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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:19 PM
    PS a little hand expression between nursing sessions can be very helpful in relieving engorgement. If you are so engorged you need to pump a bit, that is also ok. Yes of course pumping will increase milk production. But when engorgement is severe, it is the engorgement itself that is the most potentially serious and immediate problem and in that case you want to try to avoid it. Usually you only want to pump or hand express enough to relieve the pressure.
    2 replies | 278 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:01 AM
    Hi. Engorgement can be a sign of overproduction, but more typically this early on it is simply normal (many moms make too much when milk first comes in) OR it is a sign that baby is not nursing well enough or frequently enough. Baby may be getting plenty of milk, but if mom is having frequent episodes of engorgement, that may still indicate a latch problem. Since you are having engorgement even right after baby nurses, I wonder if maybe you need to have a consult with a lactation consultant to make sure all is well. More info: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html Did you have an IV in the hospital? If you had an epidural or c-section or an IV for any other reason, you may be very "water logged" at this point. This means you could be experiencing edema, (too much water in your cells) which can seem similar to and also can worsen engorgement. Are you swollen anywhere else? It can be very obvious in the extremities, but if you have edema you have it everywhere, including your breasts. OP- Unless overproduction is causing a serious problem, it is usually safest to let nature take its course. Over a few weeks, your body should get the message that it is making too much milk and begin to reduce production on its own. Block nursing gives the body a very strong, immediate message to reduce production quickly, and also can worsen engorgement (as that is kind of how it works) so at this stage is not typically recommended unless the OP is very severe, and then you still have to...
    2 replies | 278 view(s)
  • @llli*jnjsess's Avatar
    May 21st, 2017, 09:25 PM
    I am nursing my 5th baby, I had oversupply issues with all but my 3rd baby. My last baby was my worst case of over supply, it did not clear up until 12 weeks, and he had all the symptoms, green poop, coughing, gagging, crying, gained a lot of weight quickly, etc.. My 5th baby is one week old. I constantly have engorged hard breast that never soften, even after eating. Luckily he has nice yellow poop, doesn't seem to have too much trouble nursing aside from the occasional choking, but it seems like for the most part he can keep up with the flow. I have been block nursing, only pumping a tiny amount to draw out my nipple occasionally, I started drink Sage tea 2x a day, and helatch seems fine. Does this sound like oversupply still if he seems so much happier, and having great yellow diapers? Does it sound like engorment in this case is more swelling than over supply?
    2 replies | 278 view(s)
  • @llli*mommadaw's Avatar
    May 21st, 2017, 12:50 PM
    Wow this is so much great and non judgemental information. Thank you SO much. It's so hard to get any help cause very one thinks you shouldn't or they just let their babies cio. I will look into the books you suggested. I really really appreciate your thorough response. Thank you :)
    2 replies | 333 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 08:04 PM
    I am glad you figured it out! I am really proud of you for sticking with it. Breastfeeding doesn't have to be an all or nothing thing. And if using formula helps you keep at it, then I am glad that it's a tool available to you. Do you have any idea what your ratio looks like at this point?
    14 replies | 1160 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 03:19 PM
    Hi, thanks for answering my questions. So you have only the birth weight? No other weights were done even in the first few days? Anywhere? What was her weight when you saw the pediatrician this last time, and how many weeks old was baby at that weight check? Before you started supplementing, how many times in a day did baby poop and what did they look like? If it was not every day, how much did baby poop? Since you started supplementing on the doctor's orders (I assume) they must have wanted baby to be weighed again shortly to see if supplements were the answer (after all, poor gain could mean other problems)- has baby been weighed since you started supplements? If so what was the result? Of not, when is baby getting weighed again? !!!!Ok. So every three hours would be exactly 9 times a 24 hour day. Right? 9 X 4 equals 36. Are you saying your baby is being given 36 ounces of formula every day, AND nursing 9 times a day? Because 36 ounces would be more than most babies needed, even if they were not nursing at all.
    3 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*trifides's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 02:42 PM
    Absolutely, it's a simple 2 minute blood test and worth doing before you throw in the towel!
    14 replies | 1160 view(s)
  • @llli*peachesandcream's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 01:40 PM
    Hello thank you for replying! 1. I don't have one, she has been to the pediatrician just this once in the last week... mainly due to insurance changes etc. She weighed 6 1/2lbs when she was born. 2. This all has come to a head within the last 3 weeks. I started feeding her a 4oz bottle after nursing every three hours. I just got my breast pump today. It's a Medela. I'm planning to nurse (which doesn't last long as she gets frustrated) and then pump. 3. Kind of funny. With my youngest sibling my mom had trouble nursing and so come to find out he was tongue tied . When I started to realize my baby wasn't getting enough to eat, that was the first idea that came to my head. I presented that to my pediatrician and they checked it, and she confirmed that she was indeed tongue tied.
    3 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 12:08 PM
    You can see an internist or GP for this. They can do a breast exam and prescribe anti biotics. Also, as a post partum mom feeling so worn down, you probably want to have a full workup including thyroid function testing. Feeling exhausted and vaguely ill is quite likely because there is actually something wrong, and it may or may not have anything to do with your breasts. Your milk production will reduce when you tell it to reduce, and your can do that by GRADUALLY reducing either how often or how long you pump. (Or probably best, reducing both.) It is always best to gradually reduce milk removal. This is what a baby does naturally as they wean- gradually they nurse less and less often, taking less and less milk each time they nurse, as they require less and less milk each day. Over many months or even years this happens. That is how milk production reduces safely and naturally. When weaning off pumping, this natural process is what you are going to try to emulate. From what you are saying, I am guessing you probably want to move it along much faster than it would typically happen. Ok, the only problem with that is, since you have the issue with the reoccurring plug as well as a possibly injured breast, that complicates things, because most likely, the faster you wean off pumping, the more likely you will see issues with plugs and/or mastitis. You may want to contact an IBCLC to see if they would be able to help you find a process where you can more safely but more...
    1 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 20th, 2017, 11:37 AM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread Night weaning 8m old in Weaning
    I laugh when people say that to wean you "cut one feeding at a time." Ha! If only it were that simple! There are many ways to approach weaning, or rather, partial weaning. That is what night weaning amounts to- a partial weaning. The problem with night weaning is that to do it, you have to do the same things you would do for any other time weaning- do not offer, avoid taking nursing related "positions", delay, distract, substitute and shorten. These are proven and effective means of gradually weaning and reducing milk production safely and without undue trauma and upset. The problem is, these strategies tend to be much, much harder to do in the middle of the night when you are trying to sleep, than during the day! If you want to night wean, it is going to be much easier if you have a parenting partner or some other help for comforting and soothing your child overnight. A concern particular to this age, just to be aware of, is this is prime time for nursing strikes. Weaning attempts at this age in particular seem to trigger strikes in some babies. I would also suggest that night waking/nursing at this age is only partially triggered by hunger and thirst. That is certainly part of it, and why the substitution strategy (offering food and water) may help even for night weaning. But lots of what is going on at this age is that sleep patterns are changing. Every human starts out sleeping about 80% of the day, and ends up sleeping about 33% of the day. What is less...
    2 replies | 333 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 11:04 PM
    Thank you for the update and explanation about your experience, as well as your tips for other moms. I love those ideas. Wow I hope mommal stops in and sees this. She is always urging moms to get their thyroid function checked!
    14 replies | 1160 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 10:59 PM
    Sounds like you and baby are doing very well! Thanks so much for the update.
    4 replies | 450 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 07:28 PM
    Thank you both for your responses! I realized I'd forgotten to reply. =) We went home from the hospital the day after I posted, and his behavior immediately changed (now it's more a matter of making sure he wakes up enough rather than having hours of wake time/cluster feeding!). I think it must have just been a combination of normal cluster feeding and being in the hospital that was causing issues. He's been averaging a lb weight gain per week(!), so thankfully no issues transferring milk.
    4 replies | 450 view(s)
  • @llli*trifides's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 06:08 PM
    Hi Ladies I wanted to come back to the thread to firstly say thanks for the help and also to update you on what was going on for me. Maybe it can help someone else. Maddieb as you suggested I went to my local lactation consultant, she could see that it was a real battle with the baby. Like you she was unsure what exactly was going on and she suggested that I have my bloods checked including my thyroid function as it can affect let down so I went to my GP. Anyway I got a call form the GP to come in a couple of the days later. Apparently, my TSH was nearly 40 (when it should have been under 2.5) and my T4 was very low. So I was/am very hypothyroid- the doctor couldn't understand how I was coping and wasn't exhausted (I was tired but thought it was having a baby). Apparently, I have post-partum thyroiditis (I never had a thyroid issue before the baby). An interesting thing is that while I'm hypo and am tired, I am also struggling to keep weight on and apparently this is something that happens with postpartum thyroiditis ie you can have a mixture of hypo/hyper symptoms. So I'm now on thyroxine but it's a slow turn around and while my letdown has improved I'm still having issues. Thanks to you ladies I've been employing all the advice and its helping to keep things going while I wait for things to fully resolve. These are some of the things that have really helped me- 1) I don't push the baby to feed. Now when she gets upset- I sit her up for a minute and try to...
    14 replies | 1160 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 05:12 PM
    Hi peachesandcream, welcome to the forum. I am so sorry you are having these concerns. Whether the problem is tongue tie, some other latch or low transfer issue, or low milk production (or a combination- poor latch over time would cause low milk production) these are almost always entirely solvable issues. So, first, take heart. I have to ask a few questions. These may seem redundant, but it is important. Mothers are told or come to believe that there are problems when in fact there are none, or come to believe the problems are much bigger than they are for many reasons. So to help, it would help me to have more clarity. First off, can you define more clearly what this means? When was this? How was this conclusion made and what was suggested you do about it? Was there any indication prior to the visit with your mom that there was a problem with weight gain? If you can give a complete weight check history from birth, that would be helpful. Can you explain how long you have been supplementing baby, and what and how much baby is getting in supplemental feedings each day, (meaning, not at the breast, either formula or your expressed milk?) Are you also pumping? if so, please explain how that is going. (How many times in 24 hours, what kind of pump, what you are able to pump in a single session and per day.)
    3 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*peachesandcream's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 12:53 PM
    New mom here! My baby was born full term via scheduled c-section, due to breech presentation. Nurses well every three hours and was very predictable. She was an amazingly good baby. Gradually over the last 2 months ( she's 4 months) she had become fussy and kind of on edge so to speak . She went from sleeping almost through the night to waking up practically every hour screaming and crying. I would feed her... but she pulled away a lot and would get frustrated. It was exhausting. Ok so fast forward, after a visit with my mom ( veteran breastfeeder) and my pediatrician, I learned my baby wasn't getting nearly enough food. I started supplementing. I'm not really thrilled about it, but I'd way rather formula feed then my baby go hungry . So last week we find out she's tongue tied, it didn't seem to hinder her earlier. So I don't know if she is having a latching problem, or I'm just not making enough? I really want to breastfeed my baby, and this is rather emotional for me. So any help would be appreciated! Thank you!
    3 replies | 226 view(s)
  • @llli*pumpinmamanc's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 10:22 AM
    I don't think I've ever posted here before, but here goes. I have been exclusively pumping for about 2 and a half years for my 2 children. My first child was disabled and never latched until 8 weeks, and then she only infrequently nursed. My second child... never latched at all! Even though it doesn't seem like she is disabled. She is about 9 months. I got pregnant with my second child when the first was 9 months. My supply significantly dropped, and I also got sick and stayed sick for 3 months, so my lactation naturally just stopped, I didn't have to try. (I kept trying SO hard to pump but I was making -no-milk once I got pregnant.) The milk came right back easily when I had my second. I make copious amounts of milk, supply has never been an issue. Oversupply maybe has been an issue. I have been having recurring plugged ducts in the same spot this time around, especially for the past 3 months. I have tried doing some hand expressing lately to help completely empty out the ducts, which seemed like it may have been working, but I may have been squeezing too hard. My boob is SO SORE NOW. And every time the boob fills back up, it feels like a knot in that same place. I keep trying to pump and I can't seem to get the area emptied out. And it is too sore to touch to try to squeeze any out - and I wonder if squeezing was making it bruised/worse.
    1 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*mommadaw's Avatar
    May 19th, 2017, 07:57 AM
    I need some advice. Some nights my 8m wakes every two hours. Some nights he sleeps a 5 or 6 he stretch then a 3 or 4 hour stretch. Some nights in between. No routine. Always varies. And his naps arent regular. And he is nursing less during the day in general I feel like. I offer him 1 to 2 table food meals a day (blw). So I don't wanna wean all together. And he goes down to sleep super easy. We have a good night time routine. But the waking middle of the night thing is getting me. I'm okay with one even two but I feel like more than that he should be eating more during the day instead. How do I night wean? I've read to "cut out one feeding at a time". Which is great advice for a scheduled bottle fed baby but not for nursing. Idk what I'm doing. I'm sure there's gonna be some crying. I really feel like if he was more regular at night hed be more regular during the day. And I do think routines are important.
    2 replies | 333 view(s)
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