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  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Today, 06:03 PM
    If it is my period, will this decrease be temporary?
    3 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Today, 06:02 PM
    I was at 8x per day but then he began sleeping the long stretch at night so that one was cut out. I nurse every 3 hrs during the day and more often if he is hungry, bur most of the time I have to wake him at 3 hours to feed him. I asked my pediatrician whether that was ok and she said as long as it was on demand during the day with a max of 3 hours she was okay with it. I'm using a medela freestyle which I kind of hate! Had some issues with the suction a week ago so I just bought spare parts and will see if that helps. Pumping isn't all that comfortable to be honest. I am trying another size flange (xl) as I get a white ring around my nipple with the large. I'm pumping 15 min, or until 5 minutes after milk stops. Lately the milk has been flowing for the first couple minutes, then nothing. No contraception- my tubes are blocked and had ivf.
    3 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 PM
    This boggles my mind, despite the fact that I have seen moms report this over and over and over again. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation remains that babies be exclusively breastfed until 6 months unless there is a unique need for solids.
    4 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:49 PM
    So that's 7-8 nursing sessions in a 24-hour period? If so, that's a bit low for a 6 week old EBF baby. Most babies are eating a minimum of 8x per 24 hours, and many are eating more like 10-12 times per day. If you can boost your child's nursing frequency, you are like to get better supply and to reduce or eliminate the need for supplements. Now, on to the decrease in output. To determine why you've had a decrease, it would be helpful to know the following: - What sort of pump you have - How pumping feels - How long you are pumoing at each session - Whether or not you have started a new form of hormonal contraception, including "safe for breastfeeding" methods like Mirena or the mini-pill Please don't freak out yet. The sort of thing you are experiencing is generally due to normal adjustments to supply. Most moms start out making more milk than they need, but after their babies have been nursing a while, the body "reads" the baby's demand and adjusts production to meet demand very precisely. When this adjustment occurs, it is normal for pump output to decline and for a mom to rarely, if ever, feel full.
    3 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*snb1028's Avatar
    Today, 05:36 PM
    My pediatrician said he could start solids at his 4 month check. Daycare fed the sweet potatoes for the first time today and they said he ate almost half of the gerber container. He also ate cereal and 13oz breastmilk Instead of the usual 16oz. I think they are feeding him more so he sleeps longer. they do not pace bottle feed..I just recently learned about It. I will have to give them some information on it. His longest stretch at night varies between 5-7 hours. He also goes to bed early around 630 or 7 so I usually nurse 3 or 4 times before bed.
    4 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 PM
    Welcome to Awesomeville! Enjoy that feeling of liberation. I know I still do, and I haven't nursed anyone for closing in on 2 years!
    49 replies | 2965 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 05:22 PM
    Hi mama, you are amazing! I would start with the pump that yields the least - let's say the 3:30 pm pump. It's only 1 oz, so I don't think you will be engorged or uncomfortable by completely dropping it, anyway you are pumping frequently at that time of day. You can do your 2 pm pump a bit later and your 5:15 pump a bit earlier, ie you spread out the remaining pumps a bit. Let a few days go by, see how you feel. If no fullness/engorgement after a few days, move on to the next one - maybe the 8:40 one. And so on. From an antibody point of view it doesn't matter, I don't think. The other thing you can try doing is to shorten your very long/power pumping sessions that last for an hour or 40 minutes. Whether you want to do that at the same time or first or after dropping sessions - I don't think there is a right answer to that, you have to go by feel and see how it goes. You can always add pumps back in if you feel full - for me pump weaning (I pumped at work) was a step forward/step back kind of process, but for others it goes quite quickly and they can drop pumps easily.
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*anaduralia's Avatar
    Today, 04:56 PM
    By the way, have you tried a dream feed? When they are half asleep (or sleeping lightly)? That is supposed to work sometimes. I was just thinking that since she tried the other day when she was tired and disoriented, she might try when half asleep. Some people also try taking a bath with their LO and sometimes they will just want to nurse there. Thought I'd mention in case you hadn't tried these techniques. Good luck to both of you with strikers!
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 04:29 PM
    Psychological update!! With DS now almost 3.5, I can confidently say for the FIRST time in his life that he could not only survive, but thrive, without my milk, or with just a bit!!! Wow, is that ever liberating! :D
    49 replies | 2965 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 04:25 PM
    Thanks Bsua65!! A metric ton of milk is hard to fathom, isn't it? :)
    49 replies | 2965 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 04:19 PM
    I hear echoes of my DS-almost 3.5 in your description of your daughter, pteroglossus--the lying on me, the upset if I'm not facing him as he sleeps, the boring stories, loving boob manhandling, and lots of nursing to sleep. We bed share and nurse down for all sleep, including over night. What I've found works well to have DS drift off to sleep--and stay asleep longer--are a pre-bed meal (ideally fed half an hour before settling while reading a boring story), teeth brushing, pre-bed nursing, and then snuggles. I ask DS to cuddle me to help me fall asleep, or tell him with a serious face, "let's NOT fall asleep". Now, if I can figure out how to have him not freak out every time he wakes and finds me 10 feet away in the next room with DH, I'll be golden. The poor little sweetheart looks totally frantic, even though I tell him each time, "If I'm not next to you, I'm with Daddy."
    7 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Today, 04:13 PM
    I thought it might be helpful to someone out there for me to give a 3 years later update. Also, maybe therapeutic for me to write it out. We've come a long way! :) Thank you llli.org and kellymom.com My dd ended up taking bottles with no problem. Bottle type did not matter. It just took time, patience and opportunity. Her caregivers used paced bottle feeding. My anxiety got better, but I was never comfortable working outside the home away from my child. I continued to work until my dd was 18 months old. I tried switching to a different job that I thought would give me more time at home. It turned out to be a less bfing friendly environment. Pumping was made very difficult. I quit with no notice. I have NEVER even considered doing that before. I found another position a couple weeks later that was flexible and I requested part time plus some work from home. I learned to pump in bathrooms, closets, classrooms with no lock, offices with windows and in the car parked and driving. I pumped did not pump wean at a year. My dd didn't mind milk with excess lipase as long as it was spoon fed to her as a frozen slushy. My husband and I had thousands of conversations eventually agreeing to sell our home. After an elimination diet, I was on a dairy free diet for 19 months. She outgrew her allergy or sensitivity. We were lucky.
    19 replies | 4870 view(s)
  • @llli*michelleb's Avatar
    Today, 04:07 PM
    Answers/Thoughts - I'm getting 2-4 ounces with one breast... so if that's normal then maybe I'm good to go :) - I don't think she's necessarily eating more... she had a hard go with the bottle when I went back to work at 4 months. She had done fine previously (was in NICU for the first week of life and was fine with bottle and had bottles randomly throughout first couple months, but refused at 4 months) it took awhile to get her to eat via bottle - we are doing baby led weaning... but I'm considering modifying a bit in order to get a little bit more actually IN her belly not just all over her face! :) - I totally thought I was block nursing, but maybe not... I nurse at about 3am and 7am... pump at 9:30am, 12:30pm and 1:30p... then I nurse at 6:00pmish, 7:30pm(bedtime), and 10pm dream feed.
    2 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 03:53 PM
    I know how you feel (about not being alone!). I don't know where you live, but here in the US, things can be hard on new parents (bad maternity/paternity leave, lack of support in areas, especially breastfeeding support, etc). There's SO much pressure to just hop up and go back to life as normal after a baby, and at the same time everyone around you is telling you to enjoy this time with your baby, that you feel like a failure if you can't keep up, and guilty you're NOT enjoying the lack of sleep or the messy house or the fact that your family hasn't had a fresh, home-cooked (at least by you) meal a few days in a row. I don't think we're required to enjoy every aspect of parenting. We can enjoy our babies, and oh, how we do enjoy those chubby cheeks, the soft skin, that sweet smell, and that beautiful smile, but babies disrupt things, and they keep changing things on us as soon as we start to feel like we're getting things under control. I told my mom a couple weeks ago baby had begun sleeping a predictable night schedule, and the VERY NEXT NIGHT, she changed things up and hasn't slept the same schedule 2 nights in a row since. :) All that to say...you're not alone; things are hard even after baby is technically not a "newborn," and you are doing the best thing for baby simply by trying your hardest to do everything within your power to make things easier on him. Good luck and I hope things begin to improve for him (and you!) soon. Hang in there.
    14 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:40 PM
    HI! I can think of a few different possibilities for what may be going on. And yes one possibility is there is nothing to worry about. But here are some thoughts, kind of random as I don't have time to organize my thoughts. Pump output of 2-4 ounces per session is normal for two breasts. is this what you get with one? I find it odd your 6 month old is eating MORE breastmilk now then before. Intake of course normally varies day to day or week to week, but overall it is not the norm for daily intake it to go up as baby gets older. It either stays the same, or goes down, because the baby' s growth rate is slowing so rapidly. Can you tell us how much baby gets each day during how long a separation? Have you introduced solids or are you planning to and what are your thoughts on that? Block nursing/block pumping are methods to reduce milk production, and will work to continue reducing production as long as they are practiced. So 'blocking' typically should be stopped once milk production has gotten to the point it is no longer causing problems. This usually does not take more than about a week and if anything takes a shorter amount of time, typically, although in extreme overproduction cases may take longer. Block feeding for longer than that is not the typical suggestion due to the risk to milk production.
    2 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Today, 03:38 PM
    My son is 6 weeks old. He is currently breastfed 7-8times per day and generally sleeps one long stretch during the night (eats at 9:30p sleeps until 3:30). Doctor has my giving him an additional 1 oz breast milk supplement after feedings when he is still hungry, so I have been pumping approx 6x per day after feedings. My typical yield for the day has been 7 oz. Inexplicably yesterday I began noticing a decrease in pumping output and have dropped my output by about half- I am now getting half an ounce total from both breasts for the last few sessions. Even my 3am session was under half an ounce! Additionally, my little guy has been getting fussy at the breast and not eating very effectively. I have recently been weaning him from the nipple shield (he has a poor latch), so that might be part of it, but he also won't nurse well with it. Finally, my breasts just don't feel full anymore. This has all happened overnight (no changes in diet, water intakes, and I have been taking my fenugreek and eating oatmeal) so I am quite afraid that it is because my period is beginning. Is there another explanation? Thank you!
    3 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*michelleb's Avatar
    Today, 03:30 PM
    Background: 6 month old baby girl is doing great. I used to have an oversupply and have been block feeding for the last several months. One breast per feeding, feeding about every 3 hours. At work I only pump one side at a time, also every three hours. For the last two months I would pump between 3-5.5oz at each session (that's from only one breast). And I would be able to keep up with demand. Often with excess to put in the freezer at the end of the week. Current Situation: Currently (last 2 weeks) my daughter is drinking more throughout the day from the bottle (with nanny) than I am pumping at work. Last week I started a new diet and saw a decrease in supply which I quickly remedied by going back to my regular diet, but my supply has not rebounded. I am now falling behind. I am only getting 2-4oz per pumping session, and my daughter's nanny had to dip into my frozen stash (which I have plenty of (60+oz), so I'm not too stressed... but I'd like to keep my current supply up obviously) Questions: Should I stop block pumping? i.e. should I pump both sides at each session? If I pump both sides, should I also offer both sides during nursing sessions? My daughter usually eats very quickly, she eats in about 5-8 minutes (has done that since about 3 months) and now she unlatches and starts blowing raspberries (it's adorable...) I'm not sure if she'd be interested in trying the second side even if offered. I've thought I might also ask the nanny to not offer a bottle...
    0 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*michelleb's Avatar
    Today, 03:16 PM
    Background: 6 month old baby girl is doing great. I used to have an oversupply and have been block feeding for the last several months. One breast per feeding, feeding about every 3 hours. At work I only pump one side at a time, also every three hours. For the last two months I would pump between 3-5.5oz at each session (that's from only one breast). And I would be able to keep up with demand. Often with excess to put in the freezer at the end of the week. Current Situation: Currently (last 2 weeks) my daughter is drinking more throughout the day from the bottle (with nanny) than I am pumping at work. Last week I started a new diet and saw a decrease in supply which I quickly remedied by going back to my regular diet, but my supply has not rebounded. I am now falling behind. I am only getting 2-4oz per pumping session, and my daughter's nanny had to dip into my frozen stash (which I have plenty of (60+oz), so I'm not too stressed... but I'd like to keep my current supply up obviously) Questions: Should I stop block pumping? i.e. should I pump both sides at each session? If I pump both sides, should I also offer both sides during nursing sessions? My daughter usually eats very quickly, she eats in about 5-8 minutes (has done that since about 3 months) and now she unlatches and starts blowing raspberries (it's adorable...) I'm not sure if she'd be interested in trying the second side even if offered. I've thought I might also ask the nanny to not offer a bottle...
    2 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*londongirl's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 PM
    Hi ladies ! I've been lurking on here for about a year , what a great website! :-) So my situation is I was a surrogate & Im pumping for the baby , I do also breastfeed him about 3 times a week. He is now 10 months old & I need to reduce my milk for practical reasons - going back to work etc. I have been pumping 600ml /20.2 oz daily since he was about 2 months old (prior to that babys mother & I shared breastfeeding). This is yesterday's pumping schedule - 9:30-10 am pump 200 ml / 6.8 oz 10-10:30 am pump 50ml/ 1.7oz 11-12 power pump 50ml/1.7 oz
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 01:50 PM
    A lot of people find that their young toddlers go through a "nursing like a newborn" phase. Perhaps due to teeth (for example, one year molars) or developmental milestones (walking) or whatever other reason. Perhaps after eating she is thirsty! Baby won't overfeed at the breast, so I don't think you should worry about that. At a year old, solids are just starting to take on a more important role in terms of nutrition, but many one-year-olds have limited interest in solids and are happy to drink mostly milk and are perfectly healthy doing so! It is perfectly fine, indeed healthy and natural, to nurse your toddler as often as she likes. Eventually she will eat more solids and want to nurse less - but that may not happen for a while and that is all normal!
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*lind3's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 PM
    I'm sorry I misunderstood mama7008. It is hard because I normally love this stage and it goes by so fast. We want to enjoy it so I'm sorry to all the mommies going through similar situations. I think we are doing the best we can. Even though I don't wish for anyone to be exhausted and fearful of doing things wrong when it comes to their child, it's nice to know I'm not alone. Hi blueberrysmom! I will have to try the no dairy diet. I haven't done that yet. I can neither confirm nor deny spying on you at night lol. Sometimes I'm so exhausted I could be sleep walking and not even know it. I was hoping it would get better by 6 months :-( Hopefully we will be out of the woods soon-hugs back at ya
    14 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:52 PM
    If you are working 40 hours a week I'm guessing that breaks down into 8 hours per day? The rule of thumb is that baby should get 1 - 1.5 ounces per hour apart from you - sounds like he is getting closer to 2 oz per hour. The fact that he is getting twice as much than when he is with your parents also is consistent with overfeeding. So I definitely, definitely think you should try to scale that back. Check out the link about the paced feeding, go over the sheet with baby's caregivers, WATCH them do a paced feeding. How big are the bottles baby is taking? They should be 2 or 3 oz, maybe 4 at the most - that is what baby gets at the breast. It is very easy to overfeed baby with the bottle, especially if caregivers are more familiar with formula feeding, which most caregivers are because more babies are formula-fed that breastfed. And while baby will TAKE more in the bottle, that does not mean he NEEDS more in the bottle. Similarly, though feeding him into a coma may soothe him, that does not mean that the reason he is fussy is because he needs more milk; he might also be soothed by someone holding him, walking around with him, rocking, singing etc - but nobody has tried this because it's easier to give him more milk. Easier on them - they're not the ones who need to pump all that milk! I think you are absolutely heroic for pumping 6 or 7 times to get those 16 oz. I also think your caregivers are doing you a big disservice by overfeeding baby. Because, not only do you need to...
    4 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:31 PM
    I have no problem with a mom getting more sleep and if sleep training in any of its forms worked for you, great. I am glad you suggested it so OP can consider it. But too many mothers are made to feel they are failing their children or their husbands or themselves if they do not somehow make their child sleep 8-12 hours at a stretch (or any other totally made up amount of time that everyone "should" sleep) without requiring any comforting. Sleep trainers almost never have any science behind their claims. If you understand sleep science, you understand that NO ONE of any age normally sleeps 8 hours at a stretch or anything like it. We just grow out of the need to be comforted when we awake or even being aware of waking. But this assumes that controlled crying will always "work" the way it worked in your family. This is not a universal experience. You are also assuming that what you did with your child "taught' him to sleep longer. Since how long we sleep is actually out of our control, and babies do not require being taught to sleep and sleep longer stretches when they are developmentally capable whether sleep trained or not, I am not sure this can be assumed. The science and research on sleep in young children and sleep training is covered in Sweet Sleep. I will not try to replicate that whole chapter here. I will just say it is not LLL that gives sleep training a 'bad rap.' Many studies from many sources has LONG indicated that many of the claims of those...
    8 replies | 193 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:29 PM
    How about living with a little bit dirtier/messier house for a bit? These early days are just so hard, you are understandably exhausted from nursing around the clock and caring for a newborn, as well as your older kids, DH is tired from helping with the kids and working...
    5 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*nyolemom's Avatar
    Today, 12:25 PM
    My little daughter after tomorrow will be 12 months old, she eats solids around 3-4 times a day(breakfast(usually it’s millet/quinoa/buckwheat/oatmeal with banana or apple), lunch(veggies with meat), dinner-veggies or smth from our plates(actually dinner is hard going now, she refuses to eat it) and snacks as fruits between) and A LOT OF bf… like non-stop(it started week ago), I feel myself milk station:)… very rarely she drinks water: few sips a day. Often it happens she asks(demands!) breast right before(AND after) solids… I don’t want to refuse… but at the same time I am afraid to overfeed her: i wait like 30 minutes after bf and give her solids… I really don’t know how to react when she asks breast but soon we need to have breakfast/lunch/dinner…. should I worry about it? or let things going like it is? ps. I love breastfeeding my little one, it’s really amazing experience :) Thank you very much for any suggestions!
    1 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*blueberrysmom's Avatar
    Today, 12:24 PM
    Thanks @zaynethepain I'm definitely going to try that :)
    6 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:23 PM
    Maybe your strategy of offering the left first is working! That's great the you got 9 oz!
    10 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    I've always seen one drop at a time dropping into the bottle. But the fact that it's uncomfortable indicates a problem. Are you sure your flanges are properly fitted? The nipple should move back and forth easily without sucking more of the breast in. If your breast is being sucked in, try a smaller flange. If the nipple is not moving back and forth easily, try a bigger flange. In my experience my pump output was pretty consistent from day to day. It's not unusual to have trouble letting down for the pump - after all, it's a machine, not a baby! Different strategies include looking at a picture of baby (though sometimes people finds that actually has the opposite effect, because it makes them miss baby!), distraction (reading, listening to music, watching a tv show or movie), meditation. The one thing that you don't want to do is look at how much milk is coming out!
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*blueberrysmom's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    Hi Lind3! Are you sure you aren't spying on me at night?? Because we've been going through a situation very similar to your since about 4 months. Cut dairy, most veggies and DS still wakes 4-8 times per night. He's almost 6 months now and I know how hard it is to not sleep. Hopefully we'll both be out of the woods soon - HUGS!
    14 replies | 312 view(s)
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