not making enough milk. That being said, because she was so use to taking so little then tiring out so soon, lo isn't really getting the idea that she can take more than what she's use to. So that could affect how much milk I am producing. but it's actually a relief to know what's going on, and have a better idea on how to make it better. My LC changed my game plan a little. Instead of swapping between formula and breast milk when giving her the bottle ( btw. she tried the sns tube deal. and just as I had told her, my LO spits out the entire breast and *stops* eating when that tube is inserted, she got to see it first hand, so she recommended the bottle) stick with breast milk, then give her formula if she's still hungry. So our feeding plan is:
    24 replies | 402 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 11:37 AM
    I just read through your past posts (sorry, should have reviewed them more closely before responding the first time). Have you had any in-person help beyond your LC? Maybe another LC, a LLL group, something of that nature?
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 11:27 AM
    Lots of people exclusively pump for the duration of their breastfeeding relationship. If you are consistent and methodical, you may have sufficient supply to feed your baby. My friend did it -- I was in awe of how much she told me how many ounces she used to pump in only two sessions at work, while it took me three to get half of what she would get. In fact, since her baby was a about 2 years older than my first, I really thought EPing would be the easy way to go and figured I'd do the same. But I'm glad I ended up nursing -- I would not have survived EPing unless it was my only choice. You seem to feel that's where you are now. I think it's harder to motivate yourself to pump than it is to nurse, though, so try to find something you like to do while pumping (I like listening to comedy podcasts or watching TV). Just make sure you have a good pump, keep up with the parts maintenance, and pump as much as you possibly can. I pump in the car on my commute to work and then three times a day at work. You need to aim for 8-12 sessions a day, I believe (someone correct me if I'm wrong).
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:20 AM
    I can't offer any better advice. Feeling devastated or even mourning the loss would be completely natural. If baby will still latch and nurse at all, then no need to quit those nursing sessions but don't stress yourself about them. Has baby been checked out medically to make sure there is no medical reason causing the dark urine and baby's attempted refusal to even take bottles?
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*ramom's Avatar
    Today, 11:18 AM
    Thanks for the thoughts. She's starting daycare next week and they won't do paced bottle feeding (we didn't have a lot of choice in daycare but even if we did I wouldn't have known to ask about this.) So there's really not much I can do, so I really need to move on at this point. The baby doesn't want to nurse any more, and it's causing too much anguish, distraction, and lost sleep for us to keep trying.
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:14 AM
    I've seen the flung out arm behavior with my son, I actually prefer that to having my other nipple pinched. Lately he has taken to also flailing a leg about (he is getting even more acrobatic now at 7+ months, I sometimes get toes in my face instead of fingers.
    2 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:55 AM
    I will also say read those two books, they should help you view letting baby experience foods in a broader light. Yes there will be some mess but there are measures you can take to minimize the problems of mess. At the Interested in and grabbing for food stage, baby doesn't yet understand that it's food but they are ready to start learning about it. Babies that are too young to deal with solids probably won't manage to eat much as long as they are in control of what gets into their mouth. Breastfeed as much as before and offer to nurse before and after solid meals and weaning isn't likely to happen for a good long time. Most babies don't even reduce the amount they nurse till sometime after 9 months or beyond.
    4 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:51 AM
    So your baby's overall gain, from birth to 4 months, is about 8 pounds? This sounds like textbook normal, healthy gain to me. I really think you want to clarify with your doctor what the concern is. If there is any reason baby might not be getting enough milk, that is the issue to address...baby not nursing as often, regular long sleep stretch, use of hormonal birth control, overuse of pacifier...those are things that might cause baby to not get enough.
    8 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    Today, 10:45 AM
    Late to this but just wanted to say I did nurse with a lactation aid (not a commercial one but homemade with a premature infant feeding tube stuck into a bottle). I just had the attitude that I"d use it as an opportunity to educate anyone who asked about why I had to supplement and how happy I was I didn't have to use bottles and reduce risk of babies rejecting the breast. My situation was needing to give my twins a few oz of donor milk a day and I was asked a few times and just tried to not be defensive but actually welcome questions. It all worked out.
    12 replies | 651 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:45 AM
    yep, if pain is still that bad 72 hours later do contact them. That said, My LO hated and screamed about the stretches for over a week. Is the pain only during the stretches?
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:43 AM
    Have you tried other nursing positions? Cradle often becomes too confining as baby lengthens. What about sidelying? (This is great at night too) Or laid back positioning, which lets you and baby get comfy in any number of positions. Positioning differently may help the flailing arm. It is entirely normal at this age for a baby to wake frequently and prefer to nurse to settle. Nursing is usually the easiest way to settle baby so NOT nursing her at night is kind of denying yourself the benefits of you own super power. Is there some reason you are wishing to not nurse baby to sleep? As far as it frustrating your husband- Baby wants to nurse, and he can't nurse her, so of course she is not settling for him. The day will come when all she wants is her daddy, and you may feel like chopped liver, (or enjoy the freedom of the hand off) but it's not going to be when she is 6 months old and wanting to nurse, especially not in the middle of the night. That said, something that worked well for us particularly in fussy evenings was that I would nurse and if baby was still not asleep, I would hand baby to my husband and he would walk baby down in a sling. At night, I have always found bedsharing works best for getting a tad more sleep. As far as baby not wanting to hold/play with your hand, as far as I know that is entirely normal. What is your concern about that?
    2 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:41 AM
    Starting babies on solids before 6 months is outdated information. If there are supply and weight issues there are better choices than cereal and if not weight and supply related then it isn't really medical advice.
    8 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:20 AM
    You are confident you have done what you could, and that this is the best decision for you family. So if you are still feeling devastated by a decision you believe in, perhaps it is the way you are looking at your decision that is the problem. But you are not giving up breastfeeding. Your plan, if I understand it, is to pump and give your baby your expressed milk in a bottle and to supplement with formula as needed. This is still breastfeeding, as some of your child's food comes from the breast. You do not know when or even if pumping will become totally unsustainable, but if/when it does, you can deal with that then. Your child is 3 months old, and, assuming she shows signs of readiness, can start being introduced to solids in two or three months. So the time of exclusive nursing is limited anyway. I am not asking anything, I did review your threads. but I will also say that if you ever wish to nurse or your baby does, ever, wish to nurse, there is no reason to not do that. I mean, if you are mourning the loss of nursing at the breast, it might help to understand that things need not be all or nothing. If you wish and if circumstances allow, you may nurse again- whether it be one time or more. Please understand I am not saying DO that, you are ready to stop trying to nurse at the breast, and I am not questioning that. I am saying that just because you have made the decision to stop nursing at the breast need not mean there is some rule that you must never ever...
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*bib81's Avatar
    Today, 09:49 AM
    Hi Everyone, FTM here and feeling quite paranoid. I have been exclusively breastfeeding my six month old. For the last couple months when she breastfeeds (I use cradle hold only) she throws her free arm either straight along her side or wings it behind her. She doesn't even like to hold my hand or play with my hand, if I try she always just pulls it away. Has anyone else experienced this? Another thing that is bothering me is that when she wakes in the night the only thing that settles her is breastfeeding. I really don't mind this as often she is hungry, but sometimes she isn't hungry and it's still the only thing that calms her. I try to rock her but she hates being rocked and actually cries harder. This really frustrates my husband because he can't calm her at all. Is this normal behaviour that she will grow out of? Sorry if I sound overly paranoid, and thanks for listening!
    2 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*2coatskids's Avatar
    Today, 09:44 AM
    Now I'm starting to get worried. My ped isn't really much help. My DDs last two poops have been very very thick mucus. The pleasant smell is gone and now it smells acidic. I tried to attach a picture but not sure it will work. I called a pediatric gastro and made an appt. I know poop consistency changes, but this is a thick blob. Worried....
    5 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 09:39 AM
    For anyone that feels like they would offer a more thorough reply with a better understanding of the ramom's experience, please take a moment to look at the other threads she has shared, rather than asking her to rehash here. This is clearly a really difficult experience. http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?121351-overwhelmed-Quit-or-combo-feed-7-weeks-PP-mostly-pumping&p=1342623#post1342623 http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?121723-3-month-old-losing-weight-after-trying-to-get-back-to-breast You know your situation best. Better than anyone else, you know the difficulties you have encountered, and the efforts you have made. I think it is totally okay to feel however you are feeling about this-- please allow yourself room and time to experience whatever emotions are coming up, and not to focus on how you 'should' be feeling, not to try to rush yourself on to 'getting over it', etc.
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:25 AM
    I would suspect a virus. Sometimes excessive drool itself (caused by teething, usually) causes funky looking poops too.I would not suspect it has anything to do with your plug. Keep an eye on that though, for your own health. Here is what I would not worry about 1) you don't make enough milk. 4 months is atypical point of frustration and odd nursing behavior so the fussiness during feeding is not an indicator of low production 3) Foremilk/hindmilk 'imbalance.' This is a more myth than anything else. The only time a baby might get a bit more 'foremilk' than they can easily 'handle' digestion-wise, is when a mother makes too MUCH milk and/or there is forceful letdown. There are usually many other things going on to indicate that issue. If that IS the problem, the simplest, easiest fix is to encourage baby to nurse more often. When a baby has diarrhea, the usual protocol is to "manage symptoms." and wait it out. This means, prevent dehydration, which nursing usually accomplishes quite brilliantly.
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    I think healing time depends on many factors- age of baby, extent of the cut, if it was done with surgical scissors or laser...I have never heard the 48 hour thing, I am actually surprised pain is expected to last that long. If the hcp who performed the frenotomy told you baby would be pain free 48 hours and that is not happening, or if the stretches they told you to do are hurting your baby, I would suggest contact them.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*kenmhic's Avatar
    Today, 08:20 AM
    It might be a plugged duct. This happened to me last week and I noticed that I had a white spot on my nipple. After I poked it with a sterilized needle, milk started coming out. I fed my baby, he drained it and the pain and swelling went away.
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*kenmhic's Avatar
    Today, 08:15 AM
    My exclusively breastfed four-month-old has begun having green watery, non-smelly bowel movements immediately after every feeding and sometimes in between. I know right when it happens because he is normally very vocal when he poops, grunting and whatnot. I can hear it squirting out. This happened suddenly and has been going on for almost a week. His poop is normally a yellowish brown and usually happens once per day, twice tops. He is not dehydrated. I have not been eating anything out of the normal, however, about a week ago I noticed a hard, painful lump in my left breast and upon examining my nipple, I realized I was experiencing a plugged duct. I poked the white spot with a sterilized needle and milk came out. I fed my baby and he drained it. The spot is still there but I haven't experienced any backed up milk or pain since the one time, except for slight pain in the nipple where the spot was. He is not fussy, has no fever and is behaving like his normal, happy self. He has been wanting to chew on his hands a lot and has been drooling so I wonder if he may have gotten a little stomach bug or something. He does seem to fuss at the breast a bit about ten minutes into a feeding so I'm concerned that I'm not making enough milk to satisfy him or maybe there's a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance. It seems like he gets frustrated after a while and starts to fuss. No milk is squirting out which makes me think there's not enough milk as opposed to too much. I'm a little worried...
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*racheliz's Avatar
    8 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*racheliz's Avatar
    Today, 07:05 AM
    He weight 6.8 when he was born and at first he was gaining weight very fast. She did mention he weight more than the 25% of babys his age and the heigth I can't remember... he is a pretty chubby baby every one in my family always talk about how cubby and cute he is so maybe its just that the gain weigth is getting slow
    8 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*ramom's Avatar
    Today, 06:56 AM
    Hi all, This is probably not the right place to post this but I'm hoping someone has some pointers. I don't need to go through our whole story but my baby is 3 months old and we've had a major struggle, and things took a turn for the worse after I went back to work. We made the decision last night to just try exclusive pumping until my milk dries up, combined with formula to make up the difference. I know this is the right decision at this point, for both me and the baby, but I'm feeling so devastated and I don't know how to move on and focus on the important parts of my life. I guess it will get easier over time but before it does I'm going to have to watch the freezer stash get used up, my milk output decline, increase in bottles and formula, etc, all of which is going to be very hard to watch. I guess I just invested too much emotion and effort into this whole breastfeeding thing. Does anyone have any suggestions for how to move on? A support group of some kind? Ways to think about it that aren't so devastating?
    6 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 04:51 AM
    "I've started the weaning process - I think that shes allergic to my milk and or the things im eating but I swear I cant cut out anything else. I weigh 100lbs im under weight and stressed out. I love bfing and im terribly torn between formula and bfing. I would love any kind of advise. Am I crazy?? Is this normal?" By weaning process, do you mean that formula has been introduced? If so, and if you are still breastfeeding, there is a good chance this supplementation can be reversed, if you decide, so please don't feel like once it's happened, it's impossible to go back. Mama, give yourself some love! It sounds like these have been some difficult months (which is well within the range of normal, so no you are not crazy!). The protocol provided above is great. You are absolutely right-- you're health is of the utmost importance too. You cannot survive on air alone! But I think you can still have hearty nutrition, while taking one item out at a time as advised in the protocol, if an allergy seems to be the issue. Do you have a partner or mom or mom in law or sister or someone who might be able to take over some of the night time parenting for a week or a few days? I'm imagining-- baby stirs, you nurse the baby, and if baby is still up struggling with gas, you wake that person up and they stay up with baby doing massage, carrying baby upright, whathaveyou, while you go back to sleep. They can always bring baby back in if baby wants to nurse again. Carrying my daughter...
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*deklans.mom's Avatar
    Today, 04:47 AM
    My son is the same way. Since 3 weeks he sleeps through the night he is now 10 weeks. He started sleeping 7 hour stretches at 3 weeks and now sometimes sleeps up to 12 hours straight. To keep up my milk supply I wake up once or twice a night to make sure my body knows we still need milk and I freeze this for the future. Also lately I have tried sleep nursing when I get up then pump afterwards. This makes for a lot of work but I intend to give my baby breast milk as long as possible and I will return to work soon as well.
    7 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 04:21 AM
    The above ideas and suggestions are great!, and I don't have anything to add on that score. By-the-by, congratulations mama on making it to four months! That is a great accomplishment and I'm glad that you've stuck to it and have such a beautiful relationship with your baby!
    8 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 03:51 AM
    The World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics both recommend introduction of complimentary foods around six months. For some reason, my phone is not cooperating and I'm struggling to pull the quotes, but they are easily google-able. The AAP rec's continued breastfeeding for at least the first year, and as long as mom and baby want after that, and the WHO rec's continued breastfeeding for at least the first two years, and as long as mom and toddler desire after that. Both books recommendations are good. The baby led weaning / baby led solids introduction is pretty simple-- introduce food slowly, offer a wide variety of foods, let baby feed him or herself, don't stress about it. The information in My Child Won't Eat is another healthy dose of 'really, don't stress about it; also, there is no one right food or order of foods to start with.' Iron (and to a lesser extent zinc) is really the piece to be cognizant of. There is a small amount of really bioavailable iron in breastmilk, and baby has plenty stored away to get them through the first half of the first year (particularly if you did delayed cord clamping), sometimes longer. Iron deficiency is really not something to mess around with, because it can cause cognitive delays that even if the deficiency is corrected later in toddlerhood, research does not show that the cognitive impacts are similarly corrected for. But again, this is really the sort of thing that 'your mileage may vary,' so if for...
    4 replies | 106 view(s)
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