Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Clear All
  • @llli*mommele's Avatar
    Today, 09:22 PM
    So over a month since my last post. Went to a lactation specialist back then. Things have actually gotten worse. Prior to appt I was feeding only one side at each feeding and then alternating to the next at the next feeding. She suggested to offer both sides at every feeding....which gave the injured nipple less time to heal and therefore the whole is now much larger. Today I'm feeling occasional shooting sharp pain in that breast randomly ( not while nursing). There continues to be no puss or discharge. But that nipple is redder and irritated. I plan on making another appt but I'm worried about the option of antibiotics and thrush. What is thrush exactly?! I'm just so tired of having to deal with pain every time she latches on that side for the past 3 months. Feels like this is never going to end :(
    5 replies | 589 view(s)
  • @llli*gold86en's Avatar
    Today, 09:12 PM
    When I went back to work full time after my maternity leave, my DD could not be soothed by my husband or my mother ( who watched her when hubby was at work) She would cry her little eyes out for hours on end, daily. She also refused drinking out of the numerous bottles and different nipples we tried...We tried to introduce a pacifier (as she was 12 weeks by then) hoping the sucking would help soothe her while I wasn't around to nurse. She refused those as well. We tried at least 4 different brands/styles. So even if you want to try getting baby to use a paci for comfort or to give your nipples a break, baby may have other ideas ;) But now that we are past that stage, I am really glad we never had to deal with a binky.
    6 replies | 161 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:57 PM
    Only eliminate one thing at a time. I think mommal posted a link about elimination diets above
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*gold86en's Avatar
    Today, 08:50 PM
    No one knows their babies better than mamas... that being said, trust your instincts, and if you don't mind nursing your LO throughout the night, by all means continue. My LO is 2 1/2 and we still nurse sometimes once, sometimes twice, and occasionally not at all throughout the night, and it doesn't bother me one bit. We also bedshare though, so all I have to do is roll over and adjust my shirt, then doze until she's finished, and I roll back over. Neither one of us ever wakes up fully. Every mother, baby pair is different, and what works for one, may not be ideal for another, but all in all it is up to you and your baby - no one else. You are doing great, mama - ignore the parenting advice - you don't need it ;)
    8 replies | 157 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:49 PM
    I would definitely get an at the breast supplementer. I used a Medela SNS. Get baby checked for tongue/lip ties How does nursing feel? If money is really tight, if you are in the US, and on WIC, they have breastfeeding support/help in most locations. If you are not on WIC most medical insurance covers breastfeeding help. My LO is 6 1/2 months now and we finally got off all supplements shortly before he turned 6 months. That probably would have happened a lot sooner had I seen an IBCLC back in the beginning. My signature has my threads if it would help to hear some one elses story.
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*westcoaster's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 PM
    Thanks, guys. I tried the warm bath today to no avail (although he did enjoy it!). Still doesn't seem to be bothered. I probably will call tomorrow just to check in. I do hope he goes soon, just so we're not in continuous watching mode.
    4 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*smp0808's Avatar
    Today, 08:41 PM
    Thank you all for the words of wisdom and support. I really don't feel ready to wean so I think I'd like to try an elimination diet. Any great resources to make that as easy as possible?
    5 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:40 PM
    I agree that if nursing feels good and baby is gaining well, then it really doesn't matter how long or short or how often you nurse as long as you nurse on demand and offer to nurse if you feel it has been long enough even if baby hasn't cued. In fact nursing frequently is better for your supply. If Dr gives you more grief, get her to refer you to an IBCLC for qualified breastfeeding support instead of giving advice that will harm your supply and probably leave baby hungry by making him wait between feedings.
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:20 PM
    I actually did a version of this where I would put the pumped milk into the fridge sealed up and put a new bottle onto the pump parts and put the pump parts into the fridge as well and I would actually pump several times before washing everything. I often wouldn't have had time to wash even every other time since baby was taking so long to nurse, by the time I pumped it was pretty much time to nurse again and then pump again (even with using the at the breast supplementation I had NO time for a while there.)
    4 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:44 PM
    i'm the one with the three week time, my daughter went at least 21 days once. It may have been longer, I do not know for sure because we were not counting at first. I was practically begging the pediatrician to suggest a glycerin suppository but they said don't do it and that the office record was 21 days, so my daughter was not the only one! She was not constipated or uncomfortable, and when she went it was fine. Just, a lot. but I would definitely agree talk to doctor if you are concerned.
    4 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*juliasmomma's Avatar
    Today, 07:41 PM
    Thank you! That's kind of what I was planning to do at a year, emphasize the solids more. I really didn't expect him to start weaning yet though... He kinda caught me off guard :) My daughter didn't really drop feedings, I weaned her very slowly. At 12 mos (if I remember right) she was nursing about 6x a day, pretty similar to what he was doing before. He seemed more attached to nursing than she was so I'm kind of surprised that he's dropping feedings. So this is uncharted territory for me! I was hoping that we could keep all his regular (6) feedings & just add more solids when he turns one...I guess thus is baby led weaning! :) thank you for your help!
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:33 PM
    have you looked at the book Making More Milk? it is more specifically about milk production and more recent than the NMC.
    4 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:27 PM
    I think Erins ideas are good. Is it possible this is a case of formula being thrown at the problem instead of finding out what, exactly, the problem(s) are? While of course supplementing is appropriate when needed, supplementing is not going to solve whatever the underlying issue(s)are, and in fact, will often make those issues worse if supplementing is not done with great care and with careful steps taken to prevent low milk production or breast refusal. So, is the underlying issue low milk production, and if so, what factors might be causing that? Is it a nursing (milk transfer) problem, and if so, what is the problem? Without knowing what is going on, it is very difficult to address the issues effectively. Of course you can try to figure this out for yourself, but these are the questions an experienced breastfeeding helper can help you answer. It does not have to be an IBCLC, as Erin notes. however, if you look at the cost of formula feeding for a year, you may see that often the cost is not so bad in comparison. Baby appears to have gained well above the norm when you were supplementing the first time. Were you also nursing unrestricted at that time? I wonder if part of the problem is the All or nothing mentality. First baby is supplemented and gains tremendously fast. Then baby is suddenly taken off ALL Supplements. Baby loses !? weight nursing only, so supplements are brought back on. But why in the world was it suggested to restrict your baby's nursing?...
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:55 PM
    My experience with pumping was very positive. I pumped around 8-10x per day using a hospital-grade pump with correctly sized shields, and had a marked increase in supply within a few days. You estimate you're making 16 oz per day, and the highly reliable kellymom.com says that babies need just 19-30 oz per day. You're close to having all you need! So my personal opinion is that before you throw in the towel with the pump, you give it everything you have. Some things that can make pumping easier: - Keep a large basin of soapy water by the sink, and throw in used bottles/pump parts as necessary. I found it less challenging to do 1-2 big wash-ups per day than a million little ones. - Get a second set of pump parts so that you don't need to wash everything as often. - After pumping, leave the pump screwed onto the bottle and pop the whole thing in the fridge. When you need to pump again, you can reuse the set-up and pump new milk over the old milk. My LC said I could do this once before washing everything again.
    4 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 06:17 PM
    Here are some ideas to consider: 1.) In-person help: If an IBCLC is not an option (or a really pricey option) consider reaching out to a local LLL leader. Though these ladies can't assist with clinical issues, they do have a lot of experience and knowledge with normal breastfeeding issues. If there is not a local meeting in the next few days, many leaders are available over the phone. When a meeting does come around, try to go! If not for any advice or ideas, then it is worth it just for the comraderie! 2.) Supplementation: if supplementation is necessary, have you considered using an at-breast supplementer (like Lact Aid or Medela SNS)? If not, and bottles are being used, are you familiar with paced feeding? 3.) Pumping: Pump output is not always a good indicator of supply. That said, the pump is going to work best when it is in tip too shape, and the flanges are fit correctly. My little one is waking up, so that's all I have for now! Best of luck!
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 06:16 PM
    around the time the first rash started I had used some of my flushable wet wipes as we ran out of the pampers sensitive wipes. The rash went away while I continued using the sensitive wipes after re-stocking. I've never quite figured out how to manage the logistics of wetting multiple cloths to deal with a real messy situation at the changing table since there is no sink in reach and a container of water in reach of the changing station wouldn't remain full past the first change I fear, my LO may be small but he is strong and highly developed in the motor skills department for his age (read almost nothing on changing station is safe from grab, kick or sweep/roll.) I've just given him some yellow squash tonight, great way to add moisture to the meal, he seemed to like it. Was good since the chicken was a bit dry. I'm currently trying to figure out how to cook ahead and freeze single meals for us to eat during the week because I'm finding it tricky to fix dinner, do the chores and nurse all at basically the same time without putting baby down for more than a few minutes that time of day. In the mornings he is usually happy to spend some time in the saucer or one of the activity filled baby cages but after about 2 or 3 he better be sound asleep if put down more than momentarily. I wind up making dinner to him fussing and crying and everything either drys out or gets cold while we nurse right before dinner. When DH is home he cooks which makes things so much...
    21 replies | 878 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 04:51 PM
    http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/perceived-insufficient-milk/ http://kellymom.com/parenting/parenting-faq/fussybaby/ Try all of the tips in the link to help with a fussy evening. It's definitely NOT always related to supply. I have a huge supply, enough to nurse my toddler and my six month old while the baby gains above average amounts of weight, yet my youngest still cried all the time as a newborn. He magically just calmed down around the three month mark. The second link explains why so many mothers believe they cannot produce enough milk. Read through the resources at the bottom too. There are physical changes, like less full breasts, that freak many moms out at the three month mark as well as the four month fussies right after, that can cause perceived low milk supply.
    29 replies | 1109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:41 PM
    this is the kind of advice that destroys breastfeeding. it is simply incorrect to suggest there is some ideal time frame for length of nursing session or time between sessions. When trying to increase milk production, more frequent nursing is often more important than length of session. I would suggest, ask your doctor what her immediate concern is. If the concern is that baby is not gaining fast enough, there are ways to try to help baby nurse longer or more actively you can try. Namely, switching sides during the feeding and/or breast compressions. And some babies DO need to be helped to stay awake at the breast especially in the early days. If, after such steps are taken, it appears clear that baby is not getting enough to gain well while nursing frequently, it is possible there is some issue with baby's ability to transfer milk, but that is not solved by scheduling but by addressing whatever is going on with latch that may be causing a milk transfer issue. It is hard to know if there is any reason to be concerned as baby is only one week old and had a pretty dramatic initial drop in weight, so baby has a lot of ground to make up. In other words, I am not suggesting anything is wrong at all! I just wonder what it is your pediatrician is concerned about. There are two major breastfeeding issues-baby not gaining well, and/or nursing is painful to mom. If neither of those are going on, all is probably fine.
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 04:33 PM
    Congratulations! You're doing wonderful, mama! Sorry your doctor has made you feel unsure when everything is going so well. Your instincts are right. There's absolutely no reason to change anything that you are doing. Your supply is definitely going to be fine nursing that often! He's also obviously getting enough or he wouldn't be gaining weight back from the lowest known weight. Go ahead and relax again. Enjoy that new baby!
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 04:28 PM
    I agree with Mommal. I think you seem to have this idea that you are doomed to have things not work when you go back to work. But I am pretty hopeful that your need to supplement will be minimal if at all. It's called the "Witching hours" whether you breastfeed or not. I think that will an established supply, a nursing baby, and a regular pumping schedule you really could be just fine.
    29 replies | 1109 view(s)
  • @llli*kmp0511's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 PM
    So this is my first post, I'd appreciate any and all advice. My son was born 8/22 after a traumatic few days (non reactive NST led to induction, two inductions failed over two days, leading to c-section). The following hours didn't go to plan, either (no skin to skin, no help initiating breastfeeding). I nursed him while at the hospital, but the nurses there told me I was nursing him too much, so I let up but he would scream. 5 days old, our pediatrician told us to supplement because he had gone from 7lb 15oz to 7lb 3oz. I didn't want to, but I figured the doctor new best. He gained 10oz in 3 days so they told us to stop supplementing. I did, and he started nursing for hours on end. He lost 5 oz after a few days so they told me to supplement again and not to let him nurse for hours. So i did what they said and now I'm quickly losing my supply. I now take fenugreek 3500mg/day, mother's milk tea x3/day, and oatmeal x2/day. I also try to pump between feedings, but hardly get anything from pumping. He's losing his desire to nurse, we're lucky if he latches for five minutes, all the while screaming for his bottle. The last option is an IBCLC, it's just really expensive here so I haven't met with one yet. Anyone have any advice on how to get him interested in nursing again? I'll try anything, I don't want to quit.
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*davidsmomma's Avatar
    Today, 03:34 PM
    I have a newborn 8 days old. I nursed my first for over 2 yrs and although successful, really struggled in the beginning. I was so happy because everything with this LO seemed to be going so well. He latches without problem, nurses often (16x yesterday), has frequent wet diapers and bm (7 bm and 8 wet diapers yesterday) and gained back 6 oz. While he is not back at birth weight, he is now 6 lbs 9 oz from 6 lb 3 (was 6 lb, 14 at birth). Because of my previous struggles, I am not as confident as I should be after nursing my first for over 2 yrs. At our 1 week check his pediatrician wanted to know how long he nurses at each breast each time and I told her it varies from 5-25 min total, sometimes 10 min or so each breast, sometimes he only wants one for 9 min, etc. I also said he nurses often but varying from every 1-3 hrs, most often about every 1 and 1/2 to 2 hrs. She said I need to get him to nurse every 2-3 for 15 min each breast every time or I may not maintain a good supply and he may not get enough. I asked how I was supposed to force him on a schedule and to force him for said amount of time and she said mess with him to keep him awake and nursing. Doesn't seem right to me. I feel we are doing well but now I'm questioning myself. Looking for advice/ support. He seems satisfied and comes off nipple on own. When I offer other breast he sometime stakes it and when he doesn't he sticks out lips and turns away like no mommy I'm done.
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Today, 03:19 PM
    I wasn't a fan of using one and when I did try in the early days she spit it out anyway. There were a couple of months that were a couple restless nights of wanting to eat but they stopped relatively quickly. My daughter didn't/doesn't have a particularly strong desire to suck away but she uses her thumb if needed. When she sucks on her thumb it is her way of communicating either hunger or tired or used to be pooping too. We are happy with that! I find that pacifiers are overused. I don't really see why kids need them all of the time.
    6 replies | 161 view(s)
  • @llli*davidsmomma's Avatar
    Today, 03:07 PM
    I nursed my first with a shield and really struggled with it because I so badly wanted to without it. Everyone kept encouraging me to try without it and suggested I may have low supply as a result. While I really wanted to wean from the shield my son refused to nurse without it. Once I got over my own negative feelings about the shield (embarrassment, frustration and fear of not enough milk) our nursing relationship improved greatly. I am happy to say I nursed my son untitled he was 2 yrs and 3 mo old and only stopped because I was 8 mo preggo. I used the shield right up til the end. So far I have not needed a shield with my newborn and don't plan to but I am thankful I was able to nurse my first so long because of it. Good luck mama!
    4 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 PM
    " Many times he'll latch and suck a few times, or for a minute or so (not long enough for the milk to let down), but then refuses to keep going. Does that count as a feeding? I don't really count it unless my milk lets down & he gets a good amount." ... I wouldn't count that as a feeding either. Since he is pretty much one year old I would follow this guideline...Starting at a year old a child will require more nutrients and calories than what breastmilk alone provides. In my opinion if he is eating well for solids meals and you are breastfeeding four or five times a day, that is still great! This is what I would do - Perhaps see how it goes another week, and offer to nurse per usual times. If diapers are drier and you feel uncomfortable with that then offer some water too so for peace of mind. If he continues to nurse four or five times, I would up the food quantity. Was your DD similar? You had a very successful bf run there :clap
    2 replies | 101 view(s)
More Activity