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  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 06:10 PM
    My baby is 5 days old. He has never nursed more than 10 minutes on average on either breasts. He is so sleepy and I have to wake him up to nurse. My milk came in on day 3 and I heard him swallow the milk. He got so many poop diapers tha day. But today on day 5. I don't feel full. When I offered him one breast he just nursed for 5 minutes and heard him swallow and he is asleep and not interested in nursing. I am so worried that I am not feeling full anymore and he is not interested for much time. I have seen my friends babies who nurses for 45 mins and wakes up to nurse. Why is my baby doesn't wake up to nurse even at 5 days old. I am very curious and worried, and he has not gained any. I feel like I am making a mistake . And I am not sure what it is. I am worried so much that even this time I have failed in breastfeeding . Pls help
    0 replies | 4 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 06:06 PM
    Thanks for you response. I will tell them. I have other concern which I have posted as a new thread
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*haley.c.ayres's Avatar
    Today, 03:00 PM
    As a working mom, I only nurse once a day first thing in the morning. The rest of the time I am pumping milk and baby gets formula while at daycare and for his evening feedings (in addition to solids). I have struggled with low supply since the beginning so at this point, Baby nurses in the morning and has one 4-5oz breast milk bottle in the evening. For the past week or so, Baby has been refusing to nurse in the morning. He still takes his formula and breast milk bottles. He is only 9 months old, so I don't think he could be weaning already. Could something be wrong with my breasts? He has had Croup... not sure if that could be part of it. Could it just be that he now prefers the ease of bottles? Everything I read says to keep offering my breast but it's getting disheartening to try again and again every morning to just have him turn away and wiggle out of my arms. How long should I continue to try?
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:35 PM
    Well it sounds to me that you did everything you possibly could for your baby and every choice you made entirely rational and caring to your baby. Sometimes life just throws you a curve ball! I think sometimes we moms find it easier to blame ourselves for things that happen to our children, because at least that gives us the illusion of some control over the situation, and this is somehow more comfortable for us than accepting that sometimes stuff happens and we have no control. Having a child with a serious health issues is really, really difficult but it sounds like you have done and are doing everything you can and your child is getting through it all as well as can be expected. Just as an example of how hard these things are to read, my oldest son exhibited exactly the same symptoms as yours as a baby, and has no issues with dairy or any other food. He was diagnosed with reflux, but mostly I think I had OP, as I did with my next two, but just had no idea such a thing existed or what it might do to a baby. As far as the bottle of formula, maybe just get a little clarity on exactly when and how much (what amount of formula they think baby needs daily? "A bottle" could mean any amount, really.
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*robinc308's Avatar
    Today, 12:54 PM
    It's mostly all in my head. The allergist is actually very supportive of breastfeeding as a way to obtain safe (or as safe as possible) exposure to common allergens via moms diet. It's more a case of knowing that it was something I did (consume dairy) which I could easily not have done, and saved my son some suffering. You are probably correct (and the allergist said the same thing) that what exposure he had via me may have offered some protective benefit. He actually recommended I breastfeed this next baby (with the one bottle of formula a day) to giver her the best chance of avoiding allergens. As I say, it's mostly my own head and mom-guilt that I am struggling with: I'm scared of causing my child to suffer again because of something in my own diet. My son was extremely fussy, and showed all the signs of tummy pain. He struggled so hard with pooping and gas, and was almost always explosive. His pediatrician kept telling me that it was normal for some babies, but I felt like it was more than normal. Eventually, on my own, I did an experiment with cutting out dairy from my own diet (since it's a pretty harmless and easy thing to try), and my son improved some, so I reintroduced some dairy, and the next day, he had blood in his diaper and was miserable again. After talking to his pediatrician, he confirmed a likely allergy (but there are no diagnostic tests at that age), so I completely cut out dairy for several months. I began tentatively reintroducing (to my own diet)...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:06 AM
    Ok, if the plugs were not recent you may be fine, however if re-occuring plugs or some other issues do crop up with the return to work, and cannot be resolved another way, then in fact you may need to reduce your milk production just enough to be able to avoid this. It does happen that way for some moms who do not have optimal pumping at work situations...but usually if mom tends toward over production. Here are some leak tips: I used to put a disposable pad over a reusuable- the reusable was against my skin. Try very brightly or dark patterned blouses. The busy pattern was the key for hiding leak stains at least somewhat. Also unnatural fabrics show stain less and dry faster than cotton or silk. Wool might be ok but it is not sweater season yet! Actually where I live it is never very cold so I almost never wear sweaters, however the weave of a sweater or sweater vest might hide leaks pretty well now that I think about it. Especially if it is also patterned. Keep a spare blouse and bra as well as spare pads in your bag. For plugs, be careful about too tight bra or straps. If you prefer to wear an underwire, try shifting your position frequently if you find plugs are forming and only wear it when needed. Avoid as much as possible carrying heavy purse or other with a strap is across the breasts or pressing into the side of the breast. If you have to drive much, be aware that seatbelt placement can lead to plugs.
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*mr77's Avatar
    Today, 10:06 AM
    We went on vacation for 2 weeks and BF the entire time, no bottles. Now my 14 month old daughter has been refusing bottles at daycare ever since we came back. She goes to daycare 3 days a week, is with grandma 1 day a week, and I work from home 1 day a week (and she's with me on weekends.) She still nurses throughout the night. She is a reverse cycle-er I think. Any recommendations on getting her to drink breast milk during the day or is this a lost cause now? Normally she was having 2 bottles, each around 4 ounces. I am still sending those in but they keep getting dumped. Do I still pump at work? I pump at 10a and 2p. She nurses on a 'good sleeping night' only once over night at 2 am... but lately it is every 2 and 3 hours. We also just moved this week.
    0 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    Today, 08:20 AM
    Yes, that makes sense. I am mostly concerned about being uncomfortable or clogged ducts (although as a junior high teacher I am also concerned about leaking...I will have to be prepared since that would be beyond embarrassing). I have had a couple of clogged ducts (which were awful!), but I don't think it was necessarily related to going a long period of time, although both happened overnight, so I guess that could have been a factor. I am still nursing once at night, generally. (I tend to think it was from compressing a duct while sleeping - as a stomach sleeper. Trying to be more careful!) I REALLY REALLY appreciate your information and tips. I think I will try to squeeze in a pump session after my morning nurse, even if it ends up being right after, or pretty close after. I think I have a lower storage capacity (I can't think of the technical term for this), so the more often I can get any in, should help. Also, good to know about early weaning. I will just stick with breastfeeding at home and use hand expression if I'm desperate.
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Today, 07:40 AM
    Checking in with one final update. Since the pediatrician/IBCLC was on vacation for the last several weeks, her office directed us to a specialist in pediatric dentistry. My son did indeed have a tongue tie! Not a particularly severe one, since he's gaining weight just fine (more than fine, really - 19 lbs at 4 months . . . my aching back!). But enough that it was causing my nipple pain/sensitivity and likely contributed to his high-arched palate, which also isn't super helpful for nursing comfortably. It's also why my nipple came out of his mouth looking creased 100% of the time, and why I always had the odd sensation that he was somehow licking the tip of my nipple while nursing, which was rather uncomfortable. So we had the tie corrected with a laser right there in the office a week and a half ago. I actually had increased nipple pain/sensitivity the first few days afterward as he was sorting out his new tongue mobility I suppose, but things have been improving since then and should continue to do so as he re-learns how to suck effectively and so on. :) His tongue continues to be white (again, high arched palate), but we continue to NOT have thrush, which I remain thrilled about. So we're forging ahead on our nursing journey here, with high hopes for the future! I want to thank you all so much for the support and helpful suggestions as we untangled this knot. Without this forum I likely would never have though to see an IBCLC and wouldn't have figured out what was...
    25 replies | 2358 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 PM
    Thank you for your kind words! I am glad the water trick seemed to help. I liked remembering... I so enjoyed those days nursing my oldest when I was pregnant with his brother. It was also a great way to get a much needed nap!
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:29 PM
    Hmmm. I wonder, has baby ever gone 5 hours without nursing and was that very uncomfortable for you? Did you get engorged, or develop a plug, become ill with mastitis? Let me know if so, as that would change my answer somewhat. Generally, going from milk removal of 3-4 hour interval to a 4-5 hour interval once (?) a day for several days and back again does not seem like a big jump, so I am curious if your concern is discomfort, or leaking, getting plugs or? If you are not under a risk of severe discomfort or ill health, I would not suggest trying to train your body to "go longer." This would potentially be needlessly detrimental to your nursing relationship and your milk production. If you are going to be uncomfortable going 5 hours and it is not avoidable, I would suggest trying some other strategy. I think I mentioned going to the restroom and doing some quick hand expression - enough to get more comfortable. Another idea would be to pump just before this long stretch begins, rather than only have baby nursing. (baby still nurses if there, but pump also.) If this stretch is already after a pump session rather than nursing, can you make that pump session a little longer? Basically I am thinking, empty the tank at the start so it takes longer for it to fill up.
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:48 PM
    This is a good sign, if you look at the diaper log I linked 3 poops on day 3 is appropriate. Green is normal, as your milk transitions from colostrum to "mature" milk and the meconium clears out, green is a normal transition color. Make sure baby is weighed on a digital infant scale, either naked or in dry diaper. Ask for another check if the number seems off to you. Your baby's weight will most likely still be well below birthweight (normal at this point) but probably starting to increase from that lowest known weight. Most likely the scale will be different, so that can throw things off. If the doctor suggests formula, tell them how often baby is nursing (it should be 10-12 times or more in 24 hours) and what the poop pattern is. Tell them you can hear baby swallowing. And tell them how much you want to avoid formula. Basically tell them what you have told us! Usually there are other things to try if gain seems slow, yet doctors too often give formula as the first choice because it is easy and few mothers object. Go ahead and object, and see if they would be open to another plan.
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:42 PM
    I came home today
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:03 PM
    Are you home? Or are you still in the hospital?
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 PM
    Thanks a lot for your responses.he has got three green poop diapers far today. And my milk came in and he is nursing too. I have a pediatrician appointment tomorrow. Not sure what she is going to say for the weight. But anyway I don't think I need to supplement with formula. I have put so much effort to exclusively breastfeed my baby. So I will give anything to achieve that . Thank you
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:26 PM
    Thank you so much again for your help and wisdom. I've ordered the book "Adventures in Tandem Nursing" and right now I feel like continuing to nurse my toddler is the right thing to do. I drank more water and did have less BH as a result!! Thanks again, you are such a blessing to this community <3
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*teach48's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:19 PM
    MaddieB, I have another question for you concerning schedules. Right now, my daughter nurses every 3 - 4 hours during the day. At work, it looks like I'll go 4 - 5 hours between pumping (I'm working to see if I can shorten this at all). I know the body is amazing at knowing what it needs, and I'm wondering if I should start "to train" my body to go that long? I hope to nurse on the weekends (I hate pumping, and find nursing much more convenient), but if that's the case, are Monday and Tuesday always going to be a little uncomfortable? Just curious (trying not to overthink this all...but I don't think I'm doing very well. Thanks.
    6 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:06 AM
    I agree with djsmom. It would help to get the LC in there to reassure you and your nurse! The slightly 'dramatic' loss could be entirely explained by fluids on board due to C-section , baby expelling lots shortly after birth and baby sleepy. Also Birth weights are just very unreliable. From now on, make sure that all checks are done on the same scale and make note when they are not. Remember the 7 pounds 14 ounces weight. That is what all weights should be measured by going forward, not birthweight. As long as baby is nursing with good frequency now and pooping several times a day, you are probably back on track. If you have to wake baby to nurse more, do it. It is common for baby to be overly sleepy first week or two especially after C-section and some need to be encouraged to nurse more often. Skin to skin contact (holding baby on your chest, both of you with as little on as possible) as much as you possibly can will help. More on what to expect these early days: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:54 AM
    Of course you want more firm reassurance and I am sorry you are not getting that. So did the allergist tell you that breastfeeding would put your new baby at more risk or that breastfeeding caused your older child to have a life threatening dairy allergy? I mean, that is a real stretch from what I understand about it. Just because breastfeeding did not protect your older child from developing and allergy does not mean breastfeeding causes the allergy. Perhaps being breastfed reduced the seriousness of your child's reaction and it would have been even worse otherwise! Yes this was my understanding as well, although I was not aware that dairy was one of the foods that had been studied. In any case, allowing a child to eat some dairy at 4 months is a very different proposition than feeding a newborn dairy formula every day. In what way did your son suffer? I am not disbelieving that your child has this severe allergic reaction after he ate the butter but it sounds like you did suspect something was up before that (before solids) and eliminated dairy from your diet. Did that help? I guess I am thinking- many moms think their baby is reacting to something in their milk, when in fact all is normal. Of course once the severe allergy was confirmed, you look back and second guess all that happened before. But that is not confirmation that breastfeeding was the wrong choice...I mean, not to my mind. There are so many benefits to breastfeeding that the choice to not...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 AM
    I am not sure what the answer is, in terms of WHY, but I know *I* wouldn't be worrried about a baby who even after losing a whole lb still weighed almost 8lbs. I would wait and see where the baby is after a week. My son weighed 8lbs, 2 oz when he was born and my milk didn't come in for 5 day (Also a c-section) and he didn't lose a whole lbs but he got down to 7lbs 9oz in the 1st 4 days while living off colostrum alone (I didn't supplement. I gave birth in Berkeley Ca and my nurses did NOT pressure me to do so) and I remember thinking that I knew that some babies are born at term and only weight 5.5 or 6lbs. So I wasn't going to worry for a WHILE. I have never heard of too much amniotic fluid being a reason for an in flated birthweight. But I HAVE heard that the amount of fluids that get pumped into you during a c-section doing that. So if you are still at the hospital? Ask the LC when she comes back around.
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 AM
    Please I need some reassurance. My baby boy was born on July 23rd via c section. He was 8 pounds 13 oz birth weight. Today July 26. He weighs 7 pounds 14 ounces. More than 10% weight loss. Which made pediatric nurse concerned for the baby and asked me to supplement formula twice a day. My milk came in on 25 the evening which the lactation consultant confirmed. She checked and saw me nursing the baby. About the baby. He was the really really sleepy the first day. He had lots of pee diapers and 4 meconium diapers on day1. After that he did not poop the 2nd day but I have been put him on breast every two hours. Today morning he pooped it was green. And he had one more poop after few hours it was green. Baby seems content after every feeding. What mistake is going on why doesn't he gain weight instead of losing so much. I know c section babies sleep a lot. But today he is a lot better and eating well. I said I will not supplement formula because I know my milk is there. I can hear him suckle and swallow. I had too much amniotic fluid. Is that a reason that he had too many meconium stools and fluid in his body which he lost in three days? Please help
    7 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*robinc308's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:29 AM
    Thank you for your reply. The most recent research confirms that early exposure to allergens in allergy-prone children (such as siblings of a child with a food allergy) seems to have a somewhat prophylactic effect, but best as I can tell, this is introduced directly via solids, and thus no earlier than 4-6 months old. Dairy allergies are actually one of the most common food allergies in young children, however they are also one of the food allergies most likely to be outgrown, so relatively rare in older kids and adults. That's good news for my son (he's already showing strong signs of outgrowing his allergy). However allergies often don't manifest until the child is slightly older - 7 months is pretty early, and allergy testing is unreliable in babies under 12 months. It is only really in hindsight that I can tell that my son was showing signs of his dairy allergy even as a newborn: I don't blame his pediatrician for missing it at all, an allergy was one of the less likely culprits, it just happened to be the one in our case, but I do feel horrible that my son suffered so much because of it, and because it was *me* eating the dairy and passing it on to him in my milk. The issue is, now that I have one child with a food allergy, statistically, I am much, much more likely for any other children to develop them (and not necessarily the same allergy, just a food allergy in general). I already plan to ensure my diet includes all the common allergens so that I pass on what...
    5 replies | 126 view(s)
  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:23 AM
    It will have to be a c-section this time again. Last time it was at 38 weeks. Hopefully it wont be any earlier this time but we have to see how the pregnancy is progressing. I have a personal medical issue which would require a section anyway but also last time I had cholestatis of pregnancy so that determines how early I have to deliver. I didn't feel that out of it to be honest last time and once I was stitched up I was with my baby in the recovery room and could breastfeed straight away so that I was happy with. I am going to request the same again this time. Also I felt last time the baby should be dressed (in case they got cold - 1st time Mom :-)) but I know now that maybe I should just strip them down to their nappy and spend as much time skin to skin as possible? Would you be able to share a little of your birth plan because other than requesting to get my baby straight after the operation i am not sure what to ask. My consultant is very nice and accommodating so I can definitely run any requests I might have by him and see how I get on. Looking back I think it did take a couple of days for my milk to come in and I don't remember feeling the let down that everyone talks about. I will be more in tune this time for sure. Also last time my nipples were very sore and deeply cut the first 2 weeks, probably from poor latch from the tongue tie. From the start I could see my baby had a very shallow latch. It took a few weeks to heal, probably because I was...
    4 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 25th, 2017, 08:39 PM
    No, I never had Braxton Hicks at any point in any of my pregnancies. I am probably not much help there, I also never had a normal labor so I am not even sure what real contractions feel like. There is a lot going on hormonally in a pregnant mom, and the stimulation of nursing can cause many intense sensations in my experience, from great irritation to arousal. Tummy tightening and what you describe sounds familiar to me, but we are talking over a decade ago and I am not sure. I do not recall every feeling anything I thought of as a contraction. I would say kellymom is usually a very accurate source of information. When I nursed when pregnant, it was shortly after a miscarriage. As far as I know there is no reason a previous miscarriage would make nursing when pregnant unsafe, and nursing when pregnant does not cause miscarriages. What might be a concern...maybe, is previous preterm labor, or in a situation where preterm labor is suspected or threatened, and so mom is being warned off things that may cause a hormonal rush that could lead to preterm labor- namely, orgasm. Orgasm would cause a far larger hormonal rush than nursing.
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 25th, 2017, 08:24 PM
    Here is a chart that can help you count poops. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/02_diaper_log.pdf As long as baby is pooping typical amounts, you do not really have to worry about pees. As far as counting nursing, when I had to do this, I just took a piece of paper and put the date on top, and made three columns- first column for time (such as 3:30 PM) In the second column I wrote what side (Left or Right, of course sometimes baby nursed both sides) and how long baby nursed (such as L:15 minutes) and then the third column was for notes if needed ('Baby fell asleep nursing', or 'baby was fussy after nursing', or "baby did not want other side" or whatever. You can skip that third column if you want I just liked having it for notes. Of course you can also combine a poop and nursing frequency chart. This way you have a record- not just for yourself, but if it becomes necessary, to show the doctor if they are wondering how often baby is eating. There is no reason to keep charts like this if baby is gaining fine, and your baby may be. But it can help you just to have a handle on what is going on (without charting how could you possibly remember, it is all a blur) and also if anyone is questioning whether baby is getting enough to eat. This is a article I think can be helpful during these early weeks: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*hannah.seed's Avatar
    July 25th, 2017, 07:29 PM
    Hi, thanks so much for your response. I realize how many details my post was lacking, sorry about that. I decided to go get the baby re-weighed in a couple days using the same scale and then ill be able to ask the doctor some of the questions and get you some better details. I also realize from some of your questions that i dont even know how im counting times he eats, and how to count his poos and wees, so let me get a better idea of some of this and ill repost a new thread with a clearer scenario- thanks so much for your help...
    3 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    July 25th, 2017, 04:53 PM
    Hi, thanks so very much for the detailed reply. My pregnancy is normal and and my midwife has told me everything seems to be going fine. But I am wondering if my previous miscarriage might be a risk factor. I haven't talked to her much about nursing during pregnancy because unfortunately she is "old-school" and thinks toddlers should be weaned at a year old. A few minutes after she starts nursing, my bump tenses up and I feel a pulling in my pelvic region. This has only been the case in the last couple of days. I wlil definitely try drinking more water, and will also check out the book Adventures in Tandem Nursing. I read about the 4 contractions per hour on kellymon here (under the subheading "a primer on preterm labor"): http://kellymom.com/pregnancy/bf-preg/bfpregnancy_safety/#contractions I think that's the only place I read that. I've also read other moms say that they've experienced up to 8 contractions per nursing session with no issues and a full-term pregnancy.
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
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