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  • @llli*carmofrap's Avatar
    Today, 08:29 AM
    Thank you! I hadn't really noticed whether his chin was tipped or not. I've been paying attention and sometimes he does get a little scrunched up position wise if he is sitting next to me. We will see if it goes away, though he's been nursing in similar positions for months without a problem so I'm not sure that's the cause. It can't hurt though and always good to be aware of! I'm treating for thrush naturally just in-case.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:01 AM
    :( I am so sorry about the nursing strike! How unfair. This link has tips on getting a baby back to the breast: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:57 AM
    :ita with the PPs. Ortho-Tricyclen and other combination estrogen-progestin contraceptives are not breastfeeding compatible. If you are going to choose a hormonal contraceptive, I think it makes sense to choose the progestin-only minipill, as progestin-only methods are least likely to have negative impact on supply and the minipill is immediately reversible, unlike injectable/implantable methods (e.g. Mirena, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera). The following methods are 100% safe for breastfeeding: - All barrier methods- male condom, female condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, sponge, and contraceptive films, gels, foams, etc. - ParaGard IUD - LAM (lactational amenorrhea method) - FAM (fertility awareness method, generally not a good choice for a nursing mom if she has never used FAM before) - outercourse ( that's everything in the sexual menu except vaginal intercourse) - abstinence - sterilization (for couples who are 100% sure they are done having kids)
    3 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:48 AM
    :ita with Maddieb, particularly with the following: Here are some kellymom links on newborn nursing: http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/ http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/enough-milk/
    2 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:57 AM
    :ita The Swing is a relatively lightweight machine, best for a mom who is mostly nursing and pumping the occasional bottle for a sitter or perhaps working part time. In your situation, you want a good double electric pump like the Medela Pump in Style or the Hygeia Enjoye at a minimum, and a hospital-grade rental would be ideal. You also want correctly sized shields. A 6 hour break at night is not ideal. It's rare for babies to sleep that long. So you might want to simply experiment with a shorter nighttime interval- maybe 4-5 hours rather than 6? I see this as a good idea, but less important than a better pump. While you are working on supply, I suggest continuing to try to get the baby back to the breast. The tricks in this link may help: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/. In particular, I urge you to try a nipple shield, to do lots of skin-to-skin and try the instant reward technique. I also suggest staying away from hormonal contraception. It's typical for moms to be offered birth control at their 6 week postpartum visit, and while there are some hormonal methods that are sometimes safe for breastfeeding, all hormonal methods have the potential to have a negative impact on milk supply. So they are best avoided right now, while you work on increasing your supply. Can you tell us what landed you back in the hospital at 1 week postpartum? There are some health conditions that can explain issues with milk supply.
    2 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:02 AM
    Is it a possibility that you would be able to rent a hospital grade pump? A hospital grade pump is really the right tool for exclusive pumping, particularly when trying to establish supply. When you are doing such frequent pumping, it really makes the most of your efforts to have the strongest, best quality machine. The cost of these varies by area; in the urban centers of the Midwest that I am familiar with, they seem to rent for about 50-70$ a month; if cost is prohibitive, there may be some WIC programs that have these pumps for rental, or may have funds to allocate. Would you be able to pump more frequently? More frequent milk removal is the best way to increase supply, for most women. These two ideas are what come to me first, but my early riser is waking!
    2 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 04:55 AM
    I tend to get my light sleeper to where she is going to sleep and lie her down while she's still latched if I can. And yes I probably looked stupid doing this in a service station car park last night, and yes it was awkward, but she did then sleep in the car seat. Thankfully it was dark, lol! Not sure if this helps or not. One of the main reasons we took to co-sleeping was my inability to lie my DD down.
    11 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Today, 04:11 AM
    Sounds like you already have it figured out, but my kids do something similar when they need to be burped. Or when my son was really young, when he needed to poop.
    11 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*tink1983's Avatar
    Today, 02:58 AM
    Hi, first time posting anywhere like this but really need some help. Iv been expressing for my baby boy since he was a week old & had to go back into hospital. During the stay he had formula top ups and once we tried to get back to my feeding him he'd lost all patience for it. It wasn't going well anyway but I desperately want him to have my milk. I express 7x a day. Getting about 1oz per session. I'm taking fenugreek and blessed thistle and my output hasnt increased :-(
    2 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:39 AM
    if your baby has a medical need to have supplements, (which could be donated breastmilk or formula) supplements can and should be given while breastfeeding continues and problems addressed as needed. It is not a one or the other situation. A mother could nurse her child for the duration while also supplementing as needed if it was necessary. Also, even mothers who make very little or no milk sometimes choose to supplement at the breast with a lactation aid so that they can still nurse. There are any number of things that can be tried as needed. ' Formula supplements when NOT needed cause needless breastfeeding issues. So that is the scenario it is smart to avoid. But when they are needed, there are ways to give them and things to do such as pumping to minimize any additional harmful impact on milk production or breastfeeding longevity. Be careful where you get your info. There is lots of outdated and flat out wrong information floating around. Breast shape and family history is not always the whole story by a long shot. I strongly suggest the books Making More Milk and The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding-8th edition. www.kellymom.com has good articles on milk production. You also may wish to talk to a board cert. lactation consultant (IBCLC) about your concerns. We know much, much more about milk production and breastfeeding then we did even a decade or 15 years ago. Yes you may have issues with production, but you have no idea how severe they may be. You also may have...
    2 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 AM
    A growth spurt is not going to happen in one day. If baby eats more from the bottle one day then usual, that may or may not indicate a growth spurt, but if it is, baby will continue to eat more frequently for a few days at least is my guess. growth spurt or not, being able to pump only once during a separation of 9 hours is potentially a problem-(not so much for your overall milk production as you are not working every day-I assume the 12 days are not consecutive?) But I would be more concerned about you getting engorged and getting plugs or mastitis. do you tend to feel full if its been 4 or 5 hours since baby last nursed? does your husband know about paced bottle feeding?
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*babymm's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:59 PM
    If you suffer from low supply or no milk at all because of medical issues, how long do you try before either supplementing with formula or stopping breast feeding all together? My mom received a lot of pressure to not breast feed from the nurses when she had me and I am worried about being pressured as well because it is likely that I will have issues due to my tuberous breasts but I really want to try to breast feed. I am just afraid of giving up too soon but I do not want my baby to starve either. So how long do you wait before deciding to do formula?
    2 replies | 65 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:59 PM
    I agree not to beat yourself up. AND You did do something that is very important, YOU FOLLOWED YOUR INSTINCTS and pursued multiple second opinions until you got the help your baby needed. MOM INSTINCT IS IMPORTANT. If what the doctors are telling you doesn't seem right to you, trust your gut and seek another opinion. (which you did and got good results so good for you.) Let us know how it's going. Don't get discouraged if it takes a little bit to really get back on track.
    33 replies | 1360 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 PM
    I am going back to work in a few weeks, and my husband will be bottle feeding my baby pumped milk. Let's say baby has a growth spurt on a day when I am working. Obviously my husband will feed the baby more than usual as needed, but can this be made up later? In other words, when baby is back at the breast, will baby nurse more frequently to "make up" for my supply not increasing while I was away? I will be working 12 days a month, 9 hrs a day from 9 weeks of life. I am working overnights including baby's 6 hour stretch of sleep at night. I will only be able to pump once at work, but am willing to add extra pumping sessions at home. As a follow up question, do you think that this setup will likely be conducive to EBFing? I went back to work with my son at 5 months, so this is scary for me.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*eltrix's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:54 PM
    You should not beat yourself up for listening to 3 pediatricians! We go to doctors because they're supposed to have expertise in the health-related areas that we don't. Usually, going against doctors' advice has the potential to be much more harmful for your child than listening to them. I'm glad things are getting better now.
    33 replies | 1360 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    My home seems to get a lot of power outages. We have a chest freezer in the basement, and have had several outages around 4 hours. I don't worry about those. I know we have had regular food in there for 72 hours without power and it was fine. I have had milk in my regular freezer during a 2-3 hour outage. I checked after power was back on and everything still seemed frozen. I did use that milk soon rather than moving it down to the chest freezer for long term storage. The weekend before I first went back to work, we took a vacation. I pumped the couple of days before we left and then took my pump and pumped while we were gone. When we got back, I was prepping the bottles for the first day of day care, and the ones from before our trip smelled off. I tossed them. Fortunately I had pumped enough over the weekend for that first day. I talked to a neighbor and found out that we had lost power for ~7 hours while we were gone! I have a friend who stores milk at several of her friends' houses just in case of outages like that. I also have a non-breastfeeding friend that is so paranoid about outages that anytime they loose power, she tosses everything in the refrigerator, including ketchup, soda, fruit, etc. It all comes down to what you are comfortable with.
    5 replies | 106 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:49 PM
    ok if you are pretty sure it is not thrush, then I think having some sensitivity due to your fertility returning makes sense. But thrush is notoriously tricky to diagnose. Another common cause for nursing discomfort in later babyhood and toddlerhood is needing to adjust positioning to make room for growing child. You want to make sure your son's chin is not tucked, that he can tilt his head back a bit to get a comfortable latch. Adjusting positioning may help with breast refusal as well. Whatever it is, going back to latch basics may help. Also at this age you may be able to get him to latch better by showing him how to open wide and to 'nurse slower' or "nurse softer' etc- whatever words he might understand.
    2 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*eltrix's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:48 PM
    From what I've read and my doctors have told me, methods containing estrogen can cause problems for breastfeeding, but ones using only progesterone, like the mini pill and Mirena IUD, have not been shown to have negative effects. There are some anecdotal examples but no effects found in testing and studies. So yes, in theory any hormonal BC can have possible effects, but scientifically progesterone based ones are much safer for breastfeeding than estrogen/combination ones. I think ortho tricyclen is a combination, as are most versions of the pill, so that could potentially affect milk supply. If it's the method that you feel is most right for you, that's a risk that might be worth it to you to take. But I'm not sure what the acne-related effects of other types are so that's definitely something to ask your doctor or try to look up, so you know all your options.
    3 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:57 PM
    Do you use a boppy pillow? if so what kind of cover do you have? LO get's heated sometimes when we nurse. Part of it is that she's like her father- constantly warm, the other part is the velour boppy cover we have. She doesn't seem to act sick or look sick , and is otherwise normal, for her. But if you *think* something may be wrong, go a head and call the doctor. They'll tell you what to do and what to look for.
    2 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:54 PM
    it's sleep related. :(. I'm glad to have gotten the idea and figured it out...but there isn't much I am able to do to calm her down until she calms herself down. I think the worst part is after we're done, if I MOVE her, she'll wake up again, rinse repeat. So if any one's got any ideas on how to move a light sleeper, lay them on me!
    11 replies | 219 view(s)
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