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  • @llli*noelle.black's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:36 PM
    I have been breastfeeding my 6 month old son since he was born (pumping while at work for him to use at daycare during the day). Last week the stomach bug left me pretty sick. I was too sick to pump for 3 days and only nursed a handful of times during those few days to try and give some precious antibodies to my little boy so he wouldn't get it. I've been pumping a few times a day since then and nurse him every time if I can but I am not pumping much at all now. I'm still on the dehydrated side but getting much better now and taking in as many calories as I can. I'm worried my supply isn't going to come back because of those three days... am I right? Or is there still hope? Anything I can do to help get it back to where it was? If it'll come back in time, that will make me feel better but I'm just worried right now and stressing about it...:(
    0 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:35 PM
    Thank you! These are awesome resources! We also ordered a couple new types of bottles that are supposed to be easier for breastfed babies. The nipples look shorter so maybe they won't trigger her gag reflex as bad either. One is called Mimijumi and costs $30 but has a money back guarantee if they won't take it. The other is a Bare Perfe-latch. Hoping she will like those.
    6 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:52 AM
    I had the same thing happen around 6 weeks. Now I really think it was just the pique of a fussy period overall. I have a fast letdown but it never bothered her before. Starting at 6 weeks she would act so hungry and I would have to bounce her around and sing to her to get her to eat little bits at a time in between fussing. Even in the middle of the night. I was really worried and exhausted.. it just lasted about a week and is nursing just fine now.
    3 replies | 260 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 AM
    A quick update.. I spoke with my endocrinologist and even though I've been off medication for 10 months now and my prolactin level is back to being abnormally high, the MRI showed no significant change in my tumor! So I am free to continue nursing as long as I want!
    7 replies | 371 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymemommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:17 AM
    I will ask my doctor if I can do that, mommal. I would really love to see what she is actually eating. There is a breastfeeding clinic about 40 minutes away, so I could go in there and have them weigh her before and after. If her weight does not pick up here in the next week on my own scale, I think I will make the trek and do that. I do have to say, she's only been on the Zantac for 36 hours, but she is like a different baby. She is eating much larger portions, is much happier, and is actually eating more often. She NEVER ate within 2 hours of a previous feeding and she has done that 3 times yesterday too. I think I am on the right track with the Zantac!!
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:13 AM
    I want her to comfort nurse. But when she pulls off multiple times because she is frustrated by the flow I have to give it a break, for the sake of my nipples! What positioning adjustments? We lay back a bit every time we nurse - is there another position I could try?
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:10 AM
    Yes. It has been very trying and overwhelming, because I never had a fever, nor any of the typical mastitis symptoms. I never felt a plugged duct or anything like that, and when the dr. said it was just mastitis I knew that wasn't it because it was starting to protrude from the bottom of my left breast. I've had it drained 5 times now and I havent been able to relax as I am afraid it will happen again on my good breast. The only thing I can think that may have caused it was I had a severely cracked nipple on that side, and once I started bleeding and LO was spitting up my blood I started nursing less on that side, without really pumping.
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:46 PM
    I agree with mommal. I am not quite understanding. When baby wants to comfort suck, are you ending the breastfeeding session, or is baby? Comfort nursing is normal and important. If your milk flow is so bad baby is refusing to nurse for comfort, that will rectify as your production and the fast letdown calms down. If baby is willing to keep trying despite the reaction to fast flow, let her keep trying. And try positioning adjustments to help lower the flow or help her handle it better. I would also sometimes let milk flow into a towel for a few moments and they re-latched baby. Also, The fast letdown that is probably causing the pulling off, sputtering etc. will be helped by nursing more often. It might not be immediate, but it should begin to help if baby keeps nursing frequently consistently.
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:32 PM
    So that kiwi-sized lump you talked about in a previous thread turned out to be an abscess? If you don't mind me asking, how did you figure out what it was, and what was the treatment? As MaddieB pointed out, feeding "on demand" can be more complicated than simply waiting for the baby to ask to be fed. It can also mean that mom feeds the baby when her own body is demanding to release some milk. Feeling full, or feeling engorged? That's a cue from your body to try to get the baby to nurse. If the baby won't nurse- because she's too deeply asleep or too full- then you have 2 choices. You can simply put up with the fullness and try to nurse the baby again a little later. Alternately, you can hand express of pump just enough to restore comfort. What you generally want to avoid is thoroughly emptying the breast, because that will perpetuate or worsen oversupply. Please don't worry about your baby getting overfull. One of the beautiful things about being a baby on a breastmilk diet is that your tummy deals with being overfull quite easily. Too full? The excess part of your 100% liquid diet will get disposed of as spit-up, which is messy but completely harmless. I think a lot of moms get caught up in a destructive pattern of worry about the amount of milk their babies ate. It would make sense if they were bottle feeding, because it's so easy to overfeeding/underfeed a baby when you are using a bottle and the adult is in charge of the feeding. But when you're...
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:10 PM
    Found my favorite article about constipation in infants and young children: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0201/p469.html
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 05:56 PM
    I am trying to nurse more often, but it's been difficult because she will nurse until (what I assume) is full, and then wants to comfort suck, which isn't possible because my letdown frustrates her. So she pulls off, sputters, cries, re-latches, pulls off, sputters, cries, repeat. They say breastfed babies can't overeat but I believe her tummy is getting way too full. If that doesn't happen, she is extremely difficult to wake up, period. So I try for about 30 minutes and then give in and pump, because I feel so engorged. My hope is that I don't necessarily have an oversupply, and that baby will grow into my let down once my supply is full established. In the meantime, I'm struggling to comfort her (I'm trying not to give a paci) and keep myself comfortable (without resorting to pumping/expressing).
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 03:23 PM
    It would probably be best to encourage your baby to nurse more often. What happens when you try to do that? And what are you a trying? "On demand" became a saying to counteract the destructive idea of feeding schedules. In that case, it simply meant, do not put a baby on an every 4 hour feeding schedule and instead nurse when baby cues, which would typically be way more often than that. But the problem with the idea of nursing "On demand" is that there are many instances where a baby does not cue as often as is optimal, or where an infant's cues are subtle and cannot really be described as "demanding" to be fed. What I suspect is happening here is that because you have overproduction, your baby is getting plenty to eat even with a low nursing frequency and really does not need to nurse more often to gain normally. Fine for baby. But for your breast health, and your ongoing ability to breastfeed, you need baby to nurse more often. Nursing more often is perfectly fine, is NOT going to hurt your baby and it is also NOT going to increase milk production. It will not increase milk production because the more often your baby nurses, the less they will take in at once. So overall the message to your body of how much milk to make is unchanged. Frequent nursing promotes NORMAL milk production, not overproduction. What promotes overproduction (and increases production if that is needed) is pumping "extra" milk out. Breastfeeding does not really require so much...
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 01:35 PM
    Hi there, I have a question about my DD. She is 5.5 weeks old now, and has been exclusively breastfeeding since day 1. Her eating habits aren't as consistent with what LC's usually recommend, and while supply is a big concern of mine, a bigger concern is clogged ducts (im currently getting over a breast abscess). Sometimes she eats every 2.5-3 hours. Sometimes it's every 5-6. Sometimes she drains both breasts. Sometimes she only snacks on one and falls right back to sleep (when this happens I feel so engorged!). Most of the time my breasts still feel full though. Her weight gain is great, and she has plenty of poopy/wet diapers. My question is, can I continue to let her feed like this? Is this what "on demand" feeding is like? Will it effect the general health of my breasts? Should I pump during those times when she goes longer or just snacks, and if so, how long (I also don't want an oversupply, I already have an OALD!) I'm terrified of getting sick again as it has left me exhausted and overwhelmed, not to mention with a disfigured breast. It would seem has breastfeeding would be easier but it requires much more thought then I anticipated
    6 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*feetea's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 11:00 AM
    Oh that's really helpful, thank you mommal :-) Especially the bit about how long it takes to resolve - so to be patient and give the treatment time to work its effect. I've also been thinking about how much lactulose I should be giving him - the doctor said to take 2.5 ml a time, when the bottle says it should be 5ml for ages 1-5. I've been giving him the 2.5 ml but since he's over 1 year old and big for his age - over the 99th percentile - I wonder whether he shouldn't be on 5ml instead. I'll mention that to the doc when I see her. Very grateful for your advice :-)
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 07:23 AM
    I think the best thing you can do is to stop thinking of it as an imbalance and start thinking of it as oversupply. "Imbalance" implies that there is something wrong with your milk. But there's nothing wrong with it other than overabundance, which is in my experience a better problem to have than not enough milk. My experience with oversupply is that there is no way to tell how fast your body will respond to corrective measures (block feeding, full drainage, etc.). Some moms respond really fast, in just a day or two. Others take months to get things completely under control. One thing up that I found to be true is that the process is not completely under your control. Sometimes oversupply will come roaring back for no reason. It's kind of a "2 steps forward, 1 step back" process.
    1 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 07:18 AM
    Can you get your hands on a professional baby scale, one that is good down to the 1/10 of an oz? When my first baby had issues with weight gain, I did a lot of weighed feeds at home. That enabled me to see exactly how much she was taking in at feedings, so I got a good sense of her overall daily intake and aas also able to track her weight at home.
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 07:14 AM
    That's wonderful news! Thank you for the update!
    6 replies | 241 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 07:11 AM
    :ita with all the above from MaddieB. My first kid had some pretty significant constipation when she was getting interested in solids, around 14-15 months. It was caused by a combination of factors. First, when it came to solids she loved her pasta and cheese but nothing else. Second, she was nursing less, which meant that she wasn't as well hydrated as she had been. Third, we started offering her opportunities to use the potty- in the most low-pressure way, we thought, but it was still too much. Then she had an episode of hard poop, which more or less taught her to be afraid of pooping, so she started to withhold her poop which made the problem worse... The most helpful things I learned about constipation in a toddler are the following: - If you are nursing, keep nursing. Cow's milk can be constipating but human milk is not. - Keep a poop journal. It can be really hard to remember when your child last pooped. 5 days ago or 7? 7 or 10? - If you are engaged in potty-training, stop. Let her go back to diapers for as long as necessary. - Young toddlers who are nursing frequently don't need that much solid food. A lot of parents start offering potentially constipating foods just so their child will eat something. But a baby who is breastfeeding a lot doesn't need to be offered only her favorite foods. Give her a balanced and fiber-rich diet, and she will eventually eat it. If she doesn't, she's not really hungry. - Constipation takes approximately...
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*feetea's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 05:36 AM
    Oh thank you maddieb! That's really helpful and so good to know someone else has experienced something similar to me. I feel more confident to be able to talk to the doctor about things other than reducing breastmilk. I had wondered about the dairy and/or wheat being a possible reason though have been reluctant to try eliminating those things from his diet just because he enjoys the bread and yoghurt so much! However, since he's not eating much of anything anyway, it won't be a real problem to give it a go. I don't think it can be dehydration, because he's producing plenty of wet nappies, but I don't suppose it will do any harm to give him water with his meals anyway. I will look up Dr Sears. Thanks again :-)
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 12:32 AM
    Hi ellmom, congratulations! In the vast majority of situations, nursing is entirely safe while pregnant so weaning is most usually not needed when pregnant. If you have been told by your OB that you need to wean your child, is it possible they are not correct? It would depend why. In some rare cases it might be prudent, but again, not usually. For gradually reducing and eventually eliminating nursing sessions if you choose to, two good guides are How Weaning Happens and The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning. For some tips specifically on night weaning when bedsharing, a good guide would be Elizabeth Pantley's The No-Cry Sleep Solution. For information on nursing while pregnant, I suggest the book Adventures in Tandem Nursing. Here are some excerpts: http://kellymom.com/ages/tandem/welcome-to-nursingtwo/ For information on abrupt weaning in the case of an immediate medical necessity, here are some articles. http://www.nursingnurture.com/abrupt-weaning/ and http://www.lalecheleague.org/nb/nbjulaug98p118.html
    1 replies | 123 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 09:02 PM
    Hi feetea. My oldest had a pretty mild bout with constipation when he first started solids (so, around 6 months or so?) and then when we were potty training he had severe constipation for a while. I forget exactly how old he was then, but I think it was around 2? So I know how upsetting this can be. I remember feeling awful that my little guy was going through this. In both cases he was nursing at the time, in fact, nursing quite a bit, and we solved the problem without changing nursing patterns at all. As far as I know, breastfeeding does not cause constipation and reducing breastfeeding will not cure it. If there is any evidence less breastmilk or less nursing helps with constipation I would love to see it, because biologically it makes no sense. Here was our experience in a nutshell. In the first instance, we stopped constipating foods like rice cereal. I see some possibly constipating foods in what your child eats, like bread and yogurt. We offered more peas and prunes and pears (I was spoon feeding him mostly purees at the time, with my subsequent kids we did a more baby led solids approach and did not have the issues with constipation my oldest did.) In the second instance, I think the main culprit was the potty training. I realized it was way too soon. I had thought he was ready because he used his little pot to poop and pee early on and I kind of figured that was it. Later I realized that had basically been an accident and he was NOT really ready, at...
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*ellmom's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 05:26 PM
    In need of some suggestions. I'm 10 weeks pregnant and need to wean my 11 month old. He doesn't love bottles and doesn't use a pacifier or suck his thumb. I've become his pacifier. He also nurses at night as we bed share. Any thoughts?
    1 replies | 123 view(s)
  • @llli*feetea's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 05:20 PM
    My little one is 14 months old and still mostly relying on breastmilk for his nutrition. We have been following the “baby-led weaning” approach to introducing solids and he joins us at every meal, is offered some of everything we eat, and he puts it all in his mouth and chews. However, most of it comes back out of his mouth again. He eagerly swallows all the yoghurt, stewed fruit, soft ripe pear/nectarine flesh and bread he’s given but just tiny bits of everything else. He has about 4-5 breastfeeds during the daytime and 6-8 during the night. Over the past 3 months or so, his bowel movements have become quite infrequent - every 10 days or so, and they cause him a lot of pain and distress, which is horrible to witness. His poo has not changed in colour or consistency - it is still what I consider to be normal, not hard and compacted at all. I spoke to the doctor earlier this week about it and she said it’s about nutrition. I asked if she had much experience of breastfeeding and, not surprisingly, she said she didn’t. She prescribed lactulose for him and has given him an appointment at the baby clinic next Tuesday to talk to me about nutrition. She talked about withholding milk so that he was hungry enough to eat more solids at mealtimes, but my understanding is that while he’s not taking much solids in, he won’t recognise that the food will fill him up, so he will probably just get upset at not getting the milk he wants and might even refuse to eat anything at...
    5 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 04:05 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread Fennel? in Increasing Your Milk
    I have not tried fennel but when my youngest was about 18 months I went through a period where I felt very 'tapped out" and I did try fenugreek and goats rue and I thought they helped, but my child was nursing much more often than 4 times day too. You might try looking for dosage recommendations info and see if you are taking enough. You might need to take more than it says on the package depending on the herb and the form you are taking it in. Fennel is a fairly typically recommended galactagogue, I just have never tried it myself.
    1 replies | 196 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymemommy's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 12:55 PM
    Well, doctor prescribed her Zantac, told me to cut out all dairy, chocolate and coffee but he doesn't think it's that; but we could add it back in two weeks from now after her next appointment if she is doing better. We will see. We really need to put some weight on this sweet little girl, I sure hope this helps!! She threw up her meal on the way home (Carseat seems to be a bad one for her), so I think at this point I am just going to focus on more frequent feedings and really hope that she starts eating more each feeding too; I"m hoping the medicine will help with that.
    5 replies | 304 view(s)
  • @llli*haileymama's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 10:44 AM
    Thank you both so very much! I appreciate your wisdom on my posts and all the other posts I've read on these forums. To update: Most important, we have had no reactions since Wednesday. I've added familiar dairy foods back as well without I'll effect. Anything new I ate in the week before the reactions I'm just not eating (jalapeños, a new brand of coffee, sugar cookies from the grocery store). I had considered heat and ruled it out in my mind when she didn't react during a nap (where I held her in a similar position for longer than nursing). But she is a hot little thing and if it happens again I would not be so quick to rule it out. I've put a muslin wrap over the nursing pillow (my breast friend) to try to keep it cooler but I welcome other ideas. She definitely sweats on the side against the pillow if she dozes. Thank you both again, mommal and maddieb!
    6 replies | 241 view(s)
  • @llli*vpaluch26's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 09:30 AM
    I'm just starting to manage a large oversupply/OALD. I thought I had it under control but my 8 week old started to have foamy/frothy green diapers. Yesterday there was a little bit of blood in the diaper. She's had a lot of problems with gas and seems very uncomfortable when she poops. She's already seeing a GI (due to what was thought to be reflux) and they took the poop to test for C Diff, just in case. However, given my oversupply issues, I really think this is a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance issue. She nurses very frequently (12+ times a day) and stays on for 10-15 minutes. I'm doing the full drainage block feeding program to try to get my supply under control. Does anyone have experience with an imbalance? How long did it take to correct?
    1 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*onno's Avatar
    January 13th, 2017, 05:32 AM
    Gracias por esta información
    6 replies | 21094 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 09:07 PM
    Hi. I was feeding my child 3 meals a day and 2 snack by 15 months. It didn't make him want to not breastfeed. I actually think it's a good idea to have your child participate in the ritual of 3 meals a day and snack time. So that he has lots of opportunity to eat and explore food as well as get used to the idea of sitting down for meals. But I disagree with the pressure part completely. So what we did at that age was I would serve him breakfast in the highchair and he would sit there eating/playing for as long as I was eating and sometimes I could leave him there a little bit longer... when it was clear he wanted down I would put him down and I would move his plate down to the coffee table. So he had access to his food while also being able to play. The same thing would happen at lunch. So that meal time and food didn't become a non pleasant experience or felt like there was pressure connected to it. We always sat down together as a family for dinner. And I did BLS to whatever we were eating he would eat only broken out you know? So of we were having tacos, he would get beans, ground turkey, shredded cheese and broken pieces of tortillas all in separate sectionals on his plate. I always tried to make sure there were between 3 and 5 things on his plate so that even if he rejected things he was still eating SOMETHING. And we kept things we knew he liked and would eat on hand so there were always healthy snacks available to him. Like Cucumers, celery and apples. I think...
    8 replies | 355 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 08:37 PM
    :ita with all the above. I just want to chime in with what I remember of my children's eating habits at 15 months. They were still nursing very frequently during the day and at least 1-2 times overnight at that age. Their day-to-day intake of solid foods was extremely variable. Some days they ate so much solid food that I would wonder if they had worms. Other days they were more picky, and sometimes they ignored their solids and nursed, instead. They would go through stretches of trying lots of new foods, and stretches of wanting to eat only one food. Certainly there was no way that I could have made them eat something which they weren't hungry for. If I had tried starving them into submission they just would have been miserable and starved!
    8 replies | 355 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 08:27 PM
    I don't think herbs are particularly effective, so go ahead and try the fennel but don't expect much. I mean, people love to talk about herbs that increase supply, and they do some good and little or no harm, but they just can't hold a candle to things like nursing more and pumoing more.
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 05:20 PM
    Most recent LLL article about paced feeding. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf Here is a good video about paced feeding. It uses a doll, unfortunately, but the explanations are very clear. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs This one is an excellent video but baby is a newborn. Still, again, very good explanations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykdFuEOIdeE&t=6s The reason paced feeding can help in some cased with bottle refusal is it allows baby more control in both how baby sucks (how far to bring the nipple in) and in taking pauses for breathing and swallowing as a baby naturally does when nursing. And overall it helps prevent overfeeding with bottles, a common problem. Here is a nice cup feeding video, if it comes to that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R95FUa7_s84 There are other methods, like eyedropper or syringe, as this smart dad found: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUXnrojYUM0 but cup is probably faster.
    6 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*gulan's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 03:33 PM
    Thank you so much for taking your time to reply all my questions. It is very helpful and I deeply appreciate it. I will go with the natural flow and I will have opinion of another pediatrician through "My Child Won't Eat" book. I needed some encouragement and guidance and you gave me both, thanks a lot!
    8 replies | 355 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 02:20 PM
    I will do that- I'm also reading about paced bottle feeding. We have tried a practice bottle once/day for about a month with no improvement on her willingness to drink it. Every time it's the same- cry cry cry choke, cry cry cry choke, and then eventually drink it down (or scream louder if she's too upset, usually in the evening). It breaks my heart listening to it. :(
    6 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 12th, 2017, 01:36 PM
    There is no such thing as part time low milk production. If you are making enough milk for your baby to gain normally, then you make enough milk and baby should not need supplements, including evening 'top offs." What is normal is for a baby to want to nurse frequently at night, when there is commonly a temporary lull in production- basically, the breasts are more "empty." This might cause a baby to nurse more "aggressively" as well. But it does not mean baby needs a top off, and also, it should not be injuring you for baby to nurse this way. If you think your milk production really is overall low or borderline, then taking long stretches at night without nursing (or pumping) is going to exacerbate that problem. The top offs may possibly be contributing to baby going longer without nursing after them. This is how unnecessary supplementation (or too much supplementation) can hurt milk production. Sore nipples are most often caused by a poor latch. I think it makes sense to see your IBCLC again for tips on how to handle this "aggressive" nursing without getting injured. Top offs may help temporarily but they are not solving the underlying problem and might possibly cause more problems in the long run. Positioning changes may help, as might breast compressions. But especially given your history with tongue tie, it would be best to get in person help with that.
    3 replies | 254 view(s)
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