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  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 03:30 PM
    I only feel semi full when he occasionally has a longer stretch of sleep at first at night (first 3 hrs) otherwise I feel "deflated" which doesn't help my confidence but I guess actually that is better than going engorged
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 PM
    thank you. even if I wanted to pacify him there is no way or extend him l, he just doesn't allow that so I still nurse whenever he feels like it. Yeah I think he is having a growth spurt on top of things. The LC said to extend and NOT to supplement and pedi said to extend and supplement bc I am letting him go hungry but I have not done either, meaning I just let him nurse whenever he wants. Thanks, sometimes I just need reassurance. And I do not recall being engorged ever as he never lets me
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:05 PM
    LOL, you must have a sturdy crib! I think I would have broken mine if I tried climbing into it!
    5 replies | 191 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:02 PM
    You can just nurse on one side, but it's usually better to keep both sides in use. It prevents you from becoming visibly lopsided due to lopsided production and in an emergency, you have a backup breast. Keep offering the slower-flowing breast. Try diffent positions, try offering it first, try offering it first and last... Eventually your baby should figure out how to make it flow like the one she currently prefers.
    12 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:00 PM
    Wow, in your shoes I would be looking for a new pediatrician and a new LC! I can't believe the bad information they fed you. First, extending the time between feedings by allowing a baby to fuss or substituting a pacifier for the breast is not a good idea. Milk supply is created and maintained by demand. When you stretch the time between feedings, you cut down on demand and that can cause supply to tank. While it seems to make intuitive sense that allowing the milk to "collect" in the breast will result in baby getting a larger and therefore more "satisfying" meal when nurses, allowing the breast to fill up is actually a ticket to lower supply. Second, babies don't require "full meals". With a breastfed baby, there's really no such thing because the size of the average meal will vary greatly. A baby who is hungry and feeding eagerly from a full breast might take 3-4 oz, or even more. A baby who is feeding slowly and primarily for comfort might take in 1 oz or less. But it doesn't matter. That mix of big "meals" and little "snacks" all adds up to the baby getting the right number of calories for the day. On average babies require around 20-30 oz of milk per day, and they usually acquire this milk with some big feedings and lots of little ones. Third, babies don't get "gassy and uncomfortable" from not digesting "old food" before "new food" is introduced. That is literally one of the most ridiculous breastfeeding myths I have ever heard. Any adult...
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:45 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Since you're only having trouble with that first morning session, my first guess is that this is stress-related. It's not that the milk isn't there- it's that for whatever reason you are unable to relax enough to allow a letdown to happen. If this is the case, there are some relaxation techniques which might help, like deep breathing and closing your eyes and meditating. It might also help to visualize running water or milk flowing into the bottle or the baby- whatever works for you, right?!- and to smell an item of your baby's used clothing, since scent can be a powerful trigger. It may be that none of the above works for you- but give it a try!
    1 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*spicy.love's Avatar
    Today, 02:22 PM
    My DD is almost 20 weeks old. I have been back at work for almost 7 weeks. When I first got back to work, I had no trouble pumping, getting anywhere between 3-5oz per session. I would pump 3 times at work. In the mornings, I feed her from one side and then pump the other side, usually getting between 2-4oz. A few weeks ago, I started having trouble pumping at work. My first morning pump session I just can't get a let down and I end up barely getting 1oz on most days. But then my next two pump session (usually around 3-3.5 hours between sessions) I pump just fine, getting anywhere between 4-5oz. I'm not really understanding what is going on during that morning session. I hadn't made any changes to my routine. The only thing I could think of was I had caught my DD's cold, but it was really mild, just a slight runny nose and a little bit of a sore throat and coughing, and it only lasted a few days at most. But it's been over a week since that cold, I would have figured if that was the cause, I would be back to normal by now. This is what my schedule typically looks like: 430a Breastfeed/Pump 630a Get to work
    1 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    Today, 01:27 PM
    So then is a good estimate of milk to set out for him the amount I seem to be (on average) pumping at each session I'm away from him? Or if I can sit down and pump 7oz in 30min, roughly around the time he would be nursing, is this 7oz only because of oversupply and not truly the amount my body is calibrated to his eating at that time? THanks!
    11 replies | 341 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Today, 01:06 PM
    Yes, I have an appointment on Friday with the LC. We just had our first successful breastfeeding session, I think. She finally seemed content after, so I am hopeful! One breast produces MUCH more milk than the other, and she is much more interested in nursing on that side only. What do I do about this? She seems to get frustrated when I put her to the other side, can I just nurse from one side? Thank you so much for all your help!
    12 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Hello ladies. I am again dealing with an issue that I don't know how to resolve. My little guy will be 6 weeks on friday. Gained nice and is about 11lb13oz (weighed today). I wrote here before because I always think I don't have enough supply but it becomes evident that it is because bebe is on the boob constantly. He obviously takes it for feeding, for comfort, going to sleep. It is all good but that creates a vicious cycle. He will feed then 1/2 hr later he wants to put himself to sleep so boob he gets and it does trickle down his throat and he won't let go of the nipple either. then 1/2 later he wakes up, burps all uncomfortable, may even spit semi digested milk and of course wants a boob again. Then he expects a full meal but how can I produce 3 oz or so when he just sat on it for 30 minutes suckling (and drinking because I definitely feel let down and him swallowing). At this point LC recommended we extend feedings every 2 hrs and I offer him paci and have him fuss. Pediatrician thinks he is crying because he is hungry because I cannot ever provide "full meal" since he is at the breast constantly. LC said he will become gassy and uncomfortable since he doesn't fully digest food before new food is introduced. The thing is he won't take any pacifier!!! I even tried a bottle with like an ounce of my milk between the feedings so that he can fall asleep and I can have around 2 hr break to "collect" more of a fuller meal for him and sure he'll take a bottle with liquid as...
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    I am not saying there is not a problem. Since you have latch pain, that indicates there IS a problem. But the fact remains babies only need supplements if they cannot gain normally nursing a normal amount of times. The behavior you describe could mean many things. Again I suggest seeing an IBCLC and working on latch. Nursing should not hurt and latch pain may indeed indicate baby is having difficulty transferring enough milk. They can also do a before and after nursing weight check to see if baby is actually unable to transfer milk normally. These tests are hard to do and are not conclusive and it is best if more than one can be done over a few visits, however, if baby is able to transfer 2 ounces in a "normal" nursing session (both sides, baby nursing 20-30 minutes total) then that would be a good indicator baby is capable of transferring milk normally. Meanwhile, I suggest keep offering, do not wait until baby is hungry to encourage baby to nurse. A calm baby almost always nurses better than one who is frantic. If some nursing sessions are not all that productive that is ok, that is entirely normal. Sometimes babies get very little and other times they get more. But at this age, a baby has no ability to wait, they get upset very shortly after they first cue and when they are upset they are less organized and latch poorly. Also baby will often have a little more patience to work on different latch techniques if not too hungry. If baby has become frantic, I suggest...
    12 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 03:19 AM
    aww mama hugs! ladies here are wonderful and hopefully your issues will soon resolve. Now I wil tell you my son does a lot of what you say. That is why I "always" feel he is hungry. That paired with one slacker boob and me not being able to pump anything after the feeding always makes me nervous. He DOES gain very well though so objectively I know he is fed well and ladies here have been so reassuring. He has gone from 7lb14oz lowest weight to 11lb12oz at 5weeks3days. Everone who is smart (I asked here, my local LLL leaders, Dr.Jack newman, Cheryl Taylor from Dr Jay Gordon's office- my lll leaders sent me an article re growth and she is their lactation consultant) tells me not to supplement (except my pedi who somehow thinks his length has to match his weight). But he does a lot of fussying and "seems" hungry after he is done. i do pump my milk at night once when he skips feeding and give it to him in those situations. Sometimes he settles and sometimes he doesn't. My local LLL leader asked if I had fast let down (I do) and if I pace feed because he may be one of these kids who finishes meal fast and doesn't register in his brain he is full yet (I started doing pace feedings when I do give him my milk and he is much better). Also I know when the flow is slower he gets fussy but now I don't make it so easy for him with the bottle and he has to work at the bottle same way he has to at the breast. He likes it fast... You seem to have milk even after feeding her so I am certain...
    12 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:57 PM
    I would assume she was satisfied if she was not crying after the breast and rooting and putting hands in mouth, etc. All of these things are indicating to me that she is still hungry. She does not typically behave this way after a couple ounces in the bottle. I I have been trying everything today, first I tried to feed when I knew she was not very hungry and she didn't have much interest in it. Then I tried waiting until she was very hungry but she just got frustrated at that point. Then she started latching and unlatching repeatedly and flailing her arms after I tried to put her back to the breast after the bottle. Nothing has seemed to work. We both end up crying at the end of every attempt. :(
    12 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:45 PM
    If a baby is getting a significant amount of nutrition from solids, the formula would no longer apply. As I posted above, that formula (which is actually 1 to 1.5 ounces per hour) is based on the idea that an exclusively breastfed baby needs about 25-35 ounces of breastmilk per 24 hours. We know that this is the average intake for an exclusively nursing baby who gains normally. If a baby is old enough and is getting enough ounces of solids, then they would not need as much breastmilk. This is never a problem when a baby is nursed, because it is not as if more milk at the breast than baby strictly needs is in any way a problem. It isn't. But when a baby is partly bottle fed, there are many reasons to avoid overfeeding with bottles. Also what caloric intake is actually required for a one year old is unclear, and of course will also vary child to child. But it is certainly not more than a younger baby because a one year old is not gaining nearly as quickly.
    11 replies | 341 view(s)
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