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  • @llli*greciamom's Avatar
    Today, 05:43 PM
    Hola!! Hace 8 días dejé de darle pecho a mi bebé de casi 3 semanas porque me cayó una infección en ambos pechos por lo mucho que se me agrietaron, ya me sangraban y me salía pus. La doctora me dijo que éste lunes podía volver a darle pecho, pero he notado que ni con el biberón mi bebé abre la boca! Tengo miedo de volver a darle, además de que ya casi no estoy produciendo leche, qué me aconsejan? Unas pezoneras servirán? Gracias de antemano!
    0 replies | 9 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:00 PM
    A lot depends on what sort of student you are- high school, university, graduate level? While the right to pump is generally protected, schools do not always have pumping facilities available where you need them. Your best bet is likely to contact the administration of your school and discuss what the set-up is for nursing/pumping moms, and to speak to your individual teachers if you must interrupt a class in order to go and pump. They are likely to be understanding about it, especially if you explain that it is a medical need.
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 02:55 PM
    Instead of waking up to pump, how about waking the baby and nursing? The nighttime nursing would help you maintain your daytime supply, without requiring you to monkey with the pump in the wee hours of the night. Since your frozen stash is so far ahead of your baby's intake, I don't think it's absolutely necessary for you to wake the baby or to pump. Just stay alert for slumping supply- if you are suddenly and consistently pumping way less than usual, the it's probably time to reconsider nighttime feeding/pumping. Another reason you might want to consider nighttime nursing or pumping is that you're more likely to get your cycle back once your baby starts sleeping through the night. If you're enjoying a hiatus from your period, night nursing might help it stay away for longer.
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*saschroetter's Avatar
    Today, 11:49 AM
    My 7 month old baby started to sleep through the night ~ 3 weeks ago. He'll nurse right before bed (sometimes both sides), then sleep 7 - 8 hours, then wake to eat (once side), then goes back to sleep 2 - 3 hours. Prior to this, he was waking every 2 - 4 hours to eat since he was born. I had been pumping over night when he was sleeping longer stretches. From the beginning, I have been pumping / breastfeeding. Baby had jaundice when he was born (spent 24 hours in the NICU under lights), so I had to pump right from the beginning. Then, I had oversupply issues / fast letdown. Then, he'd choke with breastfeeding - so we did a combination of bottle / breast. I have about a 1.5 - 2 months supply in the freezer. For the past 2 months (with much determination / persistence), he's primarily been breastfed (and only bottle fed when I'm away at work)...no more oversupply or choking. I want to breastfed until at least 12 months. Now that he's consistently sleeping longer, should I still wake up to pump? :shrug Getting sleep seems important too though! Thanks for your help!
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:37 AM
    I think you are expecting results much too quickly. Look at it this way. All throughout your pregnancy your body was preparing to make milk. When your baby was born, your body started making milk. But then, milk was not removed from the breasts often enough, and this told your body to STOP making milk, so it did. Biologically, your body was told there was no baby to nurse. Milk production takes energy and suppresses fertility, and biologically we are designed to propagate the species. So biologically-speaking, your body was doing exactly what makes sense- saving the energy for your survival and to speed the time with which you could conceive again. Now you are telling your body that there IS a baby and to make milk again. It is going to take time for your body to get this message! Have patience. Exclusive nursing can be your goal if you choose. But remember there are mothers who never produce enough milk for their babies and still nurse. There are even mothers who make no milk and nurse. There are mothers whose babies cannot nurse but who give their baby what milk they can express, and every variation you can imagine. These are all breastfeeding mothers and they gain great benefit from doing what they can, even if it is not 'exclusive' breastfeeding. Your goal need not be only the one possibility, is my point. Or there can be an assortment of goals. Personally I think daily goals that you have some realistic control over make more sense (today I will pump one more...
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*magdatay's Avatar
    Today, 09:22 AM
    Hello!!! I think I mostly came on here to get a little bit of support and to see if anyone else has experienced something similar. Following delivery, there were a number of issues that created a domino effect that led to (formula) supplementation and for my milk supply to be delayed. Due to this fact, the supplementation continued and got to the point where now I am barely producing any milk and my son's main source of nutrition is formula. :cry Over the last 2-3 days I saw a lactation consultant (actually spoke to two) who advised me to start pumping every three hours, along with nursing my son when it was productive. Thankfully, I've been successful in doing this but see that I am pumping no more than 1 oz... and this is during the periods where my son has not nursed ahead of pumping. As an FYI, I am also taking fenugreek tablets, drinking "Mother's Milk" Tea, and taking Maylunga supplements. I am feeling so discouraged. Obviously this is hard, but I will do whatever it takes if it means that I can get to breastfeeding exclusively. However, I am worried that I am putting in all of this work... and that this goal will always be elusive. He is my third baby. I was able to nurse to 2 yrs with #1 and 8 mo with #2. I am at a point with this where I am slowly unraveling... Anyone else have success "re-lactating like this?"
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:19 AM
    so, the concern is over an apparent slow down in gain, and your/caregiver observations that baby is not eating much? Otherwise, baby appears entirely healthy? How was gain prior to 6 months? Are you aware that weight gain rate typically slows considerably after about 6 months? Were the last two weight checks done on the same scale, and done correctly? Is baby crawling, rolling around, more active? Also, many babies experience constipation after starting solids, indicating that the amount of solids is too much or the foods given are constipating. Most Cereals and for many people dairy (yogurt) are constipating. Also: Do you mean milk in the bottle or at the breast or both? Also, of course if a child is being g4iven solids they may take less breastmilk. That is why solids must be introduced very slowly and with great care to encourage lots of nursing at the same time (for example, nursing baby prior to offering food, starting offering solids a couple times a week, maybe, slowly increasing to once a day, being careful to not spoon the food into the mouth but instead let baby control the intake.) First, I suggest the book My Child Won't Eat by Carlos Gonzalez, a pediatrician. This is an excellent book, well written and not very long, and will help you get a clearer picture of what is normal and what is not when it comes to eating, and also explains charting and gain and the wide variety of normal there. How is breastfeeding going? It is unclear from your post if...
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*sacmd's Avatar
    Today, 08:11 AM
    So...I am a Pediatrician. And my suggestion is that you switch doctors (also something I rarely say or consider--I generally support my own profession), or get your breastfeeding advice elsewhere and ignore him/her. Your doctor probably did not breastfeed, or if he's male, his wife didn't breastfeed. Everything you describe sounds like the spectrum of normal. You will not have solid poops until your baby takes solids. I cannot emphasize enough that MOST pediatricians do not have adequate knowledge of breastfeeding norms...I was told by my OWN Pediatrician that at 3 months I "might just stop producing milk, for no reason at all, because it happens all the time", and many moms have to start formula. Um, no. He is still our Pediatrician because I think he has sound medical advice in many other areas, but breastfeeding and infant behavior (like sleep) are not his expertise. I just nod my head and go uh-huh, thanks for the advice...
    7 replies | 228 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Today, 06:54 AM
    Maybe a friction blister? It doesn't look like a blister or anything though. Frankly, it doesnt look like anything. I think I'm the only one that would even notice that part of the nipple appears slightly raised/swollen. I tried putting my baby in the opposite direction to nurse last night, but it was still just as painful. Fortunately, it doesn't hurt as much to pump, so I was able to pump last night on the affected side. And baby seemed satisfied with just the one side. This morning I fed him on the good side and pumped the right while I fed so my husband could feed him the pumped afterwards. I'm going into the LC today at noon and then the doctor if she thinks I need to. We'll see what she says. Thank you again for your help. It means a lot!
    18 replies | 323 view(s)
  • @llli*lenarx's Avatar
    Today, 05:50 AM
    Dear All, I'm not sure if this is the correct place to post. I'm looking for advice or anyone to share experiences with their child. My 7mo daughter has always been small but consistent gainer. We started introducing some solids at 6 mo and noticed she was taking less and less BM. She never drank much because she refused bottles and cups, so she often nursed throughout the night and still continues to at least 3 times per evening. However my nanny used to be able to sneak in a bottle while she was sleeping and that was enough. Now, even when asleep, she refuses it. While awake she eats a little cereal or yogurt, with great effort on the parts of the caretakers, but wont drink. Even if I am home to nurse her, she is often uninterested. I went to the pediatrician and we noted a gain of only 1 oz in 6 weeks! A visit to a pediatric gastroenterologist was recommended. We saw her yesterday, and even though this woman gets positive reviews from many, I did not like her at all. I felt she was rough and callous (maybe I am being a sensitive first time mom?). She immediately, without discussion, requested a stool sample, a blood draw for analysis and some radiology scans of the esophagus, etc. She also prescribed Zantac and Cyproheptadine, along with some fennel tea, brown sugar in water, probiotic and Colicease. I am more than fine with Zantac and the herbal supplements, however I am hesistant about the cyproheptadine because of the sedative and other side effects, in a infant...
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*candie.p's Avatar
    Today, 12:48 AM
    I have been searching to see if I can find information about pumping as a student. My baby will be 1 when I go back to school and our goal/plan is to breastfeed as long as he wants to. My concern is finding a place to pump while I am away for classes. Are there any laws or policies for pumping/nursing students? Would I at least be protected if I were pumping in my car?
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:08 PM
    Friction blister? or really bad irritation- from a bite or a reaction to something? For the pain, have you tried positioning baby differently? Once when my daughter bit me and the injury made nursing very painful, I was able to greatly reduce the pain by "reversing" her latch. It meant basically laying down and pulling her over my shoulder so she would pretty much latch "upside down" but it really helped while I healed.
    18 replies | 323 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:02 PM
    Are you saying there is one side (left or right) that is not getting as much 'attention' or that baby is refusing, or is your concern that baby nurses one side at a time? Nursing one side at a time is usually fine- Getting engorged is always somewhat concerning, mostly because it might lead to plugs or mastitis, or might indicate either baby is not nursing often enough or effectively enough. On the other hand, it is pretty common in the early weeks and usually resolves on its own with frequent nursing. if you cannot get baby to nurse more often overall to help stave off the overfullness, I would suggest hand expression as needed. If hand expression is not doing the trick, pump only as needed, on a lowish setting, just to extract enough milk to feel comfortable. I would not be concerned about low milk production at this point, because it sounds like you are making more than enough milk, again, assuming good weight gain.
    4 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*tomom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    Thanks for your replies. I guess I'm concerned that supply on the one side might diminish or I will stop making enough? I am getting engorged but more so at night when she seems to favor the one sided feeding more than both sides. Is that concerning?
    4 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 PM
    Yes, I'll definitely ask her tomorrow. And not sure if this means anything, but I was closely examining my nipple and noticed that the pain was mostly in one area (that is about 1/4 the full tip). That area is swollen or raised a bit more than the other area. Does this mean anything?
    18 replies | 323 view(s)
  • @llli*lan3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 PM
    I appreciate the advice. My husband is around and I am hoping he can take over at the nighttime parent. He has attempted recently but my son just gets so upset because he is expecting me and nursing. It's hard to listen to and I end up going in because nursing him back to sleep is easier so I certainly hear what you are saying that perhaps it might not get me more sleep.
    2 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:22 PM
    You can introduce bottle any way and any time you like, or just leave it to the caregivers to introduce the bottle. There is no evidence a baby must have a bottle introduced at some specific time or some specific way or some specific amount of times before mom goes back to work. Yes baby may resist the bottle and it may take some work to get baby to take much with the bottle, but that will happen no matter when the bottle is introduced. So, do whatever makes you the most comfortable would be my suggestion, but certainly not more than one small bottle per day before you return to work. Remember the bottles before you go back to work are for practice only, and so can be very small- an ounce or less. I do not think you ever did explain why you cannot pump, but I thought you were planning to hand express at work. Can't you collect your milk when you hand express and keep it in some kind of an insulated bag? Freshly expressed milk can even be left at room temp (19° to 26°C) for several hours, or in a cooler bag with a cold pack for 24 hours- do you have a refrigerator or freezer at home? Here is more info on how to store your expressed milk. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/21_storingmilk.pdf If this will not work, then of course you will need to provide something else for your baby, and that would be either formula or milk donated from another mother. But certainly no reason to introduce formula until it is absolutely necessary- when...
    1 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    Can you ask your LC if she posts on lactnet, and give her permission to ask about your case there (it's anonymous, for you, anyway... I am quite flummoxed by pain that bad, after pain free nursing, with nothing visible...I wonder if oral anti biotic should perhaps be tried even though it is unclear if mastitis is involved.
    18 replies | 323 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:55 PM
    As long as baby is pooping/gaining fine, nursing overall at least 10 times per 24 hours, and nursing is comfortable and you are not getting engorged, this all sounds pretty normal esp. for the early weeks when milk production tends to be high, tummy is at it's tiniest, and so a baby may get full quickly- Which part is concerning you?
    4 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 PM
    I pretty much left it alone (other than nursing and pumping w light compression) yesterday and today. Yesterday was fine. Today, my nipple hurts so bad that I cannot nurse. It's excruciating. Like crying it hurts so bad! I'm miserable. I'm gong to try to get into the dr tomorrow. But I'm guessing they won't do anything. I'm so upset and feel hopeless.
    18 replies | 323 view(s)
  • @llli*evergreen474's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:51 PM
    My son (almost 6 weeks) definitely prefers my left breast over my right. Maybe he just likes lying on that side, I'm not sure. But my left breast always seems fuller, consequently. He also sucks in his sleep. Both on my breast and I've even seen him do it while napping in his bassinet.
    4 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    Yes mothers are terribly vulnerable in the post partum period. This is why it is so important for mothers to get good breastfeeding support and information long before baby is born, as well as during the post partum period. It is a medical crime that we don't get this in so many cases. Please don't turn your anger over the situation onto yourself- if you are angry, and you have a right to be- turn it where it belongs- a medical system and society that undermines a mother's ability to nurse her child from long before she even gives birth. I do think that book will be very helpful to you. if you do still want hands on help, are you sure your insurance will not pay for a LC apt, or there is no clinic in your area, or some way to see the LC for a lower cost or get a payment plan etc? Maybe your family could help pay. In case you were wondering, $180 is an entirely reasonable price for a consult, IBCLCs spend years on specialized training and lots of money on specialized education, and consults last 60-90 minutes typically and often include some type of follow up contact. You may also want to see if there are any volunteer (free) support groups near you- for support and companionship on your journey as well as bfding info. Some LLL leaders even do free home visits, and this might be helpful especially when you are seeking help finding ways to encourage baby to nurse more or latch better etc.
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*anyi.cas's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:08 PM
    Wow! Many thanks for your feedback. I do appreciate it! Sorry for the confusion...I was in tears as I was typing this post. To answer your question, I would attempt to nurse on demand, but he would only last about 7 mins or less on each breast. He would fall asleep and wake up hungry, of course. I would attempt to nurse again but the same story repeats. I must also say that my close family did not support me much in the breastfeeding journey. I remember how they said so many times how I was just starving my baby and just allowing him to swallow air. I partially gave up, and now I cannot forgive myself from doing so. Due to trauma after delivery, I was in so much pain, could not even walk right for 3 weeks. Imagine, then, how vulnerable I was. I will definitively get the book you have recommended, but as far as getting a lactation consultant, I am afraid I cannot afford one right now. I just talked to one and the initial consultation is $180. Well, again...many thanks for your valuable input. I will put more effort into this and hopefully I will get some good results!
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:51 PM
    Thanks for the helpful replies. So far, the problem has not repeated itself in the past 2 days. I did call Medela, and the rep didn't make a guess as to what might be wrong, but she was going to have me check several things. I had to go, however, but said I would call back if the problem reoccurs. It seemed to me that the suction did not change, just the frequency of the revolution of the motor, if that makes sense. I was able to pump as much as normal since it was only a 10 second glitch. If it's the power adapter, several stores around here sell a replacement for about $25, but maybe Medela would send me one? The pump is out of warranty. I used it part time with baby #1, but now am using it full time for baby #2 since I work during the day, 8 hrs, 4-5 days a week. I also use it every morning after the first feed just to build up a stash (for now, will use to mix with cereal when DD starts solids). I'm hoping it was just a power fluctuation in the outlet, which was one at work that I don't normally use. My back up plan if the pump goes out during work is to call it a day, go home, and use my sister's Freestyle which I have--I tried it twice and the pumping action is so different from the PIS that I don't like it at all, so it would be an emergency use until I can either fix my PIS or buy a new one (yes, I dislike the Freestyle and love the PIS so much that I'd buy a new one!). Unfortunately, my insurance does not cover a pump because it is a "grandfathered"...
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*tomom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:26 AM
    I'm currently exclusively breastfeeding my second little one. She is now 2.5 weeks old. She easily falls asleep at the breast no matter what I try. So sometimes she only eats from one breast (this is more common than her eating from both). However, when she does fall asleep she seems to still be actively sucking. She also seems to favor the left over the right. The right seems to have powerful let down because LO will unlatch and milk will go everywhere! I sometimes pump once a day after she has only taken one side for comfort and to keep up supply? Not sure if this is necessary or not. I also try reclining especially when she's on the right. Sometimes she pops off quite quickly (after only a minute or two). Seems content but then starts rooting if she gets moved. Can any of you provide some insight? Thanks!
    4 replies | 165 view(s)
  • @llli*ml102612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 AM
    Thanks for responding. I will say that my son is a very consistently good eater. He'll usually have scrambled eggs with cheese / or fortified oatmeal, and a fruit and yogurt smoothie for breakfast. Lunch and dinner is usually a protein with veggies and rice or pasta. He loves salmon and avocados, as well as yogurt, so I feel like he is getting plenty of healthy fats. He eats a varied diet and seems to eat quite a lot. He's gaining weight like a champ - when they weighed him at the pediatrician's last month, he was in the highest weight percentile he's ever been! I could continue pumping during the day for the next few weeks, but I just really question if it's necessary, especially with the added time it will add to my day going to another floor to pump now . I guess I could introduce formula - although he's never had it in his life, and at 11 months, I am really curious how he would take to it. I've heard babies who have never had it may not be amenable to it at this point!! We are planning to introduce cow's milk around a year for daytime feeds (although again, I've read that if a mom is still nursing a few times a day, it isn't really necessary?!) so I am a little concerned about introducing formula for only 3 weeks and then switching to cow's milk. Just seems like a lot of unnecessary transition, in my opinion.
    2 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 AM
    This is a difficult question because the answer lies somewhere in the fuzzy boundary between guidelines for infant feeding and the needs of individual babies and moms. The US guidelines say that until 12 months, breastmilk or formula should provide a baby's primary source of nutrition. The reasoning behind that recommendation is that breastmilk (or formula) provide complete and balanced nutrition at a time when a baby's brain and body are growing faster than at any time for the rest of its life. It's hard to provide nutrition that is as complete and balanced using solids because babies tend to be inconsistent eaters; one week they will eat only peas, the next week it's Cheerios and air. So, if you were just nursing 3x per day, would that be enough to qualify as providing the majority of the baby's nutrition? I personally doubt it. Most moms need to nurse at least 8x per day when their babies are exclusively breastfed, and it's often stated that a mom should nurse at least 3-5x per day in order to meet a 12-24 month old's dairy requirements. So I would guesstimate that for most mom/baby pairs, you'd want to be nursing more like 5x per day, minimum, in order to meet an 11 month old's "dairy" requirements. So while that all sounds like I'm telling you to keep pumping, I think it's important to keep in mind that your baby is 11 months old- how different is that really from 12 months? Is it okay to nurse less than the minimum guesstimate given above? What if...
    2 replies | 131 view(s)
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