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  • @llli*patriciajd's Avatar
    Today, 10:02 AM
    Sure, I have been adding in another session before I go to bed on that side, plus one in the middle of the night. Is there a frequency to how long I should do this before I can determine whether it is not going to work?
    2 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 09:46 AM
    That's wonderful that you want to help other moms! La Leche League doesn't facilitate breastmilk donations, though. I recommend contacting one of the HMBANA milk banks. You can find one at hmbana.org
    1 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*gracebelle03's Avatar
    Today, 09:31 AM
    Hi i am 29 years old an active mom of 2 healthy kids,I have a great supply of breast milk , and would like to help out another person/family by providing precious nutrients for their loved ones. I currently pump an excess (milk my son does not consume) I have about 1500oz of breast milk frozen in my deep freezer now .
    1 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:07 AM
    Bienvenido al foro! Por favor, disculpe mi pobre español . Me baso principalmente en Google para la traducción. Lamento que has tenido una mala infección . Su médico parece que han dado malos consejos . La mayoría de los antibióticos son compatibles con la lactancia . Usted no tiene que dejar de alimentar sólo a causa de los antibióticos. En este punto , sugiero ver a un especialista en lactancia para obtener ayuda con conseguir su bebé al pecho . El especialista en lactancia también se debe comprobar que el bebé cuidadosamente empate lengua y corbata labio . Si su producción de leche es muy baja , se debe bombear , además de enfermería. Utilice una buena bomba eléctrica. Bomba al menos 8 veces al día .
    2 replies | 39 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 AM
    Translation for the English speakers: Hello!! 8 days ago I stopped breastfeeding my almost 3 week-old baby because I had an infection in both breasts, so much so that I had cracks and I bled out pus. The doctor said I could return to breastfeeding on Monday, but I have noticed that even with the bottle my baby bottle doesn't open his mouth! I am afraid of going back, plus I'm almost not producing milk, what advice do you have for me? Some liners (translator's note: perhaps nipple shields) would help? Thanks in advance!
    2 replies | 39 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:49 AM
    It's very normal to have differences in production between sides. The way you get an underperforming breast to produce more is to give it more stimulation and to remove milk from it more often. So you offer the underperforming side first at feedings, and pump it more often and for longer time periods. It may also help to make sure that you have the right shield size on the underperforming side; it's common for a mom to need 2 different sizes of shields. Sometimes differences in supply between breasts are fairly easy to correct, sometimes not. If you can't get the unerperforming breast to produce more, you just need to rely more on the higher performing side. The key to milk supply is more stimulation and more frequent milk removal.
    2 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:39 AM
    Welcome to the forum! The advice your sister gave you is incorrect. It is advice meant for formula-fed infants, not breastfed ones. As time goes on, formula-fed babies typically space out their feedings more and more, and take larger and larger bottles. Breastfed babies continue to eat frequently and take smaller amounts. (Guess which feeding pattern is normal and healthy. ;)) On average, breastfed babies take 1.5 oz of milk per hour of separation from mom; sometimes they take less, sometimes more, but only rarely do they consistently take more than the 1.5 oz/hour standard. 4 oz every 3 hours is just fine! And there's no need to ever package your milk in 5 oz portions. In fact, we routinely suggest packaging milk in smaller servings (1-3 oz)so that caregivers can feed a baby more typical breastfed baby amounts and also will be forced to pause feedings in order to reach for another bottle, something which can reduce over feeding and unreasonable demands for mom to provide more and more milk. I'm not entirely sure I understand why you're so exhausted- it sounds like your baby is sleeping a really long stretch at night...? If you can explain what exactly has you so tired out and worried, maybe we can suggest some things to alleviate it.
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:30 AM
    This is such a perfect description of what a lot of moms are going through! IMO, the MSPI information that's available online leaves out two crucial pieces of information: first, that there seems to be zero evidence of MSPI being harmful when the baby is otherwise healthy and growing, and second that oversupply is a far more common cause of green/bloody poops than MSPI, so you can't "diagnose" MSPI based on poops alone. People are driving themselves bonkers and worrying that they're harming their babies- it's just not fair.
    9 replies | 274 view(s)
  • @llli*patriciajd's Avatar
    Today, 05:48 AM
    Hi, I have a 3 month old who I have been breastfeeding since birth. When I started going back to work I am now pumping during the day, breastfeeding when I am home. My left breast has consistently made about 50% less milk when pumping than my right. In the past 24-48 hours my let breast has gone from making milk 1-2ounces per pumping session) to less than .5oz (sometimes just a few drops), while thr right continues to be consistently 2-4oz per session. (My daughter drinks about 1-2 ounces per hour I am at work, so about 12-15 a day for a 10 hour day.) Am offering her the left first but am concerned I will have to start her on formula if I can not get my supply to increase again. I am also pumping before I go to bed, and she feeds in the middle of the night. I also no longer feel full on that side and letdown feels a little like pins and needles. Can someone please possibly tell me if there are other things I can do to increase supply on the left side again?
    2 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:41 AM
    This sounds right to me! I am glad your midwife explained it that way. Too often moms think they need to be expressing the same amount of milk that baby takes in bottles in order to start weaning off supplements but this is not so. I don't think it is exactly accurate to say that fattier milk is harder to suck...what may be happening, and I really mean MAY, is that the initial flow from the breast right at "let down" (milk ejection) is fast and forceful, and when that flow slows, as is normal, baby protests. This dovetails with the theory that it is the "too fast" milk flow of improperly given bottles that leads to breast refusal- baby gets used to the fast flow and does not like "slow" (actually normal) flow of the breast. Some moms who have an over production and thus a VERY fast letdown early on report this happening to some degree when milk production evens out and the flow calms down, even when baby has never had a bottle. But it is important to remember that babies fuss at the breast for many, many reasons, because babies are just fussy and are at the breast a good deal- so most of the time, fussiness at the breast has nothing to do with the milk or the flow at all. I don't know what these are, but my best advice is to give all bottles using paced bottle feeding, because this allows baby to control the rate of the flow. Done correctly, paced bottle feeding requires no special nipple, although usually a slow flow nipple makes it easier for the caregiver to...
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 PM
    Hang in there mama! I can`t give better advice than you already have, but I wanted to chime in as a mom who went through a green poop phase relatively recently (my LO is 11 mos). At the time LO was ~ 2 mos old we started having green diapers and a couple instances of visible blood. I thought I might have oversupply, but my milk wasn`t shooting across the room, just a few inches out from my nipple. I worried about whether it really was MSPI, and I was harming my child by `ignoring` it. I would try to compare his diapers to pictures online to decide if they were `green` or a variation on mustard (1st time mom in all this). Through all this he was happy, healthy, etc. It took until ~4 months I think before it resolved, and occasionally I`d second guess myself again. As he grew he became better able to manage, and I seriously doubt it was mspi in our case cause he does fine with dairy and tofu now. But boy I know how hard it is to worry like that! Find a pediatrician that will help you `work the problem` and support you; I think you`ll be happier :)
    9 replies | 274 view(s)
  • @llli*diripouf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:40 PM
    OK, new worries over here (!!) I've been told to not let LO feed for more than an hour maximum… Yet these days it looks like she's actually still hungry after 25+min on each boob… Fair enough she will spend quite a bit of time dozing off and I'll be waking her up etc, but at the end of the hour I can't help but thinking "why am I not letting her have more??" If I give her a top-up she'll then be happy, and I won't pump much at all so unsure whether or not my breasts are indeed empty after an hour (?) This is all so confusing to me! I feel stuck in this game of feeding / pumping / supplementing and not sure it's the right thing to do… She will be weighed again on Monday and if the weight gain has been as good as last week I will start limiting the formula - but in this case, can I let her feed for more than an hour?
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*sammijo.edwards's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 PM
    My son is 5 months and ebf. I just recently went from part time to full time work. I'm nervous about my supply and I'm considering upping his intake/ increasing time in between feedings. Right now he's feeding about every 3 hours during the day and is eating a full 4 oz. I try to pump as many times as he eats while we are away from each other, which is about 3-4 times a day on average. When I pump every 3 hours I'm averaging 4 oz, if I go 4 hours I do get about 5 oz. When he nurses he's gone from taking 30 minutes to less than 20. He's healthy and gaining weight (75 percentile). We co-sleep at night, which helps because he eats whenever he wants. I do try to stay up and pump one last time before bed, during his 8 hour stretch of sleep. I'm considering stopping this completely because I'm just exhausted and want to sleep too! I know I shouldn't worry and just enjoy my baby, but being apart so much now has me missing my little guy. Ultimately, working full time and pumping is just exhausting. So I'm worried that between the time apart, him sleeping longer stretches at a time, and feeding for less time on each breast is going to cause me to make less. As far as the 5 oz every 4 hours, I've been told by my sister who ebf that this is the "next step".
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*greciamom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:43 PM
    Hola!! Hace 8 días dejé de darle pecho a mi bebé de casi 3 semanas porque me cayó una infección en ambos pechos por lo mucho que se me agrietaron, ya me sangraban y me salía pus. La doctora me dijo que éste lunes podía volver a darle pecho, pero he notado que ni con el biberón mi bebé abre la boca! Tengo miedo de volver a darle, además de que ya casi no estoy produciendo leche, qué me aconsejan? Unas pezoneras servirán? Gracias de antemano!
    2 replies | 39 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:00 PM
    A lot depends on what sort of student you are- high school, university, graduate level? While the right to pump is generally protected, schools do not always have pumping facilities available where you need them. Your best bet is likely to contact the administration of your school and discuss what the set-up is for nursing/pumping moms, and to speak to your individual teachers if you must interrupt a class in order to go and pump. They are likely to be understanding about it, especially if you explain that it is a medical need.
    1 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:55 PM
    Instead of waking up to pump, how about waking the baby and nursing? The nighttime nursing would help you maintain your daytime supply, without requiring you to monkey with the pump in the wee hours of the night. Since your frozen stash is so far ahead of your baby's intake, I don't think it's absolutely necessary for you to wake the baby or to pump. Just stay alert for slumping supply- if you are suddenly and consistently pumping way less than usual, the it's probably time to reconsider nighttime feeding/pumping. Another reason you might want to consider nighttime nursing or pumping is that you're more likely to get your cycle back once your baby starts sleeping through the night. If you're enjoying a hiatus from your period, night nursing might help it stay away for longer.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*saschroetter's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:49 AM
    My 7 month old baby started to sleep through the night ~ 3 weeks ago. He'll nurse right before bed (sometimes both sides), then sleep 7 - 8 hours, then wake to eat (once side), then goes back to sleep 2 - 3 hours. Prior to this, he was waking every 2 - 4 hours to eat since he was born. I had been pumping over night when he was sleeping longer stretches. From the beginning, I have been pumping / breastfeeding. Baby had jaundice when he was born (spent 24 hours in the NICU under lights), so I had to pump right from the beginning. Then, I had oversupply issues / fast letdown. Then, he'd choke with breastfeeding - so we did a combination of bottle / breast. I have about a 1.5 - 2 months supply in the freezer. For the past 2 months (with much determination / persistence), he's primarily been breastfed (and only bottle fed when I'm away at work)...no more oversupply or choking. I want to breastfed until at least 12 months. Now that he's consistently sleeping longer, should I still wake up to pump? :shrug Getting sleep seems important too though! Thanks for your help!
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:37 AM
    I think you are expecting results much too quickly. Look at it this way. All throughout your pregnancy your body was preparing to make milk. When your baby was born, your body started making milk. But then, milk was not removed from the breasts often enough, and this told your body to STOP making milk, so it did. Biologically, your body was told there was no baby to nurse. Milk production takes energy and suppresses fertility, and biologically we are designed to propagate the species. So biologically-speaking, your body was doing exactly what makes sense- saving the energy for your survival and to speed the time with which you could conceive again. Now you are telling your body that there IS a baby and to make milk again. It is going to take time for your body to get this message! Have patience. Exclusive nursing can be your goal if you choose. But remember there are mothers who never produce enough milk for their babies and still nurse. There are even mothers who make no milk and nurse. There are mothers whose babies cannot nurse but who give their baby what milk they can express, and every variation you can imagine. These are all breastfeeding mothers and they gain great benefit from doing what they can, even if it is not 'exclusive' breastfeeding. Your goal need not be only the one possibility, is my point. Or there can be an assortment of goals. Personally I think daily goals that you have some realistic control over make more sense (today I will pump one more...
    1 replies | 97 view(s)
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