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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:24 AM
    Is it a bleb? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplebleb/
    1 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:20 AM
    I think it is possible your baby could get more when baby nurses, yes. But I do not mean baby would drink 3 ounces every time baby nurses, because that is not how nursing works. Nursing is so different than pumping and bottles it is hard to compare. A baby might take 2 ounces from the breasts, then nurse again 10 minutes later and trigger another letdown and get another ounce, then sleep a bit, then nurse again 30 minutes later and get another 2 ounces, then sleep for 3 hours. Etc. No one tells moms to pump like that (or give bottles like that) because it would be so hard, but that is how babies nurse. It's ok because nursing is easier. So no, you would not have to supplement 20-30 ml after every nursing session. If that worked best for you, great. But if you find your baby cannot get enough milk from you overall to gain normally, you can figure out how much more baby needs overall with a little experimenting and give that amount per day when and however you wish. Baby can be supplemented before sessions, after, during (using an at the breast supplementer- this is often the most time efficient method.) Baby could also get a bottle here and there from someone else while you pump (or take a walk or a nap.) You can combine any of the above. Basically the only "rule" is that baby get enough to eat overall, and you protect your milk production as well as you can. This means pumping as you can, if baby requires any supplements. Also babies take in more in bottles at once...
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:58 AM
    Wow that is a lot of pumping! I bet you are tired! Is baby nursing at least 8-12 times per 24 hours and nursing pretty much around the clock? Ok, so since fast letdown is related to OP, and a fast letdown is upsetting baby, that sounds like you are probably producing more milk than you want to be. Fast letdown that baby reacts to like that can possibly even cause breast refusal or aversion, and overproduction can also cause some serious health issues for mom. Right now you are pumping in a manner that is likely to keep increasing your milk production. This may have been needed those early days when you were having issues, but if you are now making enough milk for baby to gain normally and also no longer using nipple shields, there is really no reason to pump at all to continue to have normal milk production. As long as your baby is exclusively nursed and gaining normally, you know you are making enough milk overall and will continue to do so as long as baby nurses often enough (and you pump often enough during separations.) I assume(?) you will be able to pump about every 3-4 hours during your workday(?) So there is typically no need to stockpile a huge amount of expressed milk- you need enough for the first day back, and then a "cushion" for emergencies - some moms take a few work days to get into a good pump "rhythm" and everyone has off days when they do not pump as much, so that is what the cushion is there for. Every mom has a different cushion they feel...
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Today, 01:35 AM
    Than you. It is just that if I give my baby bottle every two hours, he can drink 90-100 ml (slightly more than 3 ounces), whereas I can only pump 60 ml every two hours at the moment, which leads me to what I am producing is not enough. If baby nurses effectively he may get more than 60 ml perhaps. When I get him on breast eventually, if that ever happens, will I need to supplement 20-30 ml after each breasfeeding session? I have ordered the book you recommended, looking forward to reading it!
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*paulavzq's Avatar
    Today, 12:45 AM
    I have a recurrent problem with one of my breast since I started breastfeeding. It starts with very sharp needle pain whenever I am nursing. My baby is a premature and I still need to pump and give him in bottle most of the milk. A few weeks ago I noticed a blister of milk hanging off my nipple when o finished pumping, normally the size of a green pea. But last night i noticed a much bigger one when I was emptying the expressed milk into a bottle. This time it was the size of a broad bean a bit pink and full of milk, when I touched t it spread out into a long blister. Does anyone know what it is? And how to treat it? Thank you
    1 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*stina.hi's Avatar
    Today, 12:03 AM
    maddieb...thank you for your reply! To answer your first question, I am not sure if I have OP or not. I believe I have a forceful letdown that causes my baby to sometimes refuse the breast after the first few minutes, which is frustrating for me because I know she is hungry. Then she starts screaming. Even after I try to calm her down and try to relatch, she still refuses. I've tried switching sides since my right side has the forceful let down and I believe my left side is OK. I definitely do not want to reduce production. I would like to continue making a stockpile for when I go back to work. However, I don't want it to interfere with BF. If my production stays where it is, I'd be OK with it. I will be returning to work the first week of July and I started pumping and freezing on 4/14. I will be away from baby for at least 14-15 hours while at work, but only work 3 days a week. So the other 4 days that I am off, I will be EBF. I would definitely appreciate a plan for pumping. Usually I've been pumping more on a 3,6,9,12 schedule and missing one or two times (so total of about 6-7 times in 24 hours). However, in the last week, I have gotten so exhausted from that plan that I have only been pumping 1-2 overnight and 2-3 times during the day. My husband has gone back to work this week, so it is also harder to pump during the day. When I pump, I usually get 2-3 oz from both breasts, but there have been times were I would pump only half an ounce.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:42 PM
    Hmm. I would not call being able to pump 600 mils a day 'not great.' Also, 60-100 mils per session is normal to good pump output. When you say it in mils it sounds like more of a shortfall than it is. I think in ounces, and if my conversions are correct baby eats about 27 ounces each day and you pump 20! That sounds pretty good to me. If you are under the impression baby will need more milk each day as baby grows, please know this is not so. If baby is gaining normally now on 27 ounces per day, then that is about all baby is going to need (with occasional small fluctuations) from now on, (until baby is eating lots of solids, when the amount of milk baby needs will go down.) Nor is there any reason to think this is "your limit." Pumps, even excellent ones, are often not going to be an effective as a baby, so you might find that you are able to be closer to exclusively giving your baby your milk if baby can nurse again. Again I would suggest that book.
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:23 PM
    Thank you both for your encouragement! Yes, I have a hospital grade double pump that I hired. I pump 9 or 10 times a day. I can only pump 60 ml max at a time during day and around 100ml night time. So total pumped output is 600 ml. My baby is taking 800 ml -give and take atm- Not great :( I am doing this for while with no significant improvement. I guess this is my limit, I guess this is a question for another post :)
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*searsmami's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 PM
    Am following this thread now, thanks for sharing so much, wow, over two years of updates! I'm looking for ways to wean my almost-3-year-old, as I also have an infant. I never felt aversion/agitation during 2nd pregnancy, but once I was tandem nursing, it came on very strongly. I've been attending La Leche League meetings, which are so comforting and supportive.
    18 replies | 7747 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:11 PM
    Sorry I forgot: Typically, yes you would alternate. But you can go by feel with this. If baby wants to nurse again in 10 minutes, then no reason to not put her to the same side and see what happens. If you feel more full on that other side, start there. Etc. Also I missed that you are currently pumping after nursing. Every session? Pumping after nursing is a very effective milk production increasing technique and so is probably not advisable if you have over production. Sometimes moms with OP feel so uncomfortably full that they feel they must pump. It is true you want to avoid getting engorged. The safest way to do this is to encourage frequent nursing and then pump or hand express just enough milk until you feel more comfortable, and only when needed.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:42 PM
    I agree with mommal. Also, the book Making More Milk is an excellent source of info for the issue or low milk production, and a good online resource is www.kellymom.com Please DO NOT blame yourself for listening to health care professionals about health issues! Of course, you listened to them. Why wouldn't you have? The sad fact is the medical establishment as a whole continues to undermine breastfeeding mothers because of THEIR ignorance and lack of ability to admit when they do not know something. This is their fault, not yours.
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:35 PM
    Hello and welcome! Reclined need not mean that you are reclined so far for every session. You can sit up more, basically. I found that if baby was in line with my body (Head above tummy) that also helped, even if I was not laid back much. I will attach a short video - basically just a slideshow- that shows how this position can be done anywhere with a few adjustments. Fast letdown is usually caused by either 1) Overproduction 2) not frequent enough nursing, or both. OP is something that will reduce overtime as long as the body is not given the wrong message to increase production more. How long differs mom to mom but OP issues normally start reducing after about 6 weeks. Of course encouraging baby to nurse frequently is something you can start trying right away. Yes as long as baby is gaining well this is absolutely ok, no matter what color baby's poops are! There is lots of misinformation out there about baby's supposedly not getting enough hindmilk if their poop is green. Please ignore this, it is false. What your baby needs is enough milk overall to gain normally. If you have op and a fast letdown, the norm would be that baby is getting lots of milk and gaining very, very well. A mom with OP whose baby is nursing exclusively might want to avoid pumping "extra" milk to save for the return to work as long as she can, or keep pumping to the bare required minimum, because usually what she wants to have happen is for production to reduce.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:40 PM
    Hi! Are you concerned about the length of the spacing between some sessions, or nursing frequency overall? Are you concerned that the introduction of solids is interfering with normal nursing frequency? Are you ever uncomfortably full between nursing sessions? Is there much or any pacifier use? By my count, your daughter is nursing about 8 times per 24 hours. This is certainly considered within the normal required frequency for even a newborn baby. (8-12 times in 24 hours.) Older babies, especially past 6 months, MAY normally nurse less often in 24 hours - 5 or 6 times, maybe- and still get plenty of milk. Of course, many still nurse as often as newborns as well. Basically as baby ages, the range of normal nursing frequency widens. But basically since your baby is gaining well and you are available to nurse and not withholding the breast or trying to "stretch out" time between nursing sessions, or in some other way trying to reduce nursing frequency, you are probably just fine. Solids interfere with nursing frequency when they are "pushed"- too much, too young. If you are not doing that (and it does not sound like you are) then all is most likely fine in that department as well. On the other hand, there is no requirement that a baby be offered solids 3 times a day, so if you wanted to and it felt right, you could reduce how often baby was offered solids. One trick I used when introducing my third baby to solids was to not give her any water with her meals. Then...
    1 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*ssmith888's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Thank you!!
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*stina.hi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:09 PM
    Hi, I have a 1 month old girl. Just some background: We have been struggling with breastfeeding from the beginning. She had a tongue tie and my nipples were blistered and bleeding before we left the hospital. We got her tongue tie clipped and I had to rest my nipples. So I pumped for a week and we also supplemented with formula. When we started breastfeeding again, I used a nipple shield. I was able to wean off the shield two weeks ago and we've been exclusively breastfeeding. Right now I have a few concerns: 1) Apparently, I have a forceful letdown. My LC told me to recline back when feeding. This has helped a lot. However, how long will this last? Besides reclining back, what else can I do to help this? Also, if I am in public what other position will help as I don't want to be almost on my back? 2) She seems to be satisfied after being on one breast for about 10 min. I think she's getting hind milk bc her poops have been yellow and seedy. Is feeding on one breast ok? I am also pumping so that she has breastmilk when I go back to work. I try to pump after each feeding. When I put her to the breast for her next feeding, should I alternate breasts? Also, should I pump the other side if she only takes one side? I have been pumping both sides even if she takes one side. 3) I know that pumping increases my supply and probably doesn't help with the forceful letdown. How can I manage both so that I can keep my supply but help with the forceful letdown?
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*alicerich86's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:51 PM
    When is the best time to get pregnant? Your fertile days are the 4-5 days before ovulation and the day of ovulation, while the most fertile days are the 2 days before ovulation and the day of ovulation.
    5 replies | 2006 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    Hello ladies, I know this gets asked a lot and I know follow my baby is probably the answer but I'm feeling a bit ARGH about my girl's nursing frequency. She is nearly 8 months old, have a history of fussiness about feeding and positions. Making some headway since I got advice here - ie I don't have to side lie and nurse her all the time now but we're still mostly reclined on bed for nursing. My issue is she is dropping/stretching out nursings. I feed on demand but I still offer her frequently (every 1-2 hours) even when she hasn't asked because of distractability. We bedshare. We do baby led solids and food intake is hit or miss depending on the day; she loves playing and exploring foods - some days she appears to swallow a good bit (a good bit being probably only 1-1.5 tablespoonful or so of food overall eg a chunk of pear and a bit of a porridge finger, or like tonight she ate roast courgette/pepper and a bit of cheese/avocado tortilla wrap). She's been in 91st centile since birth weight wise. Typical day: she feeds around 6am; wakes up at 7.30am, I offer her breasts, she has a playful feed (ie she sucks a moment and pops off again a few times but then when let down happens she may have a second or two of sucking but then isn't interested); she joins us for breakfast where she'll have a bit of fruit or porridge fingers; she won't feed again until 9.30-10am when she naps; she may have a playful fed on wake-up, usually an hour later; I offer her some of what I'm...
    1 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*shanghai's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:31 AM
    She had tongue tie that was clipped on day 4.
    16 replies | 845 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:12 AM
    A flattened nipple indicates a shallow latch. Has baby been checked for tongue or lip ties?
    16 replies | 845 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:10 AM
    2 hours without nursing is a long time for a 2 week-old baby, particularly in the evening when a lot of babies are cluster feeding. (Cluster feeding: many closely spaced, small feedings, often interspersed with bouts of fussiness.) The next time you want to go out, I suggest taking your baby and sitter with you. You and your husband have a nice dinner, and grandma walks the baby around in a stroller or carries her in a sling, and brings the baby to you to nurse if necessary. (If you need tips on nursing in public, let us know. It can be challenging with very young babies, but it's doable!) For the future, I am a big fan of something we call "adult dinner". After the kids go to bed, my husband and I have a candlelit dinner with lots of yummy, pre-prepared stuff we pick up at the fancy grocery store. And wine, lots of wine! ;) Minimal clean-up, and it's cheaper than a restaurant. With a new baby, you can take the same approach mentioned above- grandma cares for the baby nearby for an hour or two, while you and your husband linger over your fancy-shmancy dinner in the comfort of your own home.
    5 replies | 562 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 AM
    :hug Don't let the frustration get to you. It's totally normal for very young babies to have difficulty finding their way to sleep. The "nurse for a moment-squirm-nurse again-fuss" pattern is really typical at this age. Have you tried nursing her and then settling her to sleep on your chest? Sometimes this will allow you to lean farther and farther back until you are lying flat, and then you roll slightly so baby is lying on her side against you. Hopefully you both can drift off to sleep at that point. Is baby sleeping in bed with you, or in a crib or bassinet?
    8 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:59 AM
    It's never too late to increase supply! All you need is the proper stimulation, and your brain will get the signal to pump out the hormone that will tell your breasts to make more milk. Do you have a pump, preferably a high-quality double electric pump with correctly sized shields? If not, now is the time to get one. I would look into renting a hospital-grade pump, as they are usually the most effective. In addition to nursing as much as possible, you will be aiming to fit in as many pumps per day as possible. Ideally, you will want to pump around 8 or more times a day, but if that is not possible, whatever pumping you can do will be good. Even if it's just 1-2 times per day, that is still better than nothing.
    8 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:44 AM
    Hello, I am a first time mom and have a almost 2 week old baby. My parents offered to come down the other night for a couple hours so that my husband and I could go out to dinner. It was great but after just an hour and a half my mom said the baby was fussing to eat. (I'm breastfeeding). So we came right home so I could nurse. I nursed her right before we left for dinner thinking she could go at least 2 hours without wanting to nurse again, but guess I was wrong. I would like my parents do watch her again sometime so that my husband and I can at least get out of the house for an hour or two but I am nervous that the same thing will happen and she will just get fussy for a nursing after an hour of us being gone. Anyone else been in this situation or have any suggestions?
    5 replies | 562 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 AM
    I haven't left my lo for longer than 2 hours yet (though plan to leave her 3-4 hours soon) and she is nearly 8 months. She also does not and has never taken a bottle. We have been getting her used to an open cup and she needs help with it but has taken at least 1oz from it when we are offering solids. So I figure I'll feed before leaving her then leave 2-4oz with the cup and hopefully she'll work it out with carers helping her. Good thing is, as maddieb says, the milk can sit out fine during that time and be offered multiple times. I also find my lo takes milk from cup better when its not me giving it -you may find a carer or another person can give bottles or cups more easily. Good luck with the return to work :hug
    3 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:53 AM
    Thank you all! Last night she seemed very squirmy all night and I had a hard time getting her to settle down and actually sleep. She acted liked she would want to nurse but then she would only nurse for a second and then get fussy again. I would change her diaper but she still seemed fussy. It also seemed liked she did not like laying on her back and would sometimes make a gurgle sound like she was about to spit up or something. She would make the sucky faces so I would try nursing again but when I put her to my breast she would smack her lips and not really latch on. Almost like she was playing a game with me. I'm so frustrated now!
    8 replies | 211 view(s)
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