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  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Today, 02:34 PM
    mommal, thank you so much for your time and the information. It's truly helpful. I have a feeling I'm more on the hypothyroidism end, because I deal with endometriosis, a disease linked to estrogen dominance. However, obviously, it's best to get tested to know for sure or be diagnosed by a doctor who is aware that some thyroid issues may not show up just in a blood test alone. Since you mentioned natural approaches, do you know of any? Again, thank you so much for your help and the information. I really appreciate it!
    11 replies | 231 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:54 PM
    In that case, she should still be pumping using a high-quantity double electric pump, preferably a hospital-grade machine th correctly sized shields. That will help her rebuild her supply so that she can nurse again in the future. Definitely okay for you to help your friend's baby out, but you should look into the screening procedures for milk sharing. Your recent test results may not have covered every single relevant issue.
    4 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:50 PM
    The answer to the medication question depends on whether a mom is hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. A mom who is hypothyroid can take the medication she needs without fear of impacting breastfeeding or harming her child, as she is only replacing a hormone her body should be making anyway. A mom who is hyperthyroid may be in a more difficult position because some (not all!) hyperthyroid medications are contraindicated for nursing moms. If you're on the hyper end of the spectrum, you might want to try some natural approaches while you wait for test results, like trying hard to gain some weight. More weight means you produce more estrogen, and estrogen can damp down on hyperthyroidism.
    11 replies | 231 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:40 PM
    Yes, compressions will still work even if the breast is not particularly full. Very typical situation now that we've all switched to compact fluorescent and LED lightbulbs. Incandescent bulbs were energy hogs but they were also much, much better at mimicking the light spectrum produced by the sun than CFLs and LEDs!
    8 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Today, 01:30 PM
    shannonfbc, I hope the appointment goes well for you, and you can get some answers! I plan to go to the doctor again as well. whitbymom, has the medication really been a big help for you? I'm glad you got some answers concerning your health! mommal, thank you so much for the thyroid information. Do you know if thyroid medication could negatively impact nursing and supply? Conversely, it seems thyroid problems could negatively impact nursing if left untreated. Thank you for your help!
    11 replies | 231 view(s)
  • @llli*v0mich01's Avatar
    Today, 12:12 PM
    So I did a paced feed today, and lo took four ounces, the refused to latch again. It took us a total of 20 minutes which is about what it takes to nurse. I'm going to go over paced feeding with my mom tonight. Thanks ladies for all your help!
    5 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 12:02 PM
    I agree . .. meds are never to be taken lightly. I noticed more emotion while off BC and after becoming pregnant--If I'd been more clued in I'd have taken a pregnancy test but I was going through a tough time with fertility decisions and PCOS and just thought my cycle was off. It took the doctor's test for me to find out, so BC might regulate my emotions better--who knows? Every medication affects every person differently. I think maybe I should start paying more attention to when I cry and become upset to see if it's something I need to address medically or not. I did see that in some of the co sleeping advice so wondered about it. Any thoughts where I could get clarification? Our guest room is now the nursery but we do have a mattress we could put on the floor for one of us, so I may speak with my husband about that. I ordered the Sweet Sleep book--among others--and a co sleeper basket to try. I want her--and I--to get more sleep!
    12 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 11:25 AM
    Good to know! When I have fallen asleep, I usually wake up in the same position and my side hurts. Baby moves more than me, I guess. Yes, I keep trying to tell myself that too. I will have to make it my mantra.
    12 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:24 AM
    Wow I have no idea. Any chance the frenotomies were not deep enough or scar tissue has formed? Scarring can re-tighten the frenulum I have heard. Here is the best article I know of in terms of latch and positioning to try. If you have tried everything here without any result I am afraid that leaves me fresh out. http://feedthebabyllc.com/latch-and-positioning/ One thing I know from when I battled latch pain is it was very important to stay on top of it EVERY nursing session or issues would crop back up. But this is a loooong time to be having latch pain. Any chance there is a small plug or something in there that keeps getting inflamed maybe? No sign of thrush aside the pain?
    4 replies | 99 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:16 AM
    Of course I have no idea whether your BC is causing any additional issue, as mommal notes, it is of course very normal to be more emotional than usual in the post partum time. However, I will share my BC story with you. I am also the 'overly emotional' type. After I started hormone based bc in my late teens it got so much worse. But I could not see it. As I entered my mid and late 20s, it got worse and worse. I blamed life stress and the fact I was "overly emotional" I even blamed my profession- at the time I was an actress- I HAD to be emotional, right? It finally took a dear friend taking me by the hand and suggesting I try life off the BC that I realized something more serious might be going on. I still felt emotional, and how, but I remember feeling SO much more in control once I was off the BC. I realized I had spent my entire adult life up until that point emotionally affected by the hormone based BC. btw numerous doctors, including psychiatrists, never put this together for me. After becoming a mother years and years later, and learning more and more about hormones, it has occurred to me how much we are emotionally and physically affected by hormonal fluctuations in so many ways. That is why it drives me a bit nuts that hcps hand out hormone based BC like it is candy. It seems to me that too often, alternatives are not even discussed. Yes of course it is very important to avoid unwanted pregnancy. But there are alternatives to hormones. End soapbox!
    12 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:46 AM
    I wish I had that issue! I got mine back one day out of the blue when DS was 7 days short of his first birthday. He had just gone through a bad ear infection that caused him to not nurse so well and it was a holiday then so my family was giving him lots of solids and then boom, 2 weeks later I got my period. Is there a reason why you still need to pump? As soon as I got my period back I was thrilled to stop pumping (I kept it up for the first year because it's not like my baby could have a different milk anyway).
    6 replies | 198 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:40 AM
    I use a pacifier for the car because of situations like you described. When he's a little older I was able distract him by my voice. I'd read aloud some of his favorite stories which I knew by heart. That was for short trips like on the way home from the supermarket. For longer trips, the pacifier was and is a very big help.
    4 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*livinghere's Avatar
    Today, 08:25 AM
    She was producing a minimal amount and the baby was losing weight instead of gaining. So that's why she is supplementing with formula now.
    4 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*lepetitmatin's Avatar
    Today, 07:02 AM
    I was going by swallows, and whether there are any swallows when using breast compressions. Breast compressions would still work on a soft breast if there is milk there right? A random off-topic question -- I was getting concerned with my LO's recent green stools... but then I noticed that the color looks different (yellow) in the daylight as opposed to green in artificial light! Has anyone ever experienced this before??
    8 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:12 AM
    The average time until return of fertility in a nursing mom is something like 15.5 months. You still have a month and a half to go, and there's every reason to expect that your fertility will return soon, especially as your child picks up his solid food intake and cuts down on his nursing. So I don't think you need to wean in order to get your fertility back. But there are still some steps you might want to take to give yourself the best shot of getting your fertility back and conceiving when it does come back. First, I would consider cutting out the daytime pumping. The longer you go without nursing or pumping, the more likely it is that you will ovulate. Going 6 or more hours in a row without nursing gives your body the best chance of getting estrogen high enough to provoke a fertile cycle. If your child can't drink cow's milk, he can have juice, water, plant-based milks (coconut, hemp, rice) at daycare, and get his "dairy" needs met by you when you are home together and nursing. It's often said that 3-5 nursing sessions per day are sufficient to provide for a child's RDA of dairy. I don't think you need to consider hypoallergenic formula, but you may want to talk to a different doctor and a nutritionist and see if they have the same advice as your current pediatrician does about your child's nutrition, the need for him to avoid dairy at this point, and the need for you to be on an elimination diet. Second, I would encourage you to get a copy of Toni...
    1 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:55 AM
    If you are dealing with a grabby grandma, wearing your baby in a sling might help. People who will freely help themselves to a baby in a carrier are often a little more reluctant to pluck a baby off your person. And if they try, you can smile sweetly and say "Oh, I would looove to let you hold her but she's just so comfortable right now! Maybe later, when she Needs a change." FTR, I would have been massively unhappy if a family member took my baby out of my line of sight without clearing it with me, first.
    4 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:50 AM
    Yes, what Midnightsangel said. If the mom in this case was EBF until 2 days ago, she should be pumping and providing her baby with her milk rather than feeding the baby formula. Is that not happening?
    4 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:46 AM
    I remember having this problem when my oldest was tiny. I found that some very silly relaxation techniques were helpful. When my mind was racing and sleep elusive, I would close my eyes and plan how I was going to redecorate my old dollhouse for my daughter, right down to details like how I would attach curtains to the windows. That worked to calm my mind and soon I'd be asleep. Maybe something like that would work for you? Alternately, there's an excellent app called Breathing Zone that guides you through a deep breathing session. I find that very relaxing and sleep-promoting, too. You're right: people with sleep disorders should not bedshare with babies. So it's not a good idea to have your husband in bed with the baby. But you could potentially bedshare with your baby elsewhere- a lot of moms decamp to the guest room for a while when sleep is scarce. You might also find yourself comfortable with a sidecar crib like the Arm's Reach. That way your baby is very close to you but not sharing the same sleep surface with you. No, you don't need anyone to check on you. :)
    12 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 05:38 AM
    Just a little personal experience to the worry about rolling over on your baby - I'm a FTM, and I was a bit paranoid about sleeping with my baby too, but just to reassure you, those mommy instincts make you very aware of baby so you won't do something like roll on them. In fact, sometimes I'll wake up to feed her to find I haven't moved at all and my neck is killing me! =) As long as you are not on medication that makes you sleep more deeply, have consumed a lot of alcohol, etc, you should be plenty aware to make it safe for you to sleep beside your baby without any worries. Oh, and to the fussy baby...my little one never sleeps in her crib - always wants to be held or lying beside me for naps. It can be frustrating, especially if I'm craving some time for myself, but I just keep reminding myself it's temporary; she won't always sleep like this, and I try to focus on the positives, like how sweet it is that she feels so safe with me.
    12 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    I should mention she also likes to pull back on my nipple and stretch it out - she will fuss and unlatch herself if I try to hold her head close with cross-cradle. It's not as painful as it was in the beginning, but it's still very uncomfoetable, and every few weeks it gets excruciating (like it is tonight) for no apparent reason.
    4 replies | 99 view(s)
  • @llli*fes's Avatar
    Today, 02:20 AM
    Breastfeeding is going well, for which I am grateful. I didn't want to introduce a pacifier too early, and honestly, I prefer for him not to get too attached to it. I figure just using it in the car for emergencies might be ok, of course, that is, if he even likes it. SO far, my DH has been out with us for the outings. I think (and hope) the night after the in-laws was more of a circumstantial upset and not a constant. We have been out once more since then, twice before then, and he was great. I really think he missed a few feedings that particular night, and my MIL took him into another part of the house from where I was, which I think was too far away from me. I have already formulated a response to this when she tries to do it again. Thanks for the advice. I guess there's no easy way to leave the house with baby no matter what. And forget about being on a schedule!
    4 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 PM
    It's entirely possible and it would be beneficial to baby as well! I would just make sure it's okay with the parents of the baby and any care givers that are in charge of him. I am not an expert so definitely ask those people first.
    4 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*livinghere's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:37 PM
    Hello, I'm inquiring about a baby that's 21 days old. He's lost a kilo of his birth weight. He was exclusively breastfed until about 2 days ago. He's now on formula and in the hospital while they try to see what's going on. They have seen there are liver issues but they are investigating what they are. I'm not an expert and I don't know what's happening, but I do have a 14 month old baby. Is it possible for me to pump and express milk and give it to their baby (like a bottle or two a day)? I have had recent thorough blood tests and everything came back as healthy and normal. My baby is still a very active feeder and I think he would be ok to miss a few feeds and pump. But I'm not sure whether this would be a help or would be recommended? If the age differences would be ok, etc. We don't have these networks were we live and I don't think there are any milk banks in our current area. Thanks for any help you can offer.
    4 replies | 73 view(s)
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