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  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Today, 11:14 AM
    Struggling during the day to get anything done because baby wants to nurse every 1.5-2 hours MAX (sometimes every hour).. and for him to get any naps whatsoever, he will only nap laying on my "breast friend" pillow while comfort nursing. Sometimes he pops off, and I try to put him over my shoulder to move him.. but he immediately wakes up and won't go back down. For him to take any naps during the day, he must be sleeping on me while nursing?? He's almost 4 months, and he's been like this since birth. All my friends babies they can lay them down half awake and their babies go to bed. Mine, won't at all. :confused:
    0 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:36 AM
    I would suggest not letting a 13 week old baby sleep quite that long with no nursing, especially if you are back at work. Going back to work is a problematic time for milk production, both because bottle fed babies are often overfed and consequently nurse less, and also because pumping tends to not be as effective as baby nursing for keeping milk production in the best shape. And a baby going longer then 6 to 8 hours every night with no nursing is also likely to be problematic for milk production. We know, for example, that once there is a 6 hour daily gap of no milk removal, moms have a much higher chance of fertility returning (if it has not already.) Now, getting a period does not mean mom no longer makes enough milk, I am not saying that at all! But we know that 6 hours daily of no milk removal seems to be enough to shift mom's hormonal balance and that means something. Also, you know baby is sleeping too long because you are getting engorged. Baby may be getting enough to eat. But that fullness is telling your body to reduce milk production. Breastfeeding is a two way street and that fullness is your body telling you baby must nurse. So I would suggest waking baby to nurse at least once or twice overnight. More than that would be fine. Yes it is ok to wake a sleeping baby in order to protect your milk production and your breastfeeding relationship! 3 month old infants have no biological need to sleep such long hours, in fact that kind of stretch is not a normal...
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:19 AM
    Personally I found this age a very nice age for bedsharing. Baby large/old enough to no longer need to be to one side and could instead be between DH and I, so no worries about him falling out. And not so large baby is taking up too much bed. If I wanted to get up, I felt pretty safe about leaving this age child in the center of the bed, as mine were the sit up and cry type if they woke, not the stealthy crawl off the edge type. But with a mobile child falls are a risk do that has to be considered. I did find I could successfully nurse some of my kids down some of the time and then transfer them into crib. Some of the time, not all, and one was really hard to do this, one easy, and one medium. So every baby is a bit different about this. I found it helped to nurse baby well to sleep, then once baby unlatched, stay laying beside baby for at least 5-10 minutes. And then make sure the transition is smooth-gently lifting baby, gently putting baby down. I would place an unwashed T-shirt with my scent in the crib with baby so baby could smell me. Some moms make sure the crib is warmed with a hot water bottle ahead of time.
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*ote.eme's Avatar
    Today, 06:15 AM
    And by sleeping through the night, I mean 8-11 hours depending on the night.
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*ote.eme's Avatar
    Today, 06:08 AM
    My kiddo is 13 weeks old and nurses on one side at a time at home. When I went back to work last week, I pumped on both sides at once every time. Today I'm feeling engorged overnight. My baby sleeps through the night most nights, and I haven't felt engorged at night for a while, so I'm wondering if I inadvertently increased my supply by pumping on both sides even though she usually only eats on one. Should I only pump one side at a time at work? Or could this all even out? I only pump twice at work. This is my schedule: 7:45 nurse 10:00 pump 12:15 or 12:30 nurse her on my lunch break 3:00 pump 5:15 nurse
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*mummyslittlethunder's Avatar
    Today, 05:43 AM
    Hi, I'm new here, enjoying bf my nearly 7month old. How can I feed to sleep if he goes into his own cot if the cot is in the lower position? Has anyone resolved this, please? At the moment I can feed to sleep and lay him in the cot as cot is in high position. It won't be for much longer though as he's growing quickly. The only option I can see is for me to feed him until drowsy, then lay him down. As I think I would be very lucky to be able to put him in the cot in the deep position with him staying asleep. How do people resolve this? Just by co-sleeping? Any feedback helpful. Thank you.
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:30 PM
    Are you actually separated from 6 am until bedtime? If you are home earlier than that, what happens if you offer to nurse when you get home? Some babies will nurse less often at night if they have the chance to nurse more during the day. So that is one reason to see if baby might nurse more during the day. Also more nursing would quite possibly mean baby takes less in bottles, if that is what you are looking to do. Overall, more frequent nursing so that nursing frequency is more or at least on par with bottles may increase the chances of the nursing relationship lasting longer, should that be something you would like. I see no reason nursing and bottle feeding have to match, at least not very closely. So, you could try increasing baby's nursing frequency when you are home with baby if you like and leave bottle frequency as it is. And/or, try increasing the frequency of bottles, as it may be that more frequent bottles will mean that they are smaller overall- that is how it works with older kids and adults, as typically, small meals more often helps reduce overall intake when that is needed. (Of course, you will have to watch any tendency to just keep giving baby the same huge bottle more often.)
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    When I'm on a work day, I nurse him at wake up (6am) and bedtime (usually 6:30/7pm) and now with the new 1-nap schedule have him set to have a bottle before and after nap. I'm open to better suggestions, though! I was mostly just trying to mimic with a bottle what I do with nursing: Home day: 6am wake, nurse 7am breakfast 11am lunch 12pm nurse/nap 2:30/3 wake, nurse 6pm nurse/bed
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:46 PM
    No, the pauses should actually come every few sucks. So every 20-30 seconds. When a baby is nursing they pause very frequently to swallow and just see what happens. They do not unlatch, and nursing mom usually makes no note of it. But that is the pattern that paced feeding is supposed to mimic. This video explains the positioning and pauses very well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs How long are you at work and how often does baby get a bottle? That can give you the number. You are right the typical recommendation is baby needs about 25 - 35 ounces of milk total per day, and if baby is nursing at night and cue nursed when you are home, that translates very simply and effectively to baby's intake requirement being somewhere between 1 to 1.5 ounces per hour of separation. So, as an example, for an 8 hour separation, 8-12 ounces total. Broken into three bottles, that is about 3-4 ounces per bottle. Of course that number is the recommendation for a baby who is living entirely on breastmilk and gaining very rapidly as a baby does between 1-6 months or so. It is entirely possible your baby, who is eating lots of solids and most likely headed for (or already in) the big gain rate slow down that is typical at about a year, does not need anything like that amount of milk over 24 hours. It is very hard to find evidence based intake recommendations for babies this age, and except for the book My Child Won't Eat I am not sure where to send you for that info....
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 PM
    Hi hblwmom, sorry you are having this concern. I can assure you many, many moms have issues with low milk production and there are many ways to increase milk production. And even more moms think they have a production issue when in fact all is normal. It is hard sometimes to figure out what exactly is going on. What is interesting (and a good sign you are getting some pretty breastfeeding supportive advice, in my opinion) is that the supplementing plan your pediatrician has suggested is 1) very specific as far as total amount to supplement (yay! this makes me very happy you would not believe how rare that is) and 2) really is not much at all. And yes even that small an amount of supplement might be the difference between slow gain and baby gaining normally. But if all the pediatrician thinks baby needs is 3 ounces extra a day, that is not much of an increase needed in what baby gets at the breast. 3 ounces is the equivalent of 1-2 feedings, normally. So I wonder if simply increasing how often baby nurses would not do the trick just as well? What do you think? You are pumping. How much milk do you get when you pump? Could you/do you supplement with that milk? Sometimes moms are told there is a problem when in fact gain is within normal range. So if you would like to post a compete weight check history with weight and day/week of life, noting whenever a different scale was used, then we can comment about that. It would also help to know how many times a day...
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    Thanks, all for your responses and help. Yes, LO is still getting up 1-3x per night but typically not nursing a full feed. Sometimes (more especially the first wake up) he will take a little more, but I've taken to not offering both breasts over night so as to gently encourage night weaning, also unlatching him perhaps a few moments before he might truly want. Usually he nurses a few minutes, I lay him down, he adjusts a bit and goes back to sleep. Work situation has been going on for a few weeks now, but baby has been fed bottles before (date nights, errands, etc.). Yes, parents and husband are doing pacing as much as they know how - holding bottle so nipple is more horizontal and not totally full of milk, giving him little "breaks," not encouraging him to drink and drink. I've asked that they also "switch sides" which I'm not sure is happening. @lli*maddieb, how often should one do the technique you mention (let all milk drain out of nipple and wait for baby to signal he wants more)? Every 3 minutes? 5 minutes? I agree that perhaps an "ounce limit" is in order to try other comfort measures to see if milk is being used as a "go-to." But not sure what that limit should be?
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*hbwmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:44 PM
    3 month is old is 10 lb 9 oz and should be close to 12. I'm finding LO and I are lazy with feeding and she is content without being absolutely full. Our pediatrician wants us to supplement (1 tsp to 1 oz x 3/daily). Clearly my supply isn't given her the calories she needs. So now I'm making sure to offer her the other side, taking fenugreek, mothers milk tea and pumping 3 times a day. My breasts are feeling empty. She falls asleep at the breast all the time. I'm torn. Any advice to increase my supply? Anyone been in this situation? Thank you for the help!
    1 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:47 PM
    So, not familiar with bottles. Curious if baby this age even needs a bottle rather than maybe a cup? Paced bottle feeding properly done is going to be your best bet for slowing down flow. All nipples drip. I suspect paced feeding is not being properly done as far as how baby and bottle are positioned. HOWEVER. A baby this age should really be able to 'pace' themselves. Paced feeding is really more for younger babies, I am not even sure it will work with an almost one year old. But I would suggest have caregivers making sure bottle and baby are being positioned properly (so the nipple is never full of milk and rate of flow is reduced by gravity) and that pauses in drinking (by tipping nipple up/bottle down so the milk drains out of the nipple, in order to stop flow all together for a few moments) are being encouraged. If baby wants more, bottle can be re-tipped up just enough so there is a little milk in the nipple. Sometimes the key is to not totally remove the nipple from baby's mouth, but to instead stop the flow for a bit to see if baby really wants more or not while tip of nipple rests on baby's bottom lip or gently in the mouth. If baby does not start 'reaching' to take the nipple again, then bottle can be gently removed. If this is not making sense let me know, may be I can find a video. I suspect perhaps a little laziness is going on, and baby is being fed bottle after bottle rather than caregiver engaging in other comfort measures or baby entertaining...
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:28 PM
    Unfortunately there have not been good studies on the impact on breastfeeding from tongue tie nor lip tie and whether surgical correction helps. Even the definitions/diagnosing criteria of tongue and lip ties is not agreed upon. What appears to be the consensus among breastfeeding experts including doctors who are also breastfeeding experts is that tongue tie CAN (but does not always) cause issues for nursing- meaning primarily, pain and injury from latch for mom and/or poor milk transfer by baby, and that surgical correction CAN (but does not always) improve the situation. There is less such consensus as regards lip tie. There is also consensus that properly performed surgeries are not likely to cause any harm. But no harm does not mean there will be improvement. I would suggest talking to whoever is recommending surgery and whoever is going to do the surgery for the experience of their clients and their recommendations for after care. This protocol on treatment of tongue tie from the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (doctors writing for doctors) may also be helpful to you: http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Protocols/ankyloglossia.pdf I do not know anything about gag reflex tongue tie, but certainly a nipple shield might cause a baby to gag if it is too big (the tip is too long) for baby. A nipple shield would also cause air swallowing, particularly if it is too large. Colic occurs in babies with no feeding issues. It is very common. I know that some say air...
    3 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob626's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 08:50 PM
    Hi, how long has your work situation been going on? I am just wondering if he is still adjusting to your absence? And just to clarify, everyone is doing paced bottle feeding techniques, right?
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 07:30 PM
    Does baby ever nurse at night? I'm asking because it helps us know how much milk baby needs during the daytime hours. (night nursing babies typically need less than babies who sleep through.)
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 07:04 PM
    Waking a baby in order to feed him more cannot hurt him. If you've ever heard "Never wake a sleeping baby", just remind yourself that that adage should really go "If baby is feeding often enough and is growing well, then mom can let him sleep long stretches as long as she is comfortable doing so. If baby is not feeding or growing well, or mom would like to nurse, there's no reason not to wake the baby." It's not as catchy as the first version, but IMO a lot more accurate!
    7 replies | 205 view(s)
  • @llli*krystine's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 04:52 PM
    My daughter did at 7 weeks or so. They had a baby restraint jacket and quickly clipped it, no anesthesia because then she was able to nurse afterwards , small amount of blood . Sadly it didn't help her milk removal issues but at least we tried. Her baby brother has similar oral structures and nursed 2 yrs without it causing a problem . I know moms who have immediately noticed a difference though and it absolutely helped . P.s. I don't think a shield should help her latch. I would really try to get away from them. Are you working with an IBCLC ?
    3 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*charlie2015's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 02:53 PM
    I don't know anything about this topic, but just wanted to say good luck! You sound well informed.
    3 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    September 23rd, 2016, 02:43 PM
    Hello helpful LLL ladies! I need some guidance on a handful of related issues. I'm writing a lot but want to be as thorough as possible, so please read on and bear with me :) I have returned to work and am home with my LO (now 11, almost 12 months) one day per week plus weekends. On the other 4 workdays he is bottle fed my breastmilk by husband, childcare, or family. He enthusiastically eats solids 2-3x/day - we don't push it, but he really enjoys food. If we happen to miss or skip a meal every once in a while, we don't worry about it. Up until about a week ago, he was nursing 6x/day on a typical day with me: wake, before AM nap, after AM nap, before PM nap, after PM nap, and bed, with meals in between. For about a week and a half straight he fought his PM nap and pushed back his AM nap to the extent that I think we've entered 1 nap/day territory. So he only just recently is nursing more like 4x/day - wake, before nap, after nap, and bed. Sometimes a little extra in between :) When I pump, I usually pump anywhere from 4-6 (sometimes 7) oz. 1. Everyone says he "whomps" the milk down from the bottle. I know it's common for BF'd babies to take milk faster via bottle than breast and that paced feeding, sitting upright, switching "sides," etc., can all help with this. People have tried all of the above. I'm working on getting a slower-flow nipple also, though the ones we use (LifeFactory) are Stage 1 (on that note: anyone know the slowest nipple out there??). The tough...
    7 replies | 146 view(s)
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