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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:40 PM
    So glad to hear that things worked out to everyone's satisfaction! That is a great end to the story. Or maybe a beginning, since your LO is still nursing his stuffies?!
    4 replies | 838 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:38 PM
    I can't offer any insight on the flask idea, but it seems to me that it would be a good idea to take your spectra on the trip. If you don't generally use a handheld pump, you don't know if it will work for you. Wouldn't it stink to be on the trip and suddenly discover that you can't get much milk with the handheld pump? Or to end up engorged and in discomfort because the handheld won't do the job?
    1 replies | 35 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 PM
    Since the 11 and 13 week weights were done on different scales, you can't compare them. Proper weigh-in procedure calls for a baby to always be weighed on the same scale, and that scale should be a high-quality scale at the doctor's office. Home scales are too often poorly calibrated, or are simply off from the scale at the doctor's office- which explains why I am 5 lbs lighter at home than I am at my gyn's office and 10 lbs lighter than I am on the one at the GP's office. :lol If you're worried about your baby's weight, I would do the following: - Stop by the doctor's office and have the baby weighed on the usual scale. Just keep in mind that there is a very good reason that we usually weigh babies only every couple of months, and that is that when you zoom in too close on weight, you can get thrown by normal fluctuations and miss the over-all trend. Growth isn't always smooth or constant, the way the charts make it appear. Some weeks the baby may gain a lot of weight while pausing in height, or grow taller but not put on much weight. - Nurse the baby more often, or at least offer the breast more often. 8 nursing sessions per day is on the lower end for a 3 month old. More nursing = more calories. - Try adding in a "dream feed" during that long sleep stretch. I know, everyone says that you should "let a sleeping baby sleep"! But long sleep stretches can be a missed opportunity for baby to take in more calories.
    1 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:18 PM
    Welcome! To my knowledge, there is no truth to the doctor's assertion that healing takes longer when you are breastfeeding. The statement about menopause is also a little bit dodgy. When you are breastfeeding, you are likely to experience temporarily lower estrogen levels than when you are not breastfeeding, and that can cause some things that are similar to menopause. You may not ovulate or menstruate for a while (anywhere from a few weeks to a couple of years is normal), and lower estrogen may cause some dryness and more fragile skin in the vaginal area. The only way I can make sense of the doctor's statement about healing is if you had surgery in your genital area, in which case lower estrogen related to breastfeeding could hypothetically cause slower healing, due to the skin being more fragile and thin.
    1 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*ashkar's Avatar
    Today, 06:21 PM
    Hi My son was 8lbs 12oz when he was born. at 6 weeks- 11lbs 11 weeks- 12lbs 9oz at 13 weeks- 12lbs 11-14oz. He is ebf. The 6 weeks n 11 weeks weight are at dr's office and the 13 weeks is at my home. He feeds close to 8 times during the day. He has started to sttn for the past 3 weeks from 8:30pm to 3am. feeds again at 3am and then at 6am. He is hitting all milestones and seems content inbetween feedings. His weight gain seems to have plateaued (??) over the last couple of weeks. is this normal? he has 7-8 wet diapers and he has been pooping 2-3 times a week from birth.
    1 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*stw's Avatar
    Today, 06:01 PM
    I am not sure if this thread is still active, or if the response will find its way back to you, but thank you both very much for your thoughtful responses and words of encouragement! I was able to work through the tough time of toddler nursing, and we weaned naturally around 32 months, to everyone's satisfaction! My now 3-year-old son has fond memories of nursing, and continues to play-act nursing his stuffed animals! I am so glad I was able to work through the hard times and keep it a positive experience for him. Thanks again!
    4 replies | 838 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:57 PM
    It sounds like baby is gaining rapidly and that might suggest overproduction. So is there any evidence of a fast letdown? The fast letdown could cause baby to almost be pushed off the nipple if that makes sense. So do you have any other evidence that there is a fast letdown or you take a lot of milk? If fast let down he is part of the issue, nursing very frequently can be very helpful. As can adopting a leaning back position so that baby is more on top of you. If you go to the website of Nancy Morhbacher her she has good information on this.
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*cspencer86's Avatar
    Today, 04:56 PM
    LO and I haven't had an easy BF journey so far - he was born at 40+5 weighing a tiny 5lbs 13oz. I'm in the UK and started out with far too shallow a latch which caused painful pits and cracks in my nipples. Numerous midwives helped me and we were making progress - the wounds have all healed and I was gaining confidence. However over the last few days his lower jaw loses suction and bangs into my nipple - ouch! This is accompanied by a 'clucking' noise - he tries to carry on like he's still properly latched. He generally has 5+ dirty nappies a day - none at all today :( however he has started Gaviscon for reflux (last Tues) which I know can cause constipation. His weight gain has been excellent so far - he was 9 lbs as of last Monday so he's gone from 0.4th centile to 19th. However I'm concerned this won't continue as he hardly drank at all today...it's too much effort for him to get the milk out :( Any experience or theories on what's happening? I can't get someone to assess us at home as access to our house is too difficult for most people to brave, and whenever I get help in hospital, etc I can't then replicate it when back on my sofa!
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*christina1994's Avatar
    Today, 04:51 PM
    Hello! I'm new here :) But, I had a question... I had surgery on Dec,2015 and my doc said it will take longer to heal because I'm breastfeeding. I've never heard of that? And also she said that you kinda go through menopause while breastfeeding.
    1 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*bloomingblair's Avatar
    Today, 03:09 PM
    Update! I am producing better now. I got a hospital grade pump and it has truly helped.
    15 replies | 401 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:56 PM
    Hmmm. Refilling pain. I have heard of (and experienced) letdown pain, (this can occur between feedings) and it can really hurt. Is this what they are talking about? It hurts worse (in my personal experience) if the milk has no where to go. In other words, letdown pain that occurred while my baby was nursing was less intense and shorter lived than if it happened when I was apart from baby and could not nurse. But overall, letdown pain is typically basically just a few minutes, not 30-60 minutes... AND it happened in both breasts. What you describe sounds more like engorgement and plugs, or at least as if those might be in the mix... Are the painful spots like a lump ever? Does the pain get any better if baby nurses or your baby nurses, or you pump or hand express? Are you making much more milk than baby needs to you think? Is there a way to avoid getting engorged in the first place? Why is that happening so much? More frequent milk removal might help with letdown pain and any other possible issues. Yes we make a bit more milk overnight...and the milk has to go somewhere. If it stays in the breasts, it causes problems. Is baby nursing overnight? Plugged ducts can certainly happen in one breast and occur in multiple places. So can a typical breast infection (mastitis) or a breast abscess (these are rare.) So I am not sure how it being in one breast rules anything out.
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*kevins-mom's Avatar
    Today, 01:59 PM
    I am preparing for a work trip without my baby. I have read all of the "tips" and tsa rules and I am feeling very stressed. I have plenty of milk at home for 4 month old baby to drink while I am gone, so that is a non-issue. I will be gone for 2 days. I will need to pump to replace the stash he drinks and bring the milk home with me. I need to figure out the logistics of transporting the milk. I have a hydroflask insulated water bottle that is extremely good at keeping things cold over long periods of time. Would it be feasible to store the refrigerated/chilled milk in a container like this with reusable plastic ice cubes? It seems easy in theory, I need to find out the real life logistics of doing it this way rather than lugging around a cooler and ice packs. I also want to try to be as discrete as possible because (as much as I really don't care) but breastmilk grosses my boss out and she will be traveling with me. I have a spectra 2 double electric breast pump, so I'd need an outlet to use it, which should be fine. Would it be easier/better to buy a handheld pump and use that for the trip instead?
    1 replies | 35 view(s)
  • @llli*sfmamamia's Avatar
    Today, 01:06 PM
    I have an almost 4-month old and have had recurring breast pain in my left breast after my night feeding(s) the past couple of weeks. My doctor and LC nurses have ruled out an infection. They determined it is refilling pain. I am back at work this week and pumping at work. The pain seems to come after I am engorged, either at the end of the work day, or in the middle of the night after a long stretch of sleep by my son. My breast became engorged last night. After a 2:30am feeding, the refilling pain became unbearable. I took a 600mg ibuprofen (an Rx from when I have birth) at 1am before the feeding, but it did not help. The recommendations from the lactation consultants (ibuprofen, pressure on the breast, etc.) helped a little, but the pain was excruciating. I can't even pick up my baby after the feeding because the pain is too great. I have to wait an hour for it to pass before it gradually goes away. They ruled out an infection because the pain is only in one breast, and I feel it in numerous spots inside my breast, not just one spot. I had an examination and don't have a fever, etc, and no lumps or hot areas. I do not feel pain during feeding... Just about 15 minutes after I feed, and the pain lasts around 30 mins to an hour. It's always at night. They said its because you produce more milk at night. Can you recommend anything to help me? I want to continue breastfeeding, but the pain is unbearable and gives me anxiety. I am feeling very discouraged. Please...
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*lovelena's Avatar
    Today, 10:48 AM
    I'm going through this currently. She can spend all day even night away from me and be fine, but when I'm around its feels constant. Especially when I'm trying to work with my 5 year old, can be very challenging. The crying and clinging when I try to distract and stick with not now is nuts. The limit setting time is here for me, I have to be firm and go through the tough stage. How are you doing mama? Have you begun the limits?
    3 replies | 368 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 08:30 AM
    Morning! I just wanted to pop in quickly and say that even if you have difficulty with pumping breaks, you may be able to work pumping into your work schedule. I have no idea what type of job you are walking into, and this may or may not be possible, but I'll detail below what I did to work pumping into my workday. It wasn't that my workplace wasn't supportive; it was, and I had access to a mother's room, but I'm always busy, it didn't have a computer, and it is a 5 minute walk away. I'm always either out and about in the community and driving, or on the phone/on the computer. Even without pumping, breaks are hard to work in. It truly was difficult if not impossible some days to set aside time during the workday to just pump. I could have, I suppose, but then I never would have been able to finish my work without staying late, which isn't really an option I was happy with at the time. It's possible that not having my attention totally on pumping made it difficult for me to pump enough, but I think it was also I hated the pump with a passion and never found it comfortable to pump. We supplemented with formula and once little one started solids (she loves them, not sure how yours will respond) I felt a bit less pressure with pumping, although we never completely weaned her from formula before a year. She's still nursing at 12 1/2 months, though, and she's now off formula, and that is good enough for me. :) I work in an office building with cubicles. I put up a...
    4 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:47 AM
    I believe this is normal. Time and gravity, and weight gain and weight loss, make everything head south eventually... ;) I know women with nips who are always pointing south, and I think it's just normal for them. I wouldn't worry!
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:45 AM
    Yes, it is certainly possible! Many moms discover that they have a shortfall in pump output during the workday, and make up for it by pumping at night. I personally wonder how likely it is that you would be able to get sufficient milk, especially if you are going to be using a manual pump. So while I encourage you to try this plan, especially if pumping during the workday doesn't work out, I also think you don't want to feel too disappointed if it doesn't work out. Of course! Making up for a shortfall in the amount of breastmilk that a mom is able to provide is exactly what formula is for. Hopefully you won't have to use it- I am really hoping that the HR department is supportive and you have plenty of opportunities to pump during the workday. I believe the same amounts would apply.
    4 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:39 AM
    Here are some things you can do that may help your child gain more weight: 1. Offer to nurse more often when you are home with your baby. More nursing = more calories. 2. Have his daycare provider feed him some more calorie-rich foods. Cereals are generally quite low in calories and provide mostly carbohydrates. You want your baby to get lots of fat and protein, not just carbohydrates. Protein and fat-rich foods for a baby this age would be things like beans and lentils, meats, tofu, and yogurt and cheese made with whole cow or goat milk. 3. Add some calories to the low-calorie solids by putting some oil in them. A drizzle of coconut oil, olive oil, or even ghee can be added to the cereals. I looked at the chart, and I see that your baby is on the lighter end of the spectrum. But being lighter doesn't mean that he's not gaining weight well! Healthy babies come in all percentiles. Statistically speaking, there are just as many healthy babies in the 1st percentile as the 99th, just as many in the 25th as the 75th, etc.
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*puja's Avatar
    Today, 03:46 AM
    My lo is now 9 month 10 days and he weights only 17lbs.he is breastfed almost every 3-4 hours. ..and given solids 3 times a day but less in quantity bcz he doesn't like his food o think and I do work outside so couldn't make lots of variation in his food...give him simple samolina porridge then broken wheat porridge and wheat bread with milk in night....what shall I do that he could gain well...
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Today, 02:53 AM
    It's a new job that I will be starting, initially on a temporary contract, so I'm very nervous to push my luck regarding pumping breaks. They are already been supportive by waiting for me to start until DS is 6 months old, I'm not sure I should push my luck if I want to get a more long term position with them. I have arranged a meeting with HR tomorrow to get some information and see what my rights are. If pumping breaks are not an option, would it be possible to pump a sufficient amount of milk while at home (in addition to lunch breaks), for example after DS goes to bed at night? Failing that could I supplement with maybe 2 small bottles of formula during the work days along with whatever milk I manage to pump? Does the same 1.5oz per hour apply for formula? So, for example if I managed to pump say 7oz at lunch, could I send send 7oz breast milk and 7oz formula to the daycare each day? I'm not opposed to giving formula I just want to continue to breastfeed in any capacity for as long as possible.
    4 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*tanpixie's Avatar
    Today, 01:22 AM
    Hi wonderful ladies, Just a nipple question. I stopped breastfeeding my baby at 3 - she's now almost 4. I've noticed that my nipples have changed the way they sit. They use to just point out - and now they kinda droop down ;) Is this normal? I'm assuming it's due to her constantly pulling down on my nipple so it's taken this stance now - I'm worried to be honest about breast cancer - changes in nipples etc. It's not inverted - not leaking, no milk left - but they both point down. Once air gets to them and they are normal again - once they are erect then once they calm down they are back to droopy nipples.
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*raydians's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:48 PM
    A few ideas for you... One thought is that as baby grows, his stomach is growing too. As he gets older, he may begin to go longer between feedings. As with everything, use your judgement. Always, as comes naturally, watch his pees and poos. Have you noticed changes in your supply? Over the course of the day? Let me just quote this section of The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding eighth edition (2010). (LLL's main book) pg. 152 - 153: "The four-month fussies Your baby's growing awareness has its temporary downside. At an LLL meeting a while back, a mother arrived with a four-month-old, saying he had begun "nursing funny." Another mother in the room said, "My baby's four months old, too, and she's started nursing funny.: And another mother spoke up with the same age baby and same concern. We dubbed it the "Four-Month Fussies" but didn't have a perfect solution for them beyond nursing in a quiet room, minimising distractions, time and nursing in whatever position the baby seemed to need. The group concluded that by around four months, babies had gained enough intellectual ability to tune in to the room around them, but didn't yet have enough grey matter to tune in and nurse well. Two of the mothers came back a few months later. "Are your babies still nursing funny?" we asked. They didn't know what we were talking about! It had passed so quickly that they had forgotten about it. With some sensitive babies, this stage can be a bit more frustrating and...
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*arlomomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:30 PM
    Hi! My 4 month old within the past few days has started screaming when I put him to the breast. It is extremely distressing! I feel like maybe he is teething? In the middle of the night and in the morning he will eat calmly and like normal, but for the rest of the day and evening he just cries and screams as soon as I put him into the position to breast feed, he does not even latch. I've tried different positions, traditional cradle, football, standing and walking, laying down, bathtub, sitting on my knee... I've gotten him latched in the tub and while standing and walking around but not for long enough to do a full feeding. I've tried expressing some milk so he knows it's there and we've already dealt with oversupply and spraying in the past and that's pretty much resolved. Tonight he had a bottle because I didn't know what else to do. Is this a nursing strike? Any suggestions? I plan to ask his Doctor tomorrow because he has his 4 month appointment but I wanted to see what advice I could find tonight! Thanks!
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:00 PM
    I also had bloody scabbed nipples with each baby. It took my infants 3 weeks to master the skill of latch suck breath and swallow. My nipples did not hurt while the baby was actively nursing, but they hurt during the initial latch on and afterwards they were so sore I could not put clothes on. In desperation i put a sliver/eyelash amount of A&D ointment on my scabby bleeding nipples and lo and behold it helped!
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:06 PM
    Yes it is safe to give your baby that milk. But you want to be very sure your pump is not causing further injury, or that defeats the entire reason for pumping. Look at flange size, suction setting, pump condition etc. I offer several suggestions for a similar situation with nipple pain and injury in this thread: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?125167-7-Days-and-having-so-much-pain-please-help! Additionally, if you are going to bottle feed for a few more days, you want to be careful to do it in a breastfeeding supportive way. Are you using bottles to feed baby or an alternative? Paced bottle feeding technique? Here is info on healing sore nipples: causes and fixes: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/sore-nipples-breasts/ healing tips: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplehealing/
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
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