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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:04 PM
    Baby is what- about 2 or three weeks old now? That is the age a baby typically kind of "wakes up" and starts nursing like mad, wants to nurse all the time, and cries if they are taken off the breast. I do not know what is going on with your child's milk intake, but I am just saying, what you are describing would describe many babies at this age, even those gaining very rapidly It does NOT mean your child is suffering. Let's imagine, for the sake of argument, that you never make enough milk, and baby continues to need supplements as a result. There is great value to breastfeeding no matter how much baby gets 'exclusively' at the breast. As long as baby is supplemented if and as needed, breastfeeding can continue with no harm, no suffering, and no starving, and only with benefit to your child. A good book that addresses the situation you are facing is Making More Milk. Yes it addresses in detail milk production issues, why they happen and what to do about it, but it also includes much insight, real world coping suggestions, (how to nurse, supplement and pump without losing what is left of your mind, etc.) and encouragement for the mother who is facing the difficult situation of a baby who is not gaining normally at the breast. I strongly recommended it.
    16 replies | 360 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Today, 01:12 PM
    So an update, they came and weighed him again today and he had gained about 160g in the past two (formula stuffing) days reaching 3340g. We discussed the ideas that the breastfeeding woman from the hospital said (2 full formula feeds, pump during them, breastfeed the rest of the time) and they said its ok to try it and we'll reweigh in two days. Since the midwife left I've been mostly keeping my son on my breast (we took a car ride to the shops when he was in his car seat but that was basically it). When he comes off he wails so pathetically and I am suddenly very unsure of myself and this idea. I feel like he is starving, I clearly can't satisfy him at all, my heart bleeds for my little boy. One part of me hopes he'll still gain, but he seems so hungry I am very pessimistic. I don't know what to do, I really want to keep breastfeeding but I don't want him to suffer or starve. When I was showing "look there is milk in there" I actually squirted it accidentally on the midwife (it tended to drip before) so I felt like, hey maybe it *is* getting better, now I am not so sure.
    16 replies | 360 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:56 AM
    Your child is not going to go hungry if you pump an ounce or two a day to freeze. I assume you want to do this to build up a freezer stash ahead of returning to work? Just try to pump is soon after baby nurses as possible. If baby wants to nurse right after you pump, do not worry about it. Let baby nurse. The body is always making milk, so baby nursing again right after pumping is usually going to simply result in another letdown of milk. IN any case, this is not likely to cause any issues with your child's overall intake. If anything, pumping here and there as well as nursing with normal (high) frequency is likely to help milk production if there are any issues there. Just be careful it sounds like your pump itself may not be working all that well for you.
    7 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*luz3stelar's Avatar
    Today, 11:47 AM
    That is good to know, I will definitely keep that in mind. I think I will stick with the dairy/soy free diet since I already started - might as well see it through. Then when/if she gets better I can reintroduce them to see if they were the cause after all. Maybe I will hold off on eliminating nuts for a while unless things don't improve. Ugh, I just don't want to do something if there's a chance it's hurting her, but I will feel silly if in the end it was nothing I could control at all! I've tried a lot of things to reintroduce night nursing but they are so hit or miss. If I offer to nurse when she stirs/wakes, a lot of times she will latch/unlatch, thrash her head around and cry until I give her the paci. OR she will drain both breasts and want to party for the next 90 minutes for some reason (I guess she associates feeding with daytime?). Whereas if I give her the paci she usually falls right back asleep. So it's very tempting to not offer the breast at all as you can imagine. :) However, I am trying to be more persistent about offering the breast. Since I had my first period and my supply has regulated, I can tell how quickly my supply decreases when she doesn't nurse frequently. She becomes frantic during feedings as if I'm starving her (I know I'm not, but it's still frustrating). We've made some progress, but it's slow going... I mentioned in my first post we've been bedsharing more. It works sometimes, but not all night. We definitely both sleep better when...
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:40 AM
    The general recommendation is that a bottle of breastmilk that has been drunk from can be put in the fridge and used again "for the next feeding." I think the concern with using it beyond that is bacteria from the child's mouth colonizing in the milk or in the bottle nipple (or cup rim or spout, I suppose- guidelines all assume bottles) Of course, these are guidelines for very young infants, not one year olds who are putting who knows what in their mouths on a regular basis, and routinely carry around the same bottle of water or juice all day. (Not saying the latter is a good idea, just saying, that is a common practice and I don't know of any dire health warnings.) However I would suggest, to be entirely 100% safe, if you want to keep the milk for several days in the fridge, keep the milk in something else and serve small amounts at a time in your child's cup, rather than giving your child it all at once with the idea of saving leftovers in the cup your child has already drunk from. I also would not suggest freezing milk from a cup that has already been drunk from, mainly because it is so easy to avoid having to reuse "used" milk by simply keeping the expressed milk in one container and serving it to the child in small amounts in another. This may be an excess of caution, but, that is what I am thinking. Perhaps another way of looking at it is the popsicle test. If your child sucked on a popsicle, but did not finish it, would you wrap it back up and pop it back...
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:32 AM
    I think everything suggests a schedule because people are in general more comfortable with schedules. You are absolutely correct that overall frequency of pumping/hand expression is what is important and there is no reason to stick to pumping in some "every such and such hour" schedule. Before pumps, people - including grandmothers, when needed- relactated by nursing the baby, and those babies were not on any schedule. I have no idea if what you are experiencing means your milk production will return nor to what extent, however the changes and feelings you are having in your breasts certainly indicate something is going on. About all I can say about some of what you report is "hormones do some wacky things" whether due to hormones of lactation or peri-menopause or some combo I have no idea.
    11 replies | 6896 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:17 AM
    Hi cjuch, I am glad you bumped your post as it was clearly missed. That said, it is a week old. Is everything exactly the same? Overall, I think it is obvious the nipple shield is not working. There are other brands of shields that might work better, and I do wonder if this one is not only too big but not being put on correctly (this can be tricky to learn but LC should have shown you) but I wonder, Has your LC worked on latch at all with you and baby WITHOUT the shield? There is no reason to assume a baby needs to use a shield after tongue tie release or after having bottles. The idea that some babies will "refuse flesh" after bottles is entirely theoretical. Every instinct a baby has compels them to nurse on the breast. So I think there have been many assumptions going on here that I think may not have served you to well. For example, are you saying LC decided off the bat before your baby ever tried to nurse, that you would have a hard time nursing your baby? Tongue tie or no, that was a huge assumption. If your nipples come out ever, they are not truly inverted. Have you always seen the same LC? Is she an IBCLC? Do you know what her actual experience and training is?
    2 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*cjuch's Avatar
    2 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*lmxo's Avatar
    Today, 10:07 AM
    Hi- i see the other person who replied said its not necessary to overhydrate. But for me, drinking a TON of water was the only way i was able to increase my milk supply. (But this was when my daughter was an infant so it may not be the same scenario). I also took the Fenugreek herb.
    2 replies | 495 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:57 AM
    Check on pump manufacturer website or customer service (or an IBCLC, best) but yes, that sounds like they may be too large. Here is a graphic on flange size from Ameda (one pump company) http://www.ameda.com/breast-pumping/getting-started/flange-fit How many sizes came in your kit? Just one?!? They used to come with two I thought...I mean, moms come in all different sizes- Some moms even need different size flange on each breast! Look a flange can be cleaned pretty darn well, it can even be boiled and thus sterilized if I am not mistaken. If a new set of flanges is a financial hardship, I wonder if you can find used ones free or cheap...
    16 replies | 360 view(s)
  • @llli*dolphindance's Avatar
    Today, 09:55 AM
    Not sure what else to call it but I cannot remember the guideline for using breastmilk after baby has already drank from a supply. I thought I remember that if you have leftover milk in a cup/bottle the saliva will start to breakdown the milk - right? My 1yr old doesn't want to nurse first thing when awake in the mornings now - he signs for food immediately and started nursing only like 2 minutes. Then pops off and signs for food again. So I guess he is just ready to get on with the day and chow down some breakfast. I pumped this morning while he ate and plan to give him the milk in a cup or sippy with his food instead of water which he is used to when eating. (He has never had a bottle so no need to introduce at this point right?) If there is leftover milk can it still be stored for 3 days in fridge and used again? And can it be froze if he has drank from it?
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:46 AM
    Hi and welcome! It is normal for weight gain rate to slow down after 3-4 months of age. If it did not, toddlers would be enormous and 5 year olds would rule the earth. It does sound like the gain rate has dropped perhaps overly dramatically, but it is hard to say. The average (meaning normal gain can be both lower and higher) is for gain to be about 1/2 pound a week (or two pounds a month) and then when it reduces, it reduces to about 1 and a quarter to one and a half pounds a month. But that is not the whole story, because to understand better whether gain is normal or not, you have to look at a longer period of time than a week here or a month there. Can you give us your baby's weight check history? We would not need everything- just maybe birth, ( I see you gave that already but we also need to know how much baby weighs now so we can compare the two.) Also, lowest weight after birth (assuming there was a lower weight in the first week or so) and then every month or so since then? I do not know how often babies are weighed where you are...Also, is length and head circ also measured? And are those showing normal growth? Also note any different scales used. Unless baby is always weighed on the same digital infant scale, unfortunately, the weight checks cannot be trusted 100%. Also, who is weighing baby? Are they rushed, distracted, are you always checking the numbers too? We place so much trust in what the scales say and forget the rather strong possibility of...
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*lmxo's Avatar
    Today, 08:14 AM
    Hello! My daughter is 27 months old and she wants to nurse constantly. Shes always been this way but now that shes this old im getting a little concerned that its too much. She eats and drinks alot throughout the day with her normal meals. We co-sleep and she nurses 1 or 2 times during the night. I only work 1 day a week so im with her most of the time. When im at work, shes fine and takes cows milk from a cup. She wants to nurse in any kind of situation (not just to sleep, out of boredom, when shes upset) but just all the time throughout the day. So I would like to know 1) Is this normal and do I need to cut down her feedings? 2 ) There is one scenario in particular that I would like some advice on: When I tell her "no" about something (no candy, no jumping etc..) she immediately wants to nurse. Sometimes I let her but other times I think that she needs to just tough it out and I should NOT let her nurse in this situation. 3) I want to wean her soon. (Not sure when bc im dreading it) Is it ok if I just continue as is until I start the weaning process? I guess Im picturing weeks of screaming tantrums if I try cutting down on feedings now and then again later, weeks of screaming tantrums with the real weaning. (Ugh)
    0 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*longtalltexan's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    I wanted to give an update for anyone who might find this thread useful in the future! Around week 10 is when everything started to settle down for us. He got big enough to handle the heavy milk flow, and I stopped spraying with every single letdown. By slowly increasing the time, based on his reaction, the feel of my breasts, his grassiness levels, and the quality of his poop, I ended up settling into 4-6 hour nursing blocks, which I have to track with an app because otherwise I will never remember which side I last nursed on and when. I also found that I had to use other forms of comfort or ways to get him to sleep sometimes if he gets too overtired or upset. Then, once he's asleep, I can get him to nurse much more lightly, which helps him stay latched and drinking. And of course, I probably could have done none of this and time still would have corrected most of it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ We're at three months now and nursing is a dream! I still have spraying let downs sometimes (I don't go anywhere without a diaper or burp cloth), but he's gaining great, his gas is much reduced, and his poop is generally curdy and yellow.
    6 replies | 428 view(s)
  • @llli*1sttimemummy's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 AM
    Hi everyone. I am new here, desperately need your advice :) My son is 18weeks old, EBF. Starting around 11-12weeks he doesnt have much interest in feeding. He can be on a breast just3-5min and thats it. I dont have any problem with milk supply, i always check after his refusal by pressing and there is always a good flow. Then I offer him second breast, sometimes he can take it for another couple of minutes but mostly he refuses it. During the nights he can be longer as he is sleepy and not distracted by anything. Day or nights I feed him by demand and it is usually every 3-4hours. We get around 4-5wet nappies and usually 1dirty nappy daily. Sometimes he can pass wet wind which is yellow mucusy. For the last month his weight gain was under 400gr which less than 1pound. And I weighed him yesterday to see the difference since then he gained only 30gr for the last week. I am very concerned about weight gain and loss of appetitte as he used to gain up to 120-180per week before and there is a dramatic change, only 30gr. I tried to feed hin in a quite room with closed curtains, for the last 10days cbedsharing (as I read somehere bedsharing babies tend to gain more weight:shrug), talk to my HV who says it can happen to some babies they just gain weight very slow. Even if it happens why he used to gain min 120gr each week and went down to 30gr now. What can cause this? I very concerned about it and desperately want to ebf but started to think about formula top up(( just for...
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*yum24's Avatar
    Today, 12:30 AM
    Im currently using large. I gave my son 2 bottles of expressed milk for past 2 days and he is pulling at breast.doctor said it could be because of bottle(nipple confusion) so, I stopped pumping all together since yesterday. I'll try small shields when possible & update you. Also, is there a way you can suggest I can pump (even if it is 1oz/day) & freeze it and breastfeed at the same time. My son feeds every 2 -2.5 hrs.if I pump in between, he will go hunger so, I'm confused. Thanks for the responses !
    7 replies | 179 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:28 PM
    I am pretty sure it's too large. My nipples are fairly small (and my areolas are huge!). Areola ends up in the tube definitely. Like half of what's in the tube is nipple and half areola. I was hoping it wouldn't make much difference because it's even more money for the alternative flanges but I guess I have to get them.
    16 replies | 360 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:04 PM
    One thing to know about allergies is that while the tendency towards allergy is inherited, specific allergies are not. That is, if you (or someone in your family) have an allergy, it's more likely that your child will have an allergy. But there's no reason to think that your child will have the same allergy that the other allergic family member does. So while I think you should feel free to eliminate nuts if it causes you not hardship, you probably don't need to take that step. It might be a good idea to start nursing her at night instead of letting her have the paci. Long stretches of time without nursing allow lots of lactose-rich milk to build up in the breast, so by the time morning roles around baby is likely to ingest a ton of lactose. All fine and healthy, but also potentially a cause of intestinal irritation and green poops. :ita EXACTLY! Focus on the baby. If she's generally happy, healthy, and gaining normally, weird poops are something to keep an eye on but nothing to freak out about. If baby is clearly sick, unhappy, not gaining- THEN you start taking poops more seriously.
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 PM
    I am sorry I did not understand the weights correctly. this all must be very frustrating- It is normal for 2 week old babies to be hungry and want to nurse/eat most of the time. Spitting up is usually normal but if you think the formula is the cause, I wonder how much baby is getting at once? In my experience with breastfed babies, they spit up more if they got more than they could handle all at once. Baby's tummy is the size of his fist, so that is why babies must eat frequent small meals. Can you see the LC again and bring your pump? I wonder if the flange is sized correctly. When you pump, does your nipple move freely in and out of the tunnel? Or does it rub? That might indicate flange is too small. Conversely, does your areola get pulled in along with the nipple or is there a lack of a seal? That may indicate flange is too large. Too large flange in particular is not going to work correctly in extracting milk, but a too small one might hurt or injure you or cause you to not be able to pump at a high enough setting because it hurts.
    16 replies | 360 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    Wow, that is wild. I worked in daycare years ago and we NEVER would have dreamed in a thousand years to tell a mother what to feed her child at home! Home was home and 100% not our business. Good for you for standing your ground. People can get set in their routines and methods and think their way is the only way. You are teaching these caregivers something important - that there is another way. I hope they can open their minds to take it in.
    9 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Hi I also used nipple shields in the early weeks with my oldest. I get being over it! I found I had to be persistent but patient. I tried every day to get baby to latch without the shield, usually a few times a day. But if it was not working and baby and I were getting frustrated, I let it go, nursed with the shield, and tried again later. One side came about two weeks before the other. In my case the shield was given to me by a lactation consultant I started working with when baby was a week old because my baby took an hour to latch and when he did finally get on there the latch injured me. Over the ensuing weeks I continued to work with this IBCLC and another she recommended to improve baby's latch. This was very important, I could not even think about weaning baby off the shield until he was latching well. So I would suggest, if you can get hands on help with latch and positioning, do that. There really is no substitute for effective hands on help. Otherwise figuring out latch and positioning takes trying different things and seeing what works best for you.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    I think that generally speaking the two most common causes of baby refusing one side is 1) Baby cannot get a good latch on that side or 2) Baby can latch but the flow is either too fast or too slow. In most cases at such a young age, the issue would be fast flow, unless mom has very low milk production. Another reason flow is slowed is not by low production but by a milk duct plug or engorgement that causes inflammation inside the breast that makes it hard for baby to extract milk. If you are able to pump without any issue, you can probably rule out a plug or engorgement causing a problem, and I assume milk production is normal. But the breast being engorged might also make it hard for baby to latch. Some questions: When did this start? Any reason to think you are engorged or that the milk flow on that breast is very fast or forceful? Any reason it might be harder for baby to latch well on that side? When you pump about how much do you get? How many times a day do you pump? Right now, are you continuing to nurse on one side and is baby gaining fine? Or are you supplementing with what you pump?
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*rogi2430's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:18 PM
    Thanks all for the help and insight! I really appreciate it.
    6 replies | 249 view(s)
  • @llli*luz3stelar's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:03 PM
    Thank you both for your replies!! She had her 4 month checkup and shots today (we skipped rotavirus and will do it at 6 months just in case). The pediatrician is still hoping it's a virus and I'm feeling slightly more confident that it is. I still don't want to rule out allergy entirely but I'm willing to take a slower approach to figuring out what is the cause. My baby did have a few bumps that looked like a rash on her bottom/back that make me suspicious, the doctor said it could be heat rash. My fiancé did remember today that his mom was allergic to nuts, and I've been eating tons of nuts, so I may try eliminating those later on just to see if it helps. No nuts would not be as big of a sacrifice as the dairy/soy free diet has been. :( Oh and the reason I've continued eating food with soybean oil and soy lecithin is because the GI said it was okay. I did think it was weird and haven't had large quantities of foods containing either one just in case. I do need to do more research on how to rule out allergy, as the GI was clearly not helpful at all. I REALLY appreciate your feedback about the hindmilk issue. I've never done anything to increase my supply aside from eating healthy, staying hydrated and nursing often. When my oversupply developed it was because of pumping for a freezer stash and also at work. She's been sleeping/not eating for really long stretches at night since 6 weeks (on her own, I always offer but she prefers the paci at night) so it's not a recent...
    5 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*marklaus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:16 PM
    I can't believe they were so pushy and even said to offer cows milk!! And told you to use formula at home! They must have very little experience with EBF babies! Sorry you had to deal with that.
    9 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*lindseyschwochow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:30 PM
    What a struggle! My baby is 6 weeks old and we are working on getting rid of this stupid nipple shield. It was given to me at the hopsital because I have flat nipple and had a spinal headache post delivery. The shield helped us a lot but I'm so over this thing. Washing them constantly in the middle of the night, losing them, the pain I still have and I just don't think it's nessasry any more. My issue is that he is so used to just sucking the shield into his mouth he doesn't understand the 'open wide and latch' concept. He just wants to suck my nipple up into his mouth like with the shield and it's super painful. His latch without the shield also seems to slip off a lot and he does the same where he just slurps my nipple back into his mouth. I have large breast which is difficult in itself but we both end up frustrated trying to work on getting this latch right. Any advice how to get him to work on his opening up wide to take in more of my nipple and areola? I want to breastfeed for as long as I can but I don't want to do with with this shield.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
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