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  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Today, 04:06 AM
    First of all, you get a standing applause from me! You are one determined lady, it is obvious that your journey so far has not been easy. Your child is very, very lucky to have you, as many before you have thrown in the towel much earlier. I am not an expert on the issue, as I only had bad nipple pain for about 2 weeks. However, like you, leaving my breasts "out and about" and out of a bra was not an option. I used the Medela breast shells, which helped immensely: http://www.medela.com/IW/en/breastfeeding/products/breast-care/breast-nipple-problems.html They basically allow your nipples to air out and not be in contact with anything while still wearing a bra. Mind you these are a temporizing measure, and the ultimate fix will be 1) to perfect latch as you have been doing and 2) as your baby ages, her mouth will grow, which should help. Sounds like you either need to work more with that second hospital LC or just use someone other than the first LC. Soldier on mama! Please trust, it will get so much better. As amazing as your nursing experience is now, you have no idea what sweet, heart-melting things await you as the months go on and your baby becomes more interactive while nursing! You owe this treat to yourself for everything you have been through!
    9 replies | 279 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Today, 03:46 AM
    TOTALLY NORMAL!!! This is called "the witching hours!" The majority of babies have this exact same behavior, usually in the evenings weeks they are young. If you look at the time of my post, I am just winding down after finally putting my daughter to bed after her nightly witching session. As always, she was latch on/latch off, put me down/pick me up, bounce me/stop bouncing, etc. You are not doing anything wrong, yes, you have enough milk, and no, there is nothing wrong with you or your breasts. Babies are just exhausted after their long day, with short bursts of being hungry, sleepy or just plain grumpy. They are "cluster feeding" which usually entails short, fitful nursing sessions at night. As long as baby is gaining well, is nursing well and is happy during the day, this too shall pass.
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Today, 03:24 AM
    I just googled "elf on the shelf." LOL! My children make similar faces before nursing... you are right, simultaneously creepy and heartwarming. I simply cannot wait until my daughter (11 weeks) is a nursing toddler, because those times give the greatest laughs!
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*saramama89's Avatar
    Today, 03:16 AM
    Pretty much at least once a day, usually in the evening, my baby will act strange like this! She's fussy and crying. Diaper changed. I try feeding her, she acts like she wants the breast, but then shell suck for just a few seconds and then pull away fussing. She'll stay there frantically snorting and wriggling and trying to find the breast again, but then pull away again once she gets it in her mouth. That goes on for a long time! Then I suppose she's not really hungry maybe, it needs a burp, so I'll walk around holding her for a while. She'll calm a little, but then start fussing and it'll start again! It usually only ends when I just hold and walk her and let her cry and scream until she gets so tired she falls asleep or nearly so, and then she'll have a regular calm feed soon after. What is going on though? She seems extremely agitated and frustrated but she seems to both want to BF and not want to. What should I be doing when this happens? Should I try to help her stay on the breast and feed, or not? This happens every day! The rest of the time she is a great feeder, every 1.5 to 3 hours, and gaining above average weight so far.
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Today, 03:11 AM
    Thank you for the reply, maddieb. Yes, I am trying to concentrate on her overall look, rather than just "the numbers." I am using the who charts, but you just made me stop and think, I wonder if that is what my ped is using. If her 6 week measurement was using the cdc charts, I may be comparing apples to oranges. I will need to check on that. Assuming there is actually a weight problem, yes I think my husband needs to try even more feeding positions/strategies. Unfortunately he seems to take it as belittling his efforts and attack on his parenting when I try to bring up suggestions. When I suggest putting her feet under the faucet as a distraction, he says, I've tried that with her hands, why should her feet be different? His view is "I've tried everything, there's nothing left to try"... and of course there must be SOMETHING left to try. This is a work in progress... my husband is a good father and a good man... he'll come around. He already seems excited about some new gadgets I bought to help him... a bottle warmer, a vibrating baby bathtub, a rotating stars light projector for the ceiling. Also, who is the author for that book you recommended?
    2 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Today, 02:54 AM
    No mom should feel bad about whether baby sleeps in the family bed or in a crib. Different things work for different families, and even for different babies within the same family. I personally have co-slept with and exclusively breastfed both of my children (4yr son and 3mo daughter). My son continued to wake up every 3 hours in the night until at least one year. I can't remember exactly how long, I'm too sleep deprived from waking up this often. Although I wore co-sleeping as a badge of honor for these past few years, I secretly envied my friends who were sleeping for 8+ hours cuddled in bed with their husbands and had visions of them waking up looking like radiant, refreshed goddesses in the morning. Then I had my daughter, who totally debunked this theory. I did absolutely nothing different with her, yet she has slept for 7 hours straight since she was 5 weeks old. She doesn't hates to comfort nurse, although lord knows I repeatedly and quite unsuccessfully try to use nursing to pacify her since this would make my life easier. So while I feel that any sleeping arrangement is legitimate, do not think that co-sleeping creates bad sleeping patterns or a baby who can't be pacified in any other way. As mommal said, we give ourselves to much credit for the habits of our babies.
    17 replies | 371 view(s)
  • @llli*lauronie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:04 PM
    Well, not sure it would qualify as plugged ducts, but I had hard, painful knots that would sometimes resolve with massaging, but often wouldn't. As soon as I got home and put the baby to breast, the knots went away. Babies are magic! I was wondering if it might be my pump? That thing has been put through the ringer. Not sure how to check on that. I might try another flange size. Another question that came to mind... I have quite a bit of milk in the freezer, but the baby isn't drinking from bottles anymore. His daycare started giving him cow's milk with meals after he turned 1 (although I don't know that he drinks much of it), and we give him water from a straw cup at home when he wants it, but otherwise, he just nurses on demand from me. So when I'm gone, should my husband try to give him bottles again after a month or two of not having one? I've tried giving him my milk in a straw cup, but he doesn't really drink much of it, and it breaks my heart to waste 4-5 oz of good milk. Maybe he will drink more from the cup when I'm away and he can't get it from the source? Another question. I never worry about his nutrition because of the breastfeeding, but when I'm away should my husband be giving him cow's milk once he runs out of my milk? Not sure if he *needs* it, and I haven't given him anything but my milk or water so far. Do babies really need cow's milk if they aren't getting breastmilk? Blerg. So much to think about for this stupid trip.
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:39 PM
    How often to pump will depend on your body, and I think it is perfectly reasonable to go by how you feel. As far as the possibility he will not want to nurse when you are together, that is certainly true. But it is also true that even a child this age can often be brought back to the breast with some patient and gentle coaxing, so even in the event there is initial nursing refusal, it need not mean the end of your nursing relationship. Also, I would think that if you offer and encourage and he continues to not be interested, then you can feel more confident the weaning was on his own terms and not entirely due to a nursing strike caused by the two separations. As far as your experience last month, do you mean you got plugged ducts? I wonder if there are any issues with your pump? Also you may find it is better in your case to pump or hand express slightly more often but (for your convenience) for a shorter amount of time. Some moms are more prone to plugs and more frequent milk removal is possibly helpful. And of course you can mix it up, every day does not require the exact same pump approach. This recent thread touched on this subject a bit. http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?122373-Advice-about-work-trip-away-from-breastfeeding-2-year-old Also I assume you have found this wonderful website? : http://breastfeedingincombatboots.com/
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*dandelions's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:30 PM
    Can you call your local hospital(s)? You may not need to wait for a referral -- ours has a lactation clinic every week and it's nice to be able to drop in. Also, don't be afraid to try different LCs -- my first told me the latch was fine (in spite of toe-curling, tearful nursing, nipples that looked like a chisel tip, etc.). I ended up seeing a different LC and she fixed everything! (Not overnight, but it was improved immediately & continued from there.) You can wait til you're reclined to let your baby latch; especially by this age they can maneuver enough to latch on when atop the breast. You may also try lying on your side in bed (put a towel underneath to catch the spill). Still point your nipple at your son's nose, but it should be an easier, more relaxed time than sitting up. It was a wonderful break-through when I started doing that instead. Good luck!
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*lauronie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:12 PM
    Hello, first time posting in the forums! I'm a military musician and I'm getting ready to go on a 37-day tour next month. This will be the first time I've had to leave my baby for so long, as I've been able to take him with me for all my tours up to this point. He will be 13.5 months when I leave. Husband and baby are coming to visit halfway through the tour, so I will be away from baby 19 days, see him for 4 days, then be apart another two weeks. I intended to wean him while I was away, but I'm having second thoughts. I would really love to nurse until he's two, but I'm having a hard time reconciling that to the realities of my job. I'm just not sure how hard I should fight to make it happen. I've been nursing him on-demand since he was born and he's still going strong. I've stopped pumping, as he doesn't need milk while we are apart anymore. Last month I had a 7-day trip, the first time to ever be apart from him since he was born. I pumped the whole trip and it was AWFUL. I got terrible clogs, and at the end of the week I couldn't get milk to come out unless I aggressively squeezed my breasts while pumping. I felt so bruised and it was just mentally a horrible experience. I brought back lots of milk, and although I'm pretty sure it did decrease my supply temporarily, my baby didn't seem to care and has been nursing happily since I returned. The baby did great while I was away, pretty much sleeping through the night with Dad, even though he still nurses through...
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:45 PM
    At less than a year old, my dd would say, "mm...mm...mm" while latched on to agree with something I said. I would tell whoever i was talking to that it meant yes. Now, she's 3 years old and it's a little joke to us. She loves to say, "mm...mm...mm" then unlatch to explain "mm...mm...mm means yes when nursing."
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:31 PM
    Wow, you've been through a lot and so much of it sounds very similar to my story with DD. My daughter's tongue tie was clipped when she was about 8 weeks and that combined with about 5 CST appointments and, yes, time finally brought me some relief. So it was probably 3.5 months until we were nursing pain free. Until then, I was taking Motrin around the clock to help manage the pain. In terms of healing cracks/open wounds in your nipple...a very well-respected breastfeeding doc gave me the following advice. After you put coconut oil on your nipples, cover them with saran wrap. I know it sounds crazy, but the idea is to keep the wound moist so that it doesn't scab over. Then, when you latch baby again she won't "suck off" the scab which, as you know, is excruciating. It's called moist wound healing.
    9 replies | 279 view(s)
  • @llli*annie0987's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:21 PM
    Made it through the weekend! Thank you! the last two feedings I used a warm wash cloth which seemed to help. One feeding actual finished with a nice round nipple! Success! The second not so great but it was a light! He is definitely slipping off the nipple, I can hear him loosing suction. i am going to try reclining next. Do you latch first then recline or be in a reclined position to latch. When I have reclined I've always latched first, but the latch is very painful and then it's like he clamps down immediately. Thanks again, this feels doable again, hopefully I can get a referral tomorrow.
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:55 PM
    Here is some info about cranial sacral therapy, or rather, this article links to other articles : http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/cst/
    9 replies | 279 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:29 PM
    Thanks for answering those questions! Based on your answers, here's what I'm thinking: single long cracks, blanching, and having cracks that sit on the crease that appears post-feeding- that sounds like a latch problem. The nipple is not sitting deep enough in the baby's mouth. It's on the front of the tongue, underneath the hard palate, where it gets compressed when baby sucks. The question is, what is causing the nipple to sit on the front of the tongue instead of being drawn onto the ideal position on the back of the tongue? Well, I'm thinking it's one of 2 things. First, it could be a lip or tongue tie- so get a second opinion on those possibilities. It's really common for people to overlook them. Multiple professionals missed my first daughter's lip tie. Second, it could be that the baby is "shallowing" his latch, a.k.a. clamping the nipple, in order to cope with a fast letdown. Either way, the first step to treating these issues is to see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC, for help with latching and positioning. I would also love for you to try using the biological nurturing/reclined positions- you can do this on your own. Reclining while nursing enlists gravity to hold the baby on the breast while he nurses, rather than having gravity be pulling breast and baby apart. Reclining also uses gravity to fight fast milk flow, which can reduce clamping. For sore nipples and cracks, try the following: - Go braless as much as possible. - Use a...
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*browncow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:42 PM
    My almost 3 month old talks to his food! Meaning he coos at my breast while still latched.
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*annie0987's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:55 AM
    Thanks for the answers. I am trying to take it one feeding at a time to see if I can just get through it. I will be calling the doctor in the morning to see if I can get a referral to a clinic. I don't believe you went six months before seeing the light, I am hoping to make it to the end of the day at this point. To answers the questions: We have checked for a tongue tie and a lip tie, there is nothing. I was diagnosed with thrust in the first few weeks, it has cleared up. I have had mastitis and get regular clots. When baby is done nursing, my nipples are usually creased, with a crack on the crease. At times they are also blanched.
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:39 AM
    I think you have a very clear view of your options! I would definitely start by allowing unlimited nursing all day long and especially in the evening. It's pretty common for a younger baby to have trouble maintaining mom's supply, but for that same baby to have no trouble at all later on when she is a more experienced and stronger nurser. I think there's every reason to expect that your baby will quickly nurse your supply to where it needs to be! If not, then I think the best option is to supplement with formula until a minimum of 6 months, because formula is closer in composition to breastmilk than solids are. It's a lot easier to feed a baby a balanced diet using formula than solids, and that balance of nutrients is part of what supports healthy growth and development.
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*liamsmommy11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:19 AM
    I just want to say I can relate to your husband! My DD is 5 months old and I had never heard of BLW weaning until a few months ago. The idea does not appeal to me at all due to the mess. I have 3 older kids and homeschool and am a little OCD. It would drive me nuts!!! So coming from his perspective, maybe there are ways that can help him feel less stressed about it. Such as putting something down on the floor (shower curtain) and making sure you are using an easy to clean high chair, letting your baby eat in just a diaper, offering to do all the cleanup. (Nice that the dog helps, haha) I think you are right that he is getting used to the chaos of having kids. My hubby had a hard time with that too, having grown up in a wealthy home with a full time maid. Of course, we can't afford a maid and have 4 kids so life is messy and crazy. He has come a long way and is now totally comfortable with things the way they are- often watching all the kids to let me sleep in or run to the store. Give your husband some time to come around and also express to him in a respectful (non argumentative) way how strongly you feel about this. Hope that helps!
    14 replies | 1810 view(s)
  • @llli*liamsmommy11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    Ha, I tried to express my situation in the title but it was a challenge. I have struggled with chronic low supply because my daughter does not empty my breasts well. I saw an IBCLC often in the beginning and did alot of pumping and built up a huge freezer stash. Eventually I was burnt out on the pumping (triple feeding) and was thrilled that I could move to breastfeeding only with a bottle or two needed from my stash here and there. Now my frozen milk is used up and my daughter is just over 5 months old. I think I have 3 options: -Go back to triple feeding (pump after each feeding and give her the extra in bottles) -Supplement with formula until 6 months and then start solids -Start solids early I was hoping to make it to 6 months on breastmilk alone, but am not sure I could handle going back to pumping. I have 3 older children ages 8, 5, and 3 and homeschool my oldest two. Please share your thoughts. Tonight I am going to let her cluster feed and see if that works. Although I know supply is typically low in the evenings I have a feeling that mine truly IS low whether is was in the beginning or not- because I have been supplementing frozen milk in the evenings for quite some time now.
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 AM
    Often times before latching, my 8wo looks up at me sideways with the creepiest smirk/grin, very Elf on the Shelf-esque. I think it's hilarious and adorable, but it totally freaks out my husband. :)
    5 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 AM
    How your baby's latch looks doesn't mean diddly. It's how it feels that matters. Questions for you: - Has baby been checked for lip or tongue ties? - Have either of you been diagnosed with thrush? Or have either of you had a recent course of antibiotics or a yeast infection anywhere on your bodies? - When baby finishes nursing, what shape are your nipples? Are they assymetrical/wedged/creased/ridged/shaped like new lipsticks, or are they symmetrical, like pencil erasers? - What nursing positions have you tried? - Have you tried pumping, and if so, how does that feel? How much milk can you get? - How would you rate your milk supply? Do you have a lot of milk? - What happens when baby unlatches? Do you ever see milk squirt or spray from the breast?
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*pickle.pie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 AM
    Yes it did start around the 4-month sleep regression time, but is still going on at 8 months, so I guess it can't still be that??
    26 replies | 1185 view(s)
  • @llli*pickle.pie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:38 AM
    For a while my baby would only nurse lying down full-stop, on either side. I think due to fast let-down - she could cope better that way. At about 6 or 7 months she suddenly got easier to nurse in other positions, so I think only time helped me! I hope the chiropractic continues to help you!
    6 replies | 310 view(s)
  • @llli*pickle.pie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:34 AM
    I've been there and it's awful. I used to dread every feed, and be in tears when my daughter latched. I was also told her latch looked OK, though it could be a bit shallow at times - and she pulled on and off all the time as well without relaxing her grip, which was agony. Everyone told me it would be better by 6-8 weeks, and it wasn't. But, it did eventually get better for me, though not really pain-free until about 6 months I'm afraid. Things that helped me were trying different positions, partiularly laid-back nursing and letting her latch herself, side-lying nursing, swapping positions regularly throughout the day so that the pressure was on different parts of my nipple, a lanolin-based nipple cream, and more than anything else - time. I think she just got bigger and better able to latch, but she's still not amazing at times. Also have you considered oversupply/fast letdown? I had issues with that, which I think was causing at least some of the pulling on and off as she couldn't keep up with the flow.
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
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