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  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Today, 02:22 PM
    Hello, thank you for all these helpful resources! Wow, this is not the kind of thorough attention I receive from Kaiser IBCLCs. Granted, I assume it's because of Kaiser mgmt, as you suggest, not because they are not inclined to care. I am seeing the one I liked best next week, but I will also look into meeting with a local LLL leader or another IBCLC. Re vomiting - the first time, LO was lying on his back, and the vomit shot up a few feet into the air then fell in an arc over onto me and the floor. Possibly could have been forceful spit-up--being a nervous FTM, I of course panicked and rushed him to urgent care. He was fine; the pediatrician thought he might simply be "overeating" (I didn't think it was possible for a BF baby to overeat). Your experience of mastitis is frightening! I'll be hyper-vigilant now and will keep the idea of a single pumping session in mind. First, I might try lecithin and keep massaging the breast. I found that vigorously massaging in the shower last night helped release more milk and soften my breast until I could feel some smaller lumps beneath my breast (the area where I always forget to check!). I know additional expression is not great for the OS, but it did seem to bring temporary relief after I got some of the smaller lumps out. Thank you again for your help and encouragement! I feel more confident in seeking additional treatment now.
    4 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Today, 01:46 PM
    Thank you for the reply. I haven't seen an IBCLC, would that be helpful? I've been focused on seeing people who can prescribe us something, since none of the non-medical remedies are working. I know it's normal for babies to have a white tongue just due to eating milk all the time, but my understanding has been that if the white coating wipes off it's just milk, and if not, it's thrush. The coating on my baby's tongue will not budge when wiped. I can't think what else would be exposing me to it - I spend almost 100% of my time topless at this point since I'm home on maternity leave with the baby, so it wouldn't be a bra or nursing pads or anything like that. I don't think my obstetrician can prescribe Diflucan for the baby since he's not her patient, and I've tried arguing with his pediatrician to no avail. I'm considering switching to exclusive pumping for a few days to try to stop the back and forth cycle and see if we can both get sorted out. Otherwise I'm fresh out of ideas and hope.
    2 replies | 55 view(s)
  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Today, 01:29 PM
    It's good to know I'm not the only one questioning why there's pressure to build a stash! I got the feeling this was the advice they give to all moms, which still doesn't explain why they encourage it in the first place... I'm hoping more frequent nursing does help. In the meantime, I've set up another appt. with an IBCLC next week and hope to get to the root of the breast pain! THANK YOU again!
    4 replies | 121 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Hi and welcome. For pumping issues and supply issues I suggest look to the many excellent articles on this on kellymom.com as well as the book Making More Milk. Here are few general suggestions as well: Many moms find that pumping NOT on a schedule, just pumping enough times in a day (at least 8, typically) works better than pumping on a schedule. Pumping more often part of the day would also allow mom to get a bit of a longer sleep once a day, as a round the clock every 2-3 hours schedule would not. Even a hospital grade pump may not fit properly. Did you have help choosing the correct size flange? Sometimes other things go wrong with a pump. You can ask the people you rented it from if they can offer help troubleshooting your pump. Many moms find that adding hand expression to their pump sessions helps them extract more milk. Are you certain EPing is the best or only choice for your situation? Because pumps extract milk differently than baby does, it can be quite difficult to pump enough milk even when mom makes enough, it just depends on the situation.
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*jknicely's Avatar
    Today, 10:58 AM
    I'm a ftm. I started with breastfeeding but my son had issues with latching first which we fixed with a shield and then he just became a lazy feeder, on for an hour and hungry ten minutes after he came off. we decided to just pump to make sure he was getting enough. Since making the switch five days ago I am not producing enough. I am trying everything and haven't seen a drastic change. Here is what I've tried... Mother milk supplements Power pumping Hospital grade pump Pumping every 2-3 hrs Drinking enough water and eating I pump with him nearby Finally my doctor put me on reglan
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:12 AM
    Have you seen an IBCLC? Is it possible you are being exposed some other way aside baby? White tongue is something that is actually common and not necessarily a symptom of thrush. So I wonder if baby might be clear, and that is not the way you are being re-colonized? Yes I know babies can be asymptomatic, I am just trying to troubleshoot a bit. Also I wonder if there may be something going on aside thrush? Some other issues might seem like thrush. I realize the fact you feel better after taking diflucan is an indication that it is thrush, however, that does not rule out the possibility something else is also going on. If you believe baby needs treatment with diflucan, can your doctor prescribe it or talk to the other doctors for you? You are of course right, obviously, thrush is a big deal because the pain can cause a mom to have to stop breastfeeding and this is harmful to her health and the health of baby. Obviously you have read Jack Newmans entire protocol for thrush and tried his suggestions? There may be other protocols you can try. Also, moms on here have reported contacting Newman personally to get his input. The book Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple has a longish entry on thrush that includes many details about how re-colonization might occur and precautions to take. An IBCLC or a LLL Leader may have this book and can share that info with you. I have not been able to find it online, but the author is Nancy Morhbacher and she has a blog.
    2 replies | 55 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Today, 07:22 AM
    I would love some advice if anyone can offer it, as I'm truly at my wit's end. Apologies in advance for the length of this post. My baby and I have had thrush since he was 2 weeks old, likely because of the antibiotics I had to have during labor for GBS. He's now two months old, and after trying just about everything, we're not in any better shape than when we started and his pediatrician seems largely indifferent. The thrush is only on his tongue, and doesn't seem to bother him or cause any symptoms other than the clicking noise he makes when nursing. He's a chubby, healthy baby, which I gather is why the pediatrician can't be bothered to prescribe anything that actually works. What we've done for the baby: He was initially prescribed Nystatin, which we used for about 4 weeks and saw no improvement whatsoever. I tried swabbing his mouth with diluted GSE, but that must've burned him because on the second day or so he actually was in too much pain to latch on to the breast or even take a bottle, so had to be fed with a medicine dropper until he felt better. I used diluted GSE on my breasts at the same time, and it seemed to burn me or dry things out and make the pain worse - I have sensitive skin so this wasn't a surprise. I've had him sucking probiotic powder off my finger twice a day. I've swabbed his mouth with a baking soda rinse after each feeding, and then applied lemon juice. Doing this for a week also resulted in no improvement. We tried a three-day...
    2 replies | 55 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    Today, 06:31 AM
    I really hate to add a pump I am pumping plenty to keep up with what she is eating at daycare. I only pump for 15 minutes a session. Unless there is still mill spraying out I'll continue to pump a little longer.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 PM
    If more than your nipple is getting pulled up into the flange, that probably indicates the flange is a little big. if the nipple is rubbing against the "tunnel" that usually means the flange is too small. Sometimes this can be corrected by being very careful about positioning your nipple when pumping and lubing the flange with olive oil or similar. It is possible that the larger flange is fine for early in the day, and then the smaller one for later when the breasts are typically less full. Some moms also need a different size for each breast. How possible would it be to add a pump session some or all days? maybe the problem is how long you are pumping each time. If you could pump more often, maybe you could pump the same amount of milk with shorter sessions.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:05 PM
    Wow, me neither! Why does your midwife or IBCLC care if you build up a stash? Wow. This is so not their job. If a mom needs to build up a stash for some reason and wants advice about how to do that safely, then they can and should offer that kind of advice if they are capable of doing so. But why are they assuming you need or want a stash...or the size or immediacy of it, or that to build one, you should pump every day? I just do not get it. Of course, you are correct- pumping over and above baby nursing is going to increase milk production. And the more often you pump, or the more that you extract when you pump, the more it will increase production. This is the most basic and rudimentary fact about milk production- more demand = more production. In the normal course of nursing, babies rarely if ever "drain" the breast. If a mom is making more than enough milk, as is actually pretty common, then of course baby will not take all that is in there. Baby takes what baby needs. The milk that is left in the breast tells the body, "hey, this much was not needed, so please start to make less." At the same time, if baby is nursing frequently, then while mom is not empty she is also not so full she is uncomfortable while the body figures out what is enough but not too much. This is why frequent nursing helps. Of course, some babies will not nurse enough and hand expression in that case is a good idea. However, most babies, if gently encouraged, will nurse more often. It...
    4 replies | 121 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:34 PM
    Hi again. I have no idea what the situation is now, but as of a couple years ago Kaiser was notorious for saying that some of their maternity nurses were lactation consultants when they had not had anything like adequate training in that area. On the other hand, at least at the 2 Kaisers local to me, there was an outpatient clinic staffed by actual board trained lactation consultants (IBCLCs.) This was great, but many new moms were never told there was such a clinic. Also, unfortunately, Kaiser management insisted that appointments be only 45 minutes long and last I heard were trying to get them down to 30. That is simply not long enough when a mom and her LC are trying to figure out a breastfeeding problem. Any decent IBCLC who has the time would always want to help a mom get to the bottom of the kind of pain you are having. Here is an article about what to expect at a proper consult with an IBCLC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html I think your issues are related to problematic over production, and it really would be best if you could get local in person professional help dealing with that. If that is proving impossible via Kaiser, have you looked into talking with or visiting a LLL Leader? Or hiring an independent IBCLC? Projectile vomit means that even if it is a small amount of milk ingested by baby, all of it flies out several yards from baby. This happens when a baby has a serious condition called pyloric stenosis and requires surgery. There is no way...
    4 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:14 PM
    I pump 3 times a day every 3 hours at work. (Mon- Fri) Im away from baby for almost 10 hours. I normally pump 3-4 oz (have gotten as much as 6 oz before) a session usually bringing home 13-16 oz. I've been using the medela 24mm flanges that came with my pump since day 1. But now after pumping my nipples kind of tingle. I think my flanges are the wrong size but I'm not sure if I should go up a size or down a size. I think I have small nipples, maybe even flat but i have large breasts. The first time I pump of a morning the 24mm flanges seem okay but as the day goes on its Iike my breast becomes more stretchy and more gets sucked into the neck of the flange. Also I have noticed a red ring at the base of my nipple on one side (the side I would consider to have the larger nipple). I tried the pumpin pals small and medium flanes but they don't seem to draw out all the milk. I feel like I am sitting there forever and hardly get any milk out. I'm okay with using the regular medela flanges but just don't want to cause any damage to my nipples or breasts. And I don't think the tingling is normal. Also I always use the pump on the lowest suction.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:45 PM
    Hi again, @llli*maddieb, again, thank you for your time and response! This is the most helpful and thorough response I've received to date--others I've consulted have simply recommended block feeding or other solutions, without looking at the entirety of symptoms/issues I'm experiencing. The midwife wanted me to pump to build up a stash, and she suggested the morning because that's when I have the most milk. She also suggested a pump at night so that I could get a few more hours of sleep. When I mentioned the OS, she didn't really give it much mind and said the pumping will not exacerbate the OS (I disagree). The last IBCLC I met with also recommended that I start building a stash. I don't understand why they are encouraging this, as I didn't indicate an immediate need for a large freezer supply. I agree with you, I was more inclined to wait and see if my OS would resolve before getting back into pumping. I am going to hold off on pumping for a while and hope that my milk supply will regulate itself soon, as you mention. It's reassuring to know that I'm at peak milk production right now and that hopefully things will settle down soon! "What is much more common than a baby who will not take a bottle is the baby who starts to refuse to nurse after getting bottles, and that can be much harder a problem to fix. This is something that never happens immediately, rather, it happens maybe many weeks or months after bottles are introduced, and is more likely to happen the...
    4 replies | 121 view(s)
  • @llli*bear.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 PM
    Hi @llli*maddieb, thank you so much for your detailed response! I truly appreciate your time. I hadn't considered whether the ibuprofen could be masking certain symptoms--by chance, today I forgot to take the ibuprofen after early this morning and did notice I was feeling slightly (very slightly) achy with stiff hand joints. Temperature is 99, which doesn't seem too high, and I had been assuming the fatigue was due from my overall postpartum recovery. Now given what you say, I'm not so sure! I have been experiencing painful engorgement and noticed it especially today--normally LO nurses every 2-3 hours, almost on the dot, but today and last night he has been going 3-5 hours between feedings. Today I have been trying to hand express earlier and more frequently (so my breasts don't stay engorged too long) just to relieve some of the pain and lumps. My breasts get engorged as soon as 1-1.5 hours after LO has nursed. I'm not sure my strategy is helping, however--the engorgement seems bad today. Also, the external skin on my left breast is even more sensitive today (the way your skin tingles when you have a cold, say). I don't think I feel any plugged ducts remaining, but I agree it is possible there are some deep inside that I am missing. So now I, too, am wondering if this is undiagnosed mastitis! Thinking aloud, I did complete a week's worth of Keflex AB several weeks ago for a (perineal) infection--I didn't notice that that did anything for my breast pain, looking back. ...
    4 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*trifides's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:19 PM
    The other tip I would add is (as written elsewhere) is try and feed with as few clothes (top half!) as possible so there is more skin contact. That also kept her trying longer and she was way more relaxed. Not always possible I know. Breastfeeding is a great thing to do for your baby - I have got the whole way through the winter without her getting sick among other things. Thanks again for all your help!
    16 replies | 1318 view(s)
  • @llli*zozja's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:24 AM
    It's been 9 days since the last time I nursed my 2 year old. I didn't get engorged which is great but I still have lots of milk if I hand express and I'm worried that I'm going to get a clog. I was prone to clogs while breastfeeding and had to take 7200 mg of lethicin to keep them at bay. I'm down to 3600 now. Anything I can do to help ny body dry up? Also in pregnant so I know I can't take sage. My other question is my toddler still asked to nurse a few times a day. We weaned gradually - taking away one feeding a week and she was down to nursing only a few times / 24 hour period anyway. But it makes me so sad when she asks. How long did it take for other peoples toddlers to stop asking?
    0 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*trifides's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:53 AM
    Just had my levels done - TSH is 2.2 and T4 is 14 so I'm back in normal range. I still don't fell 100% but my supply is much better, confirmed by babys renewed enthusiasm to breastfeed!
    16 replies | 1318 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:16 AM
    Hi bear.mommy. I responded to your other post about the breast pain and I suggest check that out. It was not clear on that post how much over production (OP) you are having. So it sounds pretty bad, but take heart, OP is almost always a temporary problem. You are at the peak time for milk production right now. Even if you did nothing at this point, your milk production would almost certainly begin to reduce to a more manageable amount over the next several weeks. Also, please do not worry about your baby overeating! Yes babies whose mom has OP gain rapidly at first. This is perfectly fine, it all evens out later. Ok, so I will take the questions one at a time. A baby nursing one side at time is fine. But no, you do not want to have one breast go more than a few hours without milk removal (unless you are intentionally block feeding, more on that below.) So, as I suggested in your other thread, can you encourage your baby to nurse more often? Baby nursing with high frequency will probably help and cannot hurt, because baby will not take in more overall, but rather, less at each meal. Frequent nursing also helps reduce fast flow, so should help baby be a little happier and calmer overall. It sounds like you have OP, as you are reporting most of the symptoms including above average rate of weight gain. But that is still not a reason to block nurse necessarily. Again, given a little time, OP usually solves itself. Also, block nursing in this situation where...
    4 replies | 121 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 24th, 2017, 09:57 AM
    Hi bear.mommy, I am sorry you are having this problem. If it persists, I think you might want to consult with a board certified lactation consultant. In my experience, dullish, aching pain in the lactating breasts is not out of the ordinary. It does not mean you are particularly sensitive, it just means there is a lot going on in the lactating breast and that normal activity can cause some discomfort, and it could be either on one or both breasts. What I find worrying in your case is the fact you have a history of poor latch and injury, and the pain sounds more intense than typical. Also the great deal of sensitivity on the skin surface sounds worrying to me. To me that IS a sign of either engorgement or breast infection (mastisis, not thrush, more on that in a moment.) You do not describe being engorged, but you have OP and get plugs that go away when baby nurses. That sounds like it may help to have more frequent milk removal. How often is baby nursing now? Could you encourage baby to nurse more often, do you think? Maybe it would help to always have baby start on the painful side? Is there any chance of a hidden plug, one so deep you are not noticing it, or do you think you are feeling sufficiently "empty" between nursing sessions that you would notice a plug that is not going away?
    4 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 24th, 2017, 09:35 AM
    Kellymom talks about friction blisters in this article. Could that be what is going on? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplebleb/ If you cannot pump or nurse, can you hand express? It is really important that you continue to take milk out of that breast. As far as baby eating, it is quite possible that baby will be able to get enough milk from one breast while you work this problem. If you hand express and manage to save the milk in a bowl or cup, you can try offering baby that expressed milk in an open cup if you think it is needed. If you would like a link to a video of a baby this age cup feeding let me know. Also you can try reversing or otherwise changing the angle of baby's latch to see if that makes nursing possible. When I was healing from a bad bite I laid down and brought baby over my shoulder to nurse, reversing the latch. it is usually fine to nurse while nipple injuries heal, although of course it can hurt.
    1 replies | 161 view(s)
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