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  • @llli*colomom27's Avatar
    Today, 07:31 AM
    It makes me feel a lot better knowing that there are other moms out there who know what they're talking about and are supportive!!:) I'm ordering Kiss Me today and letting baby sleep with me at night. I noticed that if I go sleep with her she only wants to nurse one or two times (one midnightish and the other early morning). If I put her in her pack n' play next to my bed, she seems to want to nurse four or even five times, which spells not much sleep for either of us. I think I'm just going to stop telling my Ped and her dentists about what we're doing. :rolleyes:
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:46 PM
    Thanks for answering those questions! Based on the weights you've posted, I see no issues with her gain. She's growing consistently and following the curve she was born at. So no problems there, right? If you want to boost her weight, feeding frequency is an obvious place to start. 8 feedings is generally the minimum number of feedings per day for an EBF infant, so I would try to cram in a few more when you are together. Aim for 10 instead of 8. Remember, you can't feed her too often when you're nursing! I think this goes double for babies with issues with tongue mobility. Give the baby every chance you can to grab a few extra calories, right?
    11 replies | 212 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:30 PM
    Welcome to the forum! I think what is going on is that you have a brand new newborn. Newborns are weird. They are born instinctively driven to latch and nurse, but those things are also skills that they have to work hard to perfect. Are you currently engorged? Engorgement can make it a lot more difficult for a baby to gain a good latch. If this is part of the problem, tips in this link may help: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/rev_pressure_soft_cotterman/ Some other things to try: - Different positions- I know you're already doing this but keep on trying. Reclined positions (a.k.a. biological nurturing) should be part of your rotation- see http://www.llli.org/faq/positioning.html - Try to latch baby on before she's really hungry. Hungry babies can get so frantic that they forget to latch. So try to catch your baby in that window when she's just beginning to wake, mouth, make little sounds, etc. - Try instant reward. Express a little milk into the skin of the nipple before latching baby on. You can also drop some milk on from a bottle or syringe or whatever. The goal is to have baby get a taste of milk the instant she latches on, as that may encourage her to stay latched and suck.
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*kristenw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:11 PM
    Can you give us the rundown on your baby? It would be helpful to know birthweight, lowest weight, and weight at each checkup. It would also be good if you could tell us how often (on average) the baby nurses, how nursing feels, the frequency/quantity of blood in the baby's poop (are we talking occasional streaks or specks or large blobs?), and any other symptoms you're seeing in the baby (e.g. eczema, asthma). My daughter was born full term, scheduled c section, 6lbs 13oz down to 6lbs 1oz. It was suspected throughout my pregnancy that she had growth restriction (her stomach always measured extremely small on growth ultrasounds, around the 1st or 2nd percentile). I was considered high risk because my son had undiagnosed growth restriction (he was a full term emergency c section, 5lbs 13oz). At one month she was 8lbs 5oz, at 6 weeks 9lbs, at 2 months 10lbs 4oz and most recently (15 weeks) 11lbs 15oz. Her weight gain has slowed but she's following the 15th percentile curve almost exactly. She usually eats (nurses with me and she gets 4 bottles @3.5oz each at daycare) 8 times a day. I've had some pain with nursing since the beginning - we saw a pediatrician who is also an IBCLC who took care of the tongue tie and worked with us on latch. Things were good for awhile but I can tell she's getting lazy now that she gets bottles during the day. We're going back to the basics of latching though and that seems to help. She has recently started screaming some when I...
    11 replies | 212 view(s)
  • @llli*darasun's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    Hi all, Super new to the forum, so thank you in advance for your help! My newborn baby girl was a great latcher when she first came home until my milk came in yesterday. From then on, she was very disinterested in breast feeding - either crying and wiggling a lot once in place (mostly cradle hold) or falling asleep altogether. I am trying to feed every 2-3 hours. I had a post part doula who is not a lactation consultant come over yesterday and she suggest that I manually pump out my milk and syringe feed her today if she wasn't taking the breast just so she could eat. So with the syringe, I have been sticking my pinky finger in her mouth to suck (very strong latch on my pinky) while dropping milk in her mouth. I have reached out to some lactation consultants in our area but as it is Saturday evening, it's tough to find help right now. I've tried different positions like cradle, laying down, side lying, and football. They all end the same: either she cries and get very frustrated or when she is calm, she falls asleep. I usually have to wake her from her naps to feed. I think that is it- I just want to know what else I can try? What's going on?
    1 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*3littlesprouts's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:36 PM
    My nursing consultant taught me minutes after my twins were born! It was one of the main ways I kept my supply up. If you have access to a nursing consultant, she can show you actually where to place your fingers and how to push and squeeze. It may be clearer than youtube. I was taught to use my middle finger and thumb, the thumb right above the areola and the middle finger directly opposite beneath. You push back and then squeeze until the milk stops flowing or dripping. That's how I was taught, that's how I extracted my colostrum to spoon feed the weak twin. That's how I have expressed many many ounces of milk! Hope that helps!
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:36 PM
    My toddler is 28 months, still nursed to sleep, still co-sleeping. All her teeth are in except 3 year molars and they look white and healthy. It's really great to have a pro breastfeeding Ped as we do and regarding dentist I agree with PP. Why even discuss your 1 year old there? Nursing has gotten us through some tough times, especially teething. My daughter is super healthy, but when she gets a cold (twice in her life) or a fever (once in her life) I sure was glad to have nursing in my bag of tricks. When the fever hit she was 16 months and would not take anything but breast milk for a couple days. If you want support you've got it here on this forum!
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:12 PM
    If milk is spraying out when he unlatches, then I would say NOT slow letdown. Do you let the spray go into a towel till it calms down and then try to re-latch? My Son has always fussed a lot against going to sleep, he wrestles it like a bear and when he was 6 weeks old would scream like sleep was killing him. The wrestling sleep like a bear is only difficult now because he seems to like to grab hold of the other nipple while nursing and then try to win the wrestling match with a combo nipple grip/pull/twist while trying to get me pinned with his foot. (This is now at 8 months.) Anyway, sounds like your supply is very ample based on his speed nursing and fast weight gain so I would guess that maybe fast letdown is a big part of the fussing. What happens if you offer to nurse even more frequently? That can sometimes help with easing an overactive letdown, also letting the spraying part of the letdown go into a towel so baby isn't dealing with trying to suck on the fire hose.
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*coolranchdressing's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:10 PM
    hello, BFE and going wonderfully except recently... my 6 week old son started to fuss at the breast. He gets one side each feeding. He doesn't want the other side and I think I had overproduction early on (which also caused him to fuss). This is my second child; all were BFE. He was start to suck then a second later will pull off, scream, and milk is squiring from my breast. I will try to re-latch him but he cries. The only thing that works is bouncing on the yoga ball while nursing at the moment. I've tried side nursing, and him sitting upright more (he has pretty good head control; he is a bigger boy). These methods don't work. At night we co-sleep and he nurses side lying at night well and doesn't fuss/choke. the only other times he's normally fussy is bed time; I nurse him to sleep side nursing. He nurses/cluster feeds for 1 hr at this nursing session; however, initially he will fuss/cry a lot at the breast. but once he settles then he nurses well.
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:43 PM
    I agree preference for one side is common and is not necessarily a problem even in the extreme as it is possible in some cases for baby to get plenty of milk from one side. Also, 4 months is a rather notorious time for changes in breastfeeding behavior, to the point many moms are concerned. Usually there is not an ongoing issue. However, if baby continues to refuse the right and the milk truly dries up in the right, that leaves you with one lactating breast and of course that is a more risky position to be in than two as far as the continuation of breastfeeding, even in the case one is able to make enough with one side. I would suggest: Gently encourage baby to nurse more on the right. Baby may be more willing to 'comfort nurse' or nurse to sleep or while asleep on that side, or take that side after getting some milk from the left. If baby is getting any unneeded bottles or pacifier time, try cutting back or eliminating those to encourage more nursing overall. Also avoid meal scheduling or sleep training that results in limiting time/frequency at the breast. Pump or hand express to increase production on that one side
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    To help you find an IBCLC http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901
    3 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:08 PM
    First, this is not uncommon, most moms are lopsided and many babies have a preference. Second, this isn't necessarily a "problem" and many moms nurse just one side so it is really up to you if it is worth it for you to try to correct. I actually have lower supply on my Left and my Right is the good producer. I have a lot of trouble getting DS to nurse on my left side much. He has tended to switch breasts during nursing sessions most of his life and he largely takes charge of that since probably around 3 or 4 months when he got rather distractable. I'm personally not sure how to really get him to nurse more on the low producing side. Is he shunning that side because of the lower production or is that side getting less nursing and causing the lower production? Early on I used to try to always start him on the low producing side or even try to start and finish on that side but he isn't usually willing for that. I haven't taken to pumping extra on that side since pumping really didn't work well for me increasing supply overall so it doesn't seem to be worth that much extra effort.
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*gbrazelton's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:20 PM
    My almost 4 month old suddenly only nurses well from my left side. When I put him to my right side he frequently pulls off, squirms, and fusses to be done after only a few minutes, but will nurse with no problem from the left side. This has been going on for a few days and now my milk supply is significantly less on the right side leaving me very lopsided. I'm fairly certain it's not a clogged duct issue as I can't feel any lumps and there's no pain. What might be the issue and what can I do to encourage him back to the right side?
    2 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:48 AM
    :ita If this were my baby, I would want her to have some breastmilk in her diet, and to at least try a few weeks of a 100% breastmilk diet. Single "here and there" trials with nursing and breastmilk bottles don't really tell you much about whether or not your child can thrive on an all-breastmilk diet. Clearly something was off at 3 weeks, but I don't think you have enough data to say what it was. Frequent poops and extreme fussiness are normal for newborns. What's not normal is a baby not gaining weight- but based on the data provided we don't know what was causing the baby's failure to gain. In most cases, it's going to be insufficient milk intake or measurement error and not a reaction to something in your milk. Can you see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC?
    3 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:41 AM
    My understanding is that simply treating mom is not sufficient, even if the treatment is Fluconazole. Hopefully someone with more experience will be along to confirm/refute that! Hot water bottle or electric heating pad.
    5 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    3 kids, all nursed for over two years, (oldest two nursed over 4 years, youngest is now 2 and a half and nursing.) All co-slept, nursed overnight, and not a cavity among them yet. oldest is now 11. Breastmilk is good for teeth. And breastfeeding (nursing) promotes the normal development of jaw and oral cavity, which helps promote a healthy mouth for a lifetime. Breastfed toddlers can get cavities, just as any other child might. So good dental care is always important. once baby is eating anything aside from breastmilk, good idea to brush or wipe down teeth twice a day or at least after last 'meal' of the day that is something aside breastmilk , and to have regular dental care visits. AAP and WHO and all other child health organizations suggest nursing for at least a year or two, and for as long after that as baby and mother wish. Even ADA on its website shows research that indicates caries not related to nursing.
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:07 AM
    It's bottles at night that destroy teeth since a bottle will continue leaking until the milk or juice don't reach the nipple anymore and that milk or juice will sit in baby's mouth. Also the way artificial teets affect teeth is different than the breast. I would say pacifiers and bottles ruin teeth not the breast. I expect that most breastfeeding moms that encounter this from doctors and dentists just stop sharing that info with the Dr and Dentist. The breast will provide for better dental development than ANY of the possible alternatives (like thumb or paci) and if the breast gets replaced by one of those in order to wean, well the Paci is a hard habit to break and the thumb even harder since you can't take a thumb away. (Believe me, I was a thumb sucker and the orthodontics I had to go though were no fun and because they didn't send me for physical therapy to learn how to swallow differently, the problem came back.) Baby will eventually naturally wean from the breast. As to those comments that "this is when those manipulative behaviors start" Yes you may need to set limits for your child but that is done by being firm and consistent in your behavior, not by denying them just for the sake of denying them something that is normal and healthy. I recommend the book Kiss Me by Carlos Gonzalez He also wrote the book My Child Won't Eat
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:50 AM
    It is possible, it may be a lot of work for a while but be tough and hang in there.
    2 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:45 AM
    It really doesn't work well to be cutting out all possible allergens at once because as you notice, you can't really live well on rice alone. So did ALL of your Daughters symptoms go away completely on the formula? What are the ingredients of that formula? Which allergies it is designed to avoid? Don't go worrying about the formilk/hindmilk thing, pumping before feeding is probably not helping anything if she is still having symptoms even when you do that and if the pumping before feeding seems to help the symptoms then the pumping before feeding could be making an over supply/OALD situation worse.
    3 replies | 147 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:36 AM
    Hand expression and pumping both take practice to get good at it. Now there is something to be said about pumping and the added stimulation it provides over hand expression when it comes to increasing milk supply. Generally when really trying hard to increase milk supply one might actually incorporate both pumping and hand expression along with increased nursing as much as possible.
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*jessicanewmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 AM
    3littlesprouts, you have me thinking I might not have my technique exactly right -- there's definitely areola involved here. I might need to check YouTube to get some tips!
    8 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*colomom27's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 AM
    My daughter just turned one last month and she has been a breastfed and coslept baby her entire life. I have no desire to give up nursing, but lately I feel like everyone is trying their best to convince me! At her 12 month appointment, her doctor told me that she "has no nutritional reason to breastfeed anymore" and that I need to stop nursing her at night because, "She doesn't need it" and "this is when those manipulative behaviors start":yikes. I pretty much disregarded what she said (despite my husband's "I told you so"s), but this week she went to her first dentist appointment and he said the same thing! He said that nursing her at night will "destroy" her teeth. I know there's a lot of research that says otherwise, and weaning her from nursing at night right now would be a straight horror show, but I didn't bother to question him. Are there other moms out there dealing with this? Have your baby's teeth not been "destroyed"? I honestly feel like the only support I've gotten thus far has come from this site and a few coworkers. :gg
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*summergreen's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:31 AM
    What my doctor suggested is that we would both be treated by my taking fluconazole as it passes into the breast milk which baby is ingesting. Is this insufficient? My doctor is extremely supportive of breastfeeding and very accommodating in general so I'm sure she would be open to modifying this treatment if I presented reasonable concerns. Yes, vasospasams are definitely happening and I am trying to keep myself warm usually by staying bundled up and rubbing my hands together and then placing one over my breast after breastfeeding which works pretty well. We do not have a microwave, so I'm not really sure how to apply dry heat after nursing. Any ideas?
    5 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:25 AM
    Could you be pregnant? Sometimes lowered supply, nipple pain, and a fussy baby are the first symptoms a nursing mother notices.
    2 replies | 130 view(s)
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