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  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 03:19 AM
    Hi puja Am a working Indian mom of 22 month son. And this is how the outline's my son's solid journey: 1. Started solids at 7 month, with soft Peach, pears, mango, banana fruits, graduated to rice+lentil gruel with ghee at 8 month. 2. Started with finger foods like: small sticks of roasted potato, sweet potato, carrot, cucumber. 3. Introduced cerals like wheat chapati, bread at 10,months 4. 11 months introduced dairy like curd (which he loved) cheese. 5. 12 months he started liking spicy stuff,,so ate curries, chicken eggs etc 6. 15 months he started drinking whole milk.
    13 replies | 681 view(s)
  • @llli*jazzy's Avatar
    Today, 02:16 AM
    I don't have any practical advice, but just wanted to encourage you to hang in there. 2 of my 7 children had milk transfer issues resulting in low weight gain, and I was told to only give bottles for a time. I exclusively pumped and bottle-fed them, putting them to the breast once or twice a day to keep them latching. At around 2-3 months, I was able to transition back to nursing full-time just like I did with my other children. I hated exclusively pumping, and it was one of the hardest things I've ever done - even the second time around. I hated every minute, and I was so exhausted. I wanted to quit every day. But it was worth it to get to the point of full-time nursing again, and now all of that dreaded pumping is just a distant memory. It is hard, but you can do it. See if you can find a good LC to walk you thru it. I found a good one on the 3rd try, and there is no way I could thank her enough. Wish I could give you a big hug. Hang in there, mama!
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:26 AM
    If baby were not gaining at least half a pound a week, block feeding/reducing milk production would probably not be appropriate. The suggestion to encourage baby to nurse more often has nothing to do with a concern baby is not gaining well, I assumed baby was gaining very well if you are needing to reduce your milk production. It really does help with the flow if the breast is relieved a bit more often and that is where that suggestion comes from. Even if baby is only taking a bit at a time. Everything I suggested are tried and true ways for dealing with/lessening OP and fast letdown. Not everything is going to work in every case, and when it comes to OP, as mommal says, it can take a while for milk production to decrease. However I do suggest continue to try those things I suggested. They cannot hurt and may eventually help. Have you had a consult with an IBCLC since leaving the hospital? It may be that your baby is having some difficulty with latch and this is making it even harder for baby to handle the milk flow. It is also possible that you have very extreme hyperlactation and need additional help figuring it out. I hope those articles about block nursing were helpful.
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*niklas.sarah's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:05 PM
    Well I knew it was coming but it still hurts. Elizabeth only gained 3oz in 7 days. Doc said it is not enough and labeled her failure to thrive. I was instructed to only give bottles now for every feeding, and to make half of the feeds formula only. I am only allowed to nurse if she is un satisfied after an 1.5 bottle. Doc said keep pumping but it is heartbreaking to not nurse my baby. I want to do what is best, so hopefully this will work. We are scheduled to see an OT next week as well as doc for more weight checks. This is all so hard:cry
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    :ita with MaddieB!
    5 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:03 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. I know all new moms scrutinize every single diaper, but I think it pays to step back a bit and look at trends. If your baby is still pooping green, speckled poops a week from now, then we have a trend and maybe we should start talking about what, if anything, is causing it. Until then, just watch the baby's demeanor (is he generally happy, generally acting like feedings are sufficient?) and his output. If his daily diaper tally is normal, then in all likelihood this is just a temporary and inexplicable departure from yellow poops.
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    3 months is right when a lot of moms start to describe what I think of as "nursing quirks", for lack of a better term. It's often stuff just like what you describe- baby acting fussy at the breast, latching on but then pulling off and acting fussy. It's hard to say why these quirks develop- sometimes they are related to flow speed (too fast/too slow), sometimes to bottle preference (in a baby who is getting bottles), sometimes they are just a temporary developmental stage. I personally think the best things you can do are: - Avoid bottles and pacifiers as much as possible. That way baby has to get all his needs- food and comfort- met at the breast. More nursing practice usually = less quirky behavior. - Be patient with the baby- he's still learning how to get his needs met at the breast, how to stimulate the flow of milk he prefers... Even if you do nothing, time will probably solve this problem as he masters the art of breastfeeding.
    1 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    Are the poops also larger or more liquidy or the same consistency but different color? I am wondering if baby is transferring milk better and just getting more milk at once. Also if feedings were spaced out more than normal due to all that is going on, it is possible it might make baby get more "foremilk" all at once. This is not the same as not enough hindmilk, which is actually not a real issue as much as people try to say it is. All milk has plenty of fat for a baby. Formilk is a bit higher in lactose, so lots of that and sometimes causes green poops. I suspect the black drops are from ingested blood and nothing to worry about. You not eating for a day and "too little" hindmilk, are actually non-issues. They are not going to cause health issues in baby and they are not going to cause green poop, that is for sure. Some meds do carry possible, usually very mild side effects for baby to be looked for, but most do not, and I am pretty sure gastrointestinal issues are not related to those meds. But you can call infant risk next week to be sure. Green poop is within the norm for poop look. Also a virus or something might cause temporary green poop.
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mom2jesserfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:16 PM
    My 12 week old son for almost a week now has been fussing at the breast. He will be hungry, latch on strongly, then begin to fuss, flail his arms and kick his legs after eating for 5 minutes. I know there is enough milk as it comes out the sides of his mouth and he's having adequate wet and poopy diapers. I don't know what is causing his upset. I've tried different positions with the same result. I think when he's nursing, he's getting tired and then it starts. :huh I haven't changed anything in my diet. He seems a little gassy at times, but other than that, I don't know what could be going on. He wants to nurse but then gets upset once he's latched on. I pull him off and he cries to nurse. Any help or ideas? :cry
    1 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:08 PM
    My LO is 3.5 weeks old and has had the classic yellow, seedy poop up until yesterday. His poops are now medium-dark/olive green and less seedy, with black specks and streaks. I did have to start Diflucan yesterday for yeast mastitis, and I've also recently started Zoloft for PPD. He had some laser frenectomies on Wednesday and was on children's Tylenol for about a day. I was also super stressed yesterday and was hardly able to eat anything. I had a blood blister on my nipple that I noticed at like 2 am and LO must have drank some of my blood? Could all/any of this lead to the green, mucous-y poops? He nurses well and I'm pretty sure he gets enough hind milk. Could my not eating much for a day have affected the fat content of my milk?
    2 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:54 AM
    Well I am glad to hear things seem to be improving! I certainly hope you can let go of the idea you have mutilated your child. While I think the evidence indicates that sometimes tongue tie and lip tie can be present with no actual need for frenotomy, and that sometimes frenotomy might appear indicated but then actually does not help in some cases, I would also very much disagree that frenotomy is ever mutilation unless of course the practitioner makes a serious error on where and how far to cut.
    5 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:50 AM
    And the pain was bad enough that I remember having to take something stronger than advil in order to stand breastfeeding, and I normally steer clear of pain meds that make me constipated. ETA: my daughter also had no signs of thrush at any point - except perhaps a mild diaper rash. The pediatrician checked her mouth and didn't see anything. I even had my milk cultured for bacterial mastitis, which came back negative. Yeast mastitis can be sneaky - I had no idea it could be so painful, too. Thank god for Diflucan - I would have quit breastfeeding without it.
    4 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:42 AM
    This sounds like when I had yeast mastitis while nursing my daughter. I felt sharp, stabbing pains (almost like "zings") that seemed to radiate deep into my breasts - I'd feel them during nursing and for s while after. My nipples also stung and it was uncomfortable wearing clothes over them. The doctor initially prescribed Nystatin suspension for my LO and told me to apply clortrimazole to my nipples after nursing (and to rinse them before nursing). This was unsuccessful and the stabbing only got worse. Finally we tried oral Diflucan for me (baby gets some through your milk) - a loading dose day 1 and then two weeks. I felt MUCH better within 3 days and was pain free by two weeks. However, it came back within days and I ended up doing *another* two weeks. That finally did the trick and I never got thrush again. I started taking probiotics every day and ate raw fermented foods like it was my job to help prevent future infections.
    4 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 AM
    Update: it's now day 2 after the procedure and LO is nursing better. He is no longer chomping at my breast!!! For the first time since my milk came in I haven't had any clogged up ducts - I think the clampdown was affecting his ability to drain the ducts. He also doesn't seem to struggle so hard to stay on the breast, either. I still have to compress the left breast a bit, but that one has the flatter nipple and was always more trouble. I'm cautiously hoping the positive tend continues...
    5 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:01 AM
    Is this LC board certified? And what is her experience prior to and since becoming an IBCLC- do you know? Look I am not an IBCLC. I hate second guessing people. I was not there and do not know the whole story. Lots of times there is just a communication breakdown somewhere. Also iirc, the LC believes that baby needs further frenotomy and maybe that is why she is concentrating on this path that baby is incapable of a good suck. But to me it makes perfect sense that a 3 month old, especially one who is used to being bottle fed, is not going to suck consistently on someone's finger. Milk does not come out of fingers and this baby is well aware of that. Suck reflex and suck strength is something you can test this way somewhat in a brand newborn. But a 3 month old? Also, in the normal course of things, when a baby nurses, they suck a bit, wait for milk to flow, then suck again. That is the normal pattern. So "inconsistent" sucking is actually normal in that sense. I am not saying the info gained this way is not useful, I am saying that imo it is not enough overall information to make a firm diagnosis. You did nothing wrong. Again I think that part of what is going on is that you were undermined by pressure to supplement without better help from the start in figuring what the problem was. Not saying there was not an issue with gain, maybe there was. But I think something has not been handled well here by the people who are supposed to help you. I do not think you are...
    14 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:21 AM
    Block feeding takes diffent amounts of time to work in different moms. Some moms will find that supply responds in a few days, for others it can take weeks of putting up with fullness before supply starts to go down. And because supply tends to fluctuate from day to day, you may find that oversupply comes and goes for some time before finally subsiding. I don't think it's at all surprising that you're feeling full/engorged soon after feeding. It's only been 3 days, and your body has trained itself to make a lot of milk, relative to what your baby actually needs.
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:18 AM
    Don't kick yourself for not being "adamant" about exclusively breastfeeding. When you are in a difficult situation, and medical advice is steering you towards bottles and supplements, it's VERY hard to know what to do. Often it's only in retrospect that you can identify something you could have or should have done differently. And I don't know that it's clear that you should have done things differently. You might have done everything absolutely right. Unfortunately, doing everything right is still no guarantee of breastfeeding going smoothly!
    14 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:06 AM
    Baby is not jaundiced and weight gain is normal, he actually jumped a percentile recently - maybe we are supplementing too much. LC placed her finger in his mouth and let him suck. According to her he occasionally sucked a bit then did not -that was 10 days ago- this is how she concluded poor and uncoordinated suction. I am not sure why he has poor coordination. Maybe it is to do with his tongue tie. Maybe it is to do with high palate. I don't dispute the fact that bottles played a part which I am regreting so much. I should have stuck with breast, I should have been adamant but I did not. I started putting him on breast more often. I started using the pump to get the milk running then put him on breast so he does not get frustrated while waiting - so that he can trust bf again. This didnt work today, he wanted the bottle. I will keep trying. I don't usually give up easily. Even if I can't exclusively bf, I will still continue as long as I can. If he does not want to bf again, then I will make sure he still gets breast milk.
    14 replies | 490 view(s)
  • @llli*angelpoo11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:56 AM
    I have tried reclining and nursing laying down and it doesn't help. If I'm expressing by hand, I get continuous streams of milk for like 30 seconds and it sprays everywhere. I have to latch and unlatch like a million times during a feed and she gets very upset and starts choking anyway. Unlatching her when I have a letdown doesn't help either. Maybe because she's a preemie, she's very sleepy and very uninterested in nursing unless she's very hungry. I tried to encourage her to nurse every 2 hours but she is hardly interested. She drinks a bit better when she is hungry so I don't try to force her. she is gaining just fine though. She is gaining at least half a pound a week. Nursing her is a struggle and we both often end in tears. How long until the block feeding starts to work? Is it normal for me to be engorged so quickly after a feed? It's day 3 of the block feeding and I'm at my wits end here...
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 AM
    Have you tried a course of antibiotics? Or treating this as thrush?
    4 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:37 AM
    That sounds unpleasant. Since this is an unusual problem, I have several questions if you do not mind. Have you ruled out vasospasm? the timing of the pain seems odd for vasospasm but the intensity of the pain sounds like vasospasm. What makes you think the pain is related to latch? It sounds completely unrelated since the pain comes on so long after the nursing session ends. How many times total each day is milk removed from the breasts? 2 times for nursing, how many times for pumping? When you pump, how much milk do you extract in how much time?
    4 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*kaf12's Avatar
    May 26th, 2016, 10:07 PM
    Hi new friends! I'm about to hit my 11-month anniversary of breastfeeding my little boy. For about two months, I've had very sharp and painful sensations after nursing. It starts about 30 minutes after I'm done and lasts for 60-90 minutes before easing up. First I just noticed in the morning. Then it was after every time I nursed. Now I've started to notice it after pumping, also. And it HURTS. Like, so much that I've wondered if it's worse than contractions. I'm trying to keep going, in hopes that it's just a phase, but I don't know how much more I can take. I've tried switching positions, adjusting his latch, warm compresses, hot showers, Advil... you name it. Some of this has helped but not long-term. The doctor said my son has no signs of thrush. And he's 11 months old, so if it's a latch issue, it won't be easy to fix at this stage. Additional background: I'm down to two sessions a day (usually) plus bottle feeding from a frozen stash. Had some overproduction issues which have mostly evened out, but I still get clogs about once a week. And yes, he's been teething for about 5 months already. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Any recommendations? I'm about to call it quits, but I feel bad since he does love it. (And I used to, also!) Thanks in advance!
    4 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 26th, 2016, 07:12 PM
    First I suggest try to relax. As long as baby is gaining normally from nursing at the breast, and mom is not in pain from poor latch or plugs or engorgement, there is most likely absolutely nothing wrong with baby or breastfeeding. Things might be tweaked to make life easier, but it is unlikely to be anything serious. For the 5 week old, I wonder if you have noticed having a particularly fast flow? The other thing I wonder is if this issue is happening at some particular time of day? 5 weeks is the typical high point for milk production. Additionally, 5 weeks is right in the typical window for the onset of colic. By definition, colic means that for part of the day, baby is upset and not consolable or not easily consolable. This often means that baby is not as readily able to be consoled via nursing during colicky times. If the pacifier is helping, I think that is fine. Just be very careful that the pacifier does not interfere with nursing frequency at all. Otherwise, here is what I suggest pretty much for any age. If you have had baby on a nap, nighttime or nursing schedule, stop. Offer to nurse whenever you like and at any cues. If baby will not nurse, resist the urge to bottle or cup feed as a substitute. A missed feeding here and there never hurt a healthy, otherwise normally gaining baby. Try and keep trying the ideas here for gently encouraging baby to nurse: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ Again, relax. These types of...
    4 replies | 218 view(s)
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