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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:57 PM
    Hi ira.archana. It does not look as if the OP has posted here in a few months. Hopefully she will respond to you, but whatever her experience, it may have no bearing on your baby. Is your 6 month old baby having frequent, explosive stools like the op's 6 week old? Or do you mean, blood in stool? What other symptoms are you seeing that makes you think your baby's health needs improving? Blood in stool does not necessarily mean any health issue. It depends what else is going on. We can help you troubleshoot if you can give us a little more info- is baby exclusively breastfed or have you started solids, for example?
    9 replies | 15733 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:18 PM
    :ita What symptoms of dehydration are the doctors referring to? The low pee output? I have to say that the "milk is food, babies need water" thing is 100% ridiculous. Let's say you or I decided to stop drinking water and to just drink milk. What would happen- would we end up dehydrated and die, or could we stay adequately hydrated provided we drank as much milk as we were thirsty for? That's right, we'd be just fine! Same goes for babies.
    8 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:59 PM
    This is a pretty typical occurrence and is usually nothing more than a temporary issue. Pumping is unlikely necessary, and a bottle would probably only make the issues worse. I am not telling you to not feed your baby however you can if she really needs it, I am just saying, it is very unlikely she needs it. She knows where the milk is and how to get it out, and does so fine when she wants to. Healthy babies over the newborn stage are very unlikely to go without nursing if they are hungry and need to eat. It would help to know how old baby is, and also if there has been any reason to be concerned about your milk production- any weight gain issues, anything else? Otherwise, I would suggest, just keep offering to nurse/nursing whenever baby will, for as long as baby will. If you feel you are uncomfortably full and baby will not nurse, fine to pump, but just store that milk. As much as possible, avoid bottles and pacifiers. Babies nurse for comfort, food and thirst. To encourage normal nursing frequency, try to avoid as much as possible having those needs met any other way.
    1 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 05:20 PM
    :yikes This must be so difficult for you. Dr. Newman has a brief article that may be helpful as well: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-HRMS I've had decent luck with Fenugreek. I was recommended Mother's Milk tea as well, but I am not sure you should even bother with it unless you love tea and drink it all the time. You can get both on amazon or at regular grocery stores depending on where you live.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*aishahorn's Avatar
    Today, 05:15 PM
    Help my little one is refusing to nurse during the day. She will nurse for a few minutes and then unlatch and scream bloody murder. She them refuses to relatch and finish. She won't try to eat again for another few hours. The most frustrating part is she still nurses at night no problem. What can I try to improve this? Also it makes me concerned about my supply. Should I try to pump and then give it to her in a bottle? I would prefer not to do this but I feel like it might be my only option. Any advice would be helpful.
    1 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 04:44 PM
    It is normal for patience with and enjoyment of supporting our children's wants and needs to wax and wane. I'm nursing DS3.5 and, if you've read my domperidone thread, you'll see it's been fraught with some emotion. If you're feeling like your current situation is leaving you more frustrated than satisfied, then it's time to make some changes. What does nursing currently look like for you and your DD? What is the maximum amount of nursing contact you would be willing to accept? How does that align with your daughter's minimum satisfactory level? Do you have any particular situations that drive you insane? Focus on the low hanging fruit first. How many of the behaviour you're seeing result from nursing directly? 3 is a challenging age because it aligns with identity and individuation, and a well attached child might well go through a period of clinginess or combativeness in an attempt to test the strength of the parent-child connection. My DS has been going through a dark existentialist phase for the last 6 months, and I understand the exasperation that results from giving motherhood your all and being faced with behavioral flux. If you like, tell us more about the troublesome behaviors, and prevailing/contributory factors, and we can identify some strategies to use.
    2 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:41 PM
    Oh I am so sorry, how scary and shocking. I think what you are already doing is bound to increase production. For good info on galactagogues and milk production issues in general, I suggest the book Making More Milk. www.kellymom.com is probably the best online resource, but her articles pre-date the book. If you contact Lisa Morasco, co-author of Making More Milk, I think she is the one who really knows herbs.... Fenugreek is probably the most generally reliable herbal galactatgogue. But it is not for everyone, moms with diabetes cannot take it, for example. Other herbs I have heard good things about lately are shatavari and something called Moringa, which I do not think is a herb, officially. Not sure.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:32 PM
    Hi debbers, our daughters are just about exactly the same age. I am also dealing with the mood swings and unpredictability of this age. iirc, this was a rather calm age with my 2 sons, but then things got harder especially with my middle one after he turned three. With him, getting through the day without strangling him felt like a major accomplishment. In other words I think this time in general can be quite exasperating, for some a little earlier than others. I am not sure what you mean by will this pay off- by this, do you mean, attachment parenting in general? Nursing? and of course I have no idea what you mean by pay off. But, in case it helps, here is my experience with my older two, now almost 9 and 12, and what I think I gained from AP parenting- It's not about what it has done for my kids, although I am confident parenting my children as I have was the best choice for us, without a doubt. But these days, it is more about what it has done for me. And that is, I know my children. I trust my children. I know myself as a parent, and trust myself to handle difficult issues that arise. Helping a pre-teen navigate this world gets really, really complicated. There is no subject we do not discuss (in an age appropriate manner.) I have found I am very comfortable with talking about just about anything that has come up- Very painful things, like shooting massacres at schools, very uncomfortable things, like sex and puberty, very complicated things, like racism and...
    2 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Today, 04:23 PM
    Sounds like you are doing an amazing job! I have a few thoughts. 1.How long are you pumping at each session? I wonder if it would work better for you at work in the mornings to pump a bit longer every 2 hours rather than pumping every hour. 2. Could you schedule to pump at the same time every work day? For some moms it helps to get their bodies used to a schedule. My understanding is that pump frequency and duration matter only so much that it supports your breast being as "empty" as possible for as much of the day as possible. This is what will signal your body to make more milk. 3. How difficult would it be to schedule more regular sessions in the afternoons? It sounds like you are doing your best not to go more than 3 hours and that is great. I know how difficult it can be when things get busy. Depending on your job though it might just be a matter of feeling selfish and plugging in the time no its ands or buts. Once I made it clear that pumping was a priority at those scheduled times things actually became easier. 4. Is the caregiver using paced bottle feeding? The amount she takes in is within normal range (1-1.5oz per hour away) I think if I'm understanding you correctly 8-14oz in 10.5 hours. However, it couldn't hurt to look at the way she is being fed. 5. Would you be willing to try pumping while driving. This can add to how much you can get. I used to power pump in the car. Have to go for sick kiddo. Hope this gives you some ideas.
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*angela.cormier's Avatar
    Today, 03:09 PM
    Hi everyone, I was starting to wean my son a week and a half ago, at 9 months old. I nursed my daughter for 15 months, but just finished nursing school and am applying for jobs, and didn't want to be starting a new nursing job having to take extended breaks constantly throughout my shifts. I felt awful about it, but decided to start weaning him slowly now, so it wouldn't have to be rushed. A week after we started weaning, he was diagnosed with cancer. We were still nursing about 3-4 times a day, and he was having bottles with half milk/half formula the rest of the time. I am frantically trying to build my supply back up, because obviously all weaning plans have gone out the window, as he will need my milk now more than ever. My left breast seems to have pretty much stopped producing milk, but the right is still doing ok (always the one with a better supply, since baby #1). I started putting him to the breast practically every hour, and he is sleeping terribly, so he is nursing many times throughout the night as well. After two days my breasts still feel much smaller than normal, so I have started pumping during his naps, after he has nursed. What else can I do to increase supply? I know there are galactagogues, but wasn't sure which ones are good and which ones aren't so great. I don't have a lot of time to research this right now given all that we have going on with my son right now. Please help!! Advice would be much appreciated. Thanks.
    2 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 PM
    I just need a safe place to vent. My daughter will be 3 in July and is not ready to wean. They say most moms don't plan to be nursing a toddler. All I can say is I wouldn't have predicted it. But I've always done what she needs. Nursing has become physically uncomfortable and sometimes emotionally draining as I'm simultaneously adjusting to the always developing strong willed little human who seemingly must do everything herself and erupts into tears unexpectedly at any moment. She also tends to be delighted at alternate moments. There's a lot of joy, but enough trying and exhausting moments to make me feel exasperated. I've walked away more times in the past month than in the previous 2Y9M combined. I've always been there for her. Every cry no matter what. Bed sharing since birth. Nursing on demand her whole life although she does not ask in publishing c, only at home.. Please tell me this will all pay off.
    2 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 01:33 PM
    Hmmm . . . very good point. I don't really have any downtime to watch TV and I'm usually sleeping or reading while nursing her, which is why the only time I'm willing to spare is in the mornings if I'm already awake. She slept this morning for some time so I did pump with the Symphony and did get a bit more than I get with the PISA, but she's still nursing a lot today. I guess it's just what we're doing while I'm home. Hubs and I are usually spending time together at meals if I'm not nursing and unfortunately that's about it. Maybe I'm getting ahead of myself and just need to focus on pumping as much as I can at work still.
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:40 PM
    Ok, what is going on that they say baby is clearly dehydrated? Even mild dehydration causes several symptoms, including irritability and lethargy. Is that consistent with your baby? Breastmilk is food, of course. But it is also water. If it were 'only' food, then giving breastfed babies water prior to 6 months would be needed and of course it is not- this is very specifically warned against, in fact. I am curious how many of the doctor's patients are breastfed at this age? I live in the central valley of California, where several months of the year (May-October) it gets routinely over 90 degrees and often into the triple digits for weeks on end, and does not cool off much at night either. And my three kids were never offered water at this age except sips with solid meals, if then. In fact, with my last child, because I was far too busy cooking to be sure to nurse her prior to meals, I purposefully did not give her water with meals so she would be thirsty and nurse lots after the meal. Again, I strongly suggest the book My Child Won't Eat. I do not think it will help your child gain weight any faster, but I do think it might give you a different perspective on what is happening, which frankly to me sounds within the range of normal growth. He also talks about what (in the rare case) serious illnesses might cause poor gain, things that are sometimes overlooked because doctor tend to assume underfeeding is always the problem. A weight gain plateau at this age...
    8 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*mommainafrica's Avatar
    Today, 12:08 PM
    Yes, thank you MaddieB, also, for the information about the water specifically. I definitely offer the breast frequently, sometimes more than once per hour, but he refuses unless he's sleepy or sleeping. I attributed the breast refusal to his age, because he's distracted and always wants to be on the move; however, I'm also not sure if it's an indication of a lack of appetite (possibly because of the anemia?). Anyway, we still offer some water (though now that it's a bit cooler, it's mostly just sips from a cup at meal times), but I've been chastised by a couple of doctors that he needs to be drinking lots of water. They told me that milk is food, the babies need water. I quoted that breast milk is more than 80% water, but they said he's clearly mildly dehydrated and said he needs to be drinking 2-4 ounces per day. If my milk supply is good, could it be that he's just not taking enough? And why would he do that? He generally poops in the mornings, so pretty often it's in his overnight diaper and I count it as one of his wet ones of the day. In the last few days he's decided that he LOVES solids, so we're giving him high-fat, iron-rich foods to try to get some weight on him; however, his weight is holding steady at the lower weight (18b. 2.5oz.). It's extremely frustrating! At this point it's been 9 weeks since the weight plateau/weight loss started with no improvement. I've been breastfeeding as much as I can, offering the best solids (always offering solids...
    8 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 11:43 AM
    I don't know. I'm a little torn. On the one hand, I understand wanting to get rid of the formula supplements. On the other hand, time at home is so precious - you don't want time at the pump to take you away from the baby or from some much-needed rest or - crazy thought - maybe even a few minutes with hubs? I mean, you're having to eat fast just to deal with the laundry as it is. One mom on here used to do a long pumping session in the evening while watching TV, but I'm not hearing that you are spending any time in front of the TV - that would be something to consider if you do have any such down time. Otherwise, I'm wondering whether it wouldn't be worth seeing how things go with a week or two of pumping with the Symphony at work - maybe it will be enough to kick up supply? - and then adding in home pumps if you're not getting closer to baby's expressed milk needs? Keep in mind, too, that excessive exhaustion can actually be counterproductive to milk production - in other words, sometimes it really is better just to get more sleep. I'm thinking of another mom on here with twins who got to the point where setting an alarm in the middle of the night to pump (on top of nursing the babies at night) just wasn't getting her any closer.
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    58 replies | 4257 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    There's an app called Breathing Zone that walks you through a short session of deep breathing. Very relaxing- I use it when I can't sleep or when I'm in an airplane.
    5 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 AM
    I do paperwork and make phone calls, but if you need to relax that may not be appropriate for you. When you were home, were you in a comfortable chair, had pillows, etc.? I also pump at my desk, too, so the whole going to the mother's room (except at other offices) is not something I have to do although I do have that option. I just do better if I'm distracted.
    5 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*ira.archana's Avatar
    Today, 05:01 AM
    Hi, My 6 month old is suffering from exactly the same symptoms. Can you please confirm what it turned out to be in your case? Did stopping dairy improved the babies health. Your quick response would be appreciated.
    9 replies | 15733 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:26 PM
    I have a book of sudoku I always use. During a week of extrenely low production I discovered it helped to have something that required enough attention that I wouldn't fret about getting enough milk, but that I could easily return to (without re-reading the last page) if I started dozing / daydreaming.
    5 replies | 131 view(s)
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