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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:31 PM
    Don't let other people's opinions get you down, mama. If you do, where does it stop? Someone is always judging. You let your child watch too much TV/not enough TV. You let your child run unsupervised/you're a helicopter parent. You don't feed your kid enough veggies/you don't feed him organic veggies. You just can't win, except by not giving a toss about what other people think!
    3 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 06:02 PM
    I would say that no, pain is never 'normal." It is a sign of something. It may not be anything serious, but I still think it makes sense to get checked out. Some sensitivity due to lactation? Sure. Your breasts are different now than before your pregnancy or even different from the early weeks of lactation, so activities like jumping around that may have been comfortable before may very well no longer be comfortable while lactating. But not pain. A mother who is lactating can have other breast issues that do not involve lactating just like any other woman. If this is pain that would have sent you to the doctor if you were NOT lactating, I think it makes sense to see a doctor now.
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*ngs215's Avatar
    Today, 06:01 PM
    I guess my concern is that I will be at work before her morning feed (if her sleep pattern holds). And I would rather dream feed than pump, but we shall see what her thoughts on the matter are. I will continue to offer. She doesn't take a paci and is not swaddled. Co-sleeping did not work well with my first, so I haven't been keen to try it. But I may re-evaluate depending on what happens after I go back.
    4 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*mamaofbandl's Avatar
    Today, 05:29 PM
    Hi - long time googler/lurker, first time poster :) I was just wondering if anyone else has experienced this or if it's normal: I'm breastfeeding (exclusively) my almost 5-week old son. For the last 3 weeks or so I've experienced breast pain and tenderness in the breast itself (there's nipple pain too, but only in my right breast - comes and goes - my son is an aggressive nurser). Basically, my breasts are tender, almost like what I used to experience right before my menstrual period would start, but there is no hardness or lumps. The pain seems to be constant - no better or worse before or after feeding. The pain is worse when apply pressure, but I can feel a little pain when moving around - jogging or jumping. I think my little one drains my breasts pretty well; at least they feel very soft after feeding. I don't recall having this with my daughter, so I was wondering if it's normal. Any input?
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*kevins-mom's Avatar
    Today, 03:50 PM
    We night weaned by using the don't offer/don't refuse for the first week or so and then the "nursies when the sun shines" and it was magically easy. I try to be more respectful of people than my brothers are. I am very matter of fact about it, I do not try to hide the fact that we still nurse at all, and I don't leave it open for debate (some people just like to debate for the sake of debating....it runs in my family). I'm not even sure if we're ready to stop nursing completely but sometimes I see other people's opinions on extended breast feeding and it makes me feel like I'm doing something wrong (I know I'm not). I will say I am relieved to have night weaned. I don't think I will miss nursing. I have a very affectionate, loving little boy and we have a lot of opportunities for closeness and cuddles other than nursing. I hate to take it away from him, but I think he'd get over it pretty quick ;)
    3 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*elliebelle's Avatar
    Today, 03:44 PM
    Hi everyone, Questions about my second baby. 8 days old today, born at 8 lbs 10 oz, left hospital at 7 lbs 14 oz, weighed in yesterday at 8 lbs 12 ozs at 1 week appt. Eating tons, every 1.5-2.5 hrs during the day, every 3-4 hrs at night. Produces at least 8 wets and 8 poops every day. Eating about 12-15 sessions per day. I have two questions: 1. During some daytime feedings, it is difficult to keep her awake. Sometimes I'm lucky to get to 5 minutes, sometimes she'll go as long as 10 on one side. I have a very fast letdown (first let down within the first 30 seconds, then another 2-4 for the next 5 min). Should I be trying to get her 5 min feedings more to 10 minutes? If she wakes up 20 min later, should I put her on the same side, or switch to the other? Just an FYI, the app that I'm using says the average feed has been 9-13 minutes for the past 5 days. 2. Each night has been less and less amount of sleep. I am finding that she very much loves to use me as a pacifier, but will often create more letdowns while she sucks. I've read a lot about the use of pacifiers, and am wondering if she is just the type of baby that needs to suck a lot at night, and if we were to try it out, what would I need to look out for (ex. fewer feedings at night, less weight gain, etc.) Also, at what point do I let her wake for feedings on her own, rather than me waking her up by the 4 hr mark? We did that 4 days ago, but last night started waking up on her own every 3 hours. Hope...
    0 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 PM
    @llli*lllmeg replied to a thread Weaning Impossibe in Weaning
    Your child may surprise you and sleep well while riding in the car, but be prepared to stop to nurse as needed, would be my suggestion. For long car rides, it can also help if one adult can be in the back with baby. Having just taken a long, difficult vacation with long plane rides and long driving stints, with my husband and three kids, I can say how incredibly helpful it was that my 23 month old daughter is still nursing.
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 03:36 PM
    @llli*lllmeg replied to a thread Weaning Impossibe in Weaning
    I know you are tired and I truly sympathize. Your child's behavior is 100% normal. I suggest, take a breath, maybe have a talk with your child's father, and get clarity on what it is you wish to achieve by weaning your child. For example, If you need to wean your child entirely in order to take a medication, which is very unlikely, that is a very different issue than weaning at night in the hope it will lead to more sleep. It is a myth that a toddler will necessarily sleep longer if weaned. Frequent waking is still normal at this age. Children run the gamut on this, with some nursing toddlers sleeping 8 hour stretches as a regular thing, and many not weaned (or never nursed) toddlers waking frequently, and vice versa. On the other hand, some mothers find night weaning is beneficial, but it can also be far more difficult and troubling than it is worth. As far as weaning goes, 14 month olds are very young for concepts like "you can nurse in the morning." What would probably work better at this age, if you are exhausted nursing at night, is to have someone else comfort you child part of the night, perhaps offering some water or a snack, even to just help delay a feeding so you can get a longer stretch of sleep. You live with the child's grandparents. Can't they help with this sometimes? As far as Cry it out." Aside from the many reasons this is an unhealthy practice, it is also very noisy. Who could sleep while their beloved child or grandchild screamed to be...
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:29 PM
    If you want to wean, I would definitely start with the "don't offer, don't refuse" strategy and see where it takes you. Your LO may surprise you and never ask again. If he does ask, it might help to have someone else take over bedtime/naptime (if possible). A nursing toddler only expects to nurse when mom is there. When dad or grandma handles bedtime, there may be a bit of a struggle as the toddler tries to figure out how to get to sleep without nursing, but nursing will not be expected. Since you're down to just 1-2 nursing sessions per day, you probably do not need to worry about engorgement. If you do start feeling overfull, just hand express until comfort is restored. The one thing to be careful of is plugged ducts and mastitis, as they can crop up when weaning is happening. If you feel like either of those are happening- and they probably won't!- then you want to empty the breast as much as possible even if it increases supply again. I'm sorry, mama. They sound like they are capable of being quite insensitive. Do you feel like you can be equally straightforward with them? Or are they the sort of people who can dish it out but not take it?
    3 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 02:03 PM
    http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/ http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/ Continue to offer in a calm manner. Stimulate the breasts in the meantime. Hand expression will work for now until you get a pump but the most important thing is you remove the milk from your breasts do they get the message to continue making more. You'll want to aim for 10-12 nursing pumping sessions in a day. They don't have to be every so many hours but try not to go over 3-4 hours while you're building your supply. Search this site for info on a local LLL leader and check for a lactation consultant (preferably a IBCLC-international board certified lactation consultant) in your area to get hands help. You won't regret the effort you put into nursing your child.
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*ava.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 01:58 PM
    Hello and welcome to the forum! Do you have any local lactation consultants/professionals available to help? Sometimes they will be located in private practices or pediatrician's offices. There are also WIC/public health nurses available who may be able to try to help as well. Babies have to suck differently on the breast than they do with bottles, so if you're not already, I would try using slow-flow nipples with a wide base that are more breastfeeding friendly, and used paced bottle techniques (keeping the bottle more horizontal, offering frequent rests/breaks, etc.). You may try expressing a little milk to have on your nipple to entice your baby to open really wide in order to get a good latch. You may try compressing your breast to help your baby stay sucking patiently on the breast. I'm not sure if you said she latched correctly or incorrectly, but you want her to take a mouth full of areola. Initially for the first few seconds or so, until she draws the nipple and areola farther back into her mouth, you may have some discomfort but that should quickly go away. Nursing should not be painful. Milk supply is all supply and demand, so I would try to nurse her as frequently as possible. If you are able to get a hospital grade pump, that would help to maximize your milk production by pumping after each nursing session. It would be helpful to have someone offer her a bottle after you nurse while you pump if there is someone else to help. These first few weeks...
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*kevins-mom's Avatar
    Today, 01:54 PM
    I am nursing my 2.5 year old. I think I'm ready to be done. He loves to nurse, however. He was telling my mom on the phone yesterday "I love nursies!" just randomly out of the blue. I get embarrassed that we "still" nurse when he talks about it to our family and friends. I am proud to make it this far, but at the same time I know I am being judged. My family (especially my brothers) say exactly how they feel regardless of how it's going to make me feel. That said, I'd also like to be done, just to be done. We are down to our bedtime session right now and sometimes nap time (but he goes to daycare so he only gets nap time with me 3 days a week). He very rarely falls asleep nursing, but he nurses and then lays down in my arms and I rock him to sleep. I just don't know how to go about dropping those? It's kind of automatic for us, do I just not offer and see what happens and maybe nursies will just go away without a struggle? Will I have pain/be engorged again like I was at first?
    3 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 01:51 PM
    Some extra resources for you. http://kellymom.com/category/ages/weaning/ http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/toddlernursing/ http://evolutionaryparenting.com/gentle-sleep-resources/
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*braw1027's Avatar
    Today, 01:44 PM
    My little girl will be 2 weeks tomorrow. I started her off on formula in the hospital because in my family that's just what they did. I am now starting to feel guilty and as if I have missed out on not breastfeeding. I am lactating and I want to try and breastfeed. I tried yesterday and she latched on in correctly and when I broke the seal she wanted nothing to do with it after that. Does anyone have any advice on how I should start breastfeeding my 2 week old? She is my 1st and I have no one who has experience to talk too.
    2 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 01:25 PM
    Definitely contact infant risk. There may be a medication you can take. Sorry to say though babies need to be the center of attention. It will get easier and harder in the toddler years. They spend more time able to entertain themselves but require extra supervision because they can get into do much more being mobile. If you can get back into your meds, would you be ok with nursing longer.? It's really quite normal for a toddler to need to nurse for both nutritional and emotional reasons. You're down to just a few sessions anyway. At night can you go to sleep any earlier to make up for some of the time you're awake to nurse? It might take a few more months for him to understand the concept of nursing when the sun is up. Otherwise Dr Jay Gordon has a gentle night weaning protocol you can Google. Sleep will probably get worse for a little while until he adjusts. And it may not eliminate the wakings, many children wake at night for years. The ones who night nurse are usually the easiest to get back to sleep though. I've traveled a few times with my son at night. I leaned over and nursed him to sleep in the seat till he fell asleep, then he woke a few times when we stopped to get gas. I just tried get in extra naps if he slept poorly. Follow your heart and ignore the advice you're getting about cry it out. Your baby will learn to sleep without you someday. Independence comes easiest when you encourage it when your child is ready, not when it's forced out of the fear of ' if...
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 01:03 PM
    @llli*tclynx replied to a thread Weaning Impossibe in Weaning
    As to your medication, have you contacted the InfantRisk Center to find out if your medication really is contradicted for breastfeeding? They can be reached at (806) 352-2519. You might actually be able to take your medication or another med for your condition, call to find out. Many health care professionals tend to err on the side of caution automatically instead of checking to see if there is any risk. (I actually had a nurse practitioner at the health dept say she didn't think I could take Ibuprofen because I was breastfeeding!) Don't worry about co-sleeping here, no one here will judge you for that since many breastfeeding moms co-sleep as there just being no other way to cope (it really is natural) just make sure to be safe about how it is done especially with a newborn but of course you are long past that.
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*ava.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 12:49 PM
    @llli*ava.smommy replied to a thread Weaning Impossibe in Weaning
    Welcome to the forum! I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. Gradual weaning is usually the easiest on both the child and mother, which involves eliminating one feeding daily no more often than every few days. This also will help your supply slowly diminish, without fullness and discomfort. Abrupt weanings can cause the mother physical discomfort, sudden hormonal changes, and some emotional withdrawal/feelings for baby. Either way, it's important to give some extra loving attention while you're weaning. Usually night nursings are the last to go, so you may want to start off with slowly weaning day nursings first. In addition to extra attention, keeping baby close by wearing a carrier can help baby feel cuddled and secure. It sounds like he's eating solids well but likes to nurse. There are several ways you can try to wean, including "don't offer, don't refuse" (which may take longer), changing your routine (i.e. if he's used to nursing in a certain spot/chair, trying to avoid that area), offering substitutions (favorite snack other than breastmilk)or distractions (playing, reading) when he asks to nurse, or shortening the length of the nursings (usually works better with older children who are better able to understand this concept). At night, trying to wear clothing that makes it harder to access your breasts may help (sports bra, etc). When you start weaning sessions during the night, trying to rock, sing, read, or offer nighttime snack are some substitutes you...
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*ava.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 12:19 PM
    Hello! Based on her wet and dirty diapers and her weight gain, it sounds like she's getting enough! Is her pediatrician happy with her weight gain? Usually they will follow a curve (albeit a little differently than formula-fed babies) and should have at least 6 wet diapers daily and at least 3 stools daily. Around 6 weeks or so, bowel movement frequency will start to slow down. Some breastfed babies will continue to have several BMs daily, whereas others may only go a couple times a week. It sounds like she's sleeping well and seems healthy and happy while she's awake, which are also good indicators of getting enough milk. With subsequent deliveries, our milk supply many times will improve or "come in" sooner than the first time around. Also, babies nurse differently... some snack and cuddle around the clock, and some are more down to business. Your baby is still pretty young, though, and I would imagine that as she gets more alert and interactive, you will have plenty of more opportunity for cuddling and comfort nursing more than just nutrition. As far as sleeping for long stretches, is she being swaddled or dressed too warmly? Sometimes those can cause babies to sleep a little longer than needed. When you do nurse her, does she seem satisfied/come off the breast on her own and then refuse to nurse more? You should look for signs of satiety rather than watching the clock (relaxing her posture, coming off breast on her own, relaxed hands, etc). If you'd...
    1 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Today, 11:55 AM
    I would not say that i tried to wean and then resumed, but I do feel like I made a conscious decision to allow but not offer. I work F/T so I nurse her down at night and go to sleep with her in the family bed. If she wakes and needs milk I nurse, in the morning before work and also right when i get home from work (our reconnect). Those of us nursing kids this age (mine is now 2) ARE weaning (compared to newborn time, or 3 months, or 6 months, etc). I think back to my nursing round the clock days back in 2012 and this is nothing like that. So I think of weaning as a very long process that, for us, is child led. :thumbsup
    5 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*kaitlynn's Avatar
    Today, 10:39 AM
    Hi, I'm completely new to this! I have DS 14M His daily routine is: wakes up between 6-8 AM Breastfeeds
    6 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*eegrn's Avatar
    Today, 09:44 AM
    I have a 7 week old and I feel like she may not be nursing enough. Her older sister who is nearly 3 nurses SO much until she weaned at 25 months, from the second she was born. That's pretty much all we would do all day with my first, is nurse for hours at a time. If I offered, she would NEVER refuse. She would nurse until she was throwing up! I used to laugh at the term 'nursing session' because we just nursed all day, I could never even think of them as separate sessions! My first also didn't start sleeping through the night until after she weaned, and had never fallen asleep any other way but nursing to sleep up until that point. So I guess that's what I am used to. My new baby nurses more efficiently I guess? Each session is really it's own separate event! She'll nurse usually only from one side at a time and takes about 10 min. to drain the breast. I offer the other side and she usually refuses. Usually about ever 2 hours during the day, sometimes more sometimes less. If I feel like it's been awhile since she nursed and offer before she's showing hunger cues (like just to bond!) she usually is not interested. She also will not nurse to sleep--she falls asleep by rocking and being swaddled. Additionally, she has been sleeping overnight for 4 hours stretches since birth which have just gotten longer as she's gotten older. We usually get her to sleep between 9 and 10pm, then sometimes she'll wake up around 1am to nurse but not every night, then if she did wake up at 1am...
    1 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 08:54 AM
    I night-weaned my then 17 month old and then went back to nursing at night (with great relief, as in our case, nightweaning led to less sleep for us all) a few months later. As far as others bringing you down-In my experience, this happens again and again to parents. You will continue to have people in your life with opinions, sometimes very emphatic ones, about EVERYTING your children may do and every parenting choice you make. Nursing, sleep arrangements, diet, education, manners, discipline, media, medical care, sports, clothing...I have faced "judgment" from someone on every one of these parenting 'issues' and probably many more I have forgotten. I think that a mom who continues to nurse her child in the face of pressure from others to stop develops a nice strong backbone, and can feel more confident in her choices going forward. Certainly that has been my experience.
    5 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 08:38 AM
    Are you pumping in order to deal with the current situation of baby refusing to nurse? Or have you been pumping for other reasons? Are you feeling very full or engorged due to baby not nursing? Was baby getting bottles at all , or pacifiers, prior to the onset of these issues (or since?) Some moms can pump while baby nurses. Hand expression may be more doable when baby needs to be held: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/06_hand_expression.pdf Do you have any help you can call in?
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
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