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  • @llli*mjenness's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 PM
    Sorry I should have provides background information. My LO is 7 weeks old. We been seeing LC since birth at the hospital and continued till now. She is eating very well. Measuring pre and post weight after feeding: she ate roughly 3oz. She gaining a lot of weights 22oz in two weeks. LC told me I have over active let down because of the gulping and clicking noise when observing her feed. But said she handle the flow well and when she does choke she recovered very fast. Oversupply because I am able to pumped 3oz within 3mins and the 3oz was mostly foremilk. LC also told me she probably have hindmilk/foremilk imbalance due to all the symptoms and put me on block feeding. I was doing 3 feeding per side. Now reduced to 2 feeding preside. Which helped. LO is much happier. Feed every 2-3hrs. Less gassy and no more waking up screaming from pain. Then...today happen I'm worry about comfort nursing because LC warn that will send my milk supply into over drive. I mainly just want to make sure it is comfort feed and not me deprive her of food.
    3 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:20 PM
    Good questions from dandelions. In general, block feeding "works," in the sense that it will decrease supply. So there are a couple possible things going on: first, perhaps baby was avoiding comfort nursing previously because of the fast flow. Or, baby was getting enough with relatively short/infrequent nursing because of the oversupply, and now baby is nursing in the typical way a young baby nurses, ie, all the time! It is perfectly normal for babies to nurse all the time and to want to nurse for both comfort and nutrition. A baby is 100% dependent on her parent, she instinctively knows this, and she knows when she is nursing that she is next to her mother and will be taken care of. There is no harm to nursing very frequently and there is no harm in comfort nursing. In fact, pacifiers introduced early on can be harmful to breastfeeding if they lead mother to nurse with a lower frequency. Here's some information on normal newborn nursing: http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/ In general, there are a couple ways to deal with fast flow and oversupply without block feeding. One is to use a laid-back nursing position, see the links below and adjust as needed until you are comfortable. Also baby will become more adept at dealing with fast flow as she gets older, and supply will regulate to more closely match baby's demand. https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/01_laid_back_breastfeeding.pdf...
    3 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:25 PM
    Hi :) As a general thing, I'm not aware that it is in any way abnormal for babies to comfort nurse, even for several hours. Can you provide more information, though? How old is your baby? Is she eating well / making plenty of diapers, gaining ok, etc? Has an LC told you that you have OS/OALD or is it self-diagnosed (not that it has to be professionally diagnosed, but there's a lot of completely normal variation in the early weeks). I'm sure this information will help lead to more directed advice. Thanks.
    3 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*annanybk's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    Hi ladies, My daughter only falls asleep while nursing, I'm the only one that can put her down. To put her down for a nap or for the night it takes 1-2 hours of comfort sucking for her to go down. Every time I try to leave she just wakes up and we start all over again. This is taking a toll on me, I'm getting very frustrated and upset with her when I understand that it is not her fault, plus after an hour of sucking my boobs are killing me I thought she would eventually get out of this habit but it feels like it's getting worse and worse. My plan was to stop bfing at 12 months but it doesn't seem like that's going to happen. She never took a paci no matter how much we tried. How do I get her to sleep without nursing??? After googling a bunch of other stuff it looks like she's a "high needs baby", I'm not even sure what the heck that means. Is this something an lc can help with???
    0 replies | 39 view(s)
  • @llli*milkmaid222's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:58 PM
    I do have a pump. Kaiser provided an Ameda double electric. So, I should feed then pump how much later? And hour? And for how long? And what she suggested was that if I leave off nursing on the left for example then the next feeding I would start on the left and go to the right, then the next feeding would start on right and go to the left, etc.
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mjenness's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:18 PM
    Hello everyone, It seems like everytime I think we have this breast feeding thing figured out my LO throw me for a loop. I have over supply and over active letdown. Because of this my LO has foremilk/hindmilk imbalance. I started block feeding and it help with over supply and fast let down. However today she was very fussy. I thought it might have been gas so I did infant massage as well as burped her. Then she still would fussy. She would calm down immediately when I nurse her. She would actively nurse then slowly doze off and her sucking get softer and it would stop and start. But every so often she would get another let down and she would start swallowing. Her latch would become shallow and I would try to unlatch her. She would startled and try to find the breast. If she can't find it she would start screaming. I tried pacifier, my knucle, finger even her hand and she won't take anything but the breast. This would go on for an hour plus. My nipple is getting very sore cuz of the shallow latch. Anyone else experienced this? I know when she is gassy she wants to comfort nurse but today i couldn't get her to really burp or let out any gas. I got a few good one out but she still want to comfort nurse. Do you think it's because she is still hungry? My breast feel emptier but when I gave it a gentle squeez milk still come out (LC said that mean you still have plenty of milk in there) I tried to switch side and same thing happen. Active nursing then turn into comfort...
    3 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Thanks for posting that! It looks like weight gain has been higher than 1/2 oz per day. When you're measuring weight gain, you go from the lowest know weight, not birth weight. That means that your baby gained 7 oz between 1 and 2 weeks, 7 oz between 2 and 3 weeks, 8 oz between 3 and 4 weeks- and that's when things start to look a little dodgy, because the scale is showing a gain of just 2 oz between 4 and 5 weeks, and a loss of 5 oz between 5 and 5.5 weeks. So in other words, weight gain starts out normal but then seems to reverse course. This is despite a good frequency of nursing sessions. I'd love for you to go back to the LC- is she an IBCLC?- for some more help. One possibility is that your little guy is just too sleepy or not yet a good enough nurser to maintain supply, and that he gained well when your supply was high and milk was easy to come by but now has fallen off because he's not able to maintain supply where it should be. Do you have a pump? When a baby is having trouble maintaining mom's supply, pumping in addition to nursing can boost supply and keep it boosted until the baby is adept enough to keep it high on his own. You say the LC taught you how to "offer the same breast at the next feed to ensure he's getting the hind milk." Can you explain exactly what that means? Does it mean that baby starts every feeding on the breast he finished on the last time but is allowed to nurse on both breasts, or does it mean that you are offering...
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*milkmaid222's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:43 PM
    Only one scale involved Weights: • Birth 8.7 • 1 week 7.15 • 2 week 8.6 • 3 weeks 8.13 • 4 weeks 9.5 •5 weeks 9.7 • 5 1/2 weeks 9.2 He is a slow sleepy eater, I burp him/ wake him 2-3 x each side
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:43 PM
    Okay if you know dad has a tendency to over feed, then it probably is a good idea to leave a limited amount both by leaving only small bottles, about 2 ounces each probably, and not leaving too many of them. Just make sure there's no formula in the house and he is not going to take the baby out and buy some. Assure him that even if it does indeed turned out that you did not leave "enough", baby will not starve in one day. Of course you will know there actually is enough and baby is fine.
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:27 PM
    I'm sorry I can't answer your question about what pump but I have some thoughts. Do you own your symphony pump? Or is it rented? I am wondering if the problem with international travel is due to some rental agreement? Did the Medela customer service say why they don't recommend you travel outside the country with that pump? Have you looked if there are any LLL groups in that part of the world? Or you could look up the international licensing board for lactation consultants -I can't remember the exact acronym – but they have a ways to contact lactation consultant in most parts of the world I'm just wondering if you can find someone who actually lives there that might be able to advise you better. If you do end up having to bring the pump in style, have you tried increasing your pump output using hand expression and breast compressions along with pumping? Also have you had your pump itself looked at to make sure it is in good working order?
    1 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:28 PM
    Wow 7 oz in an hour and a half? thats... a lot haha
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:54 PM
    It's also cheap! I only bought the oatmeal cereal. It's also fortified with iron and it tastes better. Before officially offering solids, if my baby was ever reluctant to nurse for whatever reason (congestion, stuffy nose, etc.) I was usually able to spoonfeed him with more success. And since milk just falls off the spoon, I'd mix EBM with oatmeal cereal.
    4 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*sweetdreams's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    Hello , I was just interested to now how you were getting on with lactating . I am just coming up to 60 and have been on the road to lactating for the past 3 weeks .
    6 replies | 1067 view(s)
  • @llli*littlenash's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:07 PM
    Yes it would be probably about 10 hours. He was definitely overfeeding when we used to supplement as i left for 1.5 hours and he gave him the 3oz of breastmilk i left PLUS 4oz of formula cause baby "was still starving" (this was actually one of the main reasons i knew we had to stop supplementing since it only hurt my supply.) He does know the hunger cues but unfortunately our baby is newly obsessed with putting his hands in his mouth so he always looks hungry to my hubby. So thats why i was thinking more on a semi-schedule. I watched the paced feeding video and its very similar to what our lac consultant showed us so i will have hubby watch for sure. Thank you!
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:26 AM
    Also, if you've noticed baby sputtering/gagging/choking when first latching on, as can sometimes occur with fast letdown, you might want to try a laid-back nursing position - look at these pictures and modify as comfortable: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/01_laid_back_breastfeeding.pdf http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/2010/10/11/some-ins-and-outs-of-laid-back-breastfeeding.html
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:23 AM
    If you have an abundant supply, it's best to avoid pumping for now, because that will only increase supply further. If you find yourself very full and need relief, try hand expression which does not stimulate as much. If you can hand express into a clean bowl, then you can save that milk for later. In any case, unless there is some urgent need to pump (like an imminent separation or some medical reason to pump), it's best to really focus on nursing in the early weeks and establish the nursing relationship, let your supply regulate (usually the oversupply calms down after the early weeks), avoid issues with bottle preference, etc. Once that happens if you want to save milk for an occasional bottle, a lot of moms do find they have the most supply early in the morning as littlecavemomma says, so that's a good time to pump a bit for freezing. Keep in mind that if you are only going to be apart from baby for a few hours, baby will only need a few ounces, so really not much need to pump a lot for an occasional bottle. Also, you can pump any time it's convenient, the breast is never empty so even if baby wants to nurse right after you pump, there will be milk in there - at most baby may want to nurse a little longer or a little sooner the next time.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:13 AM
    That's interesting, sassypants. I always wondered what was so special about rice cereal!
    4 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    I cannot recommend Dr. Gonzalez's books enough- both My Child Won't Eat and Kiss Me! How to Raise Your Children With Love. Gonzalez approaches his subjects with lots of passion and compassion for children and their parents, backed up by lots of science and substance. Plus he is an excellent writer.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:04 AM
    Sorry, I feel I should add the caveat that my advice/experience is only if you have no problems with supply, either under or over. If you're needing to pump to boost supply, or have oversupply and don't need the extra stimulation, that's a whole different story.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:01 AM
    Hi Momma and congrats on the new baby! It's all up to you, your supply, and your baby. I didn't start pumping with any regularity until about 6 weeks. At that point I noticed my LO would take a big long nap after her first morning nursing (around 6am). Since she's always been a one-sided nurser, I would put her back down to sleep then get up and pump the opposite side. Since most women are the fullest in the early morning, you're likely to get the most reward for your effort in the am. Plus, with mine I knew she would probably nap for at least 90 minutes, so I would have some time before she was hungry again. This was usually my only pump of the day since I only needed a little stash prior to returning to work. If your baby sleeps long, predictable stretches, I would seize that opportunity to pump a little. You'll help maintain your supply by not "missing" feedings and you also won't have to battle with engorgement. Occasionally l'll sleep thru one of our overnight nursings (LO doesn't usually wake up) and when I wake up totally engorged I'll go pump just a bit prior to nursing her. Personally I would try to hold out another few weeks so you can have a really solid read on your production without the interference/intervention of pumping.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:59 AM
    Baby can be cue fed with bottle just as at the breast. In other words, no reason to say "this much every such and such hours." Teach husband the cues if he does not recognize them yet. If you plan to leave bottles in certain amounts, I would suggest each bottle be no more than 2 or at most 3 ounces. Breastmilk left in bottle after baby is done can be put in the fridge for next feeding, so there is absolutely NO NEED to "push" more than baby wants each feeding. Use paced bottle feeding positioning and method as well. Very important for curbing overfeeding tendency. One day of "over" OR "Under" feeding is unlikely to cause any issues one way or another. So no need to be as cautious as one would be for regular, frequent separations. Also rather unlikely husband could in any way "fail" - I am sure baby (and husband) will still be alive when you return! But in my opinion, overly large feedings (over 3 ounces) given infrequently are the most different than breastfeeding and would consequently be the most likely to cause any problems. So like midnightsangel I would instead suggest encouraging more frequent, smaller feedings. Assure husband that sometimes on ounce is all baby wants, and sometimes all baby wants is to be held and comforted. Bottle feeding breastfed baby : http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*jazmanian's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:33 AM
    Hi! FTM with a 3w/o, almost 4 weeks. I'm considering starting to pump soon, but I feel clueless:confused:? How does pumping and nursing coincide? What kind of schedules worked for you, how often to you nurse and how often do you pump? Or does it not truly matter? So long as I'm not working I want to exclusively nurse. I could use the pumped milk for a break once in a while though. I also think pumping would be a good idea because I have an abundant supply. Although I'm new to this breastfeeding lifestyle, I'm pretty sure I have a fast let down, and I leak constantly, soaking nursing pads and dripping all over the place when trying to get baby latched. My supply has become more regulated in the last week so I seem to leak a little less than before, though I still leak and soak pads. Imput & responses are appreciated :)
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:11 AM
    All day as in 10 hours? I would leave no more than 15 oz. That's enough to cover the whole day if you nurse before you leave and when you come back. I would do frequent small meals so hubby feels like baby never gets truly hungry so there won't be much crying. I'd do 5 2 oz servings and 5 1 oz "toppers" so that would work out to feeding every 2 hours. However I'm thinking about my son and what he likes haha he nurses more than average but takes smaller meals. If yours likes bigger spaced out ones then do a 3 oz every 3 hours with a 1 oz "topper" on stand by.
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 AM
    Yes, I'm really lucky. It didn't start out that way . .. .it was a rough beginning when I first learned I was pregnant, and there's been a lot of changes, but we've all come to rely on each other and the group had been supportive of everyone's situation (there's been a lot of illness this year unfortunately). I think it has helped that I've trained half of them and have the most experience in the group.
    11 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*littlenash's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:20 AM
    So our son is 7 weeks old now and we have been formula free for over a week!! Thank you to everyone on this site and my local LLL for helping us realize that we didnt need to be supplementing and for helping us through the rough patches that came with going back to EBF. So my question now is how much/often should my husband feed our son with expressed breast milk? I have to be gone the whole day on april 9th. Ive read the standard is 1-1.5 oz of milk for every hour im gone but how should that be given? 2 oz every hour? 3oz every couple hours? Im worried because our son seems to be hitting a growth spurt and nursing all the time. I dont want to set my hubby up to fail by not leaving enough milk. But my hubby is also still overcoming his tendacy to overfeed at every fussy cue from when we were supplementing and he would feed him into a food coma. So how much is too much is what i guess i need to know? Is 4oz every couple hours too much? So hard to put a number on something that is so naturally regulated!
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
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