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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:36 AM
    What's the difference again? I am trying to remember if I ever nursed in a cradle hold. With my oldest, I nursed in the football hold for the first 5 months at least. With a breastfeeding pillow. Even in public. With my next two, I had discovered laid back nursing (me leaning back with baby kind of coming to the breast from underneath more so than directly from the side) and seldom held any child in what I would think of as a directly across the body cradle hold. (And yes I also nursed in the laid back style in public, on a regular chair or bench, it is not a requirement that the mom be in a reclining chair or couch or bed, that is a misunderstanding of that positioning.) I would suggest it may be easier and more helpful in both the short and long term to rethink your clothing or positioning (as in, are you more comfortable in a corner, can you half turn your back) when NIP than to master a hold that has eluded you even to this point. Cradle holds are fine if and when they work, but they are based not on any natural nursing position but are instead a mimic of the position a mother might hold her child to bottle feed. So there is certainly no shame in not mastering what is essentially an unnatural position. Also, it is very possible that as your baby grows, cradle holds, cross or not, will no longer work anyway. Cradle holds tend to cause 'longer' babies to tuck their chin, causing baby to either be uncomfortable and squirmy or to make latch hurt mom- or both. I...
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:28 AM
    :ita with Zachary.smommy- everything you describe sounds quite normal! Just one question- was the omphalocele associated with any other issue? Cardiac defect, chromosomal abnormality, any of the conditions that are sometimes associated with an omphalocele?
    6 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:24 AM
    What sort of pump do you have? Or are you hand expressing? If your production has dropped, it is reversible. The more often you remove milk from the breast and the more completely you remove it, the more you will make. The way I coupled nursing and pumping was to nurse the baby first, top her off with a small supplemental bottle, and then pump for 10-20 minutes. It was a lot of work, but it did increase my supply to the point where I could nurse exclusively.
    10 replies | 285 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:21 AM
    "Evolutionary Biology of the Human Microbiome" sounds like an NSF winner to me. Though if I thought of it, 100 different labs are doing it already. :lol Speaking as someone who intended to wean at 12 months and instead allowed her kids to self-wean, I have to say that nursing the older kids is just so... convenient! It was my go-to tool for distracting a toddler who was getting into something she shouldn't be touching, for comforting a kid through sadness or tantrums, for getting a hyper kid into a more relaxed mood, for getting my kids to bed when they were cranky but not sleepy, for dealing with a screaming kid in a restaurant... My personal feeling was that nursing a baby is investment, but nursing a toddler is the payoff.
    6 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 07:59 AM
    I have to say that everything you are describing sounds pretty normal to me as far as behavior goes at this age. And I am by no means an expert, just another mom with a 7 month old! My LO can be very distracted by every sound, every thing he sees, the dog passing by, daddy coming home, etc. The world is just too interesting! In that case if I feel like he is too distracted and is not eating enough I will turn off the tv and lower the lights and try to keep everything calm and see if that helps him focus more. Also, if you are able to hold him and walk around to nurse, that will also help focus on nursing, I found. I think one of the problems here is you are reading information about what babies SHOULD be doing and what you are experiencing isn't matching. Well, basically what you are reading is a bunch of bologna! A lot of info out there is geared towards bottles/formula. But 4 hours is a really long time to go without food/water regardless of how a baby is fed. Imagine you were thirsty but you were told to wait hours to take a drink! Plus, nursing can be also just about comfort or connection. So these time limits that the "experts" on all these books and blogs put out there, just don't work or make much sense at all. And try not to worry about a set pattern of napping and feeding. I think naps will become more patterned when they get older, but I think it is normal for all the variation now. Also, it is perfectly okay to nurse baby to sleep. Sometimes when they wake...
    6 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*sak184's Avatar
    Today, 06:50 AM
    I can start expressing again. But the problem is my milk production has dropped down. And with all the expressing i am really afraid that my baby wouldn't be able to nurse ever again.
    10 replies | 285 view(s)
  • @llli*rainbowgoblin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:47 PM
    I really appreciate this discussion of antibiotics and breastfeeding. I'm a scientist, but not a microbiologist (my training was in biochemistry, my research is in evolutionary biology) so I understand the basics of the human microbiome, but not the finer details. I also tend to be skeptical about medical advice (not to mention everything else), unless it agrees with what I already think. So. I'll relax a bit about the tiny hit of cephalexin my toddler will get if I nurse him. I also realized we aren't ready to wean just yet. Today was the first morning we've missed a feed as soon as we both woke up, and it was really hard on both of us. I think we'll wait until my toddler would rather be up and about when he wakes than cuddling and nursing. My firstborn weaned himself when I got pregnant with his brother, which was heartbreaking at the time (I had planned on tandem nursing), but in retrospect, at least it was his decision.
    6 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:43 PM
    How awesome that nursing is going so well this time around! :cheer In general, it is recommended that moms spend the first 4-6 weeks only nursing, and avoiding the pump unless pumping is necessary, e.g., for a baby who will not latch. This gives mom and baby time to get into a groove together, and prevents mom from pumping herself into an oversupply or getting into situations where she feels she must offer a bottle because she just emptied herself with the pump. After 4-6 weeks, a single pump per day is probably more than sufficient to build a frozen stash for emergency purposes. If you are anticipating no separations or only rare separations, you may not need to do any regular pumping at all. Baby can go pretty much anywhere you can!
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:37 PM
    I couldn't agree more. That being said, your doctor's opinion on the compatibility of breastfeeding and antibiotics is without doubt an extreme minority perspective. As MaddieB said, this is an L1 med! Also, while early antibiotic exposure and antibiotic overuse and the health of our personal microbiome are definitely things we should all be concerned about, I don't see this as a particularly troubling use of antibiotics because: 1. We are talking about a 15 month-old baby who nurses just a few times per day, not a newborn who nurses round the clock and relies entirely on mom's milk. It's a much different level of exposure. 2. In the unlikely event that a very low-level exposure to antibiotics did disturb your child's gut flora, that gut flora will reestablish itself in time. Gut health isn't a "one course of antibiotics and your gut is irrevocably destroyed" thing. 3. Breastmilk contains probiotic bacteria and is also a prebiotic. That is, there are compounds in breastmilk- particularly oligosaccharides- that are indigestible by humans and are present only to feed beneficial gut bacteria. So if your child's gut flora was affected by low-level antibiotic exposure, breastmilk would help to reestablish a normal, healthy gut mincrobiome. 4. When you are close to weaning- and it sounds like you are quite far along in this process- the concentration of immune-promoting factors actually increases in your milk. Milk produced at the tail end of lactation is a lot...
    6 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*rosesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:27 PM
    With my first child I had a lot of latching issues and had to return to work at 3 months so I started pumping a week after she was born. Now I have my second child (2weeks old) and breastfeeding is going great (such a huge relief!) and I have left work to be a stay at home mum. This time around when do you suggest I start pumping to store milk in the freezer for emergency purposes? Thanks!
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:17 PM
    Any time you need more milk, you add more pump sessions and make your sessions longer, and eventually you will see an increase in supply. The real challenge is finding time, especially as your baby grows and new and different challenges arise. Imagine trying to fit in extra pump sessions just when your increasingly mobile baby has discovered electrical sockets... (True story!) One nice thing about breastfed babies is that their milk needs should not increase over time the way formula-fed babies' intake does. Milk intake for a breastfed baby typically peaks in the first few months, holds steady until at least 6 months, and then slowly decreases as solids are introduced and start to make up more of the baby's diet. Of course, overfeeding is always a possibility when meals are delivered by bottle, simply due to the mechanics of bottles. So if you haven't checked out resources on paced feeding, now would be a great time to do so. (Paced feeding techniques can help moderate intake from bottles.) Understood! EP and exclusive breastfeeding are definitely compatible, and there are plenty of moms who make it through an entire year without needing to use formula. That being said, feeding the baby at the breast is almost always the best and easiest way to make this happen. Can you tell us more about your baby's latching issues? Is the problem that she will not latch on, is she unable to transfer sufficient milk when she latches, or is the latch painful for you? ...
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:05 PM
    My understanding is that milk removal is to keep the breasts soft and the milk flowing in order to prevent the possible reoccurrence or worsening of the mastitis due to milk stasis, not because nursing or pumping "flushes out" the infection. That makes it sound like breastmilk is the dumping ground for the body when of course it is not. Whether at this age and with the production you have you risk another bout of mastitis if you wean or do not pump/nurse often enough is hard to say. I also had mastitis when my child was a toddler- 18 months. But in my case it was pretty directly related to going too long without nursing (and the pressure of wearing a seatbelt for several hours- ironically, so I could attend a LLL meeting.) In my situation, I definitely felt encouraging lots of nursing was important because I still made quite a bit of milk. Did you take abs when you had mastitis before? Hale rates Cephalexin L1, (or at least that is the rating in my copy of Medications and Mothers Milk which is a little old- 2010.) L1 is the safest rating a medication can have according to his rating scale for maternal use of medications while nursing, even though, indeed, it is present in very small amounts in the breastmilk of a mother who is taking it. Duration of breastfeeding and the benefits thereof is also an important part of the consideration when weaning is considered due to taking any medication. Obviously every mother needs to weigh the potential risk/benefit when she...
    6 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:48 PM
    You can look at the Newman protocols and use what works for you. This website explains some different protocols: http://www.asklenore.info/breastfeeding/induced_lactation/gn_protocols.shtml Please note no protocol has a 100 percent success rate and "success" in inducing lactation is a very individual thing. Your age should not be any real barrier. How a hysterectomy is going to change what approach works best is not something I am sure about. There are other lactation aids aside the SNS and there are differences, you might want to research that. It costs money to see a LC in most circumstances, although there may be free or low cost clinics etc. in your area. I am not sure how insurance would work in this situation, but sometimes insurers cover the consult. However, for inducing lactation, you probably want to find an LC who is specifically very versed in inducing milk production. And that may mean searching outside your area. Some LCs will work with moms on Skype etc.
    4 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*bluepolka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:14 PM
    Yes I completely understand that you cannot say with a guarantee what amount and when I can pump to maintain a supply. But any tried and tested suggestions are helpful. I'm also doing fenugreek and oatmeal. The power pumping was over a period of an hour, it worked for me because apparently you Have to do it just couple of times a week. And I can do it when I kid is off on a big nap. Doing it after every feed is hard because I have a lot of house responsibilities as well. I also pump in secret because family members feel that I pump and cause my breasts to empty and my child to be hungry (yepppp!) So, anyways I'm praying that he weans off quick. In the mean time I'm also trying bottles to have a back up. He has refused every so far. He's just too smart! Ugh About the pediatrician, last visit he was very happy with the gain? I'm due to see him in 10 days. Let's see the status then! Thanks again :)
    9 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*rainbowgoblin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:34 PM
    "Safe" is a complicated notion with antibiotics. My doctor actually suggested avoiding breastfeeding if at all possible, but I would have concerns regardless. There are various long-term health consequences to early exposure to antibiotics, and antibiotics are generally present in breastmilk (I'm taking cephalexin, which is definitely in breastmilk). A lot of the long term benefits of breastfeeding have to do with gut microbes... It would be a shame to knock out my toddler's healthy guts at this point.
    6 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*bluepolka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:32 PM
    Yes I completely understand that you cannot say with a guarantee what amount and when I can pump to maintain a supply. But any tried and tested suggestions are helpful. I'm also doing fenugreek and oatmeal. The power pumping was over a period of an hour, it worked for me because apparently you Have to do it just couple of times a week. And I can do it when I kid is off on a big nap. Doing it after every feed is hard because I have a lot of house responsibilities as well. I also pump in secret because family members feel that I pump and cause my breasts to empty and my child to be hungry (yepppp!) So, anyways I'm praying that he weans off quick. In the mean time I'm also trying bottles to have a back up. He has refused every so far. He's just too smart! Ugh About the pediatrician, last visit he was very happy with the gain? I'm due to see him in 10 days. Let's see the status then! Thanks again :)
    9 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*ashmash's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:34 AM
    My baby is almost 5 months and I've done the cross cradle since he was born because it felt more secure. I've tried and tried to do the cradle hold, because then I can lay back and relax, and it's easier to feed in public that way without being overly exposed. We do fine lathing in the cradle hold but for some reason, since he's so squirmy, he will just unlatch and fidget and fuss. It is hard to cross cradle in public comfortably. What can I do? Just keep trying?
    1 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:07 AM
    I thought I had already heard every ridiculous way someone can undermine a nursing mother. Apparently not. I have heard of power pumping, if you mean pumping several times over a short period of time (aka cluster pumping.) If this is something you have the time to do, ok...but if you did it for say, an hour per day, that would be as much time pumping overall as if you pumped for 15 minutes after 4 nursing sessions, or twice for 30 minutes between sessions etc. I think any pumping plan needs to work (be reasonably convenient) for mom in order to work. If cluster pumping works better for you, then do that. I also do not think you need to do the same thing everyday, in other words, you can change it up as life dictates. But I do not think anyone can tell you whether or not one of those would be "enough" to maintain production or better than pumping for a shorter period more often. I cannot tell you if 2 times a day as I suggested is enough, too much, or just right. It was a suggestion I made in keeping with the fact your baby appears to be gaining normally so there does not appear to be any issue with production yet. I really do not remember, except I tried everything usually suggested over and over. I also had learned how to help baby latch better in general from an IBCLC. One side was 'shield free" well before the other. I tried to get him to nurse without the shield several times a day, but I do not think at every nursing session. As far as gain, what is your...
    9 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*bluepolka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:03 AM
    Thanks Maddie! That sounds reasonable. I'm sorry you had to read so much only to conclude that I'm worried for no reason! Lol but that's reassuring. And you hit my problem stop on. I want to maintain a supply while I wean him off the nipple shield without having to pump after every feeding because that is just impossible. My mother in law would feel his stomach and say it's empty. So I would get really anxious. And the nipple shield wasn't always full with milk when I pulled it out. Is it supposed to be? Sometimes it is when he falls asleep. He has about 6-7 wet diapers and 4-5 poopy ones. With a preemie's weight I'm always concerned of if and when he'll catch up. So the drop in weight gain from 2 lbs a month to 1.5 lbs freaked me out a bit. I thought he was supposed to catch up and not slow down! He's pretty much meeting milestones. Except rolling over because he detests tummy time. I have two last (hopefully) questions for you: (1) have you heard of power pumping? Would doing one power pump a day be enough to maintain a good supply? (2) how did you wean your child off the shield? I try to offer him the breast before every feeding. He sometimes screams and sometimes talks to the boob! He likes to take the nipple shield out and throw it! Then cry when I go to feed without it. I'm hoping that with continual effort and maturity he will one day give it up! Thanks for the advice.:)
    9 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:58 AM
    This sounds pretty remarkably consistent and a long stretch at night for an 11 month old. It sounds to me that the issue you are having is that nursing your child to sleep is taking a long time. Could the problem be the timing of bedtime or naps? The other issue might be that you are trying to move your child into a cot, consequently waking them! I would agree with mommal that it might make more sense to nurse your child while lying beside them and learning the art of the sneak away. For me, when nursing my child to sleep, if it was taking a long time, it helped me to read while doing so. I have burned through many a booklight! As far as nursery, won't that at least solve your nap problem for the days you work, as you will not be there to nurse child to sleep at nap times? Are you concerned your son won't nap there, or something else? I honestly do not know where people got the idea there is anything wrong with comforting a child to sleep with nursing, since obviously this is a biologically dictated and universal sleep inducing behavior, or that doing so precludes a baby or older child from going to sleep in any other circumstance. Every child who is in daycare or has different caregivers ever at bedtime or naptime has different methods by which they go to sleep, because most of the time, each caregiver has their own way of doing things. Your child has already shown that he can be comforted to sleep other ways by dad... If you are worried about the caregivers...
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*minka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 AM
    Thank you so much for all this information. If I begin pumping more frequently but for less time, in the future when my little one's need for milk increases, will my supply be responsive to this? That's been one of my concerns. I'd really like to steer clear of the need to supplement with formula if it's at all possible. Our little one has had issues latching from day one. She has a slight tongue tie but the ent we went to said that it most likely would not make a difference to have it released and our pediatrician agreed. They assured us that her range of motion of her tongue will not limit her speech wise or in any other way and the only reason to have it released would be the possible improvement in breast-feeding which could not be guaranteed, so my husband and I decided not to put her through the procedure at this time. (Although we understand that it is a simple, straightforward one.)
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:56 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby and on making it through the first 3 weeks of breastfeeding! It sounds like you are making quite a lot of milk, which is absolutely typical for a mom who is just 3 weeks in; milk production often peaks in the 3-6 week window. If I were in your shoes, here is what I would do: 1. Pump or hand express a little more often. Babies generally nurse a minimum of 8x per day, and most 3 week olds are nursing more like 10-12 or more times per day. Removing milk a little more often would be a little more like the natural pattern of breastfeeding and would decrease your risk for things like plugged ducts, mastitis, feelings of engoregement/overfull breasts. 2. Pump or hand express less milk at each session. Instead of pumping until you feel completely empty, take 2-4 oz and then stop. If you end the day a few oz in advance of your child's average daily needs, fine. It's not that much milk to store, right? And if you are a few oz behind, still okay- you have plenty in storage to make up for the shortfall and you can pump a little more the next day. 3. Invest in a standalone chest freezer. If you plan to exclusively pump, it might be a good idea to create a larger frozen stash than you would have if you were nursing and just providing milk for daycare or sitters. This way you will have a cushion for pump slumps and busy days. Milk also lasts longer in a standalone freezer than in the freezer compartment of your...
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*minka's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:30 AM
    Hello. I am seeking advice regarding oversupply and storing breast milk options. My little on is 3 weeks old and for latching reasons, we have decided to exclusively bottle feed her breast milk. I am currently pumping 7 times a day, at 3-ish hour intervals which yields about 40 oz a day. She consumes less than half of this, which leaves me with a massive inventory of breastmilk that is taking over the fridge and freezer. Since I am exclusively pumping I want to be able to meet her feeding needs when she gets older, but the output at the end of the day seems quite excessive. Any advice?
    3 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:37 AM
    Hang in there! :hug
    6 replies | 432 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:36 AM
    I think the best thing you can do is to take a deep breath and have faith that the nursery workers will find a way to get your child to take a nap. This is almost always what happens! Babies don't get why mom won't just nurse them to sleep, so when mom is there, they will kick up a huge fuss in order to get mom to deliver their favorite form of comfort. But when mom's not there, most babies don't expect anything other than cuddles. I think that if you don't want to be trapped in an hour-long PUPD battle with your LO, your choices are either to let dad take over all the nighttime comforting, or to completely reverse course and nurse him when he wants, maybe try co-sleeping (which doesn't necessarily mean bed sharing, it can also mean sleeping next to your baby in a separate bed), and have confidence that "if you meet the need, the need will go away". Maybe not as soon as you wish, but eventually!
    2 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:26 AM
    Does it help to hear that I would have committed crimes- misdemeanors for sure, felonies maybe!- for a kid who woke up just 3 times a night at 7 months? My kids were up 5-8 times at that age. :eye
    3 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 AM
    She might change her mind. But go easy on her- the last thing any mom needs is pressure on the subject of breastfeeding. If she does change her mind, I suggest celebrating her in every way possible. If she doesn't... Just keep your silence, right? You're absolutely right that there is no way to know if herbs and pumping will be enough to make you lactate, or how long you should wait before you declare the experiment a success or failure. Unfortunately, this is one area where responses to pumping and herbs and drugs are so incredibly variable that there's just no way to give people a good answer! What sort of pump do you have?
    4 replies | 189 view(s)
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