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  • @llli*blueberrysmom's Avatar
    Today, 10:37 AM
    Every now and then we get some lime green in there with DS (7 weeks)! I remember with my DD we went through a period of time when she was having medium/kelly green poops. I totally freaked out but she wasn't having any other symptoms and eventually it went away. Good suggestions from mommal :)
    3 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:37 AM
    Yes, a mixing bowl works fine!
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:35 AM
    I think it's really rare for a breastfeeding woman to develop breast cancer. I agree with PP that it's probably a plugged duct. Those are common and really not dangerous. If you feel ill then it could be mastitis but it doesn't sound like you have that. Mastitis comes with fever, chills, feeling really crummy. If you touch it and it hurts it's probably this clogged duct and the best way to deal with it, in my opinion, is to massage it like crazy (it should hurt like mad if you're doing it right) just after a shower, and anytime before nursing and after nursing. If you can do it DURING nursing is even better. If you see a white dot on top then you're lucky because you can prod it out gently with a sterilized needle and the backed up milk will all come out quickly. Lots of people warn that if you don't deal with it like ASAP you will most certainly develop mastitis, but it's not necessarily true. I've had them last for a few days before clearing up and it never caused mastitis. (I got mastitis once without having had blocked ducts).
    3 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*blueberrysmom's Avatar
    Today, 10:30 AM
    It's really hard to know what's normal and what needs adjustment - that's what makes this period so tough for moms and babies. I think we all appreciate different view points and experiences :) Should you still consider elimination diet if the gas, pain and screaming only happens at a certain time? For me, it is always 4:30/5 am until get up time at 8:30. It really does not happen during the day. Last night, DS fell asleep in the car at 8 instead of in his bed at 9. First feeding was at 10:45, second at 2:00 (all shifted about an hour or so ahead of schedule) and ta da! fussy, screaming and gassy at 3:30. So for some reason, the first two night feedings are really screwing with him. During the day he eats every 45 minutes or so when he's awake. Is he getting too full at night? He's really NOT spitting up, and honestly after those first two feedings it's really hard to burp him. He's up every 45 mins to an hour once the pain starts. I'm not against the elimination thing, its just there is dairy in almost every aspect of my diet so it would be tough!! Found out today that DS also has a top lip tie and I'm still waiting for the DRs appt to get that clipped. Thoughts?
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 08:58 AM
    Have you thought about hand expressing into something with a wider neck/bowl? I've never mastered the art of hand expression but I've been told a bowl is way easier.... Little/no aiming required!
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 08:48 AM
    http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/mastitis/ http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplebleb/
    3 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 AM
    It sounds what you have is a plugged duct, possibly due to a bleb/milk blister. It's unlikely to be breast cancer. Feed through the pain (I know it hurts like crazy, have had milk blisters that backed up in the past) and if it isn't clearing and you have a pump you might wanna try and use that too/instead. Hot compresses before/during feeding and pumping and cold when not. Massage the area affected or use a wide toothed comb overview in a nice hot shower. I'll add a link to Kellymom with more tips! Mastitis is an infection linked to a blockage. If you get a temperature or fever it is likely to be infected and need antibiotics but often you can clear the blockage and be fine!
    3 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*gmcx77's Avatar
    Today, 08:06 AM
    hi ladies so I'm not sure if I have it or not. Last night I fed LO and then went to shower after I was putting her to sleep and I felt a lump on my right breast more towards the bottom and closer to rib. It's sore to touch and still hard. <br /> Last night I put a hot compress on it but still no relief I fed LO on the right side to see if maybe she could clear a possible "clog" so this morning before hubby left to work I told him to feel it.. And he's like omg babe get it checked out adapt maybe it's breast cancer ( have had many ppl we know go thru it this year). I told him relax it may be a clog but who am I to know!! <br /><br /> My nipple is white but not sure if this is normal or not. Now LO is 3 months and never experienced this before. Of course hubby's comment got me worried. <br /><br /> I haven't seen my regular dr in years. I called my OB he openss at 10 but would he even be able to diagnose me? If not then who do I see? <br /><br /> All the info on the web also has me confused. <br /><br /> I still have a hot compress on it and I tried to pump after feeding but got about 10 drops.<br /><br /> Any suggestions on what to do? <br /><br /> Don't want to think about breast cancer but would a lump develope that quick? <br /><br /> TIA
    3 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 05:07 AM
    Sorry if I overreacted. That last line seemed aimed directly at me and seemed to imply I shouldn't have even mentioned it. For what it's worth both my boys gained wellandseemed healthy. Neither ever had a single speck of blood in their poop, nor serious congestion. My oldest had a little stuffy nose but I thought it was normal. That's why they give out the nasal aspirator at the hospital, I thought at the time. My youngest's rash did not show until a day and a half after I stopped consuming dairy. I was not suggesting a crazy total elimination diet but offering the resources pertaining to reflux since it was mentioned. I figured the op could do her own research with the many links included by Kelly mom but of course I should understand that some moms probably don't even look at my links. Next time I will be clearer regarding the rarity of foods sensitivities in my posts. You have so much more experience than I so if you thought my suggestion was concerning, I will change the wording in the future. I seriously have no idea what a normal baby looks like as both of mine had abnormal issues.
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 PM
    I suspect the actual data is flawed in defining differentiations between nursing some and nursing 'exclusively', pumping some or 'exclusively, reasons for pumping, (of which there are many) and also how much combo feeding (formula and breastmilk) is part of the picture, etc. Some mothers DO exclusively pump and bottle feed baby their milk rather than nurse because they believe it to be more doable, or convenient, in their situation. I know because I have met mothers who eping for this reason. But I would say this is probably a tiny percentage, and not a cause for any alarm, especially since some of these moms would probably formula feed instead, (if pumping were not an option) and of course baby getting moms milk is preferable no matter how it occurs. But I think what is worrisome is that among the general population, a mother pumping her milk instead of nursing is all to often viewed as a non-objectionable option and even preferable. You see it all the time- in discussions of NIP, especially, but in all kinds of situations- "Why not just pump' is a common refrain. And over and over again, expecting moms who are not planning any separations from baby (or not planning them for a long time) think they 'need' a pump prior to birth. This is misinformation, as of course unless there are breastfeeding problems of a specific kind, such moms may never need a pump. And of course there are the mothers who are told they should pump to 'bring in milk' even by hcps...
    3 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 PM
    Definitely keep nursing on demand and offer to nurse extra as well to help increase supply and if there is an evening break when you think you can fit in a daily power pumping session for a while then you may see an increase in milk supply but be careful not to pump yourself into an over supply. 4 months is notorious for changes in sleep and nursing behavior (lots of new milestones happening plus teething etc.) I would agree to err on the side of caution about the solids, and I highly recommend the book Baby Led Weaning for the method of introducing solids. Make sure you and baby are getting enough vitamin D as well and if the Dr was concerned about Iron, perhaps a multivitamin drop for baby that includes iron and vitamin D.
    10 replies | 270 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:40 PM
    Mommal's detailed and specific suggestions are all wonderful, and I don't have anything to add in that respect-- other than to echo that I hope you'll seek out some additional in-person help to help with the latch, and perform other informative assessments. If an IBCLC is pricey and not covered by insurance, some WIC programs have IBCLCs on staff, if you are in the US. In your post you say, "I don't want to go to LC again as I don't feel like she'll be able to help anymore," and that may be the case; but that doesn't mean that there isn't a breastfeeding helper or professional that will be able to! You are not inadequate, mama. You are exactly the mother that your baby needs, and it is clear from the description that you provide that you are doing everything within your power to figure this out, provide the best for your baby, to nourish and protect your baby. It is okay to care about this, and it is okay to feel however you are feeling, too, but I hope you will be able to see the hard, hard, hard work that you are doing. Also, half a day is no small amount!-- that is half of what she's being nourished on! That is hugely significant, and hard won. You deserve support and encouragement and I'm glad that you're reaching out. I hope you have people around you in real life that are being supportive and encouraging (and doing a whole lot of housework and making you meals and all of that) too.
    2 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*jessicanewmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:29 PM
    Hi! I'm an infrequent pumper, but as my 1 year old sleeps longer stretches at night I've been pumping on my low-performing side to try to maintain a supply. I have a Pump In Style but it's not nearly as effective as hand expressing -- plus it's such a hassle for once a day, one side pumping. The problem with hand expressing is that my aim isn't very good & I end up dribbling milk everywhere. Would a manual pump be closer than hand expression? Or does anybody have tips for less-messy hand expression?
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:44 PM
    I was not suggesting you should not have posted what you did. I was simply offering my thoughts as well.
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    In a baby who is generally healthy and gaining normally, green and/or mucousy poop is nothing to worry about. You only worry about poop color if it is white, red (like currant jelly), or black (after the meconium stage), or if the baby isn't gaining weight as he should or seems otherwise unwell. Since your baby currently needs just one breast per feeding, has trouble with fast letdowns, and has had a few green poops, it sounds like you may have a high supply right now. The best way to deal with that is to continue to watch baby for cues and offer that second breast only if he seems hungry for it, and to nurse with baby positioned "uphill" from mom. A great way to do this is to lean way back or even lie flat on your back while nursing, so that gravity slows the milk flow. Don't worry about foremilk/hindmilk imbalances. They don't really exist and they aren't a health problem; all milk contains everything a baby needs to grow and develop.
    3 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:26 PM
    In general, it's a much better idea for supply maintenance to pump two sides at once. It's normal for a baby to vary between taking one or two sides. My baby has weeks where he'll do one side, then sometimes when he'll do two sides. It's different. Best thing is to just offer both sides and she'll take what she needs. Taking one or two sides isn't a good indicator of supply. That is, going from 1 side to 2 sides doesn't mean supply dropped. Also at this point your supply could be adjusting to really be supply and demand which is more tailor-made to suit your baby's needs.
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:55 PM
    Yes great I understand it all it could be normal. I am simply writing my experience and providing the resource I used to make the decision to change my diet. I waited weeks even though I felt dairy was the issue with my first to try an elimination diet. I was beyond sleep deprived but had been told it was so unlikely that I shouldn't even try. I could have saved myself from months of exhaustion and prevented so much pain in my little guy had I gone with my gut earlier. My youngest was whining, grunting, and squirming in his sleep on my tummy as I wrote the post bc he found a cheesy cracker of his brother's on the floor and ate it. SoI felt it was worth mentioning. I do always try to mention that less than half of reflux cases are thought to be related to diet. The op had already mentioned asking the doctor about reflux so why not offer another option than the medications doctors tend to overprescribe as all meds have side effect risks?
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*caters's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:30 PM
    If the gas is in the large intestine than pedaling his legs might help him pass gas and thus relieve the pain. If it is in the small intestine or stomach you might have to burp him more often
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:28 PM
    More safe sun exposure is great, but it is not likely to be enough if they are actually deficient or borderline. Also it would depend how close to the equator you are, if it is winter or summer where you are, (Almost everywhere on earth except directly on the equator has some length of a "Vit D Winter" when sun exposure is not going to do the trick,) how babies are dressed, what their skin tone is like, and, probably most importantly for babies and young kids, how long you could safely expose their skin to the direct sun without increasing the risk of skin cancer. In other words, getting enough sun for optimal Vit D. exposure is quite complicated and varies situation to situation, so that is why supplements are usually suggested now in the US and Canada and I do not know where else. This does not mean everybody needs them. It is just the general recommendation for all. Whether you or your babies actually need more D I have no idea, but what the research seems to be showing is that most humans (including babies) need more D, at least in countries where indoor lifestyles have become the norm. Perhaps You could request a blood test to see if you or they are actually deficient. I am pretty sure that Officially, the definition for term or preterm is not different for twins. 36 weeks is premature, even for twins. Yes more twin sets are born preterm than singletons. Multiple pregnancy is a rick factor for premature birth. But that does not change the definition of term. ...
    9 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*caters's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:23 PM
    the green color could be from too much lactose from the foremilk and not enough rich hindmilk. Here are some other possibilities if it lasts longer than 24 hours: food sensitivity side effects of medications that pass through your breastmilk or that you give to your baby Feeding routine Gastritis or gastroenteritis, in other words, stomach flu
    3 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*toastedpea's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:22 PM
    Thanks for all your opinions on the sleep! Info on the internet does drive one crazy at times! LO is only 4 months old, which is why I'm concerned about the solids (about the supply going down). I am nursing on demand so I do intend to let LO increase my supply by feeding often. However, I want to SPEED UP the process by adding pumping sessions coz I do want LO to get more at night. She does seem very satisfied during the day but not at all so at night. I want her to get more milk at night and want to ensure that lack of milk is not the reason she has trouble falling asleep at night. She naps fairly well during the day. I really do appreciate all the inputs about the sleep recommendations and insights on introducing solids. It does make sense that I shouldn't drive myself nuts over the 15 hrs figure, etc. I shall keep that in mind! However, I do want to increase my supply. I'd feel happy to have more than enough for LO, esp. at night. Like I said, I just want to make sure that that's not the reason for LO not falling asleep at night. Thanks again, dear ladies!
    10 replies | 270 view(s)
  • @llli*bcsant's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:51 AM
    Hey mamas - I am EBF my 4 week old and am now having a few concerns, but am not sure if I should even be worried. For the first few weeks, he had great, "typical" BF poops - yellow and seedy. Now, they range in color and texture. For example, his first 3 poops today were yellow, but not seedy. Then, he started having dark green, kinda slimy poops. Sometimes a bit runny. He nurses on one side only (I thought this was the best way for him to get hindmilk?) at each feeding. Obviously, if he is still hungry, I will switch to the other side - but he's never seemed to need it. He generally "falls off" or lets go of the latch naturally when he is full.
    3 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:41 AM
    Fussyness, crying, hiccups, spit up, not spitting up, gassiness, and grunting, -all of this truly sounds entirely normal to me. One thing to look may be the 'regular' burping. I have seen parents burp a baby so much it was actually causing issues. Many breastfed babies need no burping at all. Also, Often just holding baby upright brings burps up gently. Also, reclining chairs and cradles like the rock in play hold baby at an entirely different angle then when a baby is held by an adult or worn against mom or dad in a sling. in the r&p, Baby is on an incline, but still on his back. Snuggled against mom or dad, baby is not only more upright but more on tum. This helps with gas. And sometimes air bubbles only come up a bit after baby has nursed- baby cries, and you can burp then. It is currently thought that food borne allergies via breastmilk occur in a relatively low percentage of babies. It happens, of course.
    14 replies | 328 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:17 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I'm so sorry that things haven't been easy for you and your baby in the breastfeeding department. But please don't despair- you are still at the very beginning of your breastfeeding journey and a lot of moms have problems similar to yours that go on for longer than yours have and yet still manage to go on to enjoy the nursing relationship of their dreams. With my first, I had cracked nipples for 4.5 months, had to supplement with formula and pump all the time. Breastfeeding was so miserable that I was on the cusp of giving up and going to exclusive formula on multiple occasions, and I swore that if I continued to nurse I would not nurse for one single day longer than 12 months. Instead, I nursed that kid for 3 years because nursing got so much better! The first thing I would love to have you do is to see a lactation consultant, preferably one who is an IBCLC. The LC from the hospital may not be an IBCLC; often hospital LCs are nurses with a few hours of additional coursework in lactation. They're not specialists like IBCLCs are. When you go to see the IBCLC, I would want to discuss the following: 1. Tongue and lip ties. Baby is hurting you, clicking, and seems to be having difficulty transferring milk- this all suggests the possibility of a tie. If the IBCLC finds one, you probably need to see your pediatrician, a pediatric dentist, or a pediatric ENT to have the tie cut, so ask for a referral to...
    2 replies | 140 view(s)
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