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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. Any chance that you could pick up a better pump? I used the Ameda Purely Yours and while it's a fine pump for a mom who responds well to pumping and only relies on it part time, I don't think it's a good machine for a mom who is trying to maintain or increase supply by pumping. It just doesn't have enough power, in my experience. If you go and see an IBCLC, she may be able to set you up with a better machine. Any chance of seeing a different pediatrician? I don't like the dismissive treatment or the advice you received from yours.
    5 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:46 AM
    :ita When a mom nurses when her baby asks and there are no external reasons for a decline in milk production (e.g., pregnancy, use of a medication which decreases supply), she will continue to make enough milk to supply her all baby's needs until the first birthday and will likely have enough well into the second year. There are a lot of breastfed babies who do not become interested in eating larger quantities of solids until they are in the 14-18 month age range, yet still grow just fine. The reason this works is that growth slows down over time. Breastfed babies grow really fast when they are new, often doubling or tripling their birth weight by just a few months of age. All that growth takes a lot of milk! But as time goes on, growth slows, and as a result milk intake starts to slow down, too. Babies generally increase their milk intake until around 6 weeks, at which point they generally hold steady until 6-12 months. There may even be a slight decline in intake with older babies, which may be particularly noticeable as they start eating more solids. A lot of moms get thrown by 2 things: seeing how much formula-fed babies eat, and reading a sample "meal plan" for a baby their baby's age. So it's helpful to remember that formula-fed babies reverse the normal pattern of intake, eating less and growing more slowly than breastfed babies when they are young, and escalating their intake and growing more quickly as they get older. If you see a formula-fed...
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Today, 03:24 AM
    I'm not sure what to do at this stage. I don't want to stop providing milk but the current situation is just not sustainable for another 2 months. I have no plans to reduce nursing, which DS is still totally into at least 5-8 times day/night in addition to bottles while I work, but is scalded breast milk so much more nutritious than formula to justify the sacrifices needed? I sound selfish commenting on MY missed time at work, but it bothered me the other day when I had to miss a farewell party for a good friend. My immediate work colleagues are 100% supportive, men and women, and always ask if I need to leave meetings etc. But sometimes sudden meetings pop up and I feel I cannot excuse myself all the time. DS was getting 8oz/day of pumped milk plus solids for lunch and 2 snacks of fruit in the mid-morning/afternoon. Recently I took advantage of summer holidays to spend an extra hour at home (leaving 30 minutes later in the morning and arriving 30 minutes earlier in the afternoon) to only leave 6oz and freeze the extra 2oz. This has given me a small freezer stash, maybe 30oz or so. But certainly not enough to get me through another 2 months. When he returns to daycare next week I am sure they will expect 8oz again, if not more, which I struggle to pump. I have found myself holding back on giving solids, which he loves and would eat all day, in case it would further impact my ability to pump. So when I am with him I nurse and give very little solids to protect my supply,...
    4 replies | 252 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 01:40 AM
    Hi Ladies, Just the other day we were browsing through old photographs taken in the early days when my son was a new born. Most of the photos were candid cell-phone clicks taken in spur of moment. There was photo of me snuggling him close on my chest for first time. Another one of me catching a much needed shut eye with him lying on top of me. Me attempting to nurse in laid back position. Our first latch, him taking a boob-nap, us nursing while side lying. First yummy-milky-booby-in the mouth smile. It was a real trip down memory lane, the best part was, when my sister in law in all the seriousness said that you should write a book based on your experience in nursing. All I did was grin and reply sure so day in future. But in my mind I knew that it was possible due to wealth of information that is present on site created by many untiring supporters.
    4 replies | 210 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:13 PM
    Hi tararg, sorry you are having such a rough time of it. How old is your baby and how often is baby eating? 4 ounces is a pretty large meal for a brand newborn, so I am wondering why baby is still not gaining normally if baby is taking almost that much in a bottle at every feeding. Sometimes gain issues are medical and not about how much baby is eating. A newborn of between 1 and 2 weeks old typically needs about 20-25 ounces total per day, which they get eating at least 10-12 times. So, typical meals are more like 1-3 ounces total. This daily intake increases a bit in later weeks for most babies but not by much. As far as not being able to produce milk, while a C-section is often the cause of delayed lactation, it is not likely to cause low milk production on it's own. Getting to the bottom of why you are not producing much milk may help you figure out how to proceed. Pumping should not hurt. If your pump is hurting you, there is something wrong- poor fit, too high a setting, something.
    1 replies | 55 view(s)
  • @llli*tararg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:49 PM
    Hi there So I've had a rough go of breastfeeding. I was induced followed by an emergency c section. I had no milk but tried. We were able to breastfeed but I've been having to supplement with formula. He was born at 8.1. Dropped to 7.1 after a week of mainly breastfeeding. Now with supplementing he is 7.13. We breast feed on each breast and we finish by offering formula as per our pediatrician a suggestion. Most often he's eating a full 4 oz of formula after breastfeeding. At this point I can't stop Supplanting as he still hasn't gained enough weight. But when he's feeding I don't hEar many swallows. He mainly Just sucks. I'm on motillium to help and when I squeeze to express there seems to be a lot (I've never felt a let down or Anything). I eat super well and drink tons of water. He hates pacifiers ironically considering he Would suck on the breast for hours if I would let him.
    1 replies | 55 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:44 PM
    Yes, in normal circumstances a woman can continue to make enough milk for her child to live on indefinitely, as the experiences mommal and I wrote about indicates. Of course many things might reduce milk production, but assuming a baby is nursing with high enough frequency and nothing is interfering with normal production I do not see why milk production would reduce, until baby begins to eat enough solids that baby actually starts taking in less milk, and then that is the next step in the long and gradual weaning process. Even a baby who eats solids with gusto at 6 months, like my first, is not really all that likely to significantly or at all replace breastmilk with solids for many months, (unless nursing is withheld or solids pushed) and breastmilk is ideally the primary source of nutrition for the first year at least. And breastmilk does not become less nutritious after 6 months or a year or any other time. This is a myth. This article may be helpful to you: http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starting-solids/toddler-foods/
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:22 PM
    Thanks to both of you for your replies. And a woman has enough milk quantity and quality to exclusively breastfeed until baby likes solids?
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:00 PM
    Hi just so you know I don't think you're crazy. I think you're going to have to get very proactive about getting proper care for yourself and your baby. First of all I think you must pin down whether your baby is losing weight, gaining weight or what. This can be done by using the same scale every time, doing the weight checks properly and making sure it is a working digital infant scale. If your pediatrician will not cooperate with you to bring your baby in for periodic checks on the exact same scale, perhaps there is a local health clinic that can accommodate you in this way. You could also consider renting a digital infant scale but you should really not have to do that. You don't need to weigh baby every day but maybe about once a week. Normal gain at this age is about 4-5 ounces per week although some babies might gain faster and some slower. The baby should be gaining, but probably will not gain the same every week. Plateaus are normal sometimes, but unless baby is ill with diarrhea or something, there should never be weight loss in a 3 month old. I would also suggest go to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) so that they can watch your baby nurse. I would also suggest you bring a bottle - a good lactation consultant will know all about every feeding method and would be able to help you ascertain what is going on - why your baby won't take a bottle, why your baby is so fussy at the breast and refusing to nurse etc. Babies can also be fed...
    5 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*marun4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:46 AM
    Bump / Update -- This is the most frustrating thing I've been through. If my baby would even take a bottle, I probably would be on the way to formula feeding by now. :( I'm still having problems getting the baby to eat. He only ate 4 or 5 times yesterday on one side for a few minutes each time -- only 2 times during the day and awake. The other feedings were during the night. He'd go 6 hours during the day without feeding. He had 2 wet diapers (and a couple small, green dirty ones). He is fussy almost all the time. Usually just fussy like he's hungry or maybe tired. Occasionally he sounds like he might be in pain. He gets absolutely hysterical if I try to feed him -- even if he doesn't latch on at all. Even if I just put him in position to feed. Even if he's acting hungry. We've been keeping up with the acid blocker medications (Ranitidine) but we're still seeing this problem after almost a week of taking them. I took him to his pediatrician, who automatically dismissed me and baby as having no problems and left before I could ask her practically ANY questions. Apparently that weigh-in showed he was gaining weight (said he was about 14 lbs 11 oz?!). So either that weigh-in or the last one was inaccurate due to scale calibrations or something. And she said if he's having 2 wet diapers a day not to worry.
    5 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:10 AM
    Also don't think it has to be all of nothing. You can do some pumping and some supplementing while away from the baby. Time in the evening would be better spent actually nursing than pumping.
    4 replies | 252 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:06 AM
    Oh yes I very much agree with mommal. And good news on ultrasound safety!
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 AM
    Decades of research have not turned up any side effects to ultrasound. As far as we know, its totally safe.
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 AM
    :ita with MaddieB! It can be really, really hard for breastfeeding moms to accept that their babies' every fuss, cry, fart, or uncomfortable face is not their fault or the fault of something in their diet. But it's really important for us to remember that babies are fussy, gassy, cranky, bewildering creatures even under the best circumstances, and most of the time mom and her diet have absolutely nothing to do with it. I found that when my kids were having a bit of trouble passing a toot or a poop, the best thing I could do was to nurse them. Nursing activates the gastrocolic reflex, which is scienctific talk for "put something in at the top of the digestive system and you activate muscles all the way down, often resulting in something moving out at the bottom of the digestive system." It's why we- babies, kids, adults, old people- generally poop rig after we eat!
    2 replies | 238 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:56 AM
    :ita with the PP. What would you like to do at this point? Would it be helpful to talk about ways to phase pumping out of your life?
    4 replies | 252 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:55 AM
    :ita "Introducing" a child to solid foods is like introducing him to a new friend. They don't have to be best friends right from the moment they meet. Maybe they mostly ignore each other at first. Eventually, though, they will get to know each other better and the friendship will take off. There's no need to force the friendship or worry about it. Neither of my kids ate more than a few Cheerios or a piece or two of shredded chicken from a soup at 8 months, wh but ch, incidentally, is when they both got their first teeth. They didn't really "make friends" with solids until around 14-15 months. They both had normal iron.
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:49 AM
    :ita with all the above from MaddieB and Kmrs! I would only add that when you go in to see the pediatrician and the GI doc, I think it will pay to be a VERY cautious consumer of advice regarding dietary eliminations, food intolerances, and poop appearance. Doctors get almost no training in breastfeeding, and even less in what to expect when it comes to the poop of a breastfed infant and how that can look when various factors (e.g., thrush, dietary intolerances, oversupply) are present. Because doctors approach baby poop/mucous/bloody poop with such uninformed preconceptions about what is "normal", it is fairly common for doctors to focus in on what they perceive as "abnormal" poop and suggest fairly drastic interventions, including dietary eliminations and switching to formula. They usually are not thinking "Gee, dietary eliminations and switching to formula carries their own inherent risks." They are just thinking "I will feel better if I can get this weird poop to resolve." I think the way you decide if weird poops warrant intervention is by looking at the total baby picture. If the total baby picture is good- baby is gaining and developing normally, and has few additional symptoms of concern- then you take an expectant management approach to poop. That is, you watch and wait. If this get worse, you reconsider making changes to your diet or the baby's diet. Otherwise, you just assume that a baby who appears healthy and normal is healthy and normal, no...
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 11:17 PM
    Did you see kmrs explained how to contact Dr. Newman's clinic? I would suggest that for the thrush questions. The text book Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple contains a good list of what to do to avoid reoccurring thrush, and if you have an LC who has that book they can show it to you, if not, I will try to write out the list perhaps tomorrow. But I do not think they get into as much detail as exactly how thrush might be passed between adults. I am not sure what to do for a thrush rash. But a red bumpy rash is not necessarily thrush, it could just be an irritation rash or at least partly so. These are often caused or exacerbated by commercial wipes. When my kids got a rashy bottom I avoided commercial wipes and the whole notion of "wiping" and instead soaked poopy bottom clean using a soft wash cloth or paper towels soaked in warm water with maybe a little tiny drop of soap, maybe not. Or just sticking baby's bottom into a bowl or sink and gently washing it. This always took care of rashes. My impression is that it should be entirely safe to have an ultrasound while nursing. But hopefully kmrs will have more information on that. I am so sorry you are having such a hard time. It is just not fair. I really hope you get some answers and see some improvement soon.
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 09:55 PM
    Ok - sorry about that. Started back classes this week, so it's been crazy. Baby has gastro APT tomorrow. I'm going to talk to him about the possibility of his mucus poops and blood being all caused from the yeast issue we've been having.. or if he thinks its allergy related, or whatever. I don't know why I'm going honestly. PEDS referred us. As far as my OB, I think she's just wanting to rule out any options. She is doing the ultrasound just to "be safe".. and said will only resort to a mammogram if something looks weird. Which reminds me - an ultrasound won't hurt anything as far as me nursing, right? So as I mentioned, the sharp pains came back. I'm started to think since I wasn't treating baby at first, he reinfected me. Or, I do live with my husband and 3 dogs. Without sexual contact, my husband and I can't transfer it back and forth, right? So I got another 14 day supply of Diflucan. We are going to do that again, as well as do sunlight outside, GSE nipple washes and APNO, along with GSE pump pieces and laundry. Baby is on nystatin currently (oral) but I'm going to call tomorrow his PEDS and I'm sure she will do the butt cream for it too. I'm going to try to find a good probiotic here that I can take and give to baby. I did notice today he is starting to have some red bumps near his anus. :( Anyone recommend anything else I can do for him? Or any tips/pointers that I haven't mentioned that will help me beat this? I'm really to the point of frustration and...
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 07:40 PM
    I usually held baby in different positions to help them get gas out in either direction. I played around with this as no two babies were exactly alike in what worked. Generally I would rub and pat them bringing my hand in the direction the gas should go, but this varied. Some people like more specific infant massage for this as well, there is the "I Love yoU" massage for example. http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/parenting/child-rearing-and-development/bringing-baby-home/infant-massage/get-set I also found that holding baby most of the time with babies head above tummy often helped a fussy baby and if that was NOT working, the "magic baby hold" helped. It is described here along with several other fussy baby tips: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf I also found simply laying baby 'draped" tummy down on my forearm helped. My husband held our fussy first born like this most of the time. Responding to crying quickly and nursing with high frequency and whenever baby cues or even anticipating cues may also help. No parent can prevent a baby crying of course, but lots of crying may increase gas due to baby swallowing air. Also, frequent meals means that meals are overall smaller and easier to digest. Gas is entirely normal and so is gas pain the vast majority of the time. Your baby's gut is developing and so his body is still figuring this all out. No need to worry that there is some kind of diet issues...
    2 replies | 238 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 07:18 PM
    Hi, I believe the current recommendation from the AAP (it may be slightly different among different organizations) is that babies are introduced to solids at around 6 months of age. You have done that. If baby has other plans and is growing and developing normally, in all likelihood nothing is amiss and you can continue to offer solids when and how often as you please and not worry. As far as I know, there is not any dietary requirement that is not met entirely by breastmilk at this age assuming you are starting with an overall healthy, nutritionally balanced baby. The most common concern MIGHT be iron, but this is more likely a problem if baby was predisposed to be low iron in the first place- for example, a baby who had their cord cut overly quickly after being born, as is the case with most caesarean and other emergency type births. Even then, there is no reason to assume there is any issue there. If you want, you can get an iron screen. My middle child - now 10 years old- born via caesarean- did not eat any solids at 8 months. He did not start eating much of anything until he was over a year old, and only began to eat with any regularity at around 14 months. At 9 months he tested borderline with iron and since he had no interest in foods we tried iron drops, but different doctors gave us different opinions about whether the iron level was a concern or not, and since he hated the drops we stopped those. His levels were normal at 11 months, even though he still was...
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 06:57 PM
    It's good information to be aware of, for sure! :)
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 05:42 PM
    Yes I agree I am not sure why a mammogram is being talked of in this particular case, that would be something I would personally want much more clarity on from doctor as you suggest. But many nursing moms are at an age or health history circumstance where routine mammograms are standard, or for whatever reason one is ordered, and lactating mom is told they have to wean baby in order to have one. So, just putting it out there that weaning is probably not needed, and would in fact delay any exam. Either mom can have a mammogram without weaning or a different kind of exam. I was talking generally, not about op.
    11 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 02:08 PM
    Hi my daughter is 8 months old this week and still has not eaten solid food or pureed food. When she turned six months old I started to try pureed food with no luck since then I've been trying almost every day and all she does is spit it back out. I'm not too concerned about that since I know that it can be normal for babies to take longer to get used to new foods. I breastfeed her exclusively and I'm wondering am I enough since she seems to be fussier than normal. I'm nursing her every 2 hours and I pump one time overnight since she sleeps through the night . She doesn't have any teeth yet and I don't see any teeth coming in but my concern is her iron levels I heard that babies need iron after 6 months in age and they need it from food instead of mom. Am I understanding this correctly?
    5 replies | 268 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 11:46 AM
    First of all, congratulations for giving your baby the best nutrition you can! You have come this far and that is a huge achievement. :hug I am sorry you are dealing with all these, it is hard to manage a baby, older kids, work and a home! I am not sure if your plan is to stop pumping altogether, or gradually pump wean, so that you don't deal with clogged ducts. Whatever you decide to do, please give yourself a pat on the back for coming this far! :)
    4 replies | 252 view(s)
  • @llli*jovadee's Avatar
    August 24th, 2016, 07:51 AM
    My 1 month old seems to be struggling passing gas sometimes during the day. His poop and pee output is fine, about 6-8 poops (yellow and loose) and 8-12 pees a day. At times he gets fussy and crys and starts kicking his legs and squirming while pushing and turning red in the face. Rocking him usually calms him but, Any advice on how to help him pass it? Any changes I should make in my diet? Thanks!
    2 replies | 238 view(s)
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