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  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:35 PM
    When you say she happily sleeps in the other room and you suspect that may be hurting your supply, is she not waking to nurse through the night anymore? Is it possible to move the crib into the same room as you, or find another way she can sleep near you, but not right beside you (arms reach co-sleeper, mattress on the floor, etc?). I had the same problem with my baby, so now she sleeps on a mattress on the floor right beside our bed (which is just box springs and mattress on the floor), and we're both sleeping better as she doesn't move as much when not right beside me.
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 07:57 PM
    I don't plan to supplement much!! I want to breastfeed without supplementing but baby isn't gaining well!! I guess I'm gonna have to break down and call the lactation consultant
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 07:54 PM
    Thank you maddieb!! I greatly appreciate your advice!! The dr wants me to go back in 2 weeks!! I'm not positive where she wants her weight! The only thing she said is she should be between 10 and 10 1/2 lbs!! The scale they were using was a digital until today!!! I think the dr is worried about the calorie count of the breastmilk!! thats what I grasped when she was talking!! She said the breastmilk could offer the antibodies and other things and the formula would give her the rest of what she didn't get from breastmilk!! Ok, when is the best time to pump?? After nursing?? Halfway between nursing??
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*tattmama's Avatar
    Today, 07:13 PM
    It is a digital scale. He is not always weighed on the same scale. But he is always weighed nude. He was 9 lbs 11oz at birth, then lost 11% of his body weight. They weren't too concerned as I had had a postpartum hemorrhage and lost a lot of blood resulting in the need for two blood transfusions. They figured my milk was slow to come in due to the loss of blood. He was discharged at 8lbs 5oz. Two weeks later he was 8lbs 12oz. One month later he was 10lbs, then 10lbs 7.5 oz, then 10lbs 14oz, then 11lbs 1.5oz, and today, 11lbs 4 oz.
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:10 PM
    This is probably a question you'd want to discuss with the nursery. They may actually require you to send some sort of drink for your baby, and usually they will ask for either milk or formula. Solids and water/juice/animal milk is generally not an acceptable substitute for a 10 month old, even if she is doing a huge amount of nursing at night. I personally would want to send either expressed milk or formula. Babies should receive the majority of their calories from breastmilk or formula until 12 months, because their solid food intake tends to be erratic. It's much easier to provide balanced nutrition using breastmilk or formula than it is with solids. There is a very good chance that going a long stretch with no milk removal at all will be quite uncomfortable for you and will result in a significant supply drop. There are no guarantees, but there's every reason to expect a drop in supply.
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:01 PM
    before we go down the rabbit hole of what to do about slow gain, was there any chance that the baby was mismeasured? Did the doctor use the same scale as last time, and is it a digital scale? We're all weigh-ins conducted in the nude, or has the baby sometimes been weighed clothed? Also, could you post a complete weight history for us?
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:58 PM
    Supplementing with expressed milk is a useful thing to do when you have a baby who is unable to nurse well enough to support adequate growth. If you are going to supplement with expressed milk, you want to do the following: 1. Make sure it is an appropriate intervention. You want to do it only when you are sure that your baby is not gaining well from nursing alone. 2. See a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC, for guidance on pumping, methods of supplementing, and for an in-person evaluation of breastfeeding. 3. Supplement in such a way that it does not jeopardize the nursing relationship. That generally means offering small amounts of milk, via paced bottle feeding, and making sure that the baby continues to nurse just as frequently as he/she did before supplementing began.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*tattmama's Avatar
    Today, 06:56 PM
    My son is 5 months old. At his well visit today he only gained 3 ounces in the past month. He did have a cold that lasted two weeks, but I'm still very concerned. Since birth he has been a very slow gainer, only gaining half a pound per month. He's is the 95th percentile for his height and is growing on schedule as fair as height and head circumference. My previous son also was a peanut and slow gainer (was only 17lbs at a year old) and is a very active and healthy 5 year old now. My baby has 6-8 wet diapers a day, and he had about two poopy diapers every other day. My son nurses on demand all day and night, he bed shares with me. He has a 5 hour stretch of sleep at night. He lets go of the nipple when he doesn't want to nurse anymore, or will fall asleep after he has nursed. I never stop him from nursing. I don't understand why he is gaining so little when he seems satisfied and has plenty of diapers. My pediatrician suggested pumping as well as starting solids. I was just wondering if anyone else has run into this problem as well. I'm so upset that it seems I am not producing enough for him to gain what he needs on breastmilk alone. I started my older on solids at 8 months old and had hoped to delay this ones as well, but I feel like I am starving him. :( He is reaching all milestones early, he is a happy baby, just tiny. He even coughs and gags sometimes when my milk lets down, and I hear him swallowing a lot during nursing so I don't understand. It would almost make...
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:51 PM
    This is one of those questions that is impossible to answer. The variables are too many and too individual for there to be a universal right answer. All we can do is to give you a list of pluses and minuses, so that you can weigh them for yourself. Pluses of continuing to nurse: - Baby continues to get fresh milk- no worries if your freezer suddenly dies or your baby starts refusing expressed milk - Nursing may improve if you just keep at it- biting is often something that babies grow out of or can be trained out of - Continuing to nurse is good for your health; increased duration of lactation reduces maternal risks for heart disease and certain cancers - Nursing continues to be a valuable mothering tool into the toddler years, and also provides immune support and complete nutrition that can fill in the gaps in a typical picky toddler diet Minuses of continuing to nurse: - Biting may continue to be a problem
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 06:13 PM
    There are many, many, many differences between bottle feeding and nursing. They are two completely different things. But I think what you are asking is, if all baby needs is more breastmilk, why with a bottle and not the breast? And I completely agree with you. In many cases, encouraging a baby to nurse more often will solve slow gain issues. But you have already said that your baby is nursing all the time. So I assumed this was not one of those cases. If it is true baby is nursing as much as baby possibly can and not gaining well, then the issue is that baby is not getting ENOUGH breastmilk at the breast. And the solution would be to try to get more milk into baby while you figure out why that is. If enough expressed breastmilk is not available, then formula is appropriate. But again, you will need to pump for every tiome baby gets a supplement, or as close t othat as you possibly can. That should generate some expressed milk, which can be given to baby instead of formula. Also, If your baby is not getting enough milk, the reason why must be discovered so the problem can be addressed. If baby IS getting enough milk and not gaining well, that indicates something else may be wrong. So, assuming there is some available, you could supplement with your breastmilk or formula. Formula is not a "better" supplement when a baby is not gaining. Formula is made to be the same as breastmilk as far as calories. Manufacturers try very hard to match breastmilk in the few areas...
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 04:25 PM
    The scale they used today was a baby version of the scales for kids and adults with the weights that slide across the top!! I was thinking of supplementing a couple times a day after nursing!! That way I'm not "skipping" a regular nursing session!! I have not talked that over with my dr, just what I decided!! I was also thinking of pumping after I nurse to possibly up supply or to build up a stash so that maybe mixing some cereal with breastmilk instead of giving her formula!! Height wise, she is in the 50th percentile! But because of not being successful before with failure to thrive diagnosis, I just don't want her development hindered!! As far as supplementing with my own breastmilk, what's the difference in bottle feeding and nursing?? If they are getting the same thing, what makes the difference??
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 PM
    Weights must be on same scale or they may be inaccurate. Really. I do not know what graduated means in this case. A baby can be weighed on the same scale at one month and two, it's absurd to suggest they cannot unless they are or were using the wrong kind of scale. . I agree. Supplementing before feedings at least some of the time can be helpful for many reasons. Also, What about supplementing at least partly with your own expressed milk. Can you do that? There is nothing magic about formula that makes babies grow faster. You will want to be pumping anyway when you are giving baby supplements or your milk production will be harmed. I really think you and your doctor should be looking for other answers instead of only throwing supplements at the problem. They may be needed, at least temporarily. OK. But they are NOT going to solve whatever the real problem is. Your baby nurses pretty often (although not overly often) and is spitting up a lot. Wouldn't that be something to look at if gain is indeed slow? Although it would be on the more unusual side, excessive spit up may indicate some other issue that is leading to the poor gain...allergies or reflux. Tongue tie sometimes also causes excessive spit up and also causes poor gain.
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Today, 03:07 PM
    Mommal: Yup, I've been doing this religiously as well a wearing the brace. It's starting to improve for sure, thank goodness.
    8 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 PM
    Thanks so so much, Maddie! I just saw this and it's really reassuring. I'm replacing pump parts as we speak (or write) to be sure all that is in working order. I really truly appreciate you saying that -- I am certainly feeling that societal pressure and it's really buckling me. Your last paragraph really hits home (tears are even welling in my eyes) and I'm sure I'll re-read it often over the coming weeks if not months while back at work. Thank you.
    8 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 02:56 PM
    So you're getting roughly 13.5 oz a day now, right? How long is your separation from LO? Assuming 10 hoirs, a baby will need between 10 and 15 oz so you're right in the middle. It seems like you were over producing before and perhaps baby is being over fed while you're gone? Babies usually take between 1 and 1.5 oz of milk per hour of separtion. Are you familiar with paced bottle feeding? Babies also get to be more efficient nursers as they get older so maybe hes getting all the milk he needs in his short sessions? Is diaper out put and weight gain still okay?
    3 replies | 331 view(s)
  • @llli*rw0804's Avatar
    Today, 02:20 PM
    My daughter was 9.1 at birth, and at 12 weeks she is just shy of 14 lbs. We have always exclusively breastfed and I was bordering on an oversupply for the first 8 weeks or so. She has always been a big night sleeper (we had to wake her to feed the first month, and since 8 weeks she only wakes once after 6-8 hours for a quick nurse and then back to sleep for 2-3 hours) and that whole time my supply was good, bordering on an oversupply. This has since lessened (pretty suddenly) -- I posted about it in a different thread. We have co-slept from the beginning but a few days before this drop she's begun to move around so much that I simply cannot get any sleep (while also stressing about returning to work). She happily sleeps in her crib in another room (on those nights I just couldn't take it and needed some sleep) but I've heard that will not help my supply. But at the same time, neither does not getting any sleep...I'm at my wits end. One LC told me it could be my prolactin has dropped too much due to her sleeping so well. Another told me it may not be that and is just stress. We've also read and done all the LLL advice regarding introducing the bottle (necessary as she'll be in daycare full time soon) with very limited (at most) success. In preparation of if the bottle refusal continues, anyone have cups they'd recommend? Also any particular pumping tricks or encouragement? Many thanks!
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*braden's Avatar
    Today, 01:44 PM
    my LLO is 8 months 3 weeks old and has been really short at the breast lately maybe nursing only 5-8 minutes on one side and then wanting to go explore. I've noticed when I pump it is a lot less. My morning pump before leaving the house was 10 oz now it is 6oz. The first pump at work was 5 oz now 3.5 and when I was getting 3 - 3.5 oz the other 2 pumps at work I am now only getting 2 oz in total. I am afraid he will go through the bags faster than I can pump enough to supply my care giver and don't want to have to supplement is there anything I can do to increase my milk? Please help Thanks in Advance for any feedback!
    3 replies | 331 view(s)
  • @llli*new.mama86's Avatar
    Today, 01:32 PM
    Hello, I would very much appreciate your advice and experience as I prepare to return to work in 3 weeks' time. I'm lucky to have been off for the last 9 months and my daughter will be 10 months old when I start work. She will be in nursery 3 days a week from 7.30am until 5pm and I'm wondering what to do about milk. So far I have always fed her on demand and for the last few weeks she has tended to have 3 big feeds overnight, another in the morning and then just some little sucks every 3 hours or so during the day. Since she sleeps next to me I don't really mind that she tends to drink mostly at night. She's also enjoying food, although it's hit and miss. She's healthy and growing well When I've tried to pump I don't seem to get very much at all and when I return to work it will be difficult to organise pumping time. So, I have two questions really. 1) Do you think I need to send my 10 month old to nursery with milk or can I just rely on feeding her when she's at home? 2) If I don't pump is my supply likely to drop off dramatically? I realise these are difficult to answer but I'd appreciate your help as I may need to start building up a supply of milk in the next couple of weeks.
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 01:06 PM
    She might not be as hungry as she used to be. Since you're feeding more often, she doesn't need as much at one time to feel full; also not using the shield lets the milk flow faster. As long as her weight and her diapers stay where they are supposed to I wouldn't worry about it ;)
    6 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 01:02 PM
    You could supplement an ounce before nursing and then let her fill up at the breast so you both get the cuddles and comfort that nursing brings without having to interrupt it to fix a bottle.
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 12:28 PM
    I have another question, if she nurses and goes to sleep when she is finished, I'm scared if I give her formula it will cause over feeding only to make spitting up worse!! Please give some insight on this!!
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 12:14 PM
    We did this with my son because he was premature and jaundiced, causing him to fall asleep at the breast very quickly. No amount of poking, tickling, stripping off clothes, etc. could keep him awake long enough to eat. So we supplemented with my pumped milk until he gained some weight and perked up enough to nurse more than a few seconds.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 12:07 PM
    I'm trying supplementing before I quit!! Weight history: birth 7 lbs 5 oz, day 3- 6 lbs 11 oz, day 5- 6 lbs 10 oz, day 7- 6 lbs 11 oz, day 17- 7 lbs 2 oz, day 24- 7 lbs 6 oz, day 31- 7 lbs 12 oz (June 4th) Unfortunately it was not the same scale!! I asked about the scale and they said that at 2 months they "graduate" And I think she isn't really concerned with a certain amount of formula, she gave me the option of alternating nurse one time them formula the next feeding, or just an oz after each feed!
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:50 AM
    Why would you quit rather than supplement as needed while continuing to nurse? Can you please explain how much baby has gained since last checkup and when that was? Also, same scale both times? Also, I suggest clarifying with doctor exactly how much supplement per day. 1 ounce after every feeding session is very inexact, as nursing frequency is so variable.
    14 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 11:44 AM
    If the baby isn't transferring milk well, the mom will pump to maintain supply and she'll give that milk to baby to make sure he's getting enough to grow and thrive.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Today, 11:40 AM
    My breastfeeding goal is 1 year and my plan is to start weaning after a year- so I imagined that I would breastfeed for 13 months. My daughter is 11.5 months old and we are so close, but recently she has been biting a lot more and my supply has dropped dramatically and my let down has slowed greatly. (I used to have an oversupply and overactive let down, so that's what she was used to). She loves her solids and nurses well in the middle of the night and first thing in the morning. All other times she is too impatient for the milk and if she gets really angry about it I get bit (i.e. she screws up her face and angrily bears down and I'm bleeding). I work full time, but take her to work with me or work from home, all but one day a week, that is until this week- this week I have to go into the office 3 days, then we will be back to our usual schedule then at the end of the month we are taking a month off and I won't have to pump and she won't see a bottle at all. My question is should I just go ahead and start the weaning process now? I've got plenty of breast milk in the freezer to make it another month (from past oversupply problem). Or should I just 'suck it up' and make it the next 3 weeks? (Also she is healthy, lots of wet diapers 1-2 poops/day-EBF she is also slightly small for her age around 30th percentile, but nothing anyone is concerned with)
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*perannie's Avatar
    Today, 11:38 AM
    I have read instances where babies are breastfed and also supplemented with breastmilk to promote weight gain, how does that work!! If mom nurses then gives breastmilk that she has pumped previously, what is the difference???
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*katy77's Avatar
    Today, 11:09 AM
    Fwiw nursing had no effect on my fertility at all. My doctor told me I would not be fertile but my periods came back 8 weeks postpartum despite demand feeding. I also wanted to get pregnant more quickly because I am older -I am 38 - and became preggers after a year. I waited that long on purpose because of the pressures of taking care of a newborn. Everyone has their own story of course. I like to think that sometimes we don't get pregnant when we want to because it has to be that particular egg and that particular a sperm meeting to make the special being that is to come I to the world. A bit soppy but it feels right.
    4 replies | 408 view(s)
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