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  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    Today, 01:25 AM
    Thank you so much for pointing all that out, you make excellent points and I agree on what you said about newborn behavior and the difficulty letting go of supplementing and pumping. I've decided to keep this up as is for the next day or two, just for my peace of mind and if it's okay then go cold turkey, if not then consider my options. The reason for that is the fact that she pooped a few times yesterday but she only managed to poop properly after the bottles. 2-3 good sized poops that would count as more with the teaspoon lol She got 4 2 oz bottles in 24 hours, the last she didn't finish entirely, drank about 1.5 oz. And she'd poop either during or after the bottles. In between she had two small poops that were yellow as usual cut greenish around the edges. Normally I wouldn't be concerned about that but I realized that we have another issue to consider with the current situation. I am at a slight oversupply at the moment and with the way she's nursing, many very short sessions, and the reduced pumping, my breasts are filling up, and she's basically just drinking foremilk. My guess is that's probably why she poops after bottles, because in them she gets both kinds of milk.
    11 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:20 AM
    I am so sorry your little boy has been unwell, glad he seems to be so much better! Personally, in your situation I would be seeking another medical opinion. It may be that your baby is not gaining normally, but what bothers me is the assumption that the answer is formula when there are clearly health issues either from the past or the present that may be impacting this. If your baby is taking in 32 ounces of breastmilk a day, that is certainly normal intake. ? do you mean, solids? Breastmilk is high in calories...higher than most foods a baby is likely to eat. If your baby loved solids that would be one thing, then you could tailor those to only the highest calorie foods. but if he is resisting them that is entirely normal at this age and not usually a problem, especially since most solids he would eat would have less calories and fat and be harder to absorb than breastmilk. A book I strongly recommend for any parent whose baby or young child has a weight gain concern is My Child Won't Eat by pediatrician Carlos Gonzalez. He offers some very interesting perspectives on the subject of eating and growth.
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:32 PM
    I am confused. So even at this point, baby is being supplemented almost exclusively? It would help to understand how often (how many times a day) baby nurses and how much she is getting in supplements of your expressed milk and/or formula. If your baby continues to be almost exclusively bottle fed after you have seen 3 IBCLCs I have to wonder why they are not identifying the issue better for you and helping you get baby nursing. Are your appointments like this?: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html !!! That is intake that indicates a large feeding-much larger than the norm of 1-4 ounces at this age... I wonder if baby is clamping in order to slow a fast milk flow? That might explain the pain and lipstick nipple. What kind of positioning and latch techniques have you tried? This article has an excellent overview: http://feedthebabyllc.com/latch-and-positioning/ As far as all the literature saying baby should gape, some babies just do not do that. In fact more recent breastfeeding literature barely mentions "gape." The understanding now is that babies latch and nurse comfortably a wide variety of ways and the stress is on laid back positioning or "Natural Breastfeeding" positions as explained my Nancy Morhbacher in a series of videos. As long as baby is getting enough to eat at the breast and nursing is comfortable for mom, it does not matter how baby latches and nurses.
    1 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*kelleena's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:19 PM
    I do work part time so it won't kill me. It'l lkill me waking up every 2 hours :( luckily I have freemie cups so at least it's hands free
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*kelleena's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:18 PM
    She's looking for all sources. She was told by OB and Plastic Surgeon she would not be able to breast feed. She's prepairing now. So if I pump every 2 hours I'll get my supply back to newborn ish? Herbs did not work for me when I first started. I've never gotten alot maybe 2 oz per brest is the most in a pump.
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:16 PM
    Hi ezrasmum2 - It is very common for a baby to nurse less the first couple of weeks and then kind of "wake up" and want to nurse very often....10-15 times or more a day, often in "clusters" of several nursing sessions close together. Also babies nurse for comfort and need to nurse even when they are not hungry. This is entirely normal. If a baby is gaining normally at the breast, no matter how they behave, then they almost certainly are getting enough milk at the breast and do not need supplements- not even a bottle of your own milk. Supplements when they are not needed can be very destructive to breastfeeding and the normal milk production processes. If a mom needs to start pumping and getting baby habituated to bottles in anticipation of regular separations due to work or school, it is usually suggested that pumping and bottles be delayed as long as possible and kept to a minimum. If you are anticipating separations from baby soon, we can give you more info about how to prepare for that if we have a little more info. (When the separations will start and work schedule, for example.) If you think your baby is not getting enough to eat at the breast, that would mean something is wrong, either with how well baby nurses or with your milk production. If that is the case, solving whatever that problem is with the help of a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) is probably the wisest course of action. If that is not possible, we can help you trouble shoot...
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*ezrasmum2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:43 PM
    Hello, my son is about 4 weeks old, and I am just now feeling like I am having some issues with breastfeeding. Initially breastfeeding my son did very good with latching and feeding, he would feed untill he was too sleepy and then be full and happy. I was only breastfeeding, no formula or pumping. Now I am feeling like my son is cranky and not getting full. He will nurse and never seem to reach the point of being full/ sleep-in for instance in the night I will nurse him and after burping he will not settle back into sleep but cry instead. Alot of the time he will still root/ search for the nipple soon after nursing. I am pumping now but only giving about a 2.5 oz bottle a day if I need a break. The last pediatrician visit he was gaining well. Looking for some help/ advice. I also started taking a supplement to boost my supply.
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*snackycake's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:16 PM
    Thanks so much, carm. I haven't emailed Dr. Newman yet, that will likely be next on my list depending on how things go with the lactation consultant. The pain isn't completely gone with Diflucan, it's just manageable. The pain is only upon latching - like little needles or a bunch of papercuts being ripped open. There's no pain during feeding, more an itchiness/sensitivity that's only painful if the baby yanks or slides down the nipple to a shallower latch or something like that. There's no deep breast pain/shooting pain (which I had for a day or so before starting Diflucan), and no pain at all when feeding is over. Just very sensitive nipples (i.e. very unpleasant when things brush lightly against them) with an uncharacteristic red/pink color in the creases. You know, as I write that all out, it doesn't sound so much like thrush to me anymore. If it weren't for the baby's white tongue that initially cleared up with Gentian Violet I'd suspect it wasn't thrush after all, but with that additional data point I just can't make heads or tails of things. Given that, I'm wary of trying the vasospasm protocol since adding heat would make a more inviting environment for the thrush if that's indeed what's going on. Getting a knowledgeable set of eyes on things will really be welcome.
    18 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • @llli*iveehill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:11 PM
    ***UPDATE*** It has been a while since I posted this thread, and wanted to update it in cause anyone found it by searching later. As I stated above, when I first went back to work, I was pumping only 9 ounces. This steadily increased until I was able to get about 20 ounces per day around the 6 month mark. I was able to easily meet her milk needs. It just took me a little while to respond well to the pump. My output started to decrease again once my daughter started eating. We are now at 17 months and still breastfeeding well :) I have decreased to 1 pump per day and still give her 5 ounces of milk while I'm at work. (I may have to wean soon, but that's another issue). So for all of you moms who don't respond well to the pump at first, keep trying :) You can do it!
    12 replies | 3945 view(s)
  • @llli*gotta.latch.em.all's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:20 PM
    Hi all, I would appreciate any advice on this as I feel like I've exhausted all options. My daughter turned 5 weeks old yesterday and I'm still struggling with her inability to open wide enough for a deep latch. In fact, the only time I've seen her open wide is when either crying or yawning. She's never opened wide in response to any specific positioning or placing/dragging of nipple anywhere on her mouth or nose. This is frustrating because all the literature and advice says "wait for baby to open wide" to flip the nipple in. Except she never does the gape. Holding the nipple to her lip either results in a tiny pursed mouth or ignoring the breast or wailing. :cry The only time I get anywhere close to a deep latch is if she wails and I manage to shove in the nipple sandwich/flipple, aiming for the roof of her mouth for the asymmetric latch. Even then, she clamps down so quickly and eventually slides back to just having the nipple tip in her mouth. She will suck and swallow but the result is lipstick nip, pain, line across nipple, cracks. It seems the best I can do is the sandwich to get the nipple in, hold her super close and tight to try to prevent her sliding back and then doing compressions directly into her mouth the whole feed. I've done weighted feeds and she does get 4-5 oz this way if I manage to get her to take both breasts. 2-3 oz if I can only get her to take one side. I've seen 3 pediatricians who've confirmed no tongue or lip ties and 3 IBCLCs who...
    1 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:11 PM
    :hug mama, I wish I could make it all better for you. You've worked so hard! Did you ever try emailing Dr. Newman? Is your pain completely gone when you're on the diflucan? IIRC, you said you didn't have vasospasms, but I'm wondering if maybe you're having them without the blanching. I know you're probably so sick of trying new things, but it might be worth it to try the protocol for vasospasms (Magnesium and vitamin B6 and lots of dry heat to your nipples) to see if that's part of the problem. That's what really made the big difference for me, in addition to the diflucan. Like you said, it's possible that this isn't even thrush, and I'm really glad that you're going to see an IBCLC. I'll definitely keep my fingers crossed for you, and please keep us posted!
    18 replies | 1228 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:50 AM
    How many times in 24 hours does baby get a bottle? 4 ounces every meal is a lot. Have you tried smaller bottles given more frequently? Also you can try paced bottle feeding as this normalizes the bottles a bit...makes them more like breastfeeding in how long they take to eat, as rapid eating also causes spit up. 10 ounces per side is certainly quite a lot to be pumping. And yes, for multiple reasons an eping mom with an established milk production wants to be pumping 6-8 times in 24 hours not less. The longer milk sits in the breast, the more foremilk builds up. This is not going to hurt your baby, but it might explain the copious spit up and a few other things like green poop that are caused by baby getting a little too much foremilk all at once. It has nothing to do with baby not getting enough hindmilk, and again, there is nothing wring with your milk and it is not hurting your baby. I would suggest you may want to cut down on how long you pump- in other words, do not pump so much out each time, and to also immediately increase how often you pump up to 6 times per day. So, OP and fast letdown would cause the issues your baby was experiencing while nursing including latch difficulty. There are many ways to reduce and eliminate that problem while continuing to nurse your baby. Also a shield may no longer be needed, but if it is, I wonder if the fast letdown was causing the problems not the shield, or if baby needed a smaller shield? Nursing at the breast has...
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:31 AM
    It sounds like things are going so much better! Progress is like this...some things get a little better, then other questions/concerns arise. Overall this sounds very good to me. If you had never had to supplement your baby or had any concerns, then this: would be considered entirely normal. This is how newborns nurse, including those that are getting enough and even more than enough milk. In my experience one of the hardest things for a mom who has needed to supplement her baby for any amount of time to do, is to let go of the idea that her baby may not be getting enough milk at the breast- to relax and allow herself to stop supplementing and pumping. And this is good- to an extent. Of course it is important to make sure baby is getting enough and that milk production is protected. Absolutely. But, it is also true that continued supplementing and pumping is going to interfere with the situation normalizing. Pumping and supplementing takes moms time and at energy at a point she has none to spare. And a baby who is getting supplements is not going to be nursing as much as is normal...either they will nurse less often or less efficiently or less amount of time each time, or a combo of these, because they are getting food elsewhere. So weaning off the supplementing and the pumping sometimes takes quite a leap of faith by mom. And this is really hard to do. But it has to happen, in order for you and baby to settle into the "normal" breastfeeding rhythm of very frequent...
    11 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*danielst15's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:18 AM
    My son was hospitalized for a month when he was 4.5 months old. He had acute respitory failure and pneumonia from two viruses and a bacterial infection. He was a pretty sick little boy. He is now almost 8 months and happy as a clam, though we still have to nebulize him with Albuterol and Budesonide three times a day. We just can't shake this cough. He has not gained much since he left the hospital. He went in at about 14 lbs and is currently 16.1 lbs. His Ped has been worried and we go in once a month for a well check. She has him on 36 oz per day, though I can only manage to get him to eat about 32 oz a day. I have him on an iron-rich multivitamin and we are working hard on purses, but he doesn't have much interest. I read that babies that have been sick for an extended period of time tend to have a higher metabolism to fight the illness. Our Ped mentioned that we might have to start putting formula in his BM to calorie load him. I want to avoid this and go a more natural route to get more calories in him. Has anyone had experience with this? Is he just not absorbing the calories well enough? Any other ideas on how to put some weight on him?
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 AM
    Just to give an update... The last few days things have been getting better in regards of her accepting the breast. I've been offering constantly and she's been refusing less so things were looking up. Yesterday we went to see the LC. She helped with latch and positioning, managing to get a pretty good latch. Not perfect but a great improvement. She observed DD's behavior on the breast, there was a lot of grunting, agitation, crying and such. Usually after the initial let down she'd slow down the sucking and practically just waited for the next one, which wasn't really coming, or not fast enough. She checked her mouth, her suck, we talked a lot, about her birth and the days after that, her nursing, my breasts.... and after everything she said there was no need for a shield at all. So we didn't try that. We we're limited with time also. She was very optimistic about things, said it should work out fine with time and persistence, that DD is still recovering from the trauma of birth, hence her behavior.
    11 replies | 378 view(s)
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