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  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:44 PM
    First of all, thank you so much for your replies! I juat reviewed my feeding log and noticed that I am feeding 8x per day more often than I thought. Also wanted to note that 2 weeks ago, the per began having my cut off nursing sessions at 40 minutes and providing the supplement. Apparently, my little guy was burning too many calories while sucking, so she wanted me to cut him off and supplement. Basically, I feed for 40 minutes, give a bottle, then pump for 15. This whole process is about an hour fifteen minutes, so to start it all over again and feed him at 2 hours would be really tough! Does the fact that the eating and pumping are long durations work in my favor in terms of supply? Also, how long would it take for my period to return with a longer sleep stretchbabd change in schedule? It seems crazy that it could respond so fast. I'm pretty sure it is my period, so I guess I just need to focus on adjusting. Should plan on nursing every 2 hours going forward? I hate waking the baby up and fear interrupting his growth by not letting him get enough sleep- every 3 hours is hard enough to disrupt him! I can wake up in the night to pump one session, but in not sure what else I can do!
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:43 PM
    thank you for the update and congratulations!
    20 replies | 4896 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:41 PM
    Okay, thanks for your clarification. I am not thinking it is a big deal, but was a little concerned that she seemed uncomfortable. Since there's been so much grumbling about her weight gain on the drs end, I bought a scale to monitor her input and she seems to be getting anywhere from a 1/2 oz to 1 1/2 oz per feeding. I've only been randomly weighing her before and after feeding about once or twice a day, but it has helped me get a better idea. And, she gained five oz in a week last time she was at the dr. I haven't weighed her without clothes this week and figured I'd do that when we bathe her to cut down on her being uncomfortable . . . Only weighing to make sure I'm offering the breast enough. It's getting harder for me to tell when she's hungry now since she'd rather suck on her hand at times. As for cutting out dairy and soy . . .dr thinks she might have an allergy since her poop was very mucusy at one point. Cutting out the dairy and soy actually does seem to help with that. She's on Enfamil gentle ease, which is not completely dairy and soy free, but seems okay. She doesn't take it well from a bottle though, which is why I'm not offering it much. It's more of a hassle and I feel like it's counter productive bc then she could get more at the breast and help with weight gain that way. She was 8 lbs last Friday (birth weight 5 lbs 15 oz, dropped to 5 lbs 7 oz, back to bw at two weeks) and I think she's doing relatively well, as does the lc, even if her weight...
    2 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:39 PM
    So yes pumping 2-4 ounces on each side as a regular thing is actually a lot. But there is more to how much you pump (and how much baby gets when nursing) than milk production. I suspect you may have a larger breast storage capacity as well, based not only on that output but also on the less frequent milk removal without ( I assume) discomfort to you. If you are having milk removed 8 times a day, but only one side each time, that means each breast only has milk removal 4 times in 24 hours. So yes this would be block nursing. So I would suggest either pumping both sides or nursing both at least some of the time to ensure plenty of milk for as long as you like. More on breast storage capacity if you are interested (scroll down) http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/multimedia/ and block nursing: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:14 PM
    It is common for exclusively breastfed babies to start pooping less often at any point after 6 weeks or so. And yes sometimes if it has been awhile, the poop may be larger and baby a bit more uncomfortable. I assume (but do not know for sure) the small amount of formula your baby gets is not going to change the normalcy of that pattern. My understanding is that some babies do have issues eliminating (constipation) when they are given formula or switch formulas. Never will a breastmilk diet cause constipation. So usually the only concern with less poop in breastfed baby is if it possibly indicates less milk into baby. Since your baby's gain is already being questioned, that is something to look at. Basically as I said it is normal for the poop pattern to change this way, and yes in my experience it can be quite sudden, so instead of monitoring poops you will need to use weight gain only to measure how baby is doing. Wets too, of course, but wets alone will not tell you enough. Why were you told to eliminate soy and dairy from your diet? If these items were possibly causing some specific issue have you seen improvement? I assume the formula your baby gets is also dairy and soy free?
    2 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:58 PM
    One thing that has allowed me to continue pumping in anticipation of going back to work: pumping on one side, bf on the other. I only do this once or twice a day, but it's often the only way I can get any milk to store. And, it helps with let down as your breasts are letting down already bc baby is right there feeding on the other breast.
    11 replies | 232 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:49 PM
    I'm with bfwmomof3. Maybe your husband can cook meals instead of cleaning? My husband is awful with housekeeping but has been wonderful about cooking and running almost all the errands, including grocery shopping. I let the housekeeping issue slide as I'd rather have something to eat, and paid someone to clean today as I'm going back to work shortly and know I won't be able to keep up as I can't keep up now.
    6 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 PM
    My ten week old is almost ebf (dr insisted on formula bc she's small) but I give her less than three oz of formula at most a day by syringe and tend to offer the breast first unless she won't take it. I didn't give her any formula today. She has typically had six to eight wet diapers and two to four poops per day. Poop is typical, yellow and seedy, sometimes mucusy. Yesterday she pooped only once and it seemed to make her very fussy for about an hour before she did, causing issues with feeding. Tonight she wasn't as fussy before she pooped although she was extremely fussy after, which I finally managed to fix by switching breasts. My question is it typical to see a decrease like this from one day to the next? Her wet diapers are still about the same in number. I almost called the doctors office today but was super busy so it slipped my mind. Plus, the nurse who tends to answer the messages is just not helpful so I'm a little reluctant to call. However, you've all been wonderful in answering my new mom questions so I thought I'd ask here to see what people think. In case this is relevant: I was asked to eliminate dairy and soy from my diet almost two weeks ago, and I have mostly succeeded ( a couple of times had cheese by mistake but that's it).
    2 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:06 PM
    :ita with the PP! My kids were definitely nursing like newborns around that age, but they grew out of it. I don't remember when, exactly, because the transition from newborn-like nursing to toddler-style nursing was gradual and there was a lot of back-and-forth, but it did happen eventually.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:52 PM
    Remember that there is a big difference between sleep training a young, EBF baby and a toddler! With a toddler, you're constantly teaching limits, and limits around sleep can be part of the picture. You would never deny a young baby food, because they are not able or ready to go without eating. But you can tell a toddler to wait until dinner, or that he can have the cookie after he eats his peas. In the same way, you can place a limit on nursing without it being a terrible thing for the toddler. Does that make sense?
    10 replies | 214 view(s)
  • @llli*alexbell915's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:44 PM
    Up until this point I have been anti-sleep training because of the negativity I've read regarding unattachment and loss of trust. However, I am at my wits end and rucchiio has a point- mine and my son's relationship is negatively affected at this point as it is, I don't think it can get much worse. So, this isn't working for me and I have to find another solution. Some women in my LLL meetings offered pick up put down as advice. I tried that tonight and he went down relatively quick. I'm not sure how long he'll be out, but I'm remaining positive. Thank you again for your advice and help. I'm one tired mama.
    10 replies | 214 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:42 PM
    :ita Excellent advice from the PP, as usual. Go by feel, and take the weaning process nice and slow and careful. Don't try to drop too many sessions too fast, don't be afraid to pump or express more on a day when you feel more in need of it. Watch yourself carefully for signs of plugged ducts mastitis. Kudos to you for making it to a whole year of pumping and nursing! What an awesome achievement! ETA: There's no right way to maximize antibodies in your milk as you wean. When you wean, your breasts go through a process called mammary involution, during which the milk you produce gradually becomes less watery and sugary, more protein-y, and enriched in the immune-boosting substance lactoferrin. this is why gradual weaning is so good- as the mammary involution process takes place, the remaining milk becomes more and more like colostrum, providing a last shot of immune support as the baby transitions to a solid food diet.
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:38 PM
    Thanks for answering those questions. On the plus side, you are using a good pump, pumping for a decent amount of time, and pumping frequently. So the likely explanation for the decrease in output doesn't lie with the brand of pump or length or frequency of pump sessions. That leaves you with the following explanations for the decrease in supply: 1. Normal decrease in supply related to the adjustment of supply I mentioned in my first post. 2. Decrease in supply related to poor pump function or fit. You say you've had issues with comfort and a white ring- this could indicate that you are using the wrong size of shields, which can reduce stimulation to and milk removal from the breast. I think it would be a very good idea to try a different size of shield- try a size larger and a size smaller- and to consider using a different pump altogether. A brand-new pump should not be having issues with suction! (Or is this not a brand-new pump?) 3. Decrease in supply related to not nursing enough. If you have to supplement, you probably do not want your baby nursing just 7-8 times a day. You want that baby nursing as often as possible- it's good for supply and will reduce/eliminate the need for supplements. 4. Decrease in supply related to something physiological, e.g. a new pregnancy, thyroid problems, other hormonal issues. It could be your period, particularly now that your baby is sleeping long stretches at night- menstruation is more likely to resume when you're...
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:03 PM
    If it is my period, will this decrease be temporary?
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*jswan14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:02 PM
    I was at 8x per day but then he began sleeping the long stretch at night so that one was cut out. I nurse every 3 hrs during the day and more often if he is hungry, bur most of the time I have to wake him at 3 hours to feed him. I asked my pediatrician whether that was ok and she said as long as it was on demand during the day with a max of 3 hours she was okay with it. I'm using a medela freestyle which I kind of hate! Had some issues with the suction a week ago so I just bought spare parts and will see if that helps. Pumping isn't all that comfortable to be honest. I am trying another size flange (xl) as I get a white ring around my nipple with the large. I'm pumping 15 min, or until 5 minutes after milk stops. Lately the milk has been flowing for the first couple minutes, then nothing. No contraception- my tubes are blocked and had ivf.
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 PM
    This boggles my mind, despite the fact that I have seen moms report this over and over and over again. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation remains that babies be exclusively breastfed until 6 months unless there is a unique need for solids.
    4 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:49 PM
    So that's 7-8 nursing sessions in a 24-hour period? If so, that's a bit low for a 6 week old EBF baby. Most babies are eating a minimum of 8x per 24 hours, and many are eating more like 10-12 times per day. If you can boost your child's nursing frequency, you are like to get better supply and to reduce or eliminate the need for supplements. Now, on to the decrease in output. To determine why you've had a decrease, it would be helpful to know the following: - What sort of pump you have - How pumping feels - How long you are pumoing at each session - Whether or not you have started a new form of hormonal contraception, including "safe for breastfeeding" methods like Mirena or the mini-pill Please don't freak out yet. The sort of thing you are experiencing is generally due to normal adjustments to supply. Most moms start out making more milk than they need, but after their babies have been nursing a while, the body "reads" the baby's demand and adjusts production to meet demand very precisely. When this adjustment occurs, it is normal for pump output to decline and for a mom to rarely, if ever, feel full.
    5 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*snb1028's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:36 PM
    My pediatrician said he could start solids at his 4 month check. Daycare fed the sweet potatoes for the first time today and they said he ate almost half of the gerber container. He also ate cereal and 13oz breastmilk Instead of the usual 16oz. I think they are feeding him more so he sleeps longer. they do not pace bottle feed..I just recently learned about It. I will have to give them some information on it. His longest stretch at night varies between 5-7 hours. He also goes to bed early around 630 or 7 so I usually nurse 3 or 4 times before bed.
    4 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Welcome to Awesomeville! Enjoy that feeling of liberation. I know I still do, and I haven't nursed anyone for closing in on 2 years!
    49 replies | 2985 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:22 PM
    Hi mama, you are amazing! I would start with the pump that yields the least - let's say the 3:30 pm pump. It's only 1 oz, so I don't think you will be engorged or uncomfortable by completely dropping it, anyway you are pumping frequently at that time of day. You can do your 2 pm pump a bit later and your 5:15 pump a bit earlier, ie you spread out the remaining pumps a bit. Let a few days go by, see how you feel. If no fullness/engorgement after a few days, move on to the next one - maybe the 8:40 one. And so on. From an antibody point of view it doesn't matter, I don't think. The other thing you can try doing is to shorten your very long/power pumping sessions that last for an hour or 40 minutes. Whether you want to do that at the same time or first or after dropping sessions - I don't think there is a right answer to that, you have to go by feel and see how it goes. You can always add pumps back in if you feel full - for me pump weaning (I pumped at work) was a step forward/step back kind of process, but for others it goes quite quickly and they can drop pumps easily.
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*anaduralia's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:56 PM
    By the way, have you tried a dream feed? When they are half asleep (or sleeping lightly)? That is supposed to work sometimes. I was just thinking that since she tried the other day when she was tired and disoriented, she might try when half asleep. Some people also try taking a bath with their LO and sometimes they will just want to nurse there. Thought I'd mention in case you hadn't tried these techniques. Good luck to both of you with strikers!
    6 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:29 PM
    Psychological update!! With DS now almost 3.5, I can confidently say for the FIRST time in his life that he could not only survive, but thrive, without my milk, or with just a bit!!! Wow, is that ever liberating! :D
    49 replies | 2985 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:25 PM
    Thanks Bsua65!! A metric ton of milk is hard to fathom, isn't it? :)
    49 replies | 2985 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:19 PM
    I hear echoes of my DS-almost 3.5 in your description of your daughter, pteroglossus--the lying on me, the upset if I'm not facing him as he sleeps, the boring stories, loving boob manhandling, and lots of nursing to sleep. We bed share and nurse down for all sleep, including over night. What I've found works well to have DS drift off to sleep--and stay asleep longer--are a pre-bed meal (ideally fed half an hour before settling while reading a boring story), teeth brushing, pre-bed nursing, and then snuggles. I ask DS to cuddle me to help me fall asleep, or tell him with a serious face, "let's NOT fall asleep". Now, if I can figure out how to have him not freak out every time he wakes and finds me 10 feet away in the next room with DH, I'll be golden. The poor little sweetheart looks totally frantic, even though I tell him each time, "If I'm not next to you, I'm with Daddy."
    7 replies | 251 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:13 PM
    I thought it might be helpful to someone out there for me to give a 3 years later update. Also, maybe therapeutic for me to write it out. We've come a long way! :) Thank you llli.org and kellymom.com My dd ended up taking bottles with no problem. Bottle type did not matter. It just took time, patience and opportunity. Her caregivers used paced bottle feeding. My anxiety got better, but I was never comfortable working outside the home away from my child. I continued to work until my dd was 18 months old. I tried switching to a different job that I thought would give me more time at home. It turned out to be a less bfing friendly environment. Pumping was made very difficult. I quit with no notice. I have NEVER even considered doing that before. I found another position a couple weeks later that was flexible and I requested part time plus some work from home. I learned to pump in bathrooms, closets, classrooms with no lock, offices with windows and in the car parked and driving. I pumped did not pump wean at a year. My dd didn't mind milk with excess lipase as long as it was spoon fed to her as a frozen slushy. My husband and I had thousands of conversations eventually agreeing to sell our home. After an elimination diet, I was on a dairy free diet for 19 months. She outgrew her allergy or sensitivity. We were lucky.
    20 replies | 4896 view(s)
  • @llli*michelleb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:07 PM
    Answers/Thoughts - I'm getting 2-4 ounces with one breast... so if that's normal then maybe I'm good to go :) - I don't think she's necessarily eating more... she had a hard go with the bottle when I went back to work at 4 months. She had done fine previously (was in NICU for the first week of life and was fine with bottle and had bottles randomly throughout first couple months, but refused at 4 months) it took awhile to get her to eat via bottle - we are doing baby led weaning... but I'm considering modifying a bit in order to get a little bit more actually IN her belly not just all over her face! :) - I totally thought I was block nursing, but maybe not... I nurse at about 3am and 7am... pump at 9:30am, 12:30pm and 1:30p... then I nurse at 6:00pmish, 7:30pm(bedtime), and 10pm dream feed.
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:53 PM
    I know how you feel (about not being alone!). I don't know where you live, but here in the US, things can be hard on new parents (bad maternity/paternity leave, lack of support in areas, especially breastfeeding support, etc). There's SO much pressure to just hop up and go back to life as normal after a baby, and at the same time everyone around you is telling you to enjoy this time with your baby, that you feel like a failure if you can't keep up, and guilty you're NOT enjoying the lack of sleep or the messy house or the fact that your family hasn't had a fresh, home-cooked (at least by you) meal a few days in a row. I don't think we're required to enjoy every aspect of parenting. We can enjoy our babies, and oh, how we do enjoy those chubby cheeks, the soft skin, that sweet smell, and that beautiful smile, but babies disrupt things, and they keep changing things on us as soon as we start to feel like we're getting things under control. I told my mom a couple weeks ago baby had begun sleeping a predictable night schedule, and the VERY NEXT NIGHT, she changed things up and hasn't slept the same schedule 2 nights in a row since. :) All that to say...you're not alone; things are hard even after baby is technically not a "newborn," and you are doing the best thing for baby simply by trying your hardest to do everything within your power to make things easier on him. Good luck and I hope things begin to improve for him (and you!) soon. Hang in there.
    14 replies | 333 view(s)
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