Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Last 7 Days Clear All
  • @llli*joelley's Avatar
    Today, 02:25 PM
    Nooooo, it was a disaster! Unfortunately. Much less sleep than usual. She literally woke up every 45 min, crawling about looking for me and getting upset when she couldn't find me. She likes to sleep close, wedged to my body or leaning her head on my arm, so I guess it was quite a change. I imagine that if we persevered she might get more accustomed to sleeping without this, but I am waaay too low on reserves to embark on any situation that would get worse before (possibly) getting better. But it was definitely a useful experiment and has answered my question for now! I think I just need to accept this is my nighttime life for now and go with it. I think she's too young for night weaning but will try that maybe in six months or so and hopefully that will help her sleep better. Thanks for checking in!
    4 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:34 AM
    Hi again! My first suggestion is to try to stop getting so down on yourself...really. Women tend to 'feel guilty" for things they have no control over, and mothers probably are even more prone to this. But if your baby caught a virus, for one thing, getting sick is part of the life of every human being and it is not in any way your fault. Can you look at it this way- baby maybe caught a virus, but because of my awesome mothering this did not do any serious harm? Also if baby is voluntarily nursing less often, that is not your fault. There is nothing wrong with putting your baby down so you can get a break...every mom needs a break! I know you think there is something really wrong, and you are mom and know best. But truly nothing you are describing sounds very concerning to me. There may be a few tweaks, fine tuning, that may help with your baby's fussiness....or this may be just who your baby is and it will resolve in time. Either way, please know that does not mean you have done anything wrong or are somehow failing your baby. Ok so I am going to address your answers to my questions, not quite in order: So baby gained quite rapidly up to 9 weeks. This is consistent with overproduction. Please note there is nothing wrong with a breastfed baby gaining like this. As baby gets older her growth rate will slow. After 9 weeks, gain continued to be consistent but the rate of gain slowed considerably. This is consistent with 2 things that are possibly going on- 1,...
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 11:27 AM
    How did it go? Does she sleep better by herself?
    4 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*kandyce's Avatar
    Today, 07:32 AM
    Thank you so much for taking the time to help me! After having the mucous BM after the vaccine for two weeks I did take her back to the doctor. I showed her pictures of all the BM she had over the past twenty four hours and she had said the same thing, viral infection. She asked if my husband and I were fine and we were. The only place she had been this whole time was to the doctor to get her vaccines. I didn't believe her, but I do now that you have said it. It's been almost three weeks now. I really hope it clears up soon. However, she has always had that frequency of BM. The diarrhea didn't increase the frequency. I do wipe her with a warm cloth wipe with a little unscented soap at every change. I worried about the urine breaking down her little skin. My daughter was seven pounds fifteen ounces at birth. She was thirteen pounds four ounces at nine weeks one day when she got her vaccines. She was thirteen pounds fifteen ounces at eleven weeks one day and fourteen pounds one ounce at eleven weeks six days. She started the nursing issues at eleven weeks five days. I do usually burp her at every feeding except for when I nurse her in her sleep at night. She rarely spits up during those feeds when she's asleep. Usually, the burping happens after she's already spitup. She usually unlatches and coos a little and spits up. When I sit her up to burp her she usually spits up quite a bit into a cloth with no audible burp. The only thing that has changed in our life...
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*chickshipper's Avatar
    Today, 02:41 AM
    How old was your baby when they checked for the tongue tie? I only ask because my LO had a pretty well hidden posterior tongue tie - the pediatric dentist first saw him at 2 months and said NO tongue tie but then I was urged by my LC to go back because she did detect the tie ( was only really visible when he was crying hard is what LC said) so I made another appointment after LO had turned 3 months and same dentist said YEP, LO did have a posterior tie. I asked why wasn't the dentist able to see it last month and her answer was that now that LO's mouth is bigger the tie was more visible. We had the tie released the same day. Does your LO have a tight jaw? I don't know if Poland has chiropractors for babies? My LO has been going to chiropractor since he was born and it has really helped with nursing too. Also we went to feeding therapy, this really help getting LO used to having things far back in his mouth - he had a shallow latch and would gag and choke on anything that would go far back into his mouth. We did a lot of exercises with his mouth. He's now 8 months old and nurses well, I can't remember the last time it hurt to nurse. It was a really rough start for us, but I'm so happy now. For me the pain, sleepless nights, fussy baby, was all with it. If you do decide to stop BF have you considered pumping? Good luck, I do hope it gets better for you both.
    11 replies | 804 view(s)
  • @llli*chickshipper's Avatar
    Today, 02:11 AM
    My son born in April had a tongue tie release in July, I worked with both a board certified lactation consultant and chiropractor because LO was also born with a really tight jaw. He also had a really weak suck and would "fall" off the nipple frequently and gag + choke while nursing. Was wondering if you were given exercises to do after the tie release to make sure it doesn't reattach and help with new mobility? Both LC and pediatric dentist gave me exercises that I did on LO for 2.5 months. I also started feeding therapy for LO the week before the tongue tie release. I was crying the day LO nursed without me having to do breast compression - it took 4 months from the time he was born before I was actually able to enjoy breastfeeding him. It was such a rough start for both of us. We also just recently finished up feeding therapy, I'm so proud of my little guy! He's 8 months old now and nurses like a champ.
    5 replies | 217 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 AM
    Hi kandyce, and welcome to the forum. I think what you may be describing with the poops is a case of viral or bacterial diarrhea. I am basing this on these things: Symptoms began with green WATER poop (as opposed to somewhat water-y or liquid-y which is usually normal) transitioning to very mucousy poops (which can be normal but might indicate gut is making extra mucous to protect it as result of irritation) lasting for several weeks. That all sounds like viral or bacterial diarrhea. Also frequency of poops would be consistent with diarrhea. The rash is most likely caused by the frequency of poops and baby needing to be cleaned up so often, which is hard on the skin.* If the problem is diarrhea, the vast majority of the time there actually is not any more you can do than continue to nurse your baby and wait it out. This is why doctors will often not even run tests because knowing what is causing the diarrhea does nothing to change the treatment. (plus tests are often inaccurate.) Treatment is usually to manage symptoms and wait for the body to heal. Manage symptoms simply means avoiding dehydration or weight loss, as the danger with diarrhea is that it can cause dehydration and weight loss. If your baby is gaining normally, then obviously baby is getting enough milk to counteract that concern. There is no substance better for hydrating or nourishing an infant than breastmilk, and this is especially dramatically the case when baby is ill with diarrhea. Spit up...
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*kandyce's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:29 PM
    My(12 week old) LO has been having nothing but mucous BM for approximately a month now. For about two weeks after her rotavirus vaccine at 9 weeks they were green water. This still happens but not 100% of the time. They are no longer seedy. There were instances before all of this, but I never really paid attention until the poop hit the fan with the vaccine. She has at least six bowel movements a day either during or right after a feed. She also gets recurring redness around her anus and up her bottom despite being cloth diapered with barrier cream and changed every two hours. She has also spit up at least a tablespoon during or after a feed pretty much every feed since birth. Once she had the rotavirus vaccine for about two weeks it was twice as bad. She started crying when she would spit up and that behaviour has remained even after the heavier spitups from the vaccine stopped. She now cries when being burped as well. She has been on probiotics for about a month now. Starting last Wednesday she had what seemed like a nursing strike. I could not get her to eat for the majority of the day until she had taken her bath and was ready to nurse to sleep. She filled herself up and ate during the night as she slept. Since then she has been very difficult to nurse. She screams when I even put her into the cradle position. When I offer the breast she gets hysterical. She has nursed in the cradle hold anywhere in the house or public since birth. Now I have to lay her on her side...
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:25 PM
    I agree with krystine. There is nothing unusual about a baby this age wanting to cluster nurse and switch sides frequently. It is also quite common at this age for a child to be colicky and cry frequently. Not a pleasant experience for any parent but not an indication there is anything you are doing wrong! Of course milk production does not normally dwindle at 2 months! Humans are designed to provide all their child's nourishment at the breast for about the first year of life. What often does happen anywhere from about 6 weeks to 4 months or so is mom starts noticing that her breasts feel softer and "empty" and that baby is changing up nursing patterns and changing behavior at the breast. This is usually entirely normal and not a sign of inadequate milk production. Of course some moms really do have issues with milk production. If your baby is gaining slowly or not gaining, that would be a possible indicator that that is a problem. If your baby is nursing less than about 8-12 times per 24 hours, that might cause poor milk production, as might hormonal birth control. Assuming baby is gaining normally, all is almost certainly well with breastfeeding. Unfortunately it is a common circumstance for moms to be encouraged to supplement with formula because we have been a formula feeding culture for so long most people have little or no experience with the normal behavior of a breastfed baby. But in fact supplementation is rarely necessary and has consequences if...
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:04 PM
    I think baby might be having a growth spurt. As long as baby is healthy and gaining weight well I'd continue to nurse and not worry about pumping or supplementing. No reason for supply to dwindle unless baby has a long stretch without nursing.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 AM
    OK, that all sounds great. Glad baby is nursing more normally. Just so you know, burping baby throughout the feeding has nothing to do with paced bottle feeding. Burping several times over a feeding is a practice used to get more milk into baby that came about when it was the norm to put babies on feeding schedules of 4-6 hours apart so babies had to eat very large amounts at once and were gravity fed. I am not saying it is not sometimes necessary to help baby burp, but usually If your baby needs help to burp, baby will let the caregiver know. In general, paced feeding allows baby to take in the milk slowly enough that there is less need for burping.
    3 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*asingleton5's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:08 AM
    Okay well thank you for the reply madde! I know when my husband feeds her he does stop and burp her throughout. & I have watched a video on the paced feeding so I will make sure he does that and makes sure the flow isn't too upright and fast. & also the daycare! But at daycare she seems to vary her eating more. She doesn't typically drink 4 oz at daycare just on occasion. Usually it's 1.5, 2, or 3 there. So that's good. And on the nursing note, yesterday was better! When I picked her up from my moms and brought her home she was hungry so I fed her & she didn't need the paci to latch! Yay!! So I'm hoping maybe it was just a glitch and she'll still continue to nurse good! She did also poop yesterday and it's been several days- so I'm wondering if she' was just uncomfortable or anything. Guess anyone's guess is as good as mine and as long as she's nursing good again im not gonna worry too much about it.
    3 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*tikku.mum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:03 AM
    Hi everyone! My LO completes her 8th week today. I have been breastfeeding her all this while. My baby cluster feeds for 4-5 hours in the night taking a nap or 2 in between. At times the milk seems empty in both the breasts and that really irritates her and she cries, or sometimes I have to switch between the breasts in less than 2 minutes, this becomes very frustrating for both of us as I hate to see her crying and constantly feel I have to be better at my job. My husband and MIL constantly ask me to supplement her feed at night with formula. I don't want to do that... Today the same thing happened during day time, the milk finished and baby very fussy and crying. Does milk supply dwindle at around 2 months.? Could it be because of low water intake? Would pumping after feeding help? Please advise as I am very disturbed.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*jstan's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 07:06 PM
    Thank you so much for explaining this. Actually I can feel multiple letdowns during a feeding. Sometimes even before a feeding or while taking shower. I must have misunderstood, I thought baby has to keep getting letdowns to get more milk, especially the hindmilk. In which case it is likely to be my baby's impatience with the slow flow. Also perhaps as the breastmilk increases and the formula milk in the SNS bottle decreases, I think I should be careful to make sure baby gets as much breastmilk as possible before he gets the formula milk. Again, thank you for your reply. It is very helpful.
    5 replies | 217 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 06:25 PM
    Despite a rough history, it sounds like you're a breastfeeding pro! At this point, I think the problem is a very normal one, which is lopsidedness. Most moms have some degree of differing production between breasts, and sometimes it can become extreme, especially after a bout of mastitis or when baby has a strong preference for one side. The best way to fix this issue is to continue to give the underproducing breast more frequent stimulation and milk removal. The more often and more completely you can get that breast emptied out, the more milk it will make. So nurse more and pump more on that side. Do be aware, though, that it may not be possible to even out this difference, especially if the baby is unwilling to nurse well on that side.
    1 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 06:00 PM
    It's not "really, really weird" for women to have low iron, but it's unusual enough in a woman who eats red meat that I think it's worth some more conversations with your doctor about supplements and follow-up testing.
    3 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 05:56 PM
    That's awesome! My kids also started eating a lot at around 14-15 months. Makes me wonder if that is the actual magic age for enjoying solids... Though I am sure it's not!
    20 replies | 1429 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 05:32 PM
    It is normal for bottle intake to vary. So that is fine. Assuming your baby nurses overnight, the rule of thumb is baby will drink about 1 to 1.5 ounces per hour of separation. This is based on the idea that the average total intake is 25-35 ounces per 24 hour day. So if you are separated from baby 11 hours, typical intake should be between 11 ounces and 16.5 ounces. But of course some babies will not need that much, and some might take more. What you want to watch out for is numbers consistently way above or way below this rule of thumb average. It is generally best if bottles are small and more frequent as opposed to large and less frequent. Between one and four ounces is fine, but 4 ounces as a rule might be too much.
    3 replies | 131 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 05:10 PM
    You can increase production at any point- theoretically. First, trouble shoot your pump and maybe change when you pump. Assuming your baby is nursing fairly frequently and you are pumping on top of that, milk removal is probably often enough. So galactagogues might be something you want to look into. Kellymom.com has reliable info, but somewhat limited.
    1 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 05:03 PM
    If your 2 year old has a regular nap, then nap then if at all possible. I personally found lying down and sleeping with baby when his older brother napped a must for me. No it did not work every day but often enough. Otherwise, are you concerned baby is not sleeping enough? Infants generally sleep as much as they need to, and that is going to vary. I would suggest put baby in the wrap (maybe try another one if this one seems to not be comfortable for baby) and do whatever you were otherwise going to do and your baby will sleep as much as he needs. Or you can try sitting down and nursing baby while you read to or play a quiet game with your 2 year old. Also my kids never liked wraps that covered their heads. As needed for the design of the sling or wrap, I pulled the fabric up enough to support baby's neck and head, but they hated having anything higher than that. So your baby wakes up at 5:45 in the morning and will not nurse back to sleep? I was also "blessed" with early rising children. My first two. How I handled it varied. My favorite method was to have husband take baby and get up and make breakfast or whatever so I could get a lie in. This was a fair tradeoff since with me sleeping beside and nursing the baby all night husband got plenty of sleep- despite being in the same bed with us husband eventually stopped waking at all when baby stirred. Sometimes baby would end up back with me and then nurse to sleep again. Sometimes I was able to stay in bed...
    3 replies | 183 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 04:41 PM
    OK I get what you are saying, but I think it is just way more complicated than that. Let downs can occur with no physical stimulation. That is what happens when a mom leaks. Let down is a hormonal event that is triggered by many things. And all you need is one letdown per feeding generally speaking. The milk starts flowing, and baby gets whatever is there. If it is not much (say mom has a smaller breast storage capacity) than maybe that baby will need to nurse more often than another. I am not saying that more letdowns is not helpful in baby getting more milk at a feeding, I am just saying that in the normal course of things multiple letdowns per feeding is not a concern. Baby needs to be nursing well enough to transfer milk normally, which is not really the same thing as triggering more letdowns, if that makes sense. Great breast compressions are helping! That is a good idea. If you think baby is frustrated with a slow letdown, have you tried a little hand expression prior to nursing? Also fennel is an herb that supposedly helps with slow letdown. Sorry that is all I know about that, you will have to find a reliable source for dose advice.
    5 replies | 217 view(s)
  • @llli*canadianemily's Avatar
    December 8th, 2016, 03:46 PM
    I'm not sure if my levels are still low. They were never retested. I guess that would be step 1, but I've responded to treatment for it in the past. I'm mostly just wondering if it's really, really weird and rare for nursing moms of toddlers to have low iron before they get their period back. I know breastmilk is not supposed to really take much iron. I am concerned about a colon or ovarian cancer that may be bleeding or otherwise causing anemia (don't think my levels were so low to be considered anemic she never requested follow up tests). My CT didn't show evidence of this, though it wasn't specifically to check for those things. But they were looking for anything that might be obstructing my urinary tract, either within it or outside of it. Guess I'll have to bring it up to my doctor, though she'll think I'm nuts bringing up something from that long ago.
    3 replies | 129 view(s)
More Activity