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  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 06:20 PM
    I think worrying is normal, especially if there were issues with an older child (or previously with the same child) and also if one baby has very different behavior than older sibling(s). I think it is pretty typical for baby to be more distracted when there is more interesting stuff going on, and having a four year old sibling probably means more interesting stuff is going on! IN one of my favorite books, My Child Won't Eat, the author talks about the concern that lead a mother to think something is wrong with how her child is eating (including nursing.) This section is called "Breastfeeding Without Conflict' And one part he discusses something he calls the 'crisis at 3 months.' I am thinking of you as I read this over. I truly cannot put down here what he describes so eloquently, so I can only suggest you get a hold of the book. Also If you pm me I will see if there is a way I can get this info to you. You may think it does not apply to you of course, but it contains so much wisdom overall about babies and nursing that I love it. But here is what I wonder about. In the normal course of breastfeeding, a baby in the early weeks is quite likely to have to deal with some fast letdown as a bit of overproduction is typical at this age. As milk production slows or 'levels out' the flow will become less, but not necessarily slow, if that makes sense. This is normal. Most babies will experience this to some degree. So I find it interesting that so many seem to have so much...
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*safitu's Avatar
    Today, 06:15 PM
    So sorry you are going through this. I went through it and know it is very very stressful. It will get better. The first day or two after revision were the worst and it took about 2 weeks to feel sort of normal again. Any chance you have oversupply or overactive letdown? it sounds like the symptoms you were experiencing prior to revision *could* have been due to that. As the baby refuses to nurse, your breasts may be filling up and when she does latch she may be getting blasted. If you think this is the case maybe you can hand express or manually pump some off before latching her. You might also want to try to dream feed her, feed her in a laid back position when she is sleeping or drowsy. If it upsets her just try again later. I would also suggest skin to skin and wearing her in a sling or wrap (not sure how old she is?). Hope things are better now or will be very very soon.
    3 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*safitu's Avatar
    Today, 05:51 PM
    My opinion, as someone who got a revision when everything was going fine (there were problems but I see now they were either normal newborn things or due to oversupply) ...If everything is perfect, don't get it clipped. No pain, good weight gain? Leave it alone and enjoy your time with your beautiful baby. My baby was gaining a lb a week before the tongue and lip tie revisions, after it her weight gain slowed. She began clicking, and swallowing tons of air, she refused to nurse temporarily, she stopped sleeping well and she stopped flanging her upper lip out. And mind you, I got the ties diagnosed and revised by Dr Kotlow, who is the fore most expert on tongue tie and revisions in the US (perhaps in the world). Personally, I would not even bother seeing the dentist. So he tells you the baby has a tie... the question is : does it cause any problems for YOU or your BABY. You dont have a magic ball to know whether it will cause problems down the line (dental, speech) but usually only the most severe ties cause those kind of problems, and if it were that severe you would probably have problems with nursing now. Also consider , at your baby's age, that you will need to find a dentist or ENT who does laser revision, as the nerve endings in the babies mouth are now developed so clipping with scissors would be very painful and require general anesthesia.
    7 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:24 PM
    Help?!? Pumping seems to hurt no matter what I do. I've tried different sizes of flange (from small, medium, Large and XL Medela.) I've tried lubricating with some edible oil but so far even when I wash it off, the baby objects to three different oils I've tried and the oil. The oil seemed to only help a tiny bit anyway. Most of the pain seems to be from the suction and pulling. I'm having trouble figuring out how anyone manages to pump at all let alone get enough milk out to pump exclusively. Are there ways to make it painless? Or is it just too painful for some people?
    0 replies | 39 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 02:36 PM
    It is hard to pump on top of taking care of a newborn and a 3-year-old! A lot of moms worry about being "empty" if baby wants to nurse right after pumping. The lactating breast is never empty though - at most baby just has to nurse longer to get all the milk he wants - which of course is great for further stimulating supply.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*modestguineapig's Avatar
    Today, 01:49 PM
    Thanks so much for the responses- very encouraging! I am pumping about once a day, usually after the morning feed when he takes a good nap. It is so difficult to coordinate pumping after feedings when I have a 3 year old to take care of on top of his erratic schedule.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*fshah's Avatar
    Today, 12:53 PM
    Thank you ladies! After first 2-3 months I enjoyed BFing my daughter very much. I also used to keep a blanket with me & would nurse her in the car if we were out & about. And after weaning her at 18 months, I missed the bond & closeness. With my little guy, I know I have enjoyed the first at least 6-10 weeks for sure. Even now, I enjoy the night feeds & any feeds where he is sleeping while nursing. When he is awake he is also very much distracted. Here is the thread about Fast letdown: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?119884-Overactive-letdown-amp-engorgement-in-mornings It came back up when he ate only 5-6 mins on one side only for 2-3 days & that resulted in me being full all the time. Once my body adjusted the supply we started to deal with slow letdown on left side & he used to get upset. He would only latch for 2 seconds & pull off & re-latch & this would continue until I change side.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:10 PM
    It's hard for toddlers to buffer their emotions. My toddler will go from content to crying in a heartbeat - whether because she's bumped her head, been told she can't have something she wants, or whatever else. (My LO got all upset by a piece of lint on the floor the other day - she thought it was a giant bug.) And nursing just makes it easier to get back to content from crying! The way I think of it, toddlers are realizing that the world can be upsetting, and nursing reassures them that they have someone who can help them cope with the upset. I can't tell you how often I wish my almost-four-year-old was still nursing so I could help her in the same way! Because there is still plenty that upsets her, too. I also think sometimes nursing gets caught up in the frustration that sometimes comes with parenting a toddler. My LO might be driving me crazy because of boundary-testing, stubbornness, etc and then constant demands to nurse can be one more thing that she is doing that is driving me crazy. But sometimes nursing actually completely changes the dynamic - maybe what she's really trying to do is get my attention, and nursing reminds her that she has it, and reminds me that really she is just this little person who can barely understand all the things she is feeling, let alone communicate them. And that she has an instinctual need to know that she IS being protected and cared for by someone who is capable of doing so, because at the age of two she most definitely...
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:53 AM
    There is no window of opportunity for creating adequate supply. It is certainly a little easier to build supply in the first few weeks/months after birth, but it's not impossible thereafter. Remember, after the first few days, milk supply is literally in your head! Stimulation of the breast by nursing or pumping sends a message to the pituitary gland in the brain, causing the pituitary to pump out prolactin, which signals the breast to make milk. Want to make more milk? In general the best way to go about it is to give your pituitary more signal by nursing or pumping more. I think it's a great idea to work on weaning off the supplements at this point.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 11:42 AM
    You're not using a ton of supplements - baby's probably getting around 80% of his milk from you. My guess is that with a little effort you probably could eliminate the supplements. Definitely worth a try at least! Are you pumping at all when supplementing? Here's an article from kelly mom about weaning from supplements: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/basics/decrease-formula/ Of course you'll want to keep a close eye on weight gain and diapers as you do this. It looks like in that last week baby gained 5 oz which is on track (http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/weight-gain/, even without a full week post-clipping. So I think that's very encouraging. And it's great that latch is improving.
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:31 AM
    IIRC- and it's been 8 years so take this with a grain of salt!- I started with 6 tablets per day (2 at breakfast, 2 at lunch, 2 at dinner). I think they might have been 5 mg tablets, though, so the dose would be the same. When I was ready to come off it, I tapered the dose, dropping 1 tablet a day, waiting a couple of days, and then dropping another. How has baby's weight gain been?
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:23 AM
    I know it must be extremely hard to be worrying about what you will feed your baby if your milk runs out. I'm so sorry you had to toss your stash. At this point, I think it might be worthwhile to look into donor milk- available through milk banks or from trusted donors- and talking to your pediatrician about what formulas to use if baby has an allergy to the ordinary stuff. I know that there are formulas made for very allergic babies (e.g. Alimentum, Nutramigen), and if you need to supplement that might be the way to go. Regarding finding a doc who is willing to at least discuss the possibility of a fecal transplant, you might simply want to google "stool transplant Sweden". I did that and found some likely avenues...
    5 replies | 264 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:16 AM
    :ita with LLLMeg. In my experience, breastfeesing almost always gets much better for almost all moms. Most of the annoyances of nursing a young baby are just due to the baby being small, young, uncoordinated, fussy- basically, to the general characteristics of a young baby. There are certainly exceptions to this rule- there are moms who just don't enjoy nursing and never will, mostly due to the issues that LLLMeg mentioned above. But if you ever found yourself enjoying nursing your older child, or at least got to a point where it was tolerable, then you're almost sure to get to that point again.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Today, 10:35 AM
    Does breastfeeding ever get easier or more enjoyable? What was your experience with your daughter? I will say that yes, assuming there are not major continuing difficulties that can make breastfeeding actually difficult, in most cases it does. But of course every mom is different and every experience is different. Barring cases of severe breastfeeding difficulties, in my personal observations, the moms who never really enjoy what is basically 'normal' breastfeeding fall into two main categories. 1) They are uncomfortable with the entire idea of breastfeeding for any number of reasons (poor body image, lack of familial or peer support, not comfortable nursing in public etc.) The other group are moms who are overly worried or concerned about things that are actually fine and normal. I see a few things in your post that I wonder about, such as the needing to burp baby so much, the idea he does not eat enough despite being hungry, and the too forceful letdown that turns into a too slow letdown and then back again in a matter of days. Could you tell us more about that? What are you doing to 'fix' the forceful letdown? What happens if you don't do so much burping or baby does not burp? What are you trying for the burping? How do you know baby does not eat enough? If you already addressed these issues in other threads you can direct me to those if you like. I think that any issue is serious if you think it is! Nursing takes lots of time and is a huge part of mothering...
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*alyfaye's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    I finally found a doctor (actually, a nurse midwife) who was willing to hear my breastfeeding struggles and offer some support. My milk basically dried up when my lo was tongue tied until 6 weeks old. I have been working my tail off to bring it back since then, but during that time my cycle returned. There is about 2 weeks each month now that I have an extremely low supply. I went in with the idea that I would ask about domperidone. I have always had heart palpitations and have had them checked out. EKG's say I'm fine and they're benign. However, domperidone can interfere with heart rhythm and I have been too nervous to try it without being under the care of a doctor. The midwife agreed that we should avoid the domperidone and suggested Reglan. I wasn't even considering that as an option because of all of the nasty side effects that I have read about here. My LC also isn't a fan of Reglan. In the end though, the midwife convinced me that it was my best option and started me on a low dose. That brings me to my questions for you all: For anyone who has taken or who knows about Reglan, how much were you prescribed? I am taking 3 10mg tablets a day and have noticed a small increase in supply now after taking it for two days. When can I expect to see a significant increase if I am going to? The midwife gave me enough for two weeks and said I could just stop when they're gone without tapering down. That doesn't seem right to me. Should I worry that my supply will vanish once I...
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*fshah's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    My younger son is almost 3 months old & he is EBF. I BFed my older daughter, who is 4 now, for 18 months. We had a rough start with my daughter as she was very tiny & her Ped advised to supplement with formula on her one week appointment as she didn't gain enough. I had work really hard for a month or two to up my supply but once that was done we never looked back. With my son though things are different. We had a good start as I nursed him within half hour of his birth & almost every hour the first 2 days & 2 hours for the coming weeks. We have had many bumps after that. I have fast letdown & when that is fixed, my LO gets upset for the next letdown to come & pulls off almost every 2 secs. Of course, fast letdown comes back within 2-3 days & he seems hungry but doesn't eat enough. He also requires a lot of burps as he inhales a lot of air with fast letdown & I spend half of my time getting him to burp. Sometimes it is hard to tell if he is not hungry or he is upset because the milk is not coming in fast enough. I know that my issues are pretty non-serious compare to some mamas but I am just tired of constantly dealing with one or the other thing & not enjoying BFing at all. Am I the only one who feels it that way? I know it gets easier, but when does it get easy? Am I constantly going to deal with fast letdowns or that will get fixed once & for all?
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*modestguineapig's Avatar
    Today, 09:46 AM
    My son had an undiagnosed mild tongue tie, which was caught and clipped at 8 weeks (this past Thurs.). Prior to this, nursing was going okay. I had some soreness. He nursed 10+ times a day, but he tired out easily, usually after the first let-down. I didn't think there was a problem until he stopped gaining weight around 5 weeks. Doc suggested I supplement and referred me to a specialist to clip the tongue tie. I have been giving 4-6oz in 1 oz increments via SNS prr day (here and there I have been giving a bottle). My older daughter also stopped gaining weight around 6 weeks, which makes me wonder if I have insufficient glandular tissue (I have some of the outward signs). Or if she had an undiagnosed tongue tie as well. Anyway, my question is- is there a window of time, up to 8 weeks, where your milk glands are stimulated, and if they aren't, you can't produce past a certain amount? I believe my son wasn't effectively removing all my milk due to the tongue tie, so I wonder if my max capacity, so to speak, has been set at a lower level. When I saw an LC with my daughter, she told me this, and encouraged me to supplement. Now that my son is latching deeper and I feel no soreness post clipping, I wonder if I can try weaning the supplements. But I don't want to try it if it is probably too late to build a bigger supply. Here are the weight checks, if it matters- He wasn't a fast gainer before I supplemented either. birth 7lb 12 oz 3 days 7lb 6oz 10 days...
    4 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*undergroundmuse's Avatar
    Today, 09:18 AM
    An open-minded one, I feel very discouraged now... I will bring it up but I really doubt anyone here would even cosider it as an option. No, I agree, I buy only organic and free range for LO. I will try with iron fortified oatmeal porrige, beans and egg yolks too. The other day we gave her 1/2 oz formula to see how she reacts. We found blood on her dipers later :/. I now think she might be both allergic and sick. That's what makes me feel stressed, I don't know if I will always have enough EBM and there is no backup option. I barely know anything about formulas and I hate having to give them. What to feed my LO then? I have a very humble freezer stash, had to discard the old one since it was possibly contaminated with antibiotics and milk protein :(. If only we could last until I can rely more on solids, that would be great. But pumping is driving me literally insane, and breast refusal during the day extremely sad.
    5 replies | 264 view(s)
  • @llli*karrieperry's Avatar
    Today, 06:00 AM
    and this increase in nursing could be a way for your son to confirm that he is still loved if he does something he's not supposed to, like color all over the brand new furniture with markers (like my kids!). In my experience children are always looking at us to see if we still love them no matter what they do. And being a toddler is all about figuring out "what happens if I do this?"
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:59 AM
    I am sure that he does have something emotional going on when he wants to nurse more than usual. Distress might be too strong a word for it. You say that he's been distracted and resistant to direction- that's normal for a 2 year-old. Especially when holidays and general changes to routine are in the mix. We all have to find our way through the terrible twos. The nice thing about nursing is that it usually works better than any other other technique, when it comes to resolving these normal frustrations. It sounds to me like your major issue is that you think you shouldn't be using nursing in this way- that somehow it's wrong to do so? Developmentally unhealthy? If that's what you're worried about, then maybe it would help to examine where that idea comes from. It's not something that emerged from research. It's a purely cultural bias. This is a nice article, originally published in Mothering Magazine, about how different the cultural lens can be, when it comes to breastfeeding and to using nursing as conflict resolution: http://www.incultureparent.com/2011/02/breastfeeding-land-genghis-khan/ Add my :ita to the idea that weaning is a non-linear process. My kids gave me upticks in nursing frequency, but the overall trend was down.
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*karrieperry's Avatar
    Today, 05:55 AM
    My friend and I were just talking about this the other night over dinner...that with your first child, they turn 1 year and you think they are huge and so grown up. Then with your second child and so on, a 1 year old seems like a tiny baby compared to what you had thought! I think you are 100% a normal mom of one child. I was the same exact way with my daughter. If some day you have another, you will see how much it changes the way you think about age related milestones. I get silly comments from even my dad (MY DAD!!! are you kidding me! how in the world would he know!), about how my 16 month old is a big girl now and shouldn't be nursing. So I say that I won't bug him about smoking and he doesn't bother me about nursing my child. :) I totally understand what you are saying though, that you are seeing the extra nursing as a sign that something is bothering him. If the extra nursing seems to help and you don't mind (sometimes) then that makes sense to keep helping him in that way. Soon enough he'll be older, and in a few years he'll probably want a hug instead or even be able to tell you exactly what he's thinking and what's bothering him. It is so, so much more fun to be a parent without putting those age limits on milestones. It sounds like your DH does that, and to be honest I'm sure it would be hard for him to change that about himself. My DH was kind of like that, and then now he's the opposite. Now he cosleeps on the floor with us when before he was...
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:25 PM
    hi jrob 327. I am sorry you are having such a struggle. I want to assure you all is not lost as far as breastfeeding goes. Clearly your body is capable of making milk, since you became engorged after your baby was born. Because your baby was not nursing and you were unable to pump frequently, your body was given the signal to stop or slow down on the making of milk. So it did. OK. But now you can give your body the signal to START making milk (or more milk.) Yes it really is that simple, which does not mean it is easy or will not take some work! I can offer sympathy with the difficulty of C-section recovery. I have had 3 cesarian births. They are major abdominal surgery and can really, really mess with your entire system. And yes the pain meds as typically prescribed can make a mom feel utterly exhausted and even disconnected from her baby, depressed, etc. It's really really hard! Hopefully you are no longer needing the narcotics for pain management. Getting off the narcotics and getting some freedom of movement back helps in so many ways. Please check out the information bfwmomof3 has offered. And get in touch with local support like LLL if it is available. It sounds like you saw a good IBCLC, if you agree, keep in touch with her as well. With the above info and the advice from your IBCLC, You will know what you need to do to increase your milk production and get baby nursing again, and we and your local LLL or other breastfeeding support can give you the...
    2 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*joshuas.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    Bfwmom, yes, I am confused/conflicted. On the one hand, I don't want to do anything to cause DS to wean. I'd feel guilty about precipitating it. On the other hand, I do hope he'll wean on his own within the next year or so. I think what really bothers me about this behavior is I feel like maybe it's DS' way of showing he's in some emotional distress about something. If that's the case I want to help him with whatever is bothering him. I also feel guilty about being gone a lot (although nowhere near as much as plenty of other working moms). He seems to really miss me right now and not be handling it very well. As far as the nursing itself--sometimes it's annoying, like when he won't let me cover my boobs even though he's not actively nursing, or when he wants to nurse right when I want to get in the shower, and other times I still really enjoy it. As for him, he unequivocally enjoys it. And that's great. But I have wondered if maybe I wasn't doing what I should be doing to help him move along, developmentally, to the next stage. Or if his sudden clinginess indicates distress that I need to address somehow. Nothing has really changed so I don't know why he'd be distressed now when he was fine before. But, it seems you and KatiePerry are saying that weaning is not linear and that toddlers just act like this sometimes, for no particular reason (thanks, KatiePerry, for your input! Much appreciated!). DS is my first child and I don't have much experience with toddlers this age...
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:14 PM
    My untested opinion is that maintaining equilibrium is about creating a number of meaningful "wins" for a child. Life is tough for toddlers: they have just enough competence and independence to long for freedom, but they're still aware of how inextricably they rely on us. In your shoes, I'd evaluate how much of your undivided attention your son is getting when you aren't nursing. Moving to part-time work will definitely give you an edge in being able to meet your son's need for dedicated mom-son time. I would focus first on activities he values most that bring you physically close with lots of eye contact, like reading while snuggling, wrestling, piggy-back-rides, making up riddles/jokes, etc. Based on my son's approach to nursing, a large part of nursing is the physical closeness and intimacy, not the milk per se. I'd also support the extra nursing. My guess is it's a short-term need that will pass if met.
    8 replies | 159 view(s)
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