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  • @llli*whoa1225's Avatar
    Today, 06:26 AM
    Hi! This is my first post here on LLL :-) However, I have used the resources on this website over the past 5 months and have found it to be so helpful :-) So, a little background, I have a 5 month old. He is mainly breastfed - when I'm with him I nurse him and when he's at daycare he gets 2 breastmilk bottles and 1 formula bottle. A couple of weeks ago he started getting fussy when nursing and when drinking his BM bottles at daycare. Not screaming or anything but just kind of acting like he didn't want to eat and/or was full. Which is strange because this would happen during his first feeding of the day (aka at times when he has always been/should be hungry). This has then transpired into him spitting up large amounts. He's always spit up some but I've always considered that normal. But he's spitting up so much now that daycare has talked to me about it and this morning I became concerned because he spit up what seemed to be his entire morning feeding as I was getting ready for work. Sometimes he will even spit up 2+ hours after a feeding. And most of the time it'll be so much that he needs a new outfit. What would cause a 5 month old to start spitting up a lot? I haven't changed my diet. I can't figure out what it could be :-( Can babies develop dairy allergies later like this? Any help is appreciate! Thank you!
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:14 AM
    @llli*mommal replied to a thread day weaning in Weaning
    Since he'll be so close to a year, I think your plan sounds basically sound. Here's how I would tweak it: - Instead of diluted juice, offer whole fruits and give formula, water, or whole animal milk as beverages. Juice is terrible for teeth and provides empty calories, and arguably it's something that people just shouldn't drink. Formula is the best breastmilk alternative until 12 months. - Stay flexible about your plans. If your baby goes on a major solid food strike or won't drink animal milk, pumping might help you bridge that gap. Also, weaning might take more tim that you expect- you might end up wanting or needing to pump at work, and you're going to want the machine with you just in case.
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Today, 05:24 AM
    We had our 2month apt with the pediatrician and she continues to gain a consistent half pound every week (now 10lb 13oz and 22.5 inches), so I'm feeling good that any possible oversupply or oald issues are not effecting baby girl's growth.!:)
    12 replies | 397 view(s)
  • @llli*bluegirl's Avatar
    Today, 12:46 AM
    @llli*bluegirl started a thread day weaning in Weaning
    My son is currently 10 months old; I'll return back to work 1.5 weeks shy of his first birthday. I'll be gone for 11 hours then (6am to 5pm) and do not want to pump during that time. When should I start day weaning to avoid engorgement? And do I need to replace the missed nursing sessions with formula? My son is currently eating 3 meals a day (no snacks) - about a large egg size amount each meal. I was thinking about a month before I go back to work, I would start dropping afternoon feeding, then late morning, then late afternoon and lastly early morning. To replace the missed nursings, I would start introducing a few snacks throughout the day with some diluted juice. I don't think I need to replace the missed nursing with formula because I wont be cutting back on the night and evening nursings. Will that work? Thanks!
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*irishmam's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:34 PM
    Thank you for your very detailed and helpful response! I don't think daycare is overfeeding him - she has breastfed all four of her own kids and I've seen her bottle feeding other BFed babies and she does mimic the paced feeding pattern. I do think I need to nurse/pump more. Currently, he wakes every two-three hours at night and I usually nurse him three times a night. Until recently, we were cosleeping, but moved him into his crib as we wanted to "reclaim" our evenings, especially now that I am back at work! I am in two minds about moving him to the crib, but I don't really nurse him any less because of this. I'm going to try and pump once more in the evening after I put him to bed and I'm going to try and squeeze in one more session of pumping at work and see how that works out. I also started taking fenugreek last week and today at work I pumped 5oz and 4oz over the two sessions. Thanks again for all your input! It's always reassuring to know that there ARE solutions and support out there :-)
    2 replies | 264 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:11 PM
    Pediatrician's advice does not make sense. Feeding baby less often deprives him of calories for long stretches of time every day. Your milk supply will decrease due to decreased stimulation and milk removal. And while it might make your baby hungrier, there's no guarantee that being hungrier will result in him eating more or eating better/more balanced meals. Question: you say that your baby boy is 10 months old and you have been sleeping with his baby sister... How far apart in age are your kids?
    5 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:05 PM
    Is thrush a possibility?
    5 replies | 370 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    :ita Good advice above. I just want to add that if the milk is really piling up, you might consider donating. You'd make someone very happy!
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:00 PM
    Pretty typical behavior for a baby who is starting to teethe...
    2 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Do you have the Mirena IUD? Some moms find that Mirena has a negative impact on supply. It's not supposed to, but there's pretty good anecdotal evidence that some moms find it problematic.
    6 replies | 299 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:22 PM
    When I can tell my baby is about to do this I push my breast into her face so she cannot pull off and has to unclamp.
    2 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*anxiousmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:36 PM
    Thank you. I will contact a lactation specialist.
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*mums's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:26 PM
    Has anyone done this (baby is 10 months old) and managed to continue to nurse weekends and am/pm? I am a FT working mom. Currently, my pump output over several sessions a day is not even a bottle so she is already getting formula. She also eats lots of solids. Would love to hear about experiences with this! My hope is that it can be done.
    0 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:51 PM
    Are you still pumping right after nursing in the AM on work days? If so, that is the one I would say to cut out. otherwise instead of cutting out pumping sessions, it is usually best to just pump less at each session if you feel you want less milk in your stash since you may eventually need more sessions as your supply regulates down. Over supply is only really bad if it causes problems with engorgement, plugs, mastitus or OALD which could cause issues for baby. So if you feel you need to help your body regulate down, you should probably just try to pump less when you pump (cut out any pumping sessions that happen right after baby nurses!) And When pumping on the weekend, only do the bear minimum for comfort perhaps hand express instead of pumping. Of course if you don't mind having a huge stash and it isn't causing you any problems, it will make cooking for baby with breastmilk later much easier.
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:57 PM
    This comment makes me think there could be some other issues going on because if all is well with latch and nursing, your nipples would be fine even with almost constant nursing. I highly recommend you seek some hands on help from a lactation specialist who can help with latch, supply, pumping if needed, and supplementation if needed. Here is a link that may help you find an IBCLC in your area http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901 Unfortunately there are lots of doctors and nurses out there (even ones who have nursed babies) that don't always understand milk production all that well and sometimes give misinformed advice. Here is a link to the LLL's sweet sleep tear sheets (quick info on bed sharing) I know all the hype is that babies are always supposed to be put to sleep all by their lonesome in their own bed but this really isn't realistic for breastfeeding pairs and provided you follow safety considerations, are breastfeeding, do not have any medical conditions or medications that make bed sharing dangerous, there is no evidence that a baby and breastfeeding mom bed sharing is any more dangerous than putting baby to bed in a crib. In fact incidence of actual SIDS is decreased (most of the recommendations for how to put babies to sleep, the whole back to sleep campaign has little to do with actual SIDS and is mostly about avoiding suffocation dangers.)
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*jelynn52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:55 PM
    Hi! My LO is 15 weeks. I have been back to work full-time for the last month and 1/2 and have been pumping almost double what she is taking from the bottle while I am at work. When I first went back to work, I would pump after nursing her in the am and then 3 times while working (10:30, 1:00, and 3:30). I have now cut back to 2 times at work (11:30 and 3:00) and am still pumping double my LO's intake with a bottle. I breastfeed when I am home and on weekends. I find I need to pump once during the morning on the weekends because my LO isn't hungry and I feel like my breasts are always full. My LO only nurses one side when I am BF, but when I pump I do both. I wasn't sure whether you can pump only one breast per session or if this will hurt my milk supply.
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:49 PM
    I agree, we need more info. Nipple pain and injury most commonly indicates a latch issue. But this sounds more like a plug or bleb possibly? Of course, poor latch would lead to that. I would suggest seeing a lactation consultant or breastfeeding peer counselor or SOMEONE who has the expertise to help with breastfeeding problems, in person, asap. More info: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/mastitis/ and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    3 replies | 209 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:42 PM
    Lactation cookies & teas contain galactagogues. They are for increasing milk production. Not all mothers require any galactagogues to make enough milk. In fact, most do not. Even malnourished mothers make "good" milk, although it is true that if a mother is very low in certain nutrients her milk may be as well. A malnourished mother may not make enough milk. And of course, malnourishment is not healthy for the mother. Again, if you need to pump, hand express, or encourage baby to nurse more to avoid painful engorgement, do so. You were pumping 5 ounces extra every night. It might take several days to wean your body away from needing that pump session.
    12 replies | 397 view(s)
  • @llli*anxiousmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 AM
    We have family on both sides in town. But I have had to specify that I need a nap for an hour or two instead of a visit when necessary. I'm not recovering from a complicated c section. I had a great delivery but it has been hard for me to nap when she naps cause I need to shower, eat, was dishes/bottles, take out the trash, urinate and I haven't done well napping when she does except a handful of times. My husband is against her sleeping with me but he has agreed to buy a co sleeper so I'm waiting on that to come in. As far as breast feeding that was going fantastic til this past weekend. I don't know if it is just that I'm sleeping too much which I changed last night or if she is having a growth spurt and my supply will increase again. I don't know if I should never have been pumping as much as I was. I really don't want to supplement with formula but if I continue to pump so little and breastfeed so much like I gave thus weekend then I don't think my nipples can withstand even another week like this.
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:06 AM
    I want to start this reply with two things: mothering a newborn is really tiring, hard, constant work. You deserve, as every new mom deserves, to have a really hearty support system around you that can take care of almost everything outside of nursing the baby. Walking the dogs, doing the laundry, diaper and bath, cooking you nourishing and easy-to-hold-with-one-hand foods, etc. You mention that your husband has been taking a 5-6 hour stretch, so it seems like he's game to be really supportive in this, which is great! Other than him, what does your support system look like? Are you living close to other family; what are your relationships with neighbors, etc? Because this is hard physical and emotional work!- and it's normal for it to be hard. And knowing something is normal still doesn't make it easier, but it sometimes can help keep perspective, and help not to pathologize it. Secondly: You are the expert on your own family. So any commentary or thoughts or suggestions that people share here, myself included-- just take it or leave it, because you can make the right informed decisions for yourself and your family. Alright, alright, that said-- is there a reason, outside of this normal new born phase, that you are medically/psychologically needing more rest? Are you healing from a complex C-section, or have a medical condition that requires that 5-6 hour stretch? I ask because, if you are able to just roll with your babe's natural nursing pattern right now (a pattern...
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*whitney6484's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:58 AM
    My nipples are also suddenly damaged with my Medela Pump In Style. They become cracked and bleeding. I have tried different sized shields as well. I'm really frustrated! I think I am going to stop by a local BF'ing group to see if they notice anything wrong...
    5 replies | 370 view(s)
  • @llli*whitney6484's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:51 AM
    Thank you, this was just the reassurance that I needed. I appreciate all the replies. Some days are more exhausting than others but all-in-all, it's worth everything!
    5 replies | 332 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:49 AM
    I hope the new ideas work out and result in affordable and more effective pumps! My nipples always so sore after pumping.
    3 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*anxiousmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:01 AM
    I just spoke with my pediatricians nurse and she encouraged me to offer bottles with either expressed milk or formula after she has nursed so that I can rest. And she said I won't have much time to pump if I'm nursing every 3 hours. I don't know what to do. Everything changed so quickly and we were just getting comfortable. I will look up sweet sleep and paced bottle feeding. Thank you.
    9 replies | 225 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:51 AM
    are you doing baby led solids (baby led weaning)? I would recommend the books My Child Won't Eat and Baby Led Weaning Also, may babies actually gain less when they start solids since few solids have as many calories so sticking with high calorie foods along with breastfeeding on demand and making sure Iron, zinc, and Vit D levels are good should help. My son's weight gain has actually picked up since starting baby led weaning and vitamins and he is only 6 1/2 months old but very active and already mobile.
    5 replies | 165 view(s)
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