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  • @llli*victors.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:08 PM
    I would advise pumping before nursing, or wait an hour or so after nursing to pump. Baby is better at getting all the milk out of the breast than the pump so, don't worry that you don't have enough because you just pumped and the baby got hungry. They may spend longer at the breast then, but so what.
    3 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*liamsmommy11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:33 PM
    Thank you all for so much for the advice. I'm sorry if my post was not completely clear on a few things, I was typing it while nursing and my other kids were having some issues. I will check out the linked articles. I actually have a scale here at home so I'll keep track of her weight gain. The pooping I'm not so sure about, when my older daughter was a newborn she only pooped every 4-5 days which I was told was normal for an exclusively breastfed baby. This baby girl has only pooped once every day or so and it hasn't been concerning to me because of the previous experience we had. She is wetting alot though. The main reason I was supplementing was to help the jaundice improve more quickly, and to also be on the safe side as far as her getting enough milk. Since writing the original post her nursing has gone better, she seems to have perked up a bit. We had to stay an extra day in the hospital for phototherapy. Her numbers were looking so good at discharge that she was not tested on follow up. I've basically been waiting for the jaundice to resolve, and pumping after a feeding if I feel she did not nurse well. My last baby had issues with poor milk transfer and I ended up with a low supply. I know how important it is to establish a good supply from the beginning so I'm very diligent about pumping. It helps that I have a good letdown and can empty the breast well within 5-10 minutes using a medela double pump. That being said, I don't want to overdo it and run into...
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*coldiesj's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:22 PM
    Hi all, i was new here..been a reader to this forum all these while and i'd just created ID as i got something bother me so much to seek opinions pfrom all bf experts here. Well, i had my 1st child and I greatfully bf him for 4.5m. I was EP ( LO newborn to 3mo) and i had successfully latched him from 3mo till now). I am FTWM so i only can DL afterwork/night time and weekend. Recently, LO seems make up his mind to choose bottlefeed instead of DL. I am suspecting below cause: My slow let-down and slow milk flow. When i was on EP, i need 45min to completely empty my breast with hot/warm towel and massage. since i DL him, when i was pumping at work my milk flow seems doesn't improve. When i am pumping 1 side of my breast, the other did not have milk leak problem at all, same thing when i nurse too. Is there anything that i can do? Any suggestion? Thank you!
    0 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    YAY! Great progress, Keep up the good work!
    24 replies | 655 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:01 PM
    It is overwhelming to have a newborn, generally it is pretty overwhelming for at least 6 weeks. My boy also liked to be held most of the time. Only time I could usually put him down was when he was wide awake and happy to look at/listen to his mobile over the crib while I pumped for maybe 5-10 minutes next to the crib. Now that he is 5 months he likes a little more time to practice skills and I can often get 20 minutes at a time when he is awake before he needs a change of scenery. His crib still mainly gets used as a play pen though. I can occasionally put him down in it for a nap after he falls to sleep nursing but he will wake up usually in less than an hour. We still co sleep with him which works much better than trying to put him to sleep in the crib since he will nurse much of the night. Baby wearing is a great way to get some things done but there will be times when baby gets fussy and doesn't want to stay in the carrier either. I found myself going many days between showers when DH was out of town working. And there is a reason that maternity leave is usually at least 6 weeks long but most people make it 12 weeks (It takes most of us at least that long to start to settle in.) I'm still trying at 5 months to sort out how to get back to my farming while taking care of the baby. In cooler weather wearing him while working is ok for many tasks but this time of year it's too hot to wear him outdoors for long.
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mylittleson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:48 PM
    Okay thanks. Today when he was on my left side I was able to get him take in 2.4 oz in 20 minutes. :) I had done some reading about making sure he had the aerolia in his mouth and not just the tip of the nipple, and also about positioning him and my nipple to try to make sure it goes all the way up into his high palate if possible. So I paid close attention to these things and also to how he was sucking and I tried to wake him up or re-position him when he wasn't actively sucking, and encourage him to do so. I'm really happy about that and will keep trying to improve. He doesn't take in as much on the right side but we're working on that too.
    24 replies | 655 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:28 PM
    First please know that eating all the time and wanting to be with a warm bodied mommy is very natural for a newborn. You are doing a great job. My daughter is now 2 and I did everything on demand. When she was hungry I fed her, when she was tired we slept. When she cried I soothed her. I went back to work full time when she was 3 months. So how did I get things done? 1. I used a baby carrier. I had six different kinds!! This is how you get food, wash hands, brush teeth, pick up around the house etc when baby needs to be close. 2. Sometimes she would go in her swing. But not much. 3. I bought a little cradle and put it on the kitchen floor and if she would tolerate it I'd put her there as I moved about the kitchen. Same for showers. In that or her infant car seat while I jumped in and out. If she was really fussy sometimes I needed to rely on daddy. We'd have him take off his shirt and hold baby in her diaper only on his chest. He also used baby carrier, an Ergo. They are very close now and hopefully she will continue to adore him. 4. When I startd bathing her I would run a warm bath, and bring her in with me and hold her the whole time on my lap. You have to be very careful. But sometimes this is the only way I could get clean and it was nice for her too. If she was gassy/fussy the tub would soothe her and I'd nurse her there too. But they relax so much sometimes they poop in it. :/ 4. Have lots of easy to grab food in the fridge: cut up fruit and veggies, pieces of meat you...
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mdrake313's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:19 PM
    Hi all, My DS is 7mo and has become difficult to nurse in the past month or so. He will only nurse for 10-20 seconds then pull of and fuss, so I'll switch sides and same thing. So I'll go back and forth several times before I'm exhausted and he's still fussing. The only time he nurses and is calm is in the middle of the night. He still nurses at night once or twice per night. He has between 2-3 meals of solids each day (about 4oz each). Anyways, hoping for some help/advice. What am I doing wrong? Am I not producing enough or is he just a really efficient nurser? This is so different from my DD, who was a comfort nurser and loved to just hang out. Oh, and he is still gaining weight. 1.5lbs in between his last checkups 2 months apart. I'm just concerned that he never seems content after nursing. Help please!
    0 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:01 PM
    I really don't want to add confusion or needless worry to your situation, but I wonder a bit about the preference for a side. Some babies just have a side preference with no reason. Some prefer the flow, shape of nipple or other aspect of one breast. We are not perfectly symmetrical. My daughter however had torticollis that impacted her ability to position correctly on one side. This resulted in poor latch and poor transfer on that one side. Once I knew this I learned to adjust positioning differently and got her going with exercises to resolve the issue. Maybe something else to look in to.
    24 replies | 655 view(s)
  • @llli*dom.smom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:21 PM
    Hi, I'm opening a preschool (have been for the past three months) and I have a 4 weeks old boy. I was ok with all the work until my baby was born, after that I was overwhelm with all the responsibility and time it requires to breast feed him, you could say that I'm always feeding him because when I'm not he falls sleep in my arms and as soon as I try to put him down or give it to someone else he wakes up and wants to eat more. So far I've had my husband to support me, he even spoon feed me! so I can keep nursing without the baby crying. The baby sleeps with me because it's the only thing that's has worked so far, on his bassinet he would cry and wouldn't sleep for more than an hour. I was reassured to read in the book "the womanly art of breast feeding" that the baby needed to sleep with me and to be close with me all the time, since then he rarely leaves my side, I even learned to feed him on the carrier. My mom and mother in law tell me to give him bottle and to let him sleep alone but I don't know how since he wakes up as soon as his radar tells him I'm not with him!! And I certainly don't want to give him bottles because the whole idea of opening my own preschool was so I could breast feed him all the time he needed. I'm freaking out because my husband is going back to work and I don't know how to do anything alone with the baby, how do I take a shower, make breakfast or even wash my hands after a diaper change if I'm alone at home? Where do I leave the baby?...
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:11 PM
    Ok, haven't supplemented today either but I don't think he is eating enough though I'm offering often and he isn't draining me that thoroughly. He reaches a point where he isn't interested in latching on anymore even if he only got 1.4 oz. We are 0.3 oz up from yesterday evening but I think he only got like 19 oz today. When I was supplementing I was often playing the trick where I would sneak more into him even when he was asleep on the boob because I could lift up the SNS bottle and basically force the rest of the ounce that was in it. Now that I'm trying to go without the supplement about the only "forcing" I can do is breast compressions which usually doesn't "spray" milk into his mouth when he is latched on but not actively sucking. It only does that when I'm really engorged. So I'm at a loss about how to make sure he is getting enough to eat when he doesn't really seem hungry enough to eat enough.
    156 replies | 7074 view(s)
  • @llli*mylittleson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:46 PM
    I usually pump after every nursing session. I usually pump twice over night (such as 2 am and 4:30 am) but sometimes only once. At first I was giving milk to my good friend who had/has low supply issues but she hasn't asked for milk in a few days so I haven't been pumping as much. What I do pump is enough for him to be supplemented after nursing, to have a bottle from my husband if I'm fast asleep and/or in the bath etc., and then some. There are definitely some times that the baby gets a bottle (or gets nursed) and I *don't* pump but I also don't think I have any supply issues-- somehow I seem to have high supply but low transfer.
    24 replies | 655 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:37 PM
    Also, the sandwhich method really really helped me as a part of the problem was that my baby wasn't taking in enough nipple+areola. I know your lc said latch wasn't an issue but this could help you. It's a shame you don't have access to an Ibclc but call one anyway---its amazing how knowledgeable mine was on the first phone call.
    8 replies | 297 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:25 PM
    Did she check her upper lip for a lip tie? My baby has it and I had a very tough road for three months. After a huge crack that wasn't healing when she was 3/4 weeks old I exclusively pumped on that side in order for it to heal which took two or three weeks. I pumped after every single time I fed her on the good side. After about 2 or 2.5 weeks I felt that my supply was lessening but by then I had healed enough, put her back to that side and it went up again.
    8 replies | 297 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:55 PM
    you could maybe call infant risk http://www.infantrisk.com/content/webforum
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:51 PM
    Agree with PP If engorgement is due to over production then only express/pump to comfort to avoid making over production worse. If low supply is actually an issue and engorgement is due to poor milk transfer, then get help ASAP and pumping shouldn't cause any problems long term. http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 AM
    I am confused. Are you concerned that you have low production or high production, or that baby is unable to transfer milk, or, what? Is the jaundice clearing? How severe was/is it? Has baby had blood tests? Were any interventions suggested or done? In the newborn period: Nursing very frequently is normal. Frequent nursing both day and night is normal. Cluster nursing is normal. As long as breastfeeding does not hurt and baby is getting enough milk, there is probably not much to worry about. This is just normal. You can tell if a baby is getting enough milk if baby is gaining weight normally. At a week, baby should have stopped losing weight and begun to gain. Generally all is probably ok with gain if baby is back to birth weight by 10 to 14 days, assuming baby lost weight initially which is typical. Good gain after about a week or so is about an ounce a day, but that does not mean baby will gain exactly an ounce a day. That is the average expected gain. Day to day, poop output will usually give you a reasonably good idea about if baby is getting enough. If a baby is nursing very frequently, getting enough milk, and mom is getting routinely engorged, two things may be going on. Either baby is having difficulty transfering milk normally, or mom is making so much milk baby does not need it all. Or both could be going on.
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*jml's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 AM
    Hi ladies, I have a 14.5 month old son who is still nursing. My husband and I are starting to try for another baby (my cycle returned 3 days after our son's first birthday), but there's a caveat. Our son was conceived via IVF and I have diminished ovarian reserve and based on family history (mom, grandmother and great-grandmother all started menopause by 38), I can probably count on one hand the number of "fertile" years I have left. We worked with a wonderful Reproductive Endocrinologist last time but we cannot afford to do IVF again (and are unfortunately not in a mandated state) for our second so we have to conceive naturally. Initially, prior to doing IVF, my RE put me on a strict holistic regimen (organic low GI diet, no alcohol, no sugar, no caffeine, acupuncture, light exercise and a series of supplements to improve egg quality (DHEA, L. Arginine, Inositol, CoQ10)) to try to help us conceive naturally. Obviously, we didn't; however, it did help me get good mature eggs for IVF. I'd like to get back into doing that holistic regimen because I know it will improve our chances of conceiving, and frankly, with only a handful of years left, I don't have time to waste. I don't want to wean until my son's ready, but I don't know if any of those supplements are off-limits while breastfeeding. I recall from the breastfeeding class my husband and I took at our hospital while I was pregnant that there is a handbook where you can check if medications/supplements are...
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:28 AM
    You might give the pumped milk at the breast using the lactation aid. Does it feel like she would be able to nurse well if she wasn't sleepy? Or does it feel like she may be jaundice because of poor milk transfer due to latch or other suck difficulty?
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:34 AM
    http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/ http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/exclusive-pumping/ The first link contains tips for getting baby to nurse. Expressing a bit of milk first for an instant reward is very helpful add is offering when baby is sleeping or first waking up. If he falls asleep with a bottle or pacifier in his mouth, you may be able to switch it with the breast to sneak a session in. The second link had pumping guidelines and tips. Watch the videos for breast compression and use warmth before/during pumping to stimulate a let down. Prolactin, the milk making hormone, is highest at night so definitely encourage nursing when you feel that ' heavy ' feeling. Most babies will happily latch on and nurse without waking up fully. If baby refuses, try pumping. There are many types of Galactagogues that might help you somewhat. Fenugreek is the most popular. Mother love has milk supply packs and there are various mothers milk teas. Also search for a lactation cookie recipe. No herb or pill is going to bring in your milk supply though if you don't remove milk.
    6 replies | 298 view(s)
  • @llli*liamsmommy11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 AM
    My daughter is 7 days old and not nursing particularly well due to jaundice, which is in the process of clearing up but still affecting her feeding. She is getting enough to eat, but only by nursing often and using breast compression, etc. (also by using me all night for a pacifier!) My question is, if I feed on demand and don't do any pumping but she is not emptying the breast well...won't this adversely affect my supply? I have had supply issues in the past and so my instinct is to do some pumping, but then that would worsen the engorgement right? The other problem with pumping is that it seems as soon as I do then she winds up wanting to nurse again. It's been fairly unpredictable. If I have already pumped but then she seems hungry, sometimes I give her the pumped milk with a finger feeding. Any advice is appreciated!! Thank you!
    4 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 AM
    search here for an IBCLC in your area http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901
    2 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 AM
    here are some links that might help in figuring out supplementation. http://www.lowmilksupply.org/supplementing-howmuch.shtml http://www.lowmilksupply.org/abs.shtml http://www.lowmilksupply.org/finishatthebreast.shtml
    24 replies | 655 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:40 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! During the time you fed baby with formula, were you pumping at all? If not, what might have happened is this: when milk is not being removed from the breast very frequently or not at all, it will get pretty salty and a lot of babies will reject it due to the taste. Continuing to pump should restore the normal sweet taste of the milk. If your baby continues to not like the taste of breastmilk, you are going to have to start mixing it with his formula. Start by making a small bottle that is 2/3 formula and 1/3 breastmilk, and gradually reduce the proportion of formula and increase the a out of breastmilk in the bottle until the bottles are all breastmilk. Will your baby latch on at this point? If so, I strongly encourage you to nurse him directly at least once or twice a day. That will keep your options open for the future. Most breastfeeding problems- even the horrible, painful ones such as you experienced- are temporary and will go away in time. If your baby remembers how to nurse, it will be a lot easier for you to transition him back to the breast. I also encourage you to seek professional, hands-on help from a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC. First, she may be able to help you get baby to the breast in a way that does not cause pain and trauma to the nipple. Second, if you are going to be an exclusively pumping mom, you need help with pumping. You want to be sure you have the right...
    2 replies | 153 view(s)
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