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  • @llli*kdavis18's Avatar
    Today, 01:26 AM
    Hi, My 22 week old daughter has shown no weight gain in the past 3 weeks. Our pediatrician saw her yesterday and does not seem that concerned, since her length and head growth curves are normal. BUt he advised we begin to offer more solids and a bottle after evening feedings, which I know is counterproductive to our EBF. She has always had 6-8 wet diapers/day, is a happy baby with fat cheeks :), and no one else seems concerned but me. I went back to work 2 half days (8-12) about 6 weeks ago, and she's never taken a bottle very well (1-1.5oz at best, for 5 hr period). we usually reverse cycle to catch up. Since her activity level and distractibility increased at 4 months, night nursing has become the best quality session--usually 2-3 times per night she wakes to feed. The newest challenge is teething-her first tooth just erupted and has been causing immense pain. She withdraws a lot at the breast, fussy, sometimes not latching and sucking long enough to get a let down, and getting angry cry. Sometimes she can be helped with cold teethers and pressure on her gums intermittently, but sometimes we have to give her Tylenol at night to sleep comfortably (physician recommended). Please help! I don't want her to lose weight! The last LC I had visit about a month ago when she started dropping growth curves suggested if things didn't improve to have her checked for posterior tongue tie, but felt this would be a last resort. She ended up gaining 6 oz in a week, so we...
    0 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*ragalla13's Avatar
    Today, 12:36 AM
    Hi this may be a silly question, I was wondering if anyone knew if it was ok to use the blue lid sterile containers that they use in hospitals and doctors offices for breast milk? Long story short, I got to work and realized I forgot a price to my breast pump, so I had to hand express, the only thing sterile I have is these containers. They are packaged individually and are sterile. But I'm wondering if they are safe. I really don't want to waste the breast milk I was able to express but I will if these containers are not safe to keep the breast milk in at least til I get home.
    0 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:34 PM
    Yup no issue at all with supply - you probably make more than enough based on the considerably greater than average pump output and it sounds like baby is gaining very well so that is another indication. Overproduction is not a problem in any way, unless it is causing a problem, and it sounds like things have been going well overall so it is not like you have anything to worry about. Just a few things to watch our for. When a mom has OP, she is at a higher risk of becoming engorged, and of plugs and/or mastitis. That is the biggest potential problem. For baby, lots of milk sometimes means baby gets more milk at the breast all at once than baby can readily handle. This would be indicated by baby becoming fussy at the breast, possibly refusing to nurse, as well as things like gagging, choking, gulping. Some babies get a little extra gassy or have explosive or green poops. None of these things are harmful to baby, although of course if baby is refusing to nurse that can become harmful. Luckily there is a very easy way to deal with any possible issues from OP. They are, encourage baby to nurse frequently, one side at a time if baby prefers that, and avoiding as much as possible anything that tends to increase milk production, like pumping. If you need to pump for the occasional bottle or because you are feeling full, ok. But I would suggest keep it to a minimum and you probably can stop pumping once you have 2-4 ounces or you feel comfortable again. Bottles are not...
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*aliii524's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:45 PM
    Oh wow I did not realize this about the 10 oz. When I decide to pump (which isn't daily), I usually pump right after my first feeding with my son in the morning and, between both breasts, normally get about 5-8 oz.
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 PM
    This is not typically recommended. Kellymom says this is because with silicon shields, cutting away the tip leaves sharp edges. She has several good ideas for weaning off the shield here: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/wean-shield/ Is there a reason you cannot pump after nursing again? (I mean, aside that it is a pain in the rear?) It sounds like that helped before? This is actually typically recommended while a shield is being used. It sounds like you did not have to pump after every time baby nursed, but maybe about every other time or just during the day? that is probably fine. I assume baby is nursing at least 10 times a day? So pumping is one thing, but I am not sure baby actually needs to be supplemented or if he does, it may not need to be 'several' times a day? A week of lower gain here or there is not an accurate measure. And if this does not convince you that you cannot trust weight checks on different scales I don't know what will: https://www.facebook.com/DrJackNewman/posts/445026312315087 When was the last before and after nursing weight check done? Have you tried things like breast compressions and switching sides frequently to attempt to increase intake? The point of before and after nursing weight checks is to see what baby can extract over an entire nursing session, both sides. Switching sides frequently is often an effective method of increasing overall intake particularly with a weakly sucking baby. Keeping baby on one side for...
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:19 PM
    :ita At 6 weeks, nighttime cluster feeding is pretty common. Frustrating, but common!
    4 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:17 PM
    10 oz?! Whoa, that's not just good for you. That would be good for anybody. It's actually in the realm of significant oversupply, an issue which can cause fussiness at the breast. What would you say your average pump out out is?
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:15 PM
    If this was my baby, I think I would be most suspicious that any feeding issues were being caused by the shield. Shields are a terrific tool for babies who have difficulty latching on to the bare breast. But they do come with drawbacks, the biggest of which is the potential for slowed-down feedings and lower milk transfer. But then, why does baby need the shield in the first place? Sometimes a lip or tongue tie is to blame, and I think that you should be considering that possibility due to the slow feedings and baby's difficulty in generating suction. If the worst thing that happens is that you waste $500 on a useless treatment, I would still consider that money well spent- I spent $800 trying to get breastfeeding going right with my first kid, and I don't regret spending that money even though some of it was wasted on things that didn't work. Sometimes you just plunge ahead with the "It's cheaper than formula, and at least it might work" mindset. I would definitely start pumping again for the time being. I think there is enough evidence here of poor transfer and slow gain to suggest that pumping may provide you with a needed crutch as you wait for this little guy to grow big and strong enough to outgrow his need for the shield and to become a more able nurser.
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*aliii524's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:09 PM
    Thank you for the input - this is very helpful! I have not started any hormonal birth control or a formal exercise program yet. Usually (I'd say 5-6 days out of 7), I solely breastfeed my baby on demand. 1-2 days per week he has some pumped bottles if I am separated for a short time (i.e. for a wedding, dentist appointment, etc.). He has never had any problems with bottles or nursing up to this point. I don't think the issue is one of supply - I pumped this morning and generated 10 oz between both breasts in one pump, which is good for me. I have been trying to pump in the mornings to freeze milk because I'm returning to work in two weeks and want to build up a supply. I was SHOCKED that I got my period today! Based on your input, I will try to keep offering him the breast and hopefully he will take it. He has had good diaper output too, which is likely a good sign. My son is also a pretty big boy - he is 14 lb 4 oz at 9 weeks, so it was really unusual when he started fussing and not nursing well today. Hopefully this ends up being just an "off" day.
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Can you tell us a bit more about your situation? It would help to know if you are exclusively nursing, combining nursing and pumping, or just pumping. If you are nursing, tell us how things are going with nursing- is the baby generally happy at the breast, able to get her needs met there? Is nursing comfortable? If you are pumping, is that comfortable?
    1 replies | 31 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:59 PM
    :ita Glad you have found someone who thinks they can see a way forward and is willing to work with you! Keep us updated, okay?
    25 replies | 699 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:57 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Some babies do act fussy around the time that mom gets her period. Whether this results from taste changes in the milk, or a change in flow speed, or some other factor, is unknown. In general, the best way to handle this sort of fussy behavior is to power through it and stay away from bottles. When the only option the baby has for getting fed is the breast, he is going to eventually do what it takes and feed from the breast. When the bottle is an option, he may start fussing at the breast in order to get fed via bottle. If you have doubts about whether or not baby is getting enough to eat, go back to counting diapers. Good diaper output = good milk input. Questions for you: - Have you recently started a new form of hormonal contraception, e.g. birth control pills, shot, implants, IUD? - Have you recently been exerting yourself more heaviy, e.g. taking up an exercise program again?
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:56 PM
    Some moms notice a small, temporary dip in production when they have their period, and it is remotely possible taste is changed slightly. But fussiness and occasional breast refusal is so common and normal it is truly impossible to tell if your baby's behavior has anything to do with your period returning or not. Assuming your baby has been healthy and gaining normally up until this point, there is probably no reason to give baby bottles during your period. Sometimes a very small amount of milk in the bottle prior to nursing helps if baby is so fussy and hungry but will not nurse. But usually it is best to avoid bottles and just try nursing again shortly. Here are more ideas for when baby will not nurse: http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ To ensure continued good milk production, my best suggestion is to encourage your baby to nurse frequently, at least 8-12 times in 24 hours. Regular bottles might cause issues for several reasons, everything from breast refusal to low milk production. So unless bottles are necessary due to a separation, it might be a good idea to reduce or eliminate all bottles for a while. It would help to know why baby is getting bottles, how often baby gets them, how large the bottles are and what your pumping routine is. "On occasion" to me means less than once a week- which is probably fine. But I do not know what it means to you. Of course if baby continues to refuse to nurse, it will be necessary to pump with a...
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:51 PM
    How are things going now, mama? Do you have the baby back from the hospital? If you can express 2 oz by hand, then your supply is good. On average, a 2 week old baby is going to take somewhere between 1 and 4 oz at the breast, with most feedings probably averaging around 2 oz. Do you have a pump? If you are separated from your baby or the baby is having difficulty nursing, you want to remove milk from the breast as often as the baby would otherwise nurse. Usually that means expressing milk 8-10 times a day. It can get tiring if you can only express by hand. That is why a pump is often recommended when mom needs to remove milk. In general, hand pumps are the least effective, and good double electric pumps with correctly fitted shields are the most effective.
    5 replies | 209 view(s)
  • @llli*aaperez's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    I had a great milk supply...baby is 3 months old. Then friday i saw less and by sat all i get is the milk from the let down and thats it less than half an ounce. My nipple is hard but I dont see a bleb. It hurts...just my nipple I don't have lumps in my breast or anything like that...just the nipple. I had clogged ducts back to back for 3 weeks. Not sute what to do
    1 replies | 31 view(s)
  • @llli*rogi2430's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:49 PM
    I'm no expert but I experienced a similar issue. I used a nipple shield for several weeks and my baby had a very slow gain (3-5oz/week). My first piece of advice is to not over weigh your baby. Don't weigh them everyday. It'll just drive you crazy. Maybe do it once a week on the same scale and same time of day. I would also try to wean off the nipple shield. This will be a little work but I feel like this may solve your weight gain problem. My baby didn't do a great job of transferring milk while on the shield. It would take her an hour to eat 2 oz. Once I got off the shield she started transferring about 3-3.5 oz in 15 min. I did before and after weights with a diaper. I also think baby has to work harder to transfer milk through the shield and therefore they end up burning more calories leading to slower than normal weight gain. I'm not saying it's fact but just my personal observation. Once my baby weaned from the shield she has been gaining 6-7 oz per week. I'm not sure if this was helpful but best of luck to you.
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*aliii524's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:17 PM
    My baby is 9 weeks old. I've been exclusively nursing and also pumping and giving him the milk in bottles on occasion. Nursing has been going really well up until now. Today, he has been very fussy - it is as if he tries my milk and does not like the taste. He has eaten very little and is fussy, which is quite unlike him. This evening, I discovered that I got my period! Could this be connected to his poor nursing? He did accept some pre-frozen milk, but I don't have enough to last the length of the period. Any suggestions?
    6 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*alaya's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:07 PM
    It could be a phase, or just his nursing habits changing as he's getting older and the world is becoming much more interesting. My son is almost 14 months, and an incredibly ACTIVE and busy little guy. Around 10 months, he no longer was interested in nursing when I got home from work (which used to be his FAVORITE feeding), or frankly, any time that wasn't revolving around 'sleepy time.' I kept offering during previous "day time" nursing sessions, and nope, would push away and refuse to nurse. I had wondered if he was weaning, and was so sad. I did a bunch of reading, and read this can actually be pretty common around this time due to developmental leaps. Some kids want to nurse all the time, other kids as they age will only be interested in specific nursing sessions. Now, I nurse when he wakes up, before/after nap (but the after is only very brief), bedtime, and some nights here and there. Really, he's dropped any non what I call 'sleepy time' nursing sessions. I still offer, but he just pushes away and would far rather play and explore the world then sit still long enough to nurse unless he's in settle down mode.. but with how active he is, the only time he's ever still for more then half a second revolves around sleepy times :) Play around with the timing, especially since your baby still seems to want to nurse when sleepy. Maybe it'll be a brief phase and go back to normal. Or maybe just changing preferences. We're actually going through an illness related...
    4 replies | 181 view(s)
  • @llli*sacmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:32 PM
    Ok, I need reassurance and advice. Tired and frustrated with our situation. Here is our saga, continued from a previous thread: Baby was born almost 5 weeks ago at term, 7 lbs 15 oz. Latched shallowly the first day and then sporadically from then on. On day 5 of life, wouldn't latch at all for 5-6 hours and seemed sleepier and sleepier, waking up rarely to feed, so I put on a nipple shield and he took to it immediately. The next day, he weighed in at 7 lbs 10 oz. The IBCLC at our clinic was worried about low supply and advised me to pump after every feed and supplement with EBM. That week, I pumped about 5 x/day, not during the night, and got lots of milk. We supplemented about 4 times/day via bottle with EBM after breastfeeding (all with a shield). Our weigh-in at 2 weeks was 7 lbs 15 oz, a gain of an ounce/day. Great! I gradually stopped pumping and then stopped altogether, just fed him on cue. He was almost continuously latched to my breasts. Fast forward to now, 2 weeks later. Still will almost never latch without the shield and when he does, it is shallow and only lasts for a few seconds before he lets go. His weigh-in a few days ago was 8 lbs 13 oz, a gain from the previous week of just under 5 ounces. Then today, 2 days later, again weighing in at 8 lbs 13 oz. No gain in 2 days (this was a different scale, but still...). His improved weight gain is leveling off again. During the past week, lots of breast changes have occurred. Softer breasts, less...
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:52 PM
    Ok, great. So this is still very young, frequent night wakings are entirely normal. As long as baby is gaining normally and nursing is comfortable for you, all is probably well. Again you can try encouraging baby to nurse more often during your waking hours to see if that helps, but it may not. Sleeping patterns shift many times and usually there is not much that can be done about it. Here is a good article about what to expect during the newborn period: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/ The book Sweet Sleep from LLL is very helpful.
    4 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*dsymons07's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:11 AM
    She is 6 weeks old.
    4 replies | 146 view(s)
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