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  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Today, 01:08 PM
    Thank you so much for the advice and suggestions! Makes me feel a little better. I will try not to get hung up on the numbers and will try having my caregiver offer a little more solids during the day. She is also mixing in milk so baby is getting some that way as well. It is hard to leave my baby during the day (wish I didn't have to!) and now that she is not eating much it has really been upsetting to me. I really appreciate you taking the time answering me! :)
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*runnermom31's Avatar
    Today, 11:59 AM
    I was in a similar situation with my LO. there is an excellent facebook group for tt/lt and they also have links to resources posted there as well as a link too a preferred provider finder. goodluck
    2 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    Today, 11:31 AM
    I'm somewhat freaking out right now... first time Mom with a 5 month old. I'm currently in the reserves and I just got word that our two week training got moved up to mid May. That puts my daughter at 8 months. I had planned to nurse her at least a year (September 2017). Currently she doesn't take a bottle, but hopefully she will take a sippy cup (we're going to try that this week). My main question is, how detrimental (if at all) is it to breastfeeding if you're away from your baby for 2 weeks? Side note: I'll be half way across the country, so no quick evening trips. Will I have to cease breastfeeding after that since it's too large of a gap? I already don't want to leave her for that length of time which is hard enough. But being new to this, even if I were to pump while I'm gone, could that potentially screw her up? Any info is greatly appreciated!
    0 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:10 AM
    I get it. This has long been an opinion held by many dentists. But it is one that is not held up by the evidence, according to the Journal of the American Dental Association. Plenty of pediatricians also hold outdated, unproven, and disproven opinions about breastmilk and breastfeeding, and consequently do not follow infant feeding guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatricians when advising the parents of their patients. Breastfeeding erroneously being blamed for any number of health issues is nothing new. I am sorry I cannot offer more help as far as what to do about your child's teeth decay. Here is more info about xylitol and how to use it: Xylitol - Reducing Cavities The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recognizes the benefits of xylitol on the oral health of infants, children, adolescents, and persons with special health care needs. The use of XYLITOL GUM by mothers (2-3 times per day) starting 3 months after delivery and until the child was 2 years old, has proven to reduce cavities up to 70% by the time the child was 5 years old.
    7 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Today, 10:59 AM
    Thank you for the input! I wouldn't say her latch is painful I guess maybe it's just different so I notice it...I will try some positioning adjustments.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:52 AM
    Ok so typical intake for that period of time would be about 10-15 ounces. But not all babies take in the typical amount! My best suggestion is to try to increase what baby will eat during the day but try not to get too hung up on the numbers, if that makes sense. 6-8 hours is a long sleep stretch ("Sleeping through the night" is actually defined as 5 consecutive hours) and many babies do not start sleeping that long consistently until they are well over a year old. Again when a baby does sleep that long early on, whether they do so on their own or due to some other reason, they often change that sleep pattern a few months later. More food into baby during the day may help baby sleep a bit longer at night, but you also may be many months away from baby consistently sleeping long stretches again. Actually the most common issue is something called "excess lipase" and it can make expressed milk smell and taste a bit soapy, some people say the smell is "metallic." The milk is not bad, it is perfectly safe to drink, and many babies will drink it fine. But some babies react to the smell and will not. This issue appears after expressed milk has been stored, usually when it has been frozen, but in some cases even after refrigeration. If baby is reacting the same way to "fresh" milk and there is no soapy smell, you can probably rule out lipase. Yes actually spoiled milk would smell spoiled. It is quite simple and common sense, really. I will link a video....
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:31 AM
    Actually this does seem to be fairly common. But the same 'rules' apply- nursing should not hurt, if it does, something may need to be adjusted. Latch changes might be brought on by teething, baby getting "lazy" (just not careful) about latch, baby getting acrobatic at the breast, or due to positioning. Or all of the above. As a baby gets older, it is usually needed to adjust positioning so that baby has room to tilt their head back a bit when latching and nursing, so that the chin does not tuck. Of course another reason nursing might hurt at this age has to do with hormonal changes mom may be going through. Pregnancy can make nursing painful, and simply the return of fertility (ovulation, menstruating) might cause temporary sensitivity. Thrush is also a small possibility when nursing starts to hurt at this age. The teeth scraping part of this article might be helpful. http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Today, 08:12 AM
    When I first went back to work when she was 4 months old she did refuse the bottle at first but after a couple days she was eating about 10-15oz spread out throughout the 10 hours I was gone. That went on until she hit 6 months and I was off for a week at Christmas. When she first went back in January she ate fine for a few days and then out of nowhere she pretty much stopped eating from the bottle and had about 4 to 6oz per day. Now she is having even less then that most days eating only about .5oz to maybe an oz about two times per day. I am having my caregiver give more oatmeal with more milk in it and also mixing milk into her purees. Some nights my baby is also up every hour. I have kind of ended up co-sleeping since I feed her laying on my side in bed so I can at least rest while she is eating and she has been just falling asleep in bad with me. Some nights she will sleep part of the night in her pack n play, which is where she used to sleep before the daytime hunger strike happened. I just want to make sure she is eating enough so if I have to feed her at night I will definitely continue to do that. The sippy cups we have tried so far are the nuk learner cup, munchkin 360 trainer cup, munchkin straw sippy cup, and I just got the Philips avent. I have not yet tried the tommee tippy but thank you for the suggestion! I was also thinking at this point it might be better to just give up on the bottles and just try cups since we will be heading that way soon...
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Today, 08:08 AM
    Hi all. My baby girl turns 6 months this week and for the past week I've noticed her latch feels different. Like she's taking more breast in her mouth and its borderline uncomfortable. Is it common for latches to change as baby gets older? She's EBF and doesn't take a soother or bottle. But she is teething hard.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 AM
    Thank you so much for responding! To answer some of your questions, ,my baby is separated from me for about 10 hours. I will definitely not stop nursing at night especially since she is not eating much during the day during the week. On the weekends she sleeps much better only waking one or two times to eat. She used to sleep 6 to 8 hours at night sometimes more up until 6 months old. She did this by herself I never did any sleep training or anything like that and always fed her if she did wake in the night, but that was pretty rare up until she was 6 months old. I don't think there is a taste problem to the milk as I tried giving her milk that was just expressed when my mom watched her on a weekend and during the week she gets either defrosted frozen milk or milk from the previous days pumping that was refrigerated over night and she reacts the same to all of it. I smell the milk also and it always smells fine to me. I assume that if it was bad it would smell similar to bad cows milk? Am I right in that assumption? My caregiver is my husbands cousin and has been very sympathetic to our feeding issues and is up to trying anything to get my baby to take a bottle again. Since baby has taken less milk at a time, .5oz to maybe 2oz, I have her offer milk more frequently about every 2 hours (which is closer to how frequent she eats with me when breastfeeding) than before but baby is just refusing to eat most of the time and about twice in the 10 hours she has some milk...
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    Today, 07:04 AM
    Thank you.* It's very useful to have another point of view and I do agree that breast milk is not in itself damaging however my daughter has problems with her enamel, we do not know why and while I believe breast milk* is less damaging than other food at this point I think anything left on her teeth is creating decay. My daughter does not have anything except water to drink from her sippy cup and has a balanced diet.* I have always breastfed on demand and we brush her teeth at least 3 times a day a tooth paste that contains xylitol.* Again thank you so much for your input, I'm at my wits end watching her teeth get worse.* So far I've been told by 3 different dentists to stop breastfeeding completely as in their opinion breast milk is worse than food.
    7 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*tralala.pom's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 AM
    The two things you have mentioned are not all the drawbacks of pacifiers. If interested in more, you may find this a good read: http://www.analyticalarmadillo.co.uk/search/label/Dummies%2FPacifiers Instead of a pacifier in the evening, two things come to my mind: 1) just use your pinky (of course, cut off the nail, wash properly with water without detergents) - that always did the trick for me when my son needed non-nutritive sucking and/or 2) put the baby into a baby wrap and take a walk in the evening (inside or maybe even better outside) - the motion and closeness will help him sleep. Do you have enough information/guidance on how to deal with OALD?
    2 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*longtalltexan's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 AM
    Hi mommadaw! Sorry for the delayed reply! In those early weeks, I would sometimes hold him against my chest or on my shoulder and bounce on a yoga ball while singing to him until he calmed down or fell asleep. I'd also try walking him up and down the hall in the dark while singing, or putting him in a front carrier like an Ergo or sling and walking outside for a while until he fell asleep. DH also took him for some walks to get him to fall asleep so he could nurse more calmly.
    8 replies | 1639 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:45 PM
    I am sorry you are having this difficulty with your child's dental health. There are many reasons a child might be particularly prone to tooth decay- it may be genetic, due to in utero factors, or be more or less bad luck when it comes to what type of bacteria colonizes baby's oral cavity. So, it may have nothing to do with your child's diet. According to the Journal of the American Dental Association article I am linking below, there is no conclusive evidence that either nursing or night nursing is a contributive factor to a child being prone to decay. From what I understand, once a child has severe decay, ANY food left on the teeth might pose a problem as it breaks down. Obviously young children need to eat and drink frequently, so it then becomes a matter of keeping the teeth as clean as possible between meals. I am unaware of any studies that indicate that breastmilk is any worse than any other carbohydrate source that might coat teeth and cause decay. I am also not aware of any studies that indicate that preventing a child from nursing at night helps stem already existent tooth decay. If brushing your child's teeth overnight is too difficult, have you tried wiping the teeth instead?
    7 replies | 132 view(s)
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