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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:05 AM
    For fast letdowns: - Keep using reclined positions but experiment with different positions; you never know what might help. - If you have a true oversupply, let us know and we'll talk you through block feeding (if necessary). - Avoid pumping, as it will only increase/perpetuate oversupply. - Use the "finish the first breast first" approach to nursing. With FTFBF, you allow baby unrestricted time on side A, offering side B only when pulls off side A on her own. If she doesn't want side B after finishing side A, don't sweat it. Just offer B first at the next feeding. - Don't worry too much about baby developing fussiness at the breast. Some fussiness is normal and the best way to treat it is usually to let the baby learn how to control your milk flow. It can be a frustrating process for her, but in time she will master the art of generating the flow she wants. Nighttime fussiness is 100% normal! The thing where the baby nurses and then gets mad because she got more milk than she wanted is also very typical. Try the following: - Nurse, nurse, nurse, and nurse some more. Baby can't fuss when there's a breast in her mouth. - Calm house. Lights, TV, and stereo turned down or preferably off.
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*wiggle.bug's Avatar
    Today, 10:55 AM
    I had a couple work trips away from my first, once when he was just over 2 for 3 days, and then almost a week when he was 2.5. My experience is much the same as maddieb's: both times, I brought a pump and pumped in the morning, around 5 pm, and then at bedtime (those were the times he'd nurse, and I was also pretty full those times). In both cases, he went back to nursing just fine when we were together again. He nursed until he was over 3 years old.
    5 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:54 AM
    With the oversupply and probable OALD, Unlatching baby and letting the spray from OALD flow into a towel before putting baby back to the breast is probably a good idea to help with the spit up/fussy issue. Sounds like a major over supply but since you are going back to work soon you probably want to be very careful about reducing the supply too much with block feeding right before going back to work (since supply can suddenly drop when going back to work) so definitely come back for links to articles about the Dos and don'ts of block feeding.
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:42 AM
    You can likely order the adapters, and disks along with any other items you need (like extra rings and the sealing rings) online and get them quickly. I found (if I must use bottles at all) I really like the Lanisnoh mOmma nipples which fit the Avent bottles, seems to more accurately match the latch for my breasts than the nipples with a long narrow teet meeting a wide base.
    8 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 10:35 AM
    Does she seem satisfied when she falls to sleep? Or exhausted from effort and hunger? Most young babies take longer to feed but if you have a very ample supply and active letdown, then it is quite possible baby is getting plenty of milk in a short time. If in doubt you can see an LC (preferably an IBCLC http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901) and have her do a weighted feeding (that is weight right before feeding and then again right after feeding in the same clothing/diaper) to find out how much baby manages to take in during that one feeding. I agree that bottles and pumping are not a good indication since babies can very easily be over fed with a bottle and pumping is not a good way to judge supply. How has baby's weight gain been so far? Any concerns with weight gain or health? Any concerns with your health or supply? How does nursing FEEL to you? Do you make efforts to wake baby, switch breasts etc when feeding? Can you get baby to wake and feed sooner if you feel the need? Remember that demand feeding or scheduling should always err on the side of feeding sooner and that mom gets a say about when it's been long enough not just baby. Granted mom can only offer to nurse since you can't force breastfeed a baby.
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:07 AM
    Perhaps you can ask the cafe staff for a quiet spot to pump? I am always told that Europe is a friendlier place for breastfeeding moms. Medela Pump-In-Style backpack or tote looks like a normal bag if you want to carry it around. Hope this works out for you!
    8 replies | 249 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    I don't have the luxury to transfer to Avent bottle right after pumping because I pump at work and I don't have bag space to carry 10 bottles of two different brands. The Medela-Avent adapters is great idea! I found them in Babies R Us for US$10. I wish I knew about them sooner! Although, with the adapters, I also have to order Avent bottle sealing disks online because Avent bottles with nipples don't fit in Medela handheld cooler bag that came with the pump. Thanks for all the suggestions!
    8 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:43 AM
    as far as equal time on each breast i do not know. i do switch side to side but it seems like my right breast produces a lot more milk. i have noticed he seems happier when he nurses from the left breast. so i have squeezed a little milk out of the right until the flow slows down and then nurse him. then he spits up a ton then he cries then he gives hunger cues so i put him back on the breast (right side) and then hes fussy and then i can eventually calm him down to sleep. but when he nurses on the left side its like heaven!
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:40 AM
    i just feed him on 1 breast...he usually falls asleep. i have tried block feeding as well and let him nurse 2 or 3 times on 1 breast (althought the other one becomes so large and engorged i pump the other breast, i might be taking too much out). i figured i had an oversupply. when we went to his 3 week check up he had already gained 2 1/5 pounds. he's now almost 5 weeks and is about 10 pounds. hoping the block feeding helps. thanks again for the advice
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*canne's Avatar
    Today, 09:23 AM
    Hi - It's been a couple of years since I have had to post any questions. I have two children and for various reasons I couldn't nurse them (nipple shield, bad LC advice, etc). I EP'd with my first for 8 months and my second child for 14 months. I recently had my third baby... who is three weeks old. I had a home birth and she nursed right away. So far things have been going great this time around (thank goodness). She is gaining weight very well, plenty of wet/dirties a day, I no longer am sore and her latch has only improved over these three weeks. My concern is this.... for the past three days or so, while she is nursing and I have a let down, I have noticed she is starting to choke some and gets somewhat frustrated. I do NOT want to create a situation where she is fussy at the breast.... I'm paranoid to have that happen again, especially since I am finally BF'ing a baby. I have tried to pull her off until my let down stops, recline and lay back while nursing, etc. I haven't seen any of these things really help. I DO know I have plenty of milk. I have with my other two and so I am not surprised I do this time around too. Does anyone have any experience with this and any tips on how to keep her happy at the breast and manage this flow? Also, as she ages, will she get better with controlling the flow herself?? My other question is about night time fussiness. I do believe she is doing her night time cluster feeding anywhere from 8-10 or 8-11 PM every night....
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:21 AM
    Whoa, that's a lot of milk! A more typical pumping amount, when pumping instead of nursing, would be just 2-4 oz total. Combine the large pump amount with the leaking and discomfort, and it sounds like you have some significant oversupply going on. How about working on getting that to back off a bit? Then both you and baby will be more comfortable! Here's how I would start: next time you are going to pump, take 2-4 oz and then stop. Take more only if you are extremely uncomfortable. But try to leave some milk sitting in the breast, as that will signal your body to reduce production. If that doesn't lead to a reduced supply, it might be a good idea to do some block feeding. So throttle back on the pumping for a few days and see if there's any change. If not, we'll talk you through block feeding. Okay? Oh- are you doing things like trying to offer both breasts at each feeding, or trying to get baby to spend equal time on each breast?
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    :ita with Maddieb. If it was MRSA that caused the mastitis, there's an extremely good likelihood that both mom and baby are colonized and therefore the milk would not be introducing new bacteria into the baby's system. Still, if that was the case and mom was concerned, scalding the mastitis milk would be an option, as it would kill the bacteria.
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    THANK YOU for the replies and encouragement. i return to work in a little less than 2 weeks. so he will be taking a bottle for most of the day but when im home i plan on nursing him..especially through the night. i do pump 2x a day now because if i dont feed him or pump every 2 hours i have very large painful breasts and they leak through my bra and shirt. this morning i pumped 10 0z total about 5 from each breast.
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 09:14 AM
    The above response covers everything really well. I too encourage you to reach out for help if PPD may be something you're experiencing. Both from professionals, but also from the folk who love you. Is there a partner in the picture who can take over many of the household things, cook you some nourishing meals, run the vacuum, do the laundry, etc? Are there neighbors that can swing by to walk the dogs, mom or mother in law that could swing by to hold a baby, bounce a baby, after you have nursed and bring baby to you when baby wants to nurse again so that you can get a nap or take a bath or just have a moment to yourself to do whatever? You are not a failure, mama. This is something that takes time and practice to learn. It is a biological and physiological norm, yes, but it still is a very coordinated act between two people-- one of Whom's digestive system is still maturing and who has only been on this earth for a very short time, and one of Whom's milk supply is still regulating and adjusting and getting fine tuned until about twelve weeks or so, and who is recovering from a big physical feat (birth!) that comes with a whole host of hormone-shenanigans. I would so encourage you to don't give up on nursing yet. It does get easier with practice and support.
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:12 AM
    My pediatrician tested my kids for iron at around 9-10 months.
    7 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:10 AM
    Excellent advice from Erin.in.Middletown. Even from the very earliest ages, babies have variable feeding speeds. Some get all they need in just 5-10 minutes at the breast, others take closer to an hour. So judge her intake by her nappies and weight gain, not by the bottle and not by the amount of time she spends at the breast. If your baby is difficult to wind, remember that it is not always necessary to wind a breastfed baby. I personally never bothered, since my kids preferred to let gas out at the bottoms of their digestive systems. Pretty funny to see a little baby fart like a grown man, complete with facial expressions of effort and pleasurable relief, but much easier than trying to get a burp out of them!
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*canne's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    In my opinion, and from personal experience.... pumping is HARD work and if you can nurse and work through any issues you have.... it is SO WORTH IT! I EP'd with my first two (could not nurse due to various issues) and it was exhausting. I pumped 8 months with my first and 14 months with my second. I ALWAYS wished I could nurse them. So much faster, easier, LESS exhausting, and healthier. Now, I have a third baby (three weeks old) and we are exclusively NURSING.... and I am so thankful. Honestly.... I do NOT think you should go to bottles.... keep up the nursing!
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:05 AM
    I agree with the PPs. Spit-up is generally nothing to be concerned about. Schedules- unless they are ones designed by the baby him/herself- are generally a lot more problematic, since they are associated with supply failure and inadequate milk intake. The exception to this general rule is schedules which result in the baby being nursed more than he/she would otherwise demand. My guess is that your baby is spitting up at night because she is going a really long time without eating. When she finally nurses, the breast is full and flowing fast, and baby is really hungry, leading to her taking in a very large meal. And a very large meal is more likely to result in spit-up; when the baby's tummy is very full, it's more likely that some milk will slip past the weak sphincter at the top of the stomach.
    4 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    18 replies | 8930 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:53 AM
    Most babies do. It's so easy to get milk out of a bottle. The flow is constant, never too fsat or too slow for baby's preference. It takes almost no skill to get milk out of a bottle- in fact, a bottle will just drip milk into baby's mouth when he's not even sucking. So the fact that your baby enjoyed his bottle isn't a special sign that you should switch to bottles. I would do this ONLY if you have absolutely no other option. Bottles deliver easy meals, but easier does not mean healthier!!! Bottle-feeding is associated with increased risk of overfeeding, premature loss of milk supply, and dental problems, both tooth decay and improper tooth alignment. Exclusive pumping (EP) is exponentially harder than nursing, for the following reasons: - It is harder to maintain/increase supply when pumping. Many EP moms struggle with supply.
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 08:49 AM
    Congrats on your new babe! I would encourage you to ditch the bottles unless (1) there are unavoidable separations that really really can't be avoided or (2) supplementation is deemed necessary be a knowledgable expert who is also closely monitoring that supplementation. If bottles are indeed needed for either of the above, provide them in a "paced feeding" method. It sounds like maybe you're already back to at-the-breast only, though, yes? I know it can be hard to trust your body and your baby's body! It's tough when formula feeding is so normalized. How many wet and dirty diapers a day, about, would you say? When is your next doctor's appt? Weight gain sufficiency is the best way to determine if baby is getting enough. Are you feeding on demand? You can always offer more frequently! Feeding on demand with a good comfortable latch is a great way to ensure baby is getting enough, and is all that is needed for most babies; nursing frequently with a good latch is also necessary for establishing a solid supply.
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*alyssa.martin.ab's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 AM
    I posted a thread a few days ago and got some wonderful answers...thank you. Now I have another issue. I do believe I have oald and have tried nursing in a reclined position. But baby is still having choking and gagging and gassy/ irritable issues. My inlaws fed him from a bottle and he LOVED it....so now im thinking about just pumping and feeding him from a bottle....but no matter which we feed him from he spits up a TON! it looks like everything he just took from me or the bottle he spits up. it looks like cottage cheese sometimes and sometimes its really runny. i just dont know if im over feeding him? also he drank about 6 oz of breast milk in 2 hours. and then he got super fussy so did he eat too much? i just feel like i dont know what im doing. i feel awful. i feel like a failure. and now im pretty sure i have post partum depression.....
    8 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*chey08's Avatar
    Today, 06:17 AM
    Hi there, I have a 2 week old baby and she drinks everyb2-3 hours on one breast only for 5-7 min, can that be normal and does she get enough milk? I tried puming out my breast milk and feeding her with a bottle to monitor how much she takes in, however she seems to be more hungry when i bottle feed.. She falls asleep on my breast after 5-7 min, then take winds out to see if she wants more, but she sleeps and then only wakes up 2-3 hours later for the next feed....my concern is, is she getting enough milk and is 5-7 min suffircent enough? She has regular poo and wee nappies. Is it possible that my milk is very filling or that my milk comes out so quickly that it fills her tummy quickly?
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:33 AM
    (Man, I still haven't mastered how to do 'reply with quote'-- is this just really tricky on an iPhone or am I doing it wrong?) "I agree that fussiness is normal in babies, but my baby is very calm and happy when he is not in pain. He doesn't cry and is always smiling unless he is in pain. And my concern is that I cannot help him to diminish his sufferings (thanks to very well intended doctors). The "let's wait and see how he is doing" strategy is all they can actually tell me, after years and years of medical training and practice. I can follow this strategy without going to see doctors The scary thing is that I am harming him, you are right. He was born 9.5 Apgar. I followed a very strict diet during pregnancy because of gestational diabetes and I didn't need insulin. But now, it looks like I can't do anything, because I don't know what is causing blood in his stool (the infectionist confirmed that he doesn't have any anal fissures that would bleed)." First off- I don't think that you are harming your baby. The very strict elimination diet that you are on could certainly be difficult on you, and potentially difficult to get a complete and balanced day to day, but also really stressful-- but the nutritional soundness of breastmilk has only been shown to be compromised when mom is pretty substantially malnourished. I actually would argue that the wait-and-see approach may be evidence of really sound medicine, and a really good result of years of training and study....
    18 replies | 8930 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:10 AM
    I was going to inquire about the schedule too-- perhaps you just mean 'this is around when baby typically likes to nurse', or no? It can be had to hear from every which corner "get your baby on a schedules pronto they need order and discipline in their lives!! Etc etc!!" but at this stage in the game, a schedule may be detrimental, and MIGHT be causing baby to eat when she's not hungry or not eat when she is? That said, spit up in and of itself is not typically something to be overly concerned with, if baby is gaining well, and appears otherwise happy and healthy. Here is my favorite spit up quite from Dr. Jack Newman: " I notice a comment about spitting up. Here's my take. If the baby is gaining weight well and is generally a happy baby spitting up is not a bad thing. In fact, it’s probably a good thing. Breastmilk is full of immune factors (not just antibodies, but dozens of others as well that all interact) that protect the baby from invasion by bacteria and other microorganisms (fungi, viruses etc) by lining your baby’s mucous membranes (the linings of the gut, respiratory tract and elsewhere). A baby who spits up has double protection, when the baby drinks the milk and it goes to the stomach and then when he spits it up. I frequently use this example of how breastfeeding is so different from formula and bottle feeding. Spitting up formula, if all else is going well, is probably not bad. Spitting up breastmilk, if all else is going well, is probably good."...
    4 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 04:54 AM
    The AAP rec's for standard protocol to check iron levels at 12 months, but their rec's also state that it is totally okay (ha! Not a direct quote!) to check earlier if there are any risk factors or concerns. I had been researching solid food introduction, etc etc, and from that, was feeling that iron is really not anything to mess around with, so asked that my baby be tested at her six month visit. It was a toe prick test, and the results are available right away. I will likely have another test done at 9 months, because she was on the low end of the normal range, and is really not enthused about solids yet. So if you are able to have your baby tested, it doesn't seem like it would hurt anything (except for baby's toe, for a brief time)-- if baby is good, you can rest assured that's not the issue. If they're low, you can either focus on iron rich foods and correct through diet (ideal, if baby will eat those foods), or do drops. But there is no need, and actual downsides, of doing iron drops if baby isn't low, because there are negative effects if the body has too much iron. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2010/10/05/peds.2010-2576.full.pdf
    7 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:24 AM
    She also seems to be sleeping a long stretch without eating! But maybe that's because mine still doesn't so I can't imagine it!
    4 replies | 105 view(s)
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