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  • @llli*mrsjessnelson's Avatar
    Today, 09:13 PM
    Hi Everyone! I'm hoping someone can offer me some help and reassurance. My sweet girl is 7 weeks old and we are still struggling to breastfed. She was doing great eating the first 4 weeks (although I did have some cracked nipples). She would eat on each side 5-10 minutes. Then we got mastitis, which led to thrush and everything went down hill from there. When she got thrush, she started fussing at the breast so I offered her a bottle. She started only spending about 5 minutes on each breast. Then at 5.5 weeks she started popping on and off the breast and pushing away, so I had to offer her bottles more frequently. I think she was coming on and off and refusing to nurse because I have an over-active letdown. I see milk squirting out when she pops off. I tried the laid back position but she still comes off and after going on and off a few times she gets frustrated and refuses to continue. Now at 7 weeks, she will only nurse until the letdown or after a pump but she gets mad when the milk is too slow as well. So she is currently only nursing a few times a day for a few minutes. The LC I met with a few times mentioned she has a stretchy posterior tongue tie, but wasn't sure that was the problem. Now I'm stuck pumping and almost battling her to take the breast. How do I get back to BF full time?! Would an over-active letdown start at 4 weeks- because she seemed to be fine with the flow then? Can I get her off bottles and to stay latched? Is the tongue tie part of the problem?...
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:49 PM
    Hello and welcome! Yes everything sounds 100% normal. Is nursing comfortable for you? The vast majority of the time, if nursing is comfortable for mom and baby is gaining ok, all is well. It is not only normal but preferable that nursing is "inconsistent." It is no more normal for a baby to eat at precisely spaced intervals in precise amounts in precise amounts of time as it is for you or I to. The difference between a baby and an older child or adult is that baby is trying to gain as fast as baby did while still in the womb, when baby "ate" basically constantly. So there really is no way for a baby to nurse too often. But wanting to nurse shorter or longer, shorter or longer times between sessions, etc. are all entirely normal. Also, babies nurse both for comfort and for food, and the great thing is, both are happening at the same time! As long as you are following baby's lead (and also offering as much above that as you like) and baby is nursing with a good overall frequency, you should be fine. Here is an excellent article about nursing habits in the early weeks that may help: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/ Bottles in the very early days are usually not suggested because both pumping and bottles can interfere with the normal course of breastfeeding in multiple ways. If company is preventing you from nursing your baby, maybe it would be best to limit company. If bottles are needed, I would suggest keep them as small, infrequent, and slowly...
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Today, 03:31 PM
    Hi, there! This is my first post, & I hope I'm doing this right.. I'm a first time mom to an 11 day old. So far, he has been predominantly breastfed, but I have had his father feed him a bottle of expressed milk a few times when we've had company over. (No formula) My concerns: 1) My son has developed "little boobs" in the last day or so. When I googled it, many people say this is caused by hormones in my milk, it's common, & will subside after some time. Is this true? 2) Nursing is inconsistent. I realize that as a newborn, he is trying to get the hang of breastfeeding just like I am. Sometimes, he will nurse 30 min on each side and be content for a couple hours. Other times, he'll "cluster feed" an hour apart several times in a row, feeding as little as 5 or 10 minutes, and only on one side. It seems like it may be for comfort sometimes.. he will fuss and cry, frantically trying to get to my nipple. Then, as soon as he's there, he sucks for a few minutes, and becomes drowsy. His pediatrician said this is "normal." *Note: My son is meeting or surpassing the diaper guidelines. His urine is pale yellow and stools are typical as well. 3) My son sleeps much of the time whilst nursing. Even if I take him off and have him relatch, he will fall asleep again. He sucks pretty continuously, with only short pauses. Is this acceptable? I'm just amazed at how much he can consume! His stomach is only supposed to be the size of a ping pong ball at this age. There have been times...
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:40 PM
    Yes I do not like the term either. I only use it because it is so often used in a way that undermines breastfeeding, (as in, "Oh, he is ONLY comfort nursing." but it really is a silly term. Presumably all nursing is comforting, and even if all that is happening is comfort (no milk transfer) why would you not want to comfort a baby? Often people use comfort nursing as another way of saying "non-nutritive sucking." You may have heard that one with your older child who had a physical barrier to being able to nurse. But that is another term that is often misunderstood. There is nothing wrong with non-nutritive sucking if it is comforting and the baby is getting enough to eat somehow! It sounds like you are way ahead of the game with your already deep knowledge and understanding of breastfeeding from your previous experience. Sometimes it is the babies who have the most trouble nursing or just can not nurse despite all efforts that teach us the most.
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Today, 11:28 AM
    Thank you MaddieB, that is actually very reassuring. And yes, my first had to be bottle fed from day one. He couldn't form a seal even remotely no matter what we tried, position, breast shield, his lip and palate were just way to open. Trying to hand express into his mouth didn't work either. Even with an SNS system he refused. He was only able to get roughly half an ounce from breast when he would try to nurse, and that was mostly due to my letdown reflex. I had no problem letting him, he just wouldn't. With this one I will definitely let him nurse as long as he wants, for both nutrition and comfort. I hate to use the saying "comfort nursing". I believe a baby needs comfort just as much as they need nutrition. I am familiar with paced and cup feeding. We did paced feeding with my first and some cup feeding after surgeries. I am so excited to breastfeed, now if only the little firecracker would make his appearance. Thanks for the advice and reassuring words. It does put my mind more at ease.
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:58 AM
    Is it normal to feel sad to see baby grow up? Oh yes. You are transitioning from the mom of a baby to a mom of a young child. There is a natural grieving period for that baby and that time of new motherhood - of course, that can make anyone sad! Yes there are also many joys to be found with any age, and you will find them when you are ready. But there is something special about babyhood that is truly unique. Also as a child grows up, the challenges are very different, and some stages are much harder than others. And some are impossible and you just hold on for the ride. Is it normal to feel very depressed, ever? I would not say so. If you feel truly depressed, you may want to talk to your doctor. Depression can have a chemical cause. Like mommal, I think it is fine and certainly may help to encourage your child to nurse more if you like. I do not have time to hunt them up now, but you may be able to find some good articles about weaning and mothers feelings. Yes it is normal to feel sad, doubtful, etc. during this time.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:39 AM
    Try to remember this is a different baby and things will be different, one way or another! Breastfeeding is normal, and most babies love to nurse. It actually takes some doing to get a baby to not want to nurse and instead "prefer" bottles. This baby will be a breastfed baby who gets a few bottles a day when you cannot be with baby. That is very different from your older child. I assume your older child was bottle fed basically from day one, correct? This would mean that baby was not only acclimated to bottles from very early on, they also possibly could not latch or nurse well enough to get milk at the breast at an amount that would keep them interested. When a child nurses for comfort, they are still getting milk- Basically, all nursing is both for nutrition and comfort. The reason I stressed "comfort nursing" is that moms are so often discouraged from letting baby nurse as much as baby wants, or from nursing to sleep, etc. And limiting time at the breast to avoid so called "comfort nursing" can be detrimental to breastfeeding longevity. Aside from paced feeding, you could also talk to your caregiver about using an open cup instead for at least the first several weeks. (or always) I can link info and videos for paced feeding and cup feeding should you like.
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:27 AM
    Hi foxystoat. It is normal for weight gain rate to vary (not be the exact same every week.) Like you, I think it is also normal for gain to slow or very temporarily plateau if baby is ill. But we do not really know if the vax made baby ill, or baby simply caught something at the same time. My guess is the pediatrician will look at overall gain, other growth indicators, and overall health, and not just focus on one or two weeks of gain. At least, I hope so. I do not know what kind of growth charts are used in UK. Generally it is suggested that the more recent (2006 I think?) WHO charts are more accurate as they are based on healthy, normally gaining children from many different populations around the world, (and so, allows for genetic differences in growth) and was based entirely on breastfed babies. If since baby was born slightly over 2 months ago, your baby has gained a tad more than two pounds total, I do think that is very possibly going to raise alarms about gain no matter what chart you use. If this occurs, The question then is, what do you do about it? Ounce per ounce, formula is no better than breastmilk in helping a child gain. If a breastfed baby is not gaining normally, then it could mean baby is not getting enough overall milk to gain normally, or it could be that baby has some underlying health, nutritional or growth issue going on. The problem is, all to often when a baby is breastfed, formula is thrown at the problem rather than working with...
    1 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Today, 09:11 AM
    Thanks for the quick response maddieb. I think you touched on my the major issues I am having. It is all normal that she nurses frequently on some days and less on others when she is distracted. I am depressed because I would rather her nurse more frequently then not because when she is not I become so depressed. I am really starting to think it had something to do with her losing interest in nursing. I am concerned because I feel like I should be happy that she is growing up and instead I'm not. Is it normal to feel this way? Because I am wondering if anyone else has felt so unsure of the nursing cycle??
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*foxystoat's Avatar
    Today, 08:36 AM
    My baby is 9 weeks old and is has dropped below the 0.4 centile on the charts but has still been gaining at least 4oz a week up until now. She was 5lb 5oz at birth (41 weeks) and currently weighs 7lb 9.5oz. A week ago she got her immunisations, and since then she has had diarrhea and has been sick a couple of times a day (real sick, not spit up, we can tell because it smells). She is also sleeping a few hours more and so feeding a couple of times less than usual - more like 9-10 feeds instead of 11-12. I am not concerned about her in the slightest, when she is awake she is all smiles and laughs and is very active and wriggly and is meeting all the milestones. She feeds brilliantly and I have been offering both breasts and swapping as long as she wants to feed. She is definitely full at the end of a feed which usually takes 40 minutes. She is having plenty of wet and dirty nappies and her poo is normal, apart from the diarrhea this week. My husband and I are both tall and very slim (my usual BMI is 17.5, I eat like a horse!) and his family has a history of small babies. I also have petite adults in my immediate family. This week she has only gained 1oz and we have been referred to a paediatrician by the GP. The Health Visitor was pushing me to supplement with formula a few weeks ago but since the weight gain has been steady until now she had stopped. I really would prefer not to supplement if there's no need, obviously if my baby was showing signs of...
    1 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Today, 06:44 AM
    Unfortunately I've only been with the company for 10 months so I do not qualify for FMLA. That's my biggest issue. They typically give a health benefit of $165 added on to our check to help pay for insurance, whether we go threw them or choose a separate plan. I will be receiving short term disability at 60% of my 40 hour work week, but I will not be receiving any other form of income or the health benefit while I am out. They don't offer paid maternity leave to any employee. Also they normally would have someone who is not protected under FMLA pay for insurance while they are out. However, my boss fought to have them pay for it while I'm gone and I will pay them back after I go back to work. They legally have to keep me on the insurance, but they don't have to pay for it while I am gone, but they have agreed to as long as I pay it back when I return.
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Today, 06:40 AM
    Thank you for your reply! I have started ready the Womanlh Art of Breastfeeding, one of the books that inspired me to do a natural birth for the sake of my breastfeeding relationship. I have also started going to LLL meetings as often as possible. So I have a relationship with the leader, so I will have easy access to her. Unfortunately the closet LC is 4 hours away, which I used her with my pumping journey when I lived in that town. There really isn't too much help in my current area. I know it can be done, I just worry that he will refuse me after going back to work so early. After being so heart broken that my first baby couldn't latch, I would be devastated if this baby started refusing. We tried comfort nursing with my first baby and after awhile he became so frustrated not being able to keep suction that he started crying and refusing every time I tried putting him to the breast. As for my pump, I still have my old one but I will only have it as a back up. I'll be getting a new one for this baby. I used a Medela Pump in Style and this time I will be springing for a Spectra S2, I've heard a lot of good things about it.
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:26 AM
    I never personally had a baby who was hooked on a shield, but my understanding is that when you have a hardcore shield lover, getting him off it is likely to take time, patience, and many, many repeat attempts at nursing without a shield. I'm really sorry the folks back home are blaming you for this issue- it sounds like you have worked really hard to nurse your baby and your friends and family should be your biggest cheerleaders! Regarding sippy cups: doesn't really matter what kind you use, though I strongly suggest buying something with a valve you can take apart and really clean (all sorts of mold can grow inside the spout!). Introduce one at 6 months (corrected age ) or even later if you're not feeling ready. Put an oz or two of water in it, and give it to your child along with his solid foods. A with solids, at 6 months the purpose of the sippy is fun learning experiences, not nutrition or hydration.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    :ita with the PP. I found that a cup of fenugreek tea on the days when I was feeling low often restored my confidence about my milk production. I think it may have boosted production, too, but for me the confidence angle was more important. What would happen if you offered to nurse more often on the days when she isn't asking?
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:14 AM
    :ita I also think it's time for you to get some hands-on help from a LC, preferably one who is an IBCLC. All babies have small mouths, and sometimes moms need a bit of help figuring out how to cram maximum breast into a tiny mouth. If you have gotten to 4 weeks and nursing is mostly comfortable and the cracks can be described as minor, then most likely all you need to do is wait for baby to grow a bit, and then things will improve. Healing tips for cracks: - Practice good hygeine, particularly hand washing and changing your bras, shirts, towels, and breast pads. A salt water rinse on the nipples is also a good way to flush any nasty bacteria out- use a shot glass, immerse the nipple in the shot glass, and then bring the glass up so that it forms a seal against your skin - Keep them moist between feedings using lanolin or gel pads. - Use a combination of 1% hydrocortisone cream and bacitracin ointment on them to fight inflammation and infection. (Use a pea-sized amount, mixed and applied using a clean finger.) - If the cracks rip open painfully when you nurse, try hydrating the scabs with warm water before nursing. Either use the shot glass technique mentioned above or use a wet washcloth. Softened scabs tear open less painfully than dry ones.
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:04 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. This sounds most like bad medical advice sabotaging breastfeeding.
    2 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:01 AM
    Great advice from MaddieB! It strikes me as a little fishy that your work will not pay your health insurance while you are on maternity leave. I did a quick google and found this resource: https://fairygodboss.com/career-topics/maternity-leave-101-basic-things-you-should-know. It says, in part: "Do I receive benefits while I'm on maternity leave? If you qualify for FMLA leave, your company must continue to keep you on its health insurance plan while you're on leave. However, the company has the legal right to ask for the reimbursement of your health insurance premium payments if you do not return after your FMLA leave. Also, FMLA doesn't require employers to allow you to accrue benefits or time toward seniority when you're out on leave. That means the clock may stop on things like vacation accrual and the amount of time you can say you've been with the company in order to qualify for things like raises based on seniority, participation in your company's 401k plan or the vesting of your company's matching investment, or stock options. Finally, you won't be able to contribute to your 401k or flexible spending account while you're on leave because you're not receiving a paycheck from your employer and thus can't contribute pre-tax dollars. Most companies that offer fully-paid maternity leave (i.e. not through STD policies) also pay to cover your other employment benefits during this period. " If that is correct, you would need to reimburse the company for...
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:48 AM
    Hi and welcome! First I suggest, it is important to get a realistic idea of what would be a reasonable amount of milk to have stored in the freezer at the point you return to work. You would really only absolutely need enough milk for one day, although of course, most moms wish to have more than that for emergencies, low out put days, etc. But assuming you will be pumping often enough while you are at work-and I hope that is the case- you will not need massive amounts of milk stored. 6 weeks is 42 days. Assuming a normal 8-10 hour work day, If you pumped only one ounce a day for 40 days, you would have enough milk total to leave for your baby to cover about 4 working days. That would be a pretty good stash, in my opinion. Of course, you may not want to pump every day, but if you pumped every other day but pumped 2 ounces per day, the total would be the same. What I am trying to say is, I think you have time to build up a quite good stash without too much trouble. If you would like more info on this, www.kellymom.com has a milk calculator. Now, as to your doctor's advice- was this your OB, or your baby's pediatrician? On the face of it, it sounds like a good example as to why it is often not a very good idea to take breastfeeding advice from doctors, as, sadly, most of them know little about it. But I am curious why your doctor thinks your baby needs something other than what baby is getting naturally from nursing. Is baby gaining slowly? Fast? Spitting up a lot?...
    2 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:09 PM
    Hi, sorry you are having this problem! About the only thing I can tell you is that it is very unlikely your baby's mouth is 'too small' to get a good latch. You would probably not have been able to nurse her for 4 hours, let alone for 4 weeks, if that were the case. It does sound like you have some serious nipple pain and injury going on and that would usually indicate a poor latch. But that usually has nothing to do with baby mouth size. Complicating matters, I think with the level of pain and injury you are seeing, it is also possible you have a bacterial infection on your nipple, or maybe, thrush. You have gone it alone long enough, you deserve for your nursing experience to be comfortable for you. IMO that means it is past time to get professional help. Is that in any way possible for you? What the LC said in the hospital is irrelevant at this point. Latch may well have been fine at that point. But something is clearly not fine now. I really do think your best bet is to get experienced help asap. That would mean a complete consult with an experienced, trained lactation consultant if at all possible. Please let us know if you need help finding an LC. Meanwhile, you say you have latched and unlatched baby many times. This can work, but can sometimes also be counterproductive if baby is always latching the same, painful way. This article explains in brief many latch and positioning ideas that help a baby get a better latch. If you would like more info on any...
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*chelseapeters13's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:50 PM
    Hey all, I am a first time BF new mom. My little girl was born a month early but had no complications whatsoever and latched on immediately the first try within ten minutes of being born. She's always latched well and my milk supply has been great since square one. My nipples have been sore but I figured it was just because I was new. The LC in the hospital told me she had a great latch so I just kept on. I'm now 4 weeks into it and last week I had immense pain in my right nipple so bad I couldn't feed on that side. I believe it was because I was trying to feed her with my breast engorged and she couldn't get enough in her mouth. I just pumped that side with a nipple shield and fed her from the left while it healed. Now both sides are well enough to feed from but my nipples are constantly sensitive to the touch and I'm worried about them getting to the I want to scream when I feed point again. When she pulls off my breast (without unlatching usually) my nipple always has the lipstick shape. It doesn't hurt when she feeds but sometimes is uncomfortable when I first put her on. I've tried every hold, and I've detached and reattached her hundreds of times now trying to achieve the round nipple when she's done but I just can't seem to figure it out. Is it possible her mouth is too small to get the whole nipple? The bottom of my nipple is always the elongated part and I have some minor cracking on the underneath part of my nipples and this is my main concern because I don't want...
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*1sttimerinnyc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:43 PM
    My LO is 6 weeks old and I'll be returning to work in another 6 weeks. We've gotten into a good rhythm of exclusively breast feeding, but I need to step up my pumping so I can bank extra milk now vs feeling overwhelmed when it's time to go back. So far I've been feeding on demand and pumping occasionally to relieve engorgement. At my most recent checkup, my doctor recommended that I empty each breast so the baby gets hindmilk and to pump after each session to trigger my body to regenerate more supply. I've been transitioning over the past day to adopt her advice, pumping more after nursing, however i've noticed that the "extra" milk that I pump doesn't really get stored because LO seems hungry after 15-30 mins and I put the extra pumped milk goes towards feeding him. In the past, I would throw him back on and continue nursing but now both my breasts are pretty tapped out and LO will be frustrated trying to suck. There was one time when I put the pumped milk immediately into the freezer and 20 mins later he was hungry, I hadn't replenished and he was very unhappy on the breast, creating stress for both of us. Should I try to always leave one breast semi full and drain the other, this way I can save the pumped milk from one for storage while keeping the other aside in case my little guy needs it? Any advice would be much appreciated as I am still trying to figure out a balanced approach, thank you!
    2 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*bluepolka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:17 PM
    Hi everyone, Although I've seen a number of posts about nipple shield weaning, I'm just not convinced my baby can actually let go of the shield at some point of time:( He was born 8 weeks early and was bottle fed in the NICU. For a long time in the NICU I Tried breast feeding him but he just couldn't latch because (1) he was preemie (so they said) (2) I have flat nipples Anyways, the LC sent me home with a nipple shield. And he's been feeding fine with it. I absolutely want to wean him off now because my supply is getting lesser. but he wants NOTHING to do with my bare nipple. It isn't even that flat anymore. I guess he hates its texture? Compared to the firm nipple shield. He puts the nipple in his mouth and pulls his head back and out comes the nipple. He may take 2 sucks sometimes, but looks really confused/annoyed. He eventually ( very quickly) gets fussy and I insert the shield :( My question is, did your older babies behave in a similar manner while attempting to wean them? Should I continue to preserve? Do they at some age gain a little maturity where they can finally suckle without it? What age did your little ones change their attitude towards the shield? I'm just looking for support and cheer leaders o gues. 'Cod everyone banck home blames me for this sitisuon :(
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 PM
    The nursing pattern you describe sounds entirely normal for a child who is in the weaning process. That is a process that can last for a long time. Weaning is a two way process, so of course, while child reduces overall nursing frequency, milk production gradually reduces. That is how weaning happens. Obviously you make less now than you did when your child was relying on breastfeeding for food and was nursing much more frequently, that is part of weaning. But what is happening that you think your production is dropping in the sense it is a problem? Are you wishing your child would nurse more often on the low frequency days, or less often on the high? Personally I took a herbal galactagogue supplement when I felt a bit tapped out when my youngest was a toddler and she was nursing a lot and I felt as if I could not keep up production wise. It helped. I am sure pumping might help increase your production, and there is no reason to not pump if that is something you want to do. On the other hand, there is no reason you have to do it if you would rather not. Nature understands what it is doing most of the time. Meaning, I think another way to look at what is happening is that your child is weaning, and so nurses less. The she ups the nursing frequency, at least in part, to increase your production so she can get more. Then she gets busy with other things, and does not nurse as much...and the cycle repeats, and eventually this will result in complete weaning when she...
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 PM
    Hi momma.d and welcome! Many moms have gone back to work and continued to breastfeed for a long time. Yes, 6 weeks is a pretty short leave, but by understanding what the issues are that typically cause breastfeeding to end before mom would have otherwise liked, and taking the precautions necessary to avoid those, you can expect to continue to nurse your child as long as you like. My first suggestion is to do everything you can to get breastfeeding off to a great start. This is probably the single most important factor in breastfeeding success. This means, learn everything you can now about how to avoid problems in the early days, and if you have problems, get effective help immediately. Breastfeeding help is best provided by a very well trained and experienced lactation consultant and/or a volunteer peer counselor like a La Leche League Leader. I do not know how much help or support you got with your first baby as far as nursing goes, but obviously your experience there with establishing a good milk production and can be drawn on as well. Just be aware that the specifics can vary quite a bit when it comes to nursing rather than pumping. I know you do not have much time, but here is what I suggest. Get a hold of a copy of The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (8th edition) and read the first 4-6 chapters to start, reading more as needed and there is time. Since you are already an experienced mom, you can skip any parts that do not apply to you or you already know...
    7 replies | 136 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:34 PM
    My 2 1/2 old daughter has nursing up and downs. This is what I call it when she wants to nurse 4-6 times a day and then only once or twice a day. I had never breastfeed this long before. My older two boys I only nursed 12-14 months, so I don't know what to expect with my youngest now. I have actually planned to nurse her till 3 or 4 if she wants to. So all this unexpected nursing ups and downs is confusing. It seems like if she doesn't nurse much for a couple of days, then she gets annoyed when she wants to nurse more again, but my supply has dropped. What do I do? My supply is steady dropping and I don't know if I should try to pump when she doesn't nusre much to try to keep my milk in for when she does want to nusre more? Any suggestions or information in what I am dealing with?
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:03 PM
    Thanks!!!
    2 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 AM
    It's fine to eat iron-rich foods and supplement with formula. You won't overdose your child on iron that way. Do you want to be supplementing? Or would you prefer to breastfeed exclusively? If you would like to breastfeed exclusively, or even to think about exclusive breastfeeding, we will be more than happy to talk through the nuances of weaning off of supplements and milk allergies, even if it involves a long backstory! For the record, spit-up is completely normal in 4 month-old babies. It's not happening because of allergies, or because baby is overeating at the breast (that doesn't happen). It's all about babies having short esophagi (less distance for milk to travel in order to get back into the mouth), spending a lot of time on their backs (gravity is not helping keep stomach contents down), and having relatively weak muscle sphincters at the opening to their stomach (much easier for stomach contents to slip past than when sphincter is well-developed). In my experience, spit-up also tends to increase in frequency when the baby becomes more mobile- all that rolling and squirming jostles the baby's tummy and makes spit-up more likely.
    1 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:59 AM
    Electric pumps can be so expensive. :( Since you were doing well with hand expression, I would simply start hand expressing as much as possible after feedings. If you can buy a manual pump, I would do that as well. They don't work as well as electric pumps and often are less effective than hand expression, but they are still worth a try.
    12 replies | 450 view(s)
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