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  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 PM
    http://www.lalecheleague.org/llleaderweb/lv/lviss1-2008p16.html This article describes babies sticking their tongues to the roof of the mouth and clenching their mouths as a measure to support their heads. Perhaps fiddle around with positioning, getting help from an lc or LLL leader, to see if that helps.
    4 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 03:03 PM
    Seattlemama, you are a caring and committed mom, and I hope through all of this you can find a way to give you and your son credit for how far you've come this far, and give a little compassion to yourself! I don't have a toddler, but do have an eight month old. She is indeed really busy and distractible. At this point, nursing has decreased in frequency during the day compared to the 2-3 month point (from every hour or so to anywhere from 1-3 hours or so), but increased a little during the night (from one or two night wakings to 3-5 or so -- I count wakings that wake me up, but I guess there would be more depending if you count since when SHE falls asleep for the night). So probably pretty similar for a 24 hour period to mommal above. She has always been a relatively efficient nurser, so things can be pretty quick now. BUT I think all of this is really variable between babies. I will say that probably 75% of her nursing is related to sleep-times, either while falling asleep, when waking up, or when feeling sleepy, so that sounds similar to part of what you're describing. Maybe 10% is related to having bumped her head crawling around etc. and the other 15% might be little very brief nibbles here and there, kind of like checking in. We do one time of sitting in the high chair to experiment with foods at this point, and she's not too enthused by it but growing a little more adventurous.
    3 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:50 PM
    have you tried different positions, different rooms? My LO would sometimes get where he wanted to nurse but objected to the couch some times or to the glider other times.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:40 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on making it to 14 months! That's an awesome milestone. When a baby shows no signs of self-weaning, there is no reason for a mom to proactively give up nursing or pumping sessions unless that is what she, the mom, wants to do. 14 months is very early to expect self-weaning; babies who are allowed to set the timetable for their own weaning generally don't give it up until 2-4 years. So compared to 2-4 years, it's not like 14 months is some crazy long time to be nursing! And while nursing infrequently can mean that the quantity of milk is low, breastmilk continues to be important for nutrition and for immunological support, and breastfeeding itself still has psychological and physiological benefits for the baby and for the mom. If YOU are ready to wean, that's fine! But don't wean because you're thinking that you "should"- it's way too early to be worried about that. :) I hate to break it to you, but weaning doesn't mean that you automatically get to sleep in or that you get a break from bedtime responsibilities. Your child will still want and need you, even after she is weaned. Luckily, nursing doesn't mean you will always be the one to have full responsibility for bedtime and wake-up. Your partner or a grandma can take the baby in the morning and let you sleep, or can work on getting the baby to sleep without nursing. Handing mornings/bedtimes off to another caregiver will get easier in time- but again, 14 months...
    1 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:22 PM
    My kids nursed around 8-15 times per day at that age, usually on both breasts, for anywhere from 5-30 minutes at a time. They ate maybe 1-2 tsp of solids per day, all table foods that they fed to themselves. So clearly they were enthusiastic nursers and still about 99% breastfed, though their nursing patterns were quite variable! But that was my experience, and as they say, results may vary. I also know people with babies who were nursing less often than mine at the same age, and 2 babies who self-weaned at 9-10 months, deciding they liked solids and were done with nursing despite all their mamas tried to do to get them re-interested in nursing. Nursing slowdowns and nursing strikes are VERY common at this age. Some busy babies would rather play/look around/interact than nurse. This link has good tips for getting babies more interested in nursing: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/ The fact that your baby will nurse, albeit for short time periods and often only at naps/nighttime, is a good sign that he can transition back to more nursing. Just keep offering in a fun and low-pressure way, and don't sweat it if he only nurses for a very short time period. A short session can be quite productive at this age, and nursing always beats not nursing when it comes to maintaining your breastfeeding relationship.
    3 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*seattlemama's Avatar
    Today, 01:02 PM
    Anyone willing to share your experiences? Thoughts? Really feeling helpless here.
    3 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*jenn.walker12's Avatar
    Today, 12:45 PM
    My daughter is 6 weeks old, but has been starting to scream when I try to nurse her during the day. She is sending hunger cues like sucking her hand, and searching for the breast when she is against my chest, but when I try to feed her she starts crying. This has been going on for the last 2 days. She's done it before a few weeks ago but when it stopped i thought it was just because she is so young. However, she does not have any issues nursing at night and I have found that if I can get her to sleep before i feed her she will nurse a little bit better, but won't eat much. Could this be a growth spurt coming on? or maybe she just wants to suck? I'm very confused and it gets frustrating because I just want to give her what she needs and i'm worried about over/underfeeding her.:banghead
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:47 AM
    How do you know milk supply started to drop and keeps dropping? How often is baby nursing and how much solids does she eat? Are you pumping for any reason? Not sure what you are asking re "side affects if pregnant?" I would suggest think about waiting a bit to try for number 2...it is generally considered best for everyone's health if pregnancies are spaced a bit more.
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:44 AM
    could you be pregnant? Usually mom's who experience a drop in supply from a return of fertility find it usually only lasts a few days. Has DD been nursing less than normal or not nursing overnight? That can often trigger a return of fertility along with reduction of supply.
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:40 AM
    Hospital grade pumps are designed for the mother who pumping frequently every day, either because she is pumping full time, pumping for a hospitalized baby or a baby who cannot nurse for some other reason, or trying to increase milk production. A personal use pump like the PISA is designed for the mother with normal milk production who is pumping 2-4 times a day due to separations from baby. If personal use pumps did the same job as hospital pumps, why would there be hospital pumps that cost 3 to 5 times as much as personal use? It is more than about the pump being multiuser. For example, Hygeia makes a a multi-user personal use pump as well as a hospital grade. Will a hospital grade make a difference in your situation? This is unknowable. Not everyone responds well to pumping no matter what the pump. Some moms seem to respond better to a personal use pump, and some moms even respond better to manual pumps or hand expression then they do to electric pumps. Also not everyone is able to increase milk production to 'enough.'. Some moms just do not make enough milk, it happens. But if I was struggling with low milk production and pumping to try to increase it, you can bet I would rent a hospital grade pump.
    1 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*lindseymaerean's Avatar
    Today, 11:23 AM
    Okay I have been EBF my DD until she was 6 months then I started introducing baby foods. She is now 9 months old and I'm still breastfeeding and doing baby foods. About a week ago I started my period and about two weeks before I started my period my milk supply started to drop, it's been about 5 days since my period and I was hoping it would come back (my supply) it just keeps dropping. I'm devastated I wanted to at least make it to 12 months. Ad just a side note me and my husband are trying for baby #2 with that being said my go to has always been the mothers milk and that always worked for me but I know there are side affects if you are pregnant. With that being said what advice do you ladies have for me? I'm pretty desperate.
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*seattlemama's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    This is a call for desperate help to all you Moms that have or are still breastfeeding their toddlers. Im sorry its a very long post, details are important. I'd like to know from you how your kid was nursing around 7-8-9-10mo age (the time when they start crawling, standing walking etc that gets them distracted even from nursing.) Did your LO start nursing less and less/more and more during this time frame? How often were they nursing everyday, and how long did each nursing session last, nursing single side/both sides? How much solids were you giving to them and how did that impact their nursing habits? What did you do to make sure you were able to nurse your LO for a longer period of time? My now 9.5mo boy has been ebf and started solids since 5.5mo. I've had this passionate desire to nurse my LO for a long duration (at least up to 18 months.) He was doing fine first few months (although due to sore nipples I had to use a nipple shield for 4months.). LO has been very distractible since around 4-5 mo and that's when he started a latch on latch off game that Id hoped would improve with time. Things have been very hard since then. Around 6-7 months time frame he changed a lot - from having a regular 3hourly nursing he went to nursing only while naps and MOTN. I realized that that's how its gonna be and accepted it because at least he was nursing. He was on solids only once a day until around a month ago when he started solids twice a day. This past month and a half he...
    3 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    35 times a day? For half an hour to 45 minutes each time? I am not sure that is even possible, mathematically. Are you saying baby is basically never not nursing? Nursing that much for FOOD at almost 3 months of age indicates either low milk production or poor milk transfer, IMO. If baby is nursing so often for comfort (does not like being put down) then I agree a carrier (Sling, wrap, etc) should help. But if baby literally needs to nurse that much to get enough calories, that would indicate a breastfeeding issue. Is baby gaining normally? Have you started any meds that might impact milk production? Any other reason to be concerned about your milk production or babies ability to nurse effectively? Is baby actively sucking that whole time, or just hanging out? If baby is just hanging out, what happens if you take baby off the breast and go do something else WHILE HOLDING baby (not putting baby down?) Sometimes in a situation like this, breast compressions are helpful. Switching sides at least once or more often during a feeding may help as well. http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-BC
    4 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:52 AM
    Agree that baby may be getting overfed during the day. On the other hand, it depends how often baby is able to nurse while you are home. If baby is allowed to take a very long sleep stretch (More than 4-6 hours) every night, and this leads to less nursing when home, this may mean baby does need more milk during the day. This (regular long stretches of not nursing) is also not usually a good scenario for continued normal milk production especially after the return to work. So my first suggestion is to encourage baby to nurse more overnight or at least during your own waking hours. If baby is being swaddled or using a pacifier or sleeping in a separate room from you, those practices can lead to longer sleep stretches so sometimes just changing those habits lead to baby waking with more typical frequency to nurse. Of course, if baby is being overfed during the day, that might well lower nursing frequency at night...so it's a chicken or the egg thing. This article explains not only paced bottle feeding technique, but also cue feeding with bottles and tips for helping baby be eager to nurse when mom is home: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf Video demonstration of paced feeding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs
    4 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*bkmama11231's Avatar
    Today, 09:50 AM
    Hello all, thanks for any words of wisdom. As many others say - I can't believe i've made it this far when I never thought I'd make it beyond 4 weeks! I have a few things I'd love some advice on, the biggest topic is when/how to give up some or all of the nursings when baby shows no signs of self-weaning. I nurse 3 times a day - first thing in the morning, right before bed and once after her morning nap (around 1). I have started feeling that it is the right time to give up the daytime nursing because I have been working a lot and having to pump in public stall bathrooms (i freelance, it's complicated) and am only eeking out about 2 ounces at those times anyway and am frankly kind of over it. Though I do feel conflicted since it's not like i have to do that every day. But then that leads me to think about the other nursings. I know I don't have to make a decision imminently, but boy would i love to be able to be the one who gets to sleep in one morning, or not have to always be responsible for the bedtime routine. Of course, all that said, I love nursing and am sure I would be sad when it was over. I don't know how to make the decision to end it if it doesn't come naturally. Part of me wants more freedom and part of me doesn't want anything to change. Plus I like all the benefits of continuing breastfeeding (both for me and for my LO). Another thing I'd like advice on that never really occurred to me before - I don't really nurse on demand, we're...
    1 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*jessica.holiga's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 AM
    Hello - So I have posted a few other times on the forums to try to troubleshoot my low milk supply and trying to increase. I have tried pretty much everything and the hospital grade pump is my last attempt. But as I've been looking to try to find information on why the hospital grade pump is more effective, the only information I have really found is in regards to the fact that the hospital grade pumps are just multi-user. Before I go through the trouble time wise and financially of obtaining a hospital grade pump - I was just wondering if someone could educate me on why the hospital grade pumps are better? I currently am using a Medela PISA if anyone is wondering. Thanks in advance for any help!
    1 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:32 AM
    Any estrogen-containing medication, even if only topical, has the potential to effect supply. But I wouldn't worry too much about it at this point, because your LO is over a year. Any drop in supply should be made up for by increased solids intake, which is going to be happening regardless of whether or not you try to increase his solids. With your family history, a TSH level is a VERY good idea!!! I personally would want it as part of my routine yearly bloodwork.
    12 replies | 232 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:31 AM
    Have you tried any carriers? As baby gets older nursing in a carrier gets easier and ma make it easier to get some stuff done (probably one handed) even when nursing. Is baby transferring milk ok? Does nursing feel ok? Is baby comfort nursing/sleeping on the breast a lot?
    4 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 08:29 AM
    My baby goes to sleep at about 8pm and sleeps solidly until about 12-1, when he wakes up for the first feeding, so time isn't an issue. We basically have a few hours to ourselves and since he does not sleep in our room, we really have privacy and no distraction. So that's not the issue either. Bsua65, you bring up an interesting point. I have not had any thryroid bloodwork done, but maybe I should? I just had my yearly well woman's exam this week so maybe I can call the dr and have her give me a prescription for such a bloodtest. My older sister got Hashimoto's after giving birth to twins. My father had to have his parathyroid removed because of a polyp, and my younger sister has borderline thyroid issues. So this may very well be the case. I definitely will another cycle and see how things turn out, but if not will get my thyroid checked. I don't really exhibit any other symptoms of postpartum thyroiditis, though. I got a cream from my gyn called Femarin which is supposed to provide estrogen to the vaginal area and help with the dryness. She said to try it and see what it does for me. Does anyone know if it can affect milk supply even though it's only topical (applied 2x a week)?
    12 replies | 232 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:27 AM
    Excellent advice above!!!
    2 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:27 AM
    Those "how long" questions are so tough to answer! The answer is going to be different for everyone. For me, it took about 3-4 weeks to phase out formula supplements, and supplement with breastmilk only. But I had a full-term if lip-tied baby, a hospital-grade pump, and no issues aside from those given by my daughter's poor latch.
    2 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:24 AM
    Agree totally that you and hubby and any caregivers need to learn about paced bottle feeding and giving smaller bottles and then giving a break before giving more by bottle since if baby is almost prone and a bottle is tipped up into them, they just swallow and can drain the bottle before they realize they are full and then the tummy being stretched out they may get used to really big meals which isn't necessarily good for breastfeeding and if baby is being overfed during the day it may be harder for mom to get baby to nurse at night which can really hurt mom's supply since pumping is always harder and less effective than a baby with a good latch. Sleeping through the night is also not always desirable for milk production, especially if mom doesn't have a huge storage capacity. Night nursing is good for supply and easier/more pleasurable than pumping.
    4 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:24 AM
    Ha ha! Bsua beat me to it! I personally think all women should have a test for thyroid function during the postpartum year. My guess is that this is normal- just give yourself a few months of having your cycle back!
    12 replies | 232 view(s)
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