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  • @llli*danikap's Avatar
    Today, 04:10 AM
    Hi all! My one month old had a tongue and lip tie revised at 2 weeks. Always nursed from birth but latch was never wide and tongue humped back. Even post revision I see the same issues for the most part. (We are working on it with sone mouth exercises) The biggest problem is at night. We cosleep and have been trying to nurse side lying (because let's face it, that's a huge advantage to cosleeping!!!) But my sweetie won't open her mouth. ..she fusses with mouth barely open and is giving me signs she is hungry. I line us up and try to get her to latch but she seems so confused. Sometimes in desperation I try to literally put my nipple in her mouth and use my fingers to open her mouth so I can get it in (cringe...I know this isn't the way it should work...). Is this closed mouth thing something some babies just grow out of with time and side lying will be possible? Is she confused bc of where pressure is on her body ( chin and face don't really have contact and she's on her side against the bed)? I'm at a loss...I've even wondered if it's bc it's dark lol. I'd love to hear any tips!!! TiA
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Today, 03:08 AM
    Sorry, duplicate post.
    4 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Today, 03:01 AM
    You know there is a let-down button on the PISA, right? It is the one button on the front and switches between let-down mode and regular mode. It is still hitting a button every 2 minutes, but better than turning the machine on and off.
    4 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:24 AM
    I think it usually makes sense to pump when it is most convenient to pump. It is going to be a bit different for every mom. If you are worried that pumping means you will not have enough milk for your baby, I would suggest this is not usually a problem, unless there is an issue of low milk production going on. Even if you pumped until you were 'empty' and baby immediately wanted to nurse, this would probably not be much of a problem because 1) your body is always making milk, so baby nursing will probably bring in more milk quickly and 2) it is only one nursing session of the presumably 10 or more times a day baby is nursing at this age. If baby does not get much at that one session, baby can simply nurse again soon. Usually what you do want to do when building a stash in anticipation of returning to work is to pump as infrequently as possible while still pumping enough in order to reach your goal. This is because 1) Pumping is extra work, something a mom of a 2 week old does NOT need, and 2) Pumping more than about once a day in the very early weeks while also nursing 'full time', assuming your milk production is normal rather than low, may lead to over production, which has it's own set of issues.
    2 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:08 AM
    Hi! I nursed two kids well past two and am currently nursing a two year old. I have certainly had my emotional ups and downs as a nursing mom, so I have a few thoughts and suggestions, hope they help at all. First, I would suggest, look more at the hormonal issues. no chance you are pregnant? Or anything else happening that might be causing hormonal upheaval? Is nursing actually painful? If it is, have you tried anything specifically for that? Negative emotions may occur during a certain activity, but not really be entirely about that activity. you are dealing with anger and depression-do you think this is situational, hormonal, bit of both? Are there other things going on in your life that are perhaps making you feel trapped or resentful or anxious or angry? How is your relationship generally with your DS2? Personally I had a much more difficult relationship with my DS 2 at this age than I had had with my DS1, and that affected how I felt about all kinds of things including nursing. But I did find that this age (about 18 months to 2 and a half) were the hardest with both kids. Having a full time job and 2 kids makes it very difficult to have time to take care of yourself, but I do suggest, try anyway, maybe to get more sleep, time to relax, etc. mothers are human and we all do things and say things to our children we later regret when we are tired, frustrated or angry. When I become angry with my children and lose it, that makes me feel far worse about myself...
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*stw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:55 PM
    I am nursing my second son, age 22 months. His older brother nursed to nearly 28 and we weaned slowly and peacefully in my first trimester with his brother. I struggled with night nursing my first as a toddler - basically when milk did not put him to sleep within 15-20 min, I would become increasingly frustrated, especially in the middle of the night. With my second, his night waking is less frequent and of shorter duration, but I am struggling more and more with nursing this one, at night and at bedtime. I have discovered this time around that I am especially sensitive and irritable during ovulation and menstruation, and am taking evening primrose oil to help with physical symptoms of discomfort. But my real struggle is the intense negative emotions I am having. When we nurse in the day, surrounded by plenty of distractions, I am fine. However, I work full time, so we don't nurse often during the day - we are basically down to a bedtime nurse, once or twice in the night, and waking up in the morning, plus a naptime feed on weekends - all the feedings I hate the most, b/c I am trying to use milk to put him to sleep/need sleep myself. Sometimes in the night, I will get up and watch TV to distract myself, b/c I cannot bear to lie there in the dark with nothing to think about than how much I hate the nursing. I feel intense feelings of anger and feelings that I am trapped there nursing him, and I start to get extremely resentful and anxious. After a time when he starts to...
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 PM
    I think, always feed the baby first! And while you're pumping, if baby wakes up and is hungry again, just pause the pump and nurse the baby. How many weeks until you return?
    2 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*emt9514's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 PM
    Hi, I am going back to work in a few weeks and want to start freezing my breast milk to make sure my little one will have enough throughout the day. However, I am not sure exactly how to begin pumping and at the same time continue to breast feed. Should I feed him first and then pump right after? Should I pump in between feedings? Any advice would be helpful as I am a first time mom!
    2 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:33 PM
    here is one video with some of them but not all http://youtu.be/0BgGWNp0-GA for the clamping, I think having my little guy chomp on my fingers helped strengthen the jaw and reduce the fatigue that can lead to clamping down.
    4 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:32 PM
    I think this is normal, at least, very common. My three all did this. I think how you are handling it is fine. Maybe some of the bedtime routine can get moved to the bed, for example, books or lullabies or prayers or whatever while baby is flinging herself around? When mine did this, I never worried that I needed to handle it the same every time. how I handled it depended on how I was feeling and/or whether or not I was in some kind of time crunch. Sometimes, I would just play along until baby settled. or Sing lullabies or read a book in bed. or pretend to sleep myself or give up and bring baby to my husband to be walked down for a while or give up and go do something else with baby until she or he settled down more One thing I found very effective but which I only pulled out for emergencies was to hold baby close and tightly to me, but (usually) with baby's back to me, facing AWAY from me. Baby would cry a bit and struggle, (this is why I had them face away from me) but I would calmly say it was time to sleep, speak soothingly, sing, whatever. The usual result is baby would struggle for a bit and then want to turn around and nurse.
    1 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:13 PM
    Ok it sounds like you have a good handle on what is going on and that things are improving. Great! The paced feeding video is a great 'how to' -I also suggest talking to your MIL about the 'why to' information so your MIL can have an understanding on why this is important. Your pumping output per pump session and your pump frequency sounds good to me. It certainly can be very challenging to pump at work. I suggest, maybe try to anticipate your baby's cues? A hungry baby will have a harder time latching than one who is calmer. Look over that kellymom article- it has many good ideas.
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*sarag's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:57 PM
    I think its definitely a possibility that she is being over fed. My mother in law who is watching her says she acts like she is still hungry after 2-2.5 oz. I'm sure this has to do with the way she is feeding. She thought that it was good to burp after evey oz just for her comfort, if that's not a good thing I will definitely let her know. I'm going to show her the video on paced feeding, so I really hooe this will help. She does use a pacifier often even when I am home. She wants it usually when she is fussy sitting in the swing by herself or when I put her in the car seat (she hates being in it). I don't give it to her when she sleeps unless she keep waking up every few minutes. This I think is because of gas. She has also been pretty gassy and uncomfortable the past few weeks. I tried cutting out dairy but it didn't seem to improve. She often spits up but swallows it, sometimes a long while after feeding. Is this possibly reflux? I also just noticed today a small whiteish/yellow bump on the inside ridge of her gums. I rubbed it and it didn't seem hard but it didn't pop like there's anything in it either. As far as pumping goes I think its pretty good. I get to pump at least 2 times while I'm gone, but I try for 3. My work schedule is hard to work around because I'm a dental assistant so different things take longer than others and sometimes I get stuck. I still get at least 1.5-2.5oz from each breast every time I pump(about every 2 1/2 to 3 1/2hrs). My pediatrician...
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*hkwm0714's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:11 PM
    Do you know of any websites with the exercises like the ST showed you?
    4 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*hkwm0714's Avatar
    4 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:00 PM
    Hi I'm really sorry nursing strikes like this can be so very difficult and frustrating. First I would suggest don't believe in your head that she is never going to nurse again. She may not or she may but there is certainly been nursing strike that it lasted far longer than two weeks and eventually the baby went back to nursing. No reason to not offer on a gentle basis whenever you like or the time feels right. I'm sure you've already been suggested to offer when baby is falling asleep, just waking, or sleeping. Also I'm sure you've already read the Kelly mom.com article help my baby won't nurse. Just remember what did not work yesterday or last week may work today. As far as drinking, I can't imagine a child would refuse to drink just for the sake of refusing. Thirst is an incredibly strong motivator. I can only guess that your child is simply not as thirsty as you think she should be. What did the doctors say about the situation, I'm sure you have a list of the signs of dehydration. There are signs of mild to moderate to severe dehydration to watch out for. Severe dehydration does not happen until the mild and moderate has occurred so if you're watching your baby closely you should be able to tell if she is getting to the point where you're going to have to bring her in to the doctor or hospital for treatment for dehydration. I do not know if there are any illnesses or conditions that would cause a child to refuse to drink to the point that they became dangerously...
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*jessicanewmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:26 PM
    When I lay down next to my 10 m.o. to nurse her to sleep she often spends 20 minutes or so happily flinging herself around the bed. She babbles and rolls and twists and tries to engage me in smiling, etc. She stops by for a quick drink and goes back to her flinging. I usually try to pretend I'm asleep. Eventually she tires herself out and nurses to sleep. So, do I just need to wait longer to try to nurse her down? Or is this just another roll-with-it quirk of nursing a baby who's no longer an infant? Or is this a nip-it-in-the-bud behavior like pinching? It's not a big problem (in fact it's kind of cute when I'm not in a rush), but it does add quite a bit of time to our already pretty elaborate bedtime ritual. On nights when I do wait until she's really tired before nursing her down she doesn't do this, but then we seem to have an hour of crankiness instead.
    1 replies | 92 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:44 AM
    also: Why is this being done? This suspiciously sounds like a technique for getting as much milk into a baby at one feeding as possible. This is NOT what you want to have happening. If baby needs to burp, that will be clear. If baby is being given bottles with appropriate pauses, insisting baby burp at all is probably not needed. As far as burping "every ounce" it just does not even make sense. Why every one ounce? (why not a half ounce? Why not two ounces) and why always? Even if the burping is working well for baby- the ounce per ounce things may indicate caregiver is looking at how much baby is drinking rather than following babies cues for how much baby wishes to drink, which will normally fluctuate meal to meal. Hopefully the links above explain paced bottle feeding well. Kellymom has more info too I believe. It can seem very odd to someone who is used to bottle feeding the 'old' way or who has been told to feed in such a way as to never let any air into the bottle.
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:33 AM
    Sorry- just saw your other post. If you think fast letdown is part of what is going on, have you tried laid back positioning? http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/01_laid_back_breastfeeding.pdf and http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/ Encouraging frequent nursing also helps reduce the flow. If baby is sucking her hands, or cueing in any way, or you just feel like nursing, never any harm in offering to nurse.
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:30 AM
    How frustrating! This is not an uncommon situation, and there are many things to try to turn this around. Since this started after your return to work, it is likely, but not 100% certain, it is due to the introduction of regular bottles. First, I would suggest making sure that your baby is not being overfed while you are at work. If baby is getting more than 1 to 1.5 ounces per hour of separation, it is possible baby is being overfed. A Baby who is being overfed with bottles will often stop being enthusiastic about nursing. As pp suggests, make sure baby is being cue fed using paced bottle feeding positioning and pauses. This is VITAL, as it allows baby to control the feeding just as baby does at the breast. It is your best bet when trying to prevent the overfeeding and/or "flow confusion" that leads to breast refusal. If it is not happening, make sure it starts happening. Is anything else happening that might interfere with your baby's desire to nurse? Pacifier use, sleep training, and meal scheduling are other things that can inadvertently "train" a baby away from nursing. A 2 month old will typically nurse frequently for both food and comfort, and this is behavior that is best encouraged while baby is with you. Pacifier use may be ok while you are at work, but it also may be helpful to suggest other methods of comforting baby to your baby's caregiver.
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*sarag's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:08 AM
    The only thing that is being done now is burping her after every ounce. How should I explain paced feeding to them? I don't think it is my supply being low though, I think I may have a fast let down because sometimes she will choke or click while sucking. That often upsets her further. I think she is mostly used to it now but could I still have a low supply with a fast let down? She eats about every 2-3hrs during the day and at night she has been doing aboit every 4hrs. She recently started sucking on her hands. I think she is doing it because she's hungry but I know its possible she's only doing it because she found them.
    7 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:45 AM
    It is so odd to me to deal with DS only nursing for a very short time now when he is wide awake. When he wants to nap he will still often latch on and comfort nurse/sleep for a long time. But when not sleepy... Sometimes I'm lucky to get 4 minutes of nursing out of him.
    5 replies | 355 view(s)
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