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  • @llli*newathis's Avatar
    Today, 01:03 PM
    Congrats on new baby! I can't recommend baby led weaning cookbook enough. It gave me confidence in what I could feed my boy at that age. But really, they can eat almost anything... tough veg can still be steamed. Also, be careful of raw apples, they are a bit chokey... but here's some more of my faves... Chick peas, raw or baked with different spices. Soft boiled eggs Pieces of ham, steak, lamb chop, roast chicken Sugar snap peas Frozen beans, frozen peas, frozen sweet corn Olives ( cut in half )
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*babymm's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:19 PM
    Does anyone know if it is safe to use CBD oil while breastfeeding? Even if it is, I probably wouldn't use it but I am curious. I am suffering from anxiety and I am hesitant to go to the doctor because his first reaction in the past was to start me on antidepressants right away. I hate those medications. It's a nightmare taking them and switching them til I find something that works but has side effects. I just refuse to do that again and I will not take any pharmaceuticals while I am breastfeeding, period. Reading about "natural" remedies for anxiety online has me curious about the use of CBD oil while nursing a baby. I am currently trying meditation and aromatherapy to help but it only helps temporarily.
    0 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    Hi, my daughter will be 2 years in December. I'm starting to wonder how I go about starting to wean. I stay at home with her and currently nurse her 5 or 6 times. Alot of it is comfort for her. I would be ok stopping soon...but she seems to be increasingly attached to nursing as the months go by. She's rather demanding which I don't like too much and she seems to get real upset if I deny her. I've ALWAYS loved nursing and still do..., But am starting to be ready to let it go. But how??? I do leave for an entire weekend with my husband mid November without her. She will get no milk in a cup or anything because she refuses my milk in a cup...will only nurse from me. Good news is when I'm not with her at Naptime or bedtime (if I am at a meeting and my husband has to put her down) she will go to bed without me needing to nurse her. P.s she never has liked cow's milk or anything like that...
    0 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*yassine's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2017, 05:12 PM
    I Think yeast infection Use Home Remedies Effective home remedies for getting rid of yeast infection and candidiasis of skin include the application of tea tree oil, yogurt mixture, aloe vera juice and oregano oil.
    9 replies | 44026 view(s)
  • @llli*lil-as-mama's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2017, 09:36 AM
    Thanks a lot! I have read My Child Won't Eat, and I found it to be helpful but I guess it hasn't fully sunk in. Old anxieties die hard I guess! :) That's a great list, definitely going to try some of those!
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2017, 04:26 PM
    Sweet Potato Fries cucumber spears-cut length wise and then in half. Perfect size for them to grip. Artichokes. Pulling off the leaves and eating the bottom part can be a whole experience! Baby Carrots. Quesadillas cut into strips Celery Celery with cream cheese or peanut butter Raw bell peppers cut up. Kale chips. Home made. Put raw kale on a cookie sheet. Spray with olive oil and bake at 350 for 15 minutes Apples cut into hand size wedges was a favorite of my at that age because it kept him busy for a while without much of a mess.
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2017, 04:21 PM
    My only suggestion is to keep doing what you are doing- offering whatever you are eating but not pushing. That plus those few things baby consistently likes should be fine, and if baby also eats peaches or plums that kind of thing should help with constipation issues, also sips of water would help with that. I had one very reluctant eater and I found this a helpful book: My Child Won't Eat by Carlos Gonzalez. It is not about how to get a child to eat more, but rather it is about why trying to get a child to eat more is almost never necessary.
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*lil-as-mama's Avatar
    September 22nd, 2017, 01:45 PM
    Any tips for easy to eat finger foods that might help expand the variety of solids that my 11 month old will eat? Now that he's older he refuses to be spoon-fed unless he really really wants what you're offering. He likes to feed himself banana, cheese, and toast--he has those pretty much every day. He also likes other fruit, especially peaches and kiwi, and as those are slippery for him to handle and he likes them enough he'll usually let you help him with them. We try offering him some of basically everything we're eating, but most other things he puts in his mouth and chews on for a little bit and then spits back out, or occasionally eats one bite of and then is done. I wouldn't be worried about it and would be perfectly happy to let him proceed at his own pace, except we're now expecting baby #2. So far my milk supply seems to be fine and I haven't noticed any significant change in his nursing pattern...he's decreased maybe a little but nothing huge. Maybe we'll continue like that throughout the pregnancy and be totally fine, but I know pregnancy can sometimes impact supply or cause some babies to wean, so in case that happens I'd like to help him be as prepared as possible to have his nutritional needs otherwise met. I guess he could subsist for a while on bananas, cheese, and toast...but it would be nice to have one or two other things in the mix for him, especially at least one option that's a little less constipating. :) Thanks for your help!
    4 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*anuha's Avatar
    September 21st, 2017, 08:39 AM
    My son also did this around 9 mths and around 1 yr. It lasted about two weeks both times. The same with my daughter when she was about one. I also followed advice from that site, kellymom. Stopped nursing, explained it hurts. Had a little break and then continued. I didn't take too long breaks, because I was afraid of nursing strikes, especially when my son was only 9 mths.
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    September 21st, 2017, 12:55 AM
    This happened with my twins. One thing that helped was always having an alternate thing available during nursing that was appropriate to bite: they liked silicone teething rings and those silicone teething necklaces that you (the mom) wear. Whenever they would bite, I would unlatch, and say (firmly but kindly) "You can't bite mommy. Bite this!" And I would give them the item they could bite. I won't say it eliminated biting, but it helped and they really liked biting those objects while teething. It seemed to give them a lot of relief. Also, you may find that you can predict when they are going to bite. My twins would both start making a certain noise -- it was sort of like "nom nom nom" but in an agitated way, like their teeth were hurting or something. I started offering the teething object when I heard that sound, and they would usually be glad to take it.
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 20th, 2017, 08:27 PM
    Repetitive biting is really difficult- my daughter did this around the year mark and it was so frustrating and painful. After a while, she just stopped. In talking with other moms about repetitive biting this seems to be the typical pattern, it just goes away as mysteriously as it came on. Very good general article with many tips on how to handle biting: https://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*medic's Avatar
    September 20th, 2017, 10:54 AM
    It can happen that way, but more typically there are days of more nursing, days of less nursing, several weeks or months when nursing increases for a while, times it drops off etc.
    13 replies | 3029 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    September 19th, 2017, 06:40 PM
    Nursing a toddler is definitely a different feeling than nursing a newborn! Bigger, stronger mouth = stronger suction. That said, by age 2 you can definitely work on nursing manners - ie, "that's too rough for mama, please be gentle" and ending the nursing session. You don't have to wait long to let him try again, but that little break will help him to figure out that if he doesn't nurse nicely, he doesn't get to nurse! Another thing to think about is whether you're getting your period back (if you haven't already) or if you're possibly pregnant - both things that can make it a little more uncomfortable to nurse.
    2 replies | 167 view(s)
  • @llli*anuha's Avatar
    September 19th, 2017, 08:56 AM
    :lol Mine had a short period of doing the vacuum clearer style (at around one year). But it passed as we always re-adjusted the latching so she wouldn't take too much of my boob.
    2 replies | 167 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob626's Avatar
    September 19th, 2017, 07:25 AM
    Hi all, is it normal for toddlers to nurse a bit tougher as they get older? My two year old isn't biting or anything, but I feel like I am being attacked by a vacuum cleaner or something...crazy sucking that is mildly uncomfortable.
    2 replies | 167 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    September 19th, 2017, 02:51 AM
    I think that is true of a lot of kids, for sure. Mine drank it, a little, but not as much as they do now. To the OP: I was going to add that I personally would not start an 11 month old on formula because it's not necessary, they might refuse it anyway, and it can cause constipation or other digestive issues. It sounds like you're providing plenty of options without it! :)
    4 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    September 18th, 2017, 08:08 AM
    Often teething is short-lived, especially if your consistent in how you handle it. You can pre-emptively end the feed when you see your LO slowing down/finished to prevent the opportunity to bite. You can break suction, end the feed, put baby down and tell her no; and usually if your consistent they get it, like, oh, okay, if I do that, I can't nurse. And you can give her something she CAN teeth on after you take her off. One of my kiddos loved it when I would rub his gums and he would nurse contently afterwards.
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    September 18th, 2017, 08:02 AM
    Congratulations on surviving the strike and persevering through it! I offer to nurse even at 4! Mind you, not often, but still. I think it's a good thing to offer to nurse a child and I hope it's something that YOU feel good about. I don't think you ever have to stop offering, especially when your not ready to wean. Nursing is a two-way street. It meets my needs for closeness as much as his.
    2 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*newmama19's Avatar
    September 17th, 2017, 10:17 PM
    My 13 MO is cutting two of her top teeth, and has taken to biting down on my nipple (hard!) when I try and nurse her. I've just gone back to work so I'm offering her a nursing session 2-3 times a day, depending on when she wakes up. But the way things are going she is often only getting 1 good session in. I think she's frustrated that the milk isn't flowing immediately and then bites me. I've tried telling her no and unlatching but she either cries and gets very upset or just does it again. I really want to keep nursing her but worried that this biting thing may make that difficult... I do think it's teething related but am not sure what to do! Help?
    4 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    September 16th, 2017, 08:00 PM
    My kid wouldn't really play around with Cow's milk until he was over 2. It seemed weird to him. Like...it wasn't as sweet as BM so why? He did eat plenty of cheese and yogurt at that age tho!
    4 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    September 16th, 2017, 03:42 PM
    With my twins, around that age they got funny about whether or not they'd take a bottle of expressed milk. My doctor said during separations of a few hours, simply leave solid foods, and if needed a bit of water in a cup or even a couple ounces of cow's milk.
    4 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 16th, 2017, 10:09 AM
    Here are my thoughts based on my experience- Nursing is not only about eating. As a child gets older and begins to eat more volume and variety of other foods, they naturally need breastmilk itself less and less (although logically we can assume breastmilk is always good for the child, it is a perfect food that would be "good for" anyone at any age.) But what nursing is still important for (as well as nutrition and immunity protection) is comfort. A mother nursing her child is positive and comforting physical contact, and that is something everyone needs. If your child stopped asking to hug you, my guess is you would offer to hug, or ask for a hug because YOU want a hug. To me, offering to nurse a nursing child is no different. You never needed to offer before, but maybe you do now. It is common that kids get busy and basically forget to nurse. Kids do tend to go through periods where they get busy and do not ask to nurse as much. So even though your child did not need "reminding" before, they may now. The reason people say "don't offer" is a weaning strategy is because it really works as such. Breastfeeding is something done by two people, and like anything else done by two people, either participant can initiate the contact and if both are initiating, it will probably continue to happen longer than if only one is initiating. Many breastfeeding sources talk about limiting nursing at this age. This is advice for mothers who WISH to limit nursing or are...
    2 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    September 16th, 2017, 05:40 AM
    Oh ok. Thanks a lot both of you. It's very reassuring.
    10 replies | 617 view(s)
  • @llli*agnesd's Avatar
    September 15th, 2017, 09:40 PM
    Hi. I am currently nursing my 21mos old. I have heard that toddler nursing varies greatly from couple to couple, and at the end it's all up to instinct, but kind of want some advice anyways. Don't offer don't refuse is often referred to as a weaning technique. My question is, if so, what would be a more natural/neutral, or a "non-weaning" stance on breastfeeding, especially a toddler? Offer and don't refuse? Where this comes from is, we have just recovered(?) from a week long strike. Strike struck me hard and I was an emotional mess, but thanks to the forum we made it through and now we are almost back to normal with a few changes. But "offering" has now become a part of my routine(that was the only thing I did during the strike! )and I don't know when or whether to end it. Before the strike it was don't offer don't refuse, and we still had 5-10 sessions a day. Now that I've actually witnessed/experienced my LO doesn't really need and can live without those feeds, it feels kind of weird to offer. After all, I have never actively offered throughout our BF relationship, up until this strike. I am a dedicated SAHM, enjoy and want to continue BF as long as we can. Thanks in advance.
    2 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    September 15th, 2017, 09:44 AM
    There is an old post on here somewhere, or used to be, where the mother discovered that she could use a bottle warmer to scald the milk as it heated the milk to the appropriate temperature.
    4 replies | 412 view(s)
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