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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:41 AM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread Weaning books in Weaning
    Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning and How Weaning Happens. They address weaning at any age including toddler years. Mothering Your Nursing Toddler is the classic guide to all aspects of nursing a child beyond age one. It includes an excellent chapter on gentle weaning.
    1 replies | 35 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:53 PM
    Survey says, scale error. Different scales (unless they moved the same scale from room to room, and if that was done that may impact the calibration?) And, balance scales are NOT the right kind of scales for weighing infants. Good digital infant scales are way more accurate. Not saying this is the entire issue necessarily, but I do think this could be causing at least part of it. You would not believe how much scale error can impact things.
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:41 PM
    Hi Elizabeth. I am so sorry you are ill. Have you confirmed that your have mastitis (a breast infection)? I am a little confused if you have the flu or if you have mastitis. Or both? Normal milk production does not stop on a dime. If baby was gaining normally exclusively nursing before you and baby were ill, there is really no reason to think your milk production would have plummeted to almost nothing with only a few days of illness or mastitis. Yes illness might cause a temporary milk production drop, but this is usually minor and short-lived. I do not know what exactly you mean when you say that you cannot pump much, many moms overestimate what they think they "should" be able to pump. But in fact pump output is not typically a good indication of milk production anyway. Baby is/has been ill and that could easily explain baby being fussy at the breast or changing nursing patterns and sleep patterns. Of course these change all the time anyway. Also many 3 month old babies get plenty to eat in 5 minutes at the breast. Additionally, 3 months is the age at which many moms think they are experiencing low production based on how their breasts feel and how baby behaves, even if they have not contended with illness. Almost always, this concern is an entirely false alarm. See article I will link below for more on this. You need your rest and to be as comfortable as possible. There is no reason for a nursing mom to avoid otc pain relievers/fever reducers, except...
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*isla.smommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:18 PM
    Looking for some good books to read regarding gentle weaning of a toddler that loves to nurse.
    1 replies | 35 view(s)
  • @llli*elizabethfawcett's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:06 PM
    Please advise me. I have a 13 week old 16 pound baby girl who is the light of my life. She is exclusivly breast feed. Monday I woke up with a very sore breast and a lump. Along with a high temp of 103 and a cold. Baby had a temp of 100.4. Her health got better but my went down hill. I started amoxicillin on Monday night along with Tylenol and Advil every four hours. Up to today: my milk has dwindled to almost nothing and it killing me. When she gets on she eats for a few minutes then gets fussy and pulls off. I have started pumping between feedings but I don't get much. She is probably getting five minutes and she needs ten. I'm trying water and I've stopped the Tylenol but I have to stay on the antibiotic. She barely slep all day I think bc she doesn't have a full belly. I just tried a formula bottle and she won't take it. Please advise.
    1 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*norajsmama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:56 PM
    It was a different room than our normal room, and the scales are not digital but the balance kind. Do those ever break I wonder? She was naked each time.
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*norajsmama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:53 PM
    Thanks for the reply! I can't think of anything that has changed in the past month. I have always eaten dairy and have no digestive issues. She does seem to be more bothered by the letdown than she used to be. But I can see it when it comes out when I pump and it does not look that strong so I have no idea what the problem is. So tonight after nursing her to sleep I pumped 2.5oz, usually I pump for 5-10 minutes when I pump. To me they felt totally empty so that was surprising. And baby was totally relaxed, hands open, limp body which to me says "I'm full!" I will definitely find a LC. And my instincts say to keep pumping in case it's a milk transfer issue... Don't want to impact my supply.
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:36 PM
    Sounds like a good plan. Just remember that practice bottles don't need to be given every day, and that they should be small. 1-2 oz is plenty. Any time you go a long stretch without removing milk, your body will interpret that as a sue to reduce supply somewhat. However, for many moms a single 5 hour stretch is not particularly problematic. Best way to deal with long stretches of no milk removal is generally to watch your body carefully for signs that supply is dropping. If it is, then those stretches are too much and you need to either nurse or pump during those intervals. The rule of thumb is that a baby will need around 1.5 oz per hour of separation from mom. Sometimes baby will take more or less than this amount, but if she always takes more it is a good idea to talk to her caregivers about overfeeding.
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:23 PM
    Think of foremilk and hindmilk as useful shorthand for a much more complex reality. The major problem with these terms- IMO- is that there are these weird parasitic concepts that attach to them- like the idea that foremilk is "low fat" and not satisfying, or green poop is caused by baby not consuming enough hindmilk. I think it can help to imagine yourself as a woman living a thousand years ago, who never worried about foremilk and hindmilk because she had never heard of them. Most of the day she hung out with the other village women, tending her goats or planting potatoes or whatever. The baby nursed whenever, and if the baby's poop was green, the mom didn't worry because she had seen plenty of other green-pooping babies who did just fine.
    6 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:15 PM
    :hug Of course you have the back-to-work blues! Nature intends for moms and babies to stay together. The problem here is society, which expects moms to rush back to the workplace long before they or their babies are generally ready (I say generally because there are, of course, some moms who cannot wait to race back to the office!).
    1 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:12 PM
    Any chance of scale error between the 1 and 2 month visits? Did the baby get weighed on 2 different scales, or was she weighed in the nude one time and dressed another?
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:09 PM
    :ita with the PP. In almost all cases, all you really need to do is to trust your body and to eat a decently healthy diet- no need to be extreme about it! Any prenatal vitamin is fine; they all contain pretty much the same thing and the only thing that really differentiates them is the marketing. If you want to make sure your DHA levels are what they should be, eat some seafood. There are plenty of low-mercury options. If you want your vitamin D levels to be what they should be, go outside and get some sun on your skin, no sunblock. For pale-skinned people, 20 minutes of sun exposure per day is generally sufficient to create sufficient vitamin D. If you happen to be a dark-skinned person living at a northern latitude, you may need more sun exposure or a vitamin D supplement. The same goes for your baby- sunshine is the best way to make vitamin D for most people. Regarding building your child's immunity, the best way to do that is to breastfeed. Breastmilk gives your child antibodies and immune-active compounds which coach his developing immune system to recognize the difference between harmful and non-harmful substances. It also contains a large portion of prebiotic oligosaccharides, which are there specifically to foster the development of a healthy gut flora. So there is no need to supplement him with prebiotics. The second best thing you can do for your child's immunity is to expose your child to plenty of dirt and germs. I don't mean that...
    5 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    I think you were smart to ask about seeing a lactation consultant and I would suggest pursuing that. Here is why. I am glad doctor is not alarmed, as this probably means she is seeing a baby she sees as overall healthy, and that is very good. But the fact is, a baby gaining one pound between age one month and age 2 months is quite slow gain. This is the time average gain is twice that, and after 2-3 months gain normally begins to slow. I have seen it time and again- doctors will be relaxed about slow gain at first, only to become alarmed at 3 to 4 months when gain becomes even slower. Unfortunately, by then it might be much harder to fix a breastfeeding problem if that was the cause of poor gain- and frankly, some kind of breastfeeding problem- either with your milk production (unlikely given your good pump output) or with how well baby is able to transfer milk at the breast or how often/long baby nurses- is far more likely a cause of poor gain than a dairy allergy. Another odd thing is that baby gained very well in the 3 weeks before that (between 5 day check and one month.) The difference in gain rate during month one and month 2 is very dramatic. So that makes me wonder, what happened that changed that? Did you introduce dairy to your diet when baby was a month old? Or did something else change at one month? An IBCLC can watch you and baby nurse and see if anything seems amiss. She can do a before and after nursing weight check to see if baby is transferring...
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:07 PM
    I know it is all soooo confusing! 13 years ago when I had my first baby, no one talked about hindmilk. They talked about other things that were nonsense, but not that. It has taken forever for me to understand that actually breastfeeding is not all that hard. It is natural. Mothers have been doing it for millions of years without many problems. But many realities of the modern world conspire to cause it to feel like a huge mystery. For one thing, many modern moms have never even seen a baby nursing before they have a baby. This would not have happened before, when mothers learned how to nurse from seeing mothers nursing babies their entire lives. While of course it is great and vital that we have breastfeeding experts to help mom who are struggling, sometimes all that expertise and studies leads to us thinking there are problems when there are none. Frankly I kind of wish no one had ever "discovered" that milk at the start of a feeding is less fatty and higher in lactose and gradually becomes more fatty as the feeding goes on. This is interesting, but has this information really helped anyone? Sadly it has actually been used to confuse and even cause moms to do things that are not good for breastfeeding. Presumably nature made it happen this way for a reason. In fact we know the reasons- babies need that thirst quenching and energy giving lactose early in the feeding. Somehow this got twisted into the idea babies might not get enough fat and we all have to be...
    6 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*gsfeli's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    My son is 2 1/2 years old. I am still nursing him during naps and at night. I love breastfeeding but this has become quite burdensome for me and is starting to put a strain on my marriage. I don't mind nursing him to sleep but when I put him down for a nap he will sleep for about 30 - 45 minutes before he wakes up to nurse and then will sleep nurse for up to 2 hours after that. Same thing happens at night. I know that he can sleep without nursing. I have had to leave him with a sitter over night before. However, that is not an option in this case and my husband is not able to step in and take over at bedtime because of his job. I don't have a crib. He shares a bed with his sister but refuses to sleep in it unless I nurse him to sleep first. Most of the time I end up sleeping in their bed with them instead of my own bed. I'm so tired because it's getting harder and harder to sleep while he is night nursing and this is taking much of my time away from many other important activities. We have tried gradual weaning (there is little to no more day time nursing except during naps). I have also tried cold turkey weaning (very unsuccessful). Not sure what to do.
    0 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*carmenoct24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:37 PM
    Ufff. It is very hard to get it out of my head the whole hindmilk and foremilk when all the reliable sources like Womanly Art of Breastfeeding and Kellymom and other sites talk about this. Anyway, I am reviewing WAB now... It´s not really clear, or at least not to me. Although I am starting to wonder about the too much foremilk at once (this is OALD, right?), which is something it mentions. Lately, she pops off the breast alot and has alot of spitup. I suppose I could try expressing before feeding her, but honestly, I am not good at recognizing hunger cues even though objectively I know what they are. Plus, I really have to work to pump. Meaning it takes me a awhile to get positioned right before the milk flows, which is wasted time when she is hungry. This breastfeeding thing is hard!!!! I really had no idea. I really believed the whole "it´s the most natural thing in the world" and would be easy. One almost needs a degree to breastfeed. Hahaha! Thank goodness these forums are here to help sift through all the information! WRT returning to work, I am lucky, I will go back only part time for awhile, I live literally two blocks from my office and my husband is the owner so I can pretty much do I want. I think I get overly protective of my supply because the first few weeks of BF were hard because my daughter lost weight for more than the first few days and so the pediatricians wanted me to give her formula to "catch up" and my husband was pressuring me to give her...
    6 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:19 PM
    Myth. In fact I call it the vampire myth because it will not die. What MIGHT cause green poops is not not enough hindmilk. It is "too much foremilk all at once." And that (the too much foremilk all at once) happens only in specific situations I will explain in a moment. I completely agree that the WAB - an excellent book in most respects- explains this in a very confusing way. All that talk of "not enough cheesecake" when that is not the problem at all. But I do suggest go back and reread that section. Unless my memory is faulty- and it may well be- They are not talking about a normal situation where baby is simply pooping green but there are no other issues. They are talking specifically about what can happen if mom is over-producing and/or baby is nursing infrequently and/or mom is timing baby at the breast and insisting baby take both sides ever nursing session, as it sounds like you might be doing? These are the things that might cause fast (aka forceful or over active) letdown, or oald, and THAT in turn might cause the "too much foremilk all at once" issue. If that is the case, then you can simply encourage baby to nurse more often and let baby decide if they want both sides at once or not. Also if the only "problem" is green poops, then that is not really a problem. As far as pumping to build a stash, that is fine. If you want to pump enough to increase your production, that may be fine as long as doing so does not cause issues for you or baby. Over...
    6 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:58 PM
    Ok, so there are some unusual things going on with this growth pattern. As always PLEASE check my math. Baby weighed in at an entire pound above birth weight at 2 weeks. This is very unusual, because typically a baby looses weight for a few days after being born, usually losing several ounces, then starts gaining about an ounce per day at day 4-6 or so. So 2 weeks weight checks are usually either about where birth weight was, or just a few ounces more, at most about a half pound more. So I wonder if the birth weight or the 2 week weight was off? It only really matters because if this is somehow making doctor assume that 50% is the normal gain rate for your baby, and it is not, he might be comparing percentiles incorrectly. There is nothing inherently "better" about a baby gaining on the 50% over the 25%. In the 6 weeks (about 42 days) from 2 weeks to 2 months, baby gained 4 pounds 5 ounces - or 69 ounces. So average gain for this period would have been again, an ounce a day- 42 ounces. So baby gained very rapidly during this time, 27 ounces more than average. There is nothing wrong with this, but often when a baby gains very rapidly in the early weeks, baby's normal gain slow down when it happens is more dramatic. 2 months to 3 months - baby gained about a pound over 30 days. So sometime after 2 months, baby started gaining MUCH more slowly than before. Leaving out the first two weeks (that gain was so unusual I have to think there was scale error) baby was...
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*mommadaw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:42 PM
    I'm not an expert so idk if it's a concern or not. Just sharing my experiences :). I would think if he's pooping okay the iron probably isn't affecting him
    5 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommadaw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:40 PM
    That could be. His pooping problems were trouble pooling. Excessive straining and grunting then only getting a little. Like for hours. Disrupting his sleep.
    5 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:38 PM
    I'm reading so many mixed things.. I want to start getting baby used to the bottle (once our thrush problem is gone). Here's my plan based on what I've read.. can you help me out with my questions? I plan to start at 4-5 weeks -I'll start with baby getting a small amount of milk from a bottle right after an evening feed just to get used to it... -Then pump half hour after morning feed daily so my husband can cover a night feed. Questions... - If I go 5 hours at night without feeding will my supply decrease? -How much should I pump for a 4-5 week old?
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*carmenoct24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:23 PM
    WRT color of poop. I have read so much that says if poop is green then it could be baby isn´t getting enough hindmilk, which has me a bit worried. Some things say it doesn´t matter especially if you are nursing frequently and for long enough (I nurse 9 times for 15 minutes on each side, that´s an approximation), but even in the Womanly Art of Breastfeeding it is mentioned. Maybe I have misunderstood? Am I pumping to build a small storage and for supply... I will be going back to work in 6 weeks. I know I still have lots of time, but I have read so much about supply problems once returning to work that I want to slowly work up to the level of pumping I will need and resolve any problems that I may have ASAP. Maybe I am being overly cautious, I just wanna make double sure not to put BF in jeopardy when I return to work.
    6 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*norajsmama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:36 PM
    My baby is two months old exactly, and she only gained 1lb in this past month. My pediatrician, who is really great and supportive of breast feeding, didn't seem overly concerned because my daughter's weight is still average for her age and she is off the charts for height (as in greater than the 99th percentile). So in this past month, her poops went from normal thick yellow to tons of mucous and green. She poops at least 4-6x per day, has huge blow outs, of this weird poop. It does seem to bother her when she goes. She has like 6-8 wet diapers a day. The Dr. suggested no dairy for a month for me, and then we will re-weigh her at 3 months. Does this makes sense as the only course of action? I asked about seeing an LC and she didn't seem to think it was necessary. The Dr. thinks that it is allergy related because her diaper output is great and she seems very happy, but that possibly she isn't fully absorbing the nutrients in the milk (going by the mucous in her poop and that she has so much green mucous poop every day). My baby is really happy, smiling, sleeps a normal amount and is generally very happy unless it's her fussy time from like 5pm-8pm. She is exclusively nursing, no bottles, we don't use a pacifier. She does prefer to sleep in the baby swing for naps (sleeps in bed with me at night) and I have tried offering nursing to sleep but it seems like she will only nurse to sleep for her fussy time at night and all during the night in bed with me. I pump 1-2x...
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*lc.aggie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:26 PM
    Weight check history: Birth- 6lb 15 oz 2 weeks- 7lbs 15 oz 2 mos- 12 lbs 6 oz 3 mos- 13 lbs 8 oz 4 mos- 14 lbs 6 oz 4mos, 3 weeks- 15 lbs. All weight checks after birth have been on the same scale. Dr only suggested supplementing with formula. He suggested I add 1/2 tsp to every 4.5 oz of breast milk. Or when I nurse to nurse for no longer than 10 minutes and then offer formula. (Which I might refuse to do. I can't justify it!)
    3 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*skyisred's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    I'm ready to get some proper sleep at night! I'm exhausted and find myself loosing patience with LO during the day. He will definitely benefit from having a more rested, calmer mom. LO is 14m. Originally, I was going to follow Jay Gordon's method when he reaches 18m, but my husband will have a two week vacation soon and I want to take advantage of that time. DH currently sleeps in the other room and I share the bed with LO. I'm thinking to first have DH sleep with us for couple of nights (if we can fit, haha), then I'd move on the floor on DH's side, and if it goes well, to another room. Any advice you could give me? Experience to share? I'd like to make it less stressful if possible.
    0 replies | 39 view(s)
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