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  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 03:30 PM
    And as I sit here pumping, my 5 1/2 months old Little Guy just pulled himself up to standing in his crib all on his own. Looks like we gotta drop the mattress again already. (Top rail is currently at mouth height when he pulls himself up to kneeling but if he manages to get his feet closer to the side when he pulls up to standing I'm afraid he will manage to go over the top.) Crib is mostly used like a play pen while I pump so far. Only occasionally does he ever nap in it.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Today, 03:01 PM
    Besides nursing, what do you all do to help your kiddo through a cold? I've had one for a couple days and it looks like I've passed it along to my daughter, who is 25 months. Runny nose, cough, watery eyes. My body hurt in the course of mine, so she may be facing that too. No signs of discomfort yet. I 'm at work during the day and will nurse when i get home and as needed between then and tomorrow when I leave for work. Thanks.
    0 replies | 13 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:49 PM
    How does nursing feel? If nursing feels good and the pump doesn't hurt either, then pumping after nursing as many times a day as you can manage is often a quick way to increase supply but this might be best done with a hospital grade pump. If there is any issue with nursing discomfort or if you feel there is milk there but baby seems to take a really long time or has trouble getting it out there could be a problem with milk transfer and it is possible the problem isn't really your supply and getting some hands on help to assess the situation may be in order. http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*runbabyrun's Avatar
    Today, 02:43 PM
    I've contacted Public Health already. They referred me to the hospital LC who does not see a problem with the latch or the shield, and the breastfeeding support group I attended. I haven't found a breastfeeding coalition. The next nearest group is 2 hours away. We have our 1 month checkup this week so I am going to discuss it with my doctor. I also located an email for a local LLL leader and have sent an email. I was able to get a latch with this feeding without the shield. I used it then quickly switched out. He does feed frequently except at nights and isn't usually frustrated, I try to avoid getting to that point.
    10 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:31 PM
    He is getting interested in what we eat but at this point it is more that he wants to grab things rather than actually eat them. I don't think it will be long but so far he only seems to ingest very small quantities most of the time (except banana, he will suck that down scary fast.) I've not really been in a panic about his weight since he otherwise seems quite healthy, happy and developmentally on/ahead of schedule. I'm only obsessed, no panic.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 PM
    Thanks for sharing that, it is good to hear that there are other babies with this tendency.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:16 PM
    It's not too late. You may be in for an arduous task for a while though, get as much help taking care of you and the household/family as possible so you can devote yourself to baby and supply. Can you get him to latch at all? If so, you might want to switch to using a lactation aid or at the breast supplementer until you can improve your supply. See an IBCLC for some hands on help http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901 Rent a hospital grade pump and pump after as many feedings as you possibly can without suffering complete exhaustion. Again, get some hands on help if anything hurts at all. Pumping and nursing should not hurt.
    1 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 01:58 PM
    I second the dream feed idea. I have done it with both of my kids for different reasons. My first woke up a lot at night, so the dream feed helped me get a longer stretch of sleep without him waking up from being hungry. My second, who I am BFing currently, sleeps too long and I get plugged ducts, so I dream feed her to empty at least one breast before heading to bed. Also, since going back to work, I like to get in that one extra nursing session to keep my supply up.
    3 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 01:50 PM
    I guess solids will only help if he is interested... But it will happen eventually :) I do have 1 friend who has nursed 5 children and her 5th just isn't that bothered by eating and has always been on the slender side. That said she is happy and healthy and nursing at 2 still :) It stressed her out a lot at points to esp as her others were all more interested.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 01:50 PM
    I went back to work when my daughter was 3 month old and we tried to get her to take a bottle every day for 2 weeks leading up to it, but she wouldn't. We tried 5 different nipples and none of them made a difference. We tried it when she was hungry, when she wasn't hungry, when she was sleepy, when she wasn't sleepy, I gave her a bottle, DH gave her a bottle without me in the room, etc. We tried everything we could think of. When the time came, I went back to work for half a day and she ate 1 oz. That is it. The next day she ate ALL of her bottles. I think it took a day without me around for her to realize the necessity of bottles. It sounds harsh, but when you have to go to work sometimes it happens that way. Also, I hate giving bottles and find it very awkward, but babysitters and daycare workers give bottles all the time and may have a better time of it.
    2 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:41 PM
    Congratulations on your baby and your VBAC! I had all of mine via C-sections- how I wish I could have experienced vaginal birth. Are there other issues? Is nursing comfortable for you? Is baby overly sleepy? Jaundiced? etc. How many times a day does your baby nurse? At this age, healthy gaining infants tend to nurse a minimum of 10-15 times a 24 hour day. It is normal for a newborn baby to lose weight in the first few days of life. Then (assuming all is well) the weight loss stops and baby starts gaining, usually the gain begins by day 3-5. It is a usually a good sign if baby is back to birth weight by day 10 or earlier, although some take a little longer. If baby is NOT back to birth weigh by 2 week, that is a red flag something may be wrong. You are only supplementing 4 ounces a day. That is not so much. How is baby's weight gain since? I assume because there was so much concern that formula was prescribed, that weight gain is being closely monitored? Are all weight checks on the same scale, done very carefully, done on a digital readout professional infant scale, with baby naked or in a dry diaper? This is very important. Scale error does happen.
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 01:36 PM
    I think there was one study once that claimed babies reject post-exercise milk, and numerous other studies that show babies don't care. Go, exercise, be happy, just wear a good bra. There have been many discussions about choosing a good bra on this forum, but the summary is this: get fitted so you know your exact size, pick an encapsulation (divide and conquer) rather than compression (squish them down). If you find you get plugged ducts, nurse or pump immediately after. Eat for hunger, drink for thirst and you should be okay, no need to over analyze.
    3 replies | 207 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 PM
    I have both and I like both for different reasons. I have had my PISA since my first born and got my Hygeia through insurance for my second child. For me, I find the medela empties faster and I really like the letdown button to help get the pumping started. I don't know if the extra help from the letdown button is the reason I pump faster with the medela, because everything else, fit and function, feel about the same. As PP said, the hygeia has both speed and suction dials, while the medela only has variable suction. I am not sure what model zaynethepain has with 5 settings, because my PISA is a continuous dial. Maybe they changed it? I have heard the one offered by insurance is not as nice as the one sold in stores. Since I have one breast larger than the other, I require two different size shields and I was happy to find that the medela and hygeia shields are interchangeable, so I could use my previously purchased medela shields with my new hygeia pump. That also means you can find new shields pretty easily, FWIW. I decided to get a hygeia rather than another medela PISA through insurance because LLL endorses them and the pumps are recyclable, but after having used both, I would say I like the medela better, purely from a functional standpoint.
    8 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*sonogirl's Avatar
    Today, 01:21 PM
    "Snacking" is a normal way for an infant to feed, though. Generally speaking, there is no need to wait a specific amount of time in order to ensure that baby is getting a proper meal. Whatever the baby is demanding is generally the "proper" meal. I do think that your situation--that is, feeding the baby less frequently to increase supply--is outside the norm for most nursing dyads. This is, or course, not to question your particular experience, as you know that following what your baby wanted worked out well for you two! This is mostly something worth pointing out to anyone else who may be following this thread. I think the OP is correct in following her instincts to nurse frequently in this case, because she has good reason to suspect that she has a low storage capacity. Those of us who have those low storage capacities generally manage to keep our babies fed by what some would deem "snacks." I don't think my daughter ever routinely had much more than a 2 oz meal at the breast or from the bottle!
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 01:10 PM
    Well, ruchiccio, I guess those diagrams were wrong, then! Mine isn't quite like that. I don't have a lot of pain. If I had the white dot I'd know it was a plugged duct for sure (the one plugged duct I definitely had with my daughter was like that). I'm going to leave it alone for a day and see if it gets better. I'm thinking it might be something like a bruise, but it's so scary to think of leaving a plugged duct to get worse.
    3 replies | 91 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 01:03 PM
    I do realize that growth rate changes as babies get older. (which is what I don't think the current ped was taking into consideration and why I'm trying to switch to a Dr that is actually pro breastfeeding.) If we continue only gaining 2 oz per week we will be dropping on the chart though. I'd been managing to keep him between the 5th and 10th centile on the WHO weight chart by supplementing expressed breast milk for the past couple months. However, it seems over time his apatite has dwindled a bit or something is keeping him from consuming much at any one meal so his overall intake the past three weeks has dropped. This seems to have started a week or so before I tried cutting out the supplements completely. I hadn't really noticed that he hadn't taken as much and I hadn't been looking at the weights that closely that week but I did notice that I was having a lot of trouble getting him to take the supplement that week which kinda prompted me to go ahead and just drop them (of course that is when I started doing all the weighted feedings and discovered he wasn't eating all that much.) Since I've been on the Domperidone my supply is definitely improved to the point that there is still milk there for him when he decides he is done. I've tried even giving a bottle after nursing a few times just to see if he is just objecting to flow rate and that doesn't seem to be it. Back around 4 1/2 months old We got done with the speech therapy and he was definitely able...
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*sassypants's Avatar
    Today, 12:53 PM
    Did the plugged ducts pop up this week, from pumping? Check to see that your shields fit properly. From my experience, a shield that is too small may not empty well and lead to plugged ducts. Massage while pumping along with correctly sized shields can help alleviate the plugs.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*saradha81's Avatar
    Today, 12:35 PM
    Hi, With my first baby I had a c-section and had issues with establishing my supply. I had my second baby last week (10 days back) and it was a successful VBAC. I thought the nursing was going on well as she nursed every two hours and seemed satisfied for the first three days and I was able to express colustrum and thin milk. We visited the pediatrician on the third day and she mentioned that the baby has lost weight and was not gaining enough and asked us to supplement formula. We are giving her 1oz every other feeding after she finishes nursing on me. I have been pumping 15 minutes three times daily in between feedings and all I am able to get is 1oz in a day, she takes 4 oz of supplement. What is the best way to increase my supply and get her out of the formula? Any advice is appreciated. I go back to work in another 8 weeks.
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 11:43 AM
    Am so glad it improved for you :)
    9 replies | 431 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 11:30 AM
    Is he dropping on the chart tho? Babies gain less as they grow so while a newborn might put on an ounce a day that wouldn't be the case for the same baby at 6 months. I don't know enough about expected weigh gain at 6 months to know what is normal. My LG was 12lb 12 at 6 months and healthy :) You are really close to the 6 month mark where some high calorie solids may be an easier supplement than pumping and sns-ing, which would mean pumping is just short term.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:23 AM
    I had a soreness on the base of my breast, also on the bone. Like if I pressed my bone it hurt. It was a pretty severe pain, though. It woke me up at night when I leaned on that side. I tried heat and massage but there wasn't really a way to massage it in that funny area. Then in the morning I saw a small white dot on my nipple so I figured it's a duct leading to that painful spot and sure enough, after releasing the plug with a sterilized needle, milk came out and the area became unpainful.
    3 replies | 91 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:04 AM
    Well, the new Ped I want to switch to can't yet accept my insurance and I don't think I can switch plans at this point. I've scheduled a meet and great with her anyway and will see if we can go to her and pay out of pocket until such time as our insurance is set up with them since I really don't want to go back to the other Dr again.
    191 replies | 9074 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:18 AM
    Call a neighboring group? Sometimes Leaders retire and Groups disband, but like everything else the info stays on the internet forever. What public Health services do you have access to? Any breastfeeding coalitions local or not so local? There might be one for the whole province or country. Did you ask your baby's pediatrician, your OB, or your hospital if they can refer you to an IBCLC or to someone who diagnoses oral issues that affect breastfeeding? Mommal is correct. Yes the silicone shields are better than what was used previously, but the use of even these shields has been shown to be connected to low milk production over time. The problem is, it is hard to identify who will have an issue, There are other factors at play. Yes, four ounces a pump session is a good amount, and your baby is gaining normally. So you do not have a milk production issue YET. It takes time for milk production issues to happen. You are pumping some, right? So that is good. Another possibly helpful idea would be to encourage baby to nurse frequently. This also helps with latch issues because the softer the breast, usually the easier to latch, and because nursing often helps baby not be frantic at meal times and a calm baby is more willing to try different approaches to latch.
    10 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:06 AM
    mommal is right of course. Also, washing with a 'mild' soap will probably cleanse the straps just fine as well. I just find using wipes easier and have done that for years as needed.
    4 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*still-learning's Avatar
    Today, 09:53 AM
    Nursing while pregnant is a very personal decision, and you need to do what is best for you and your baby. Nursing to sleep was particularly painful while pregnant. I think it was the combination of the hormones of pregnancy mixed with my toddlers desire to want that milk to help him fall asleep. He would do the same things with the added benefit of tugging with his mouth on my breast while trying to get milk out. For mine it seemed like way to much stress to encourage weaning at that point and at least I got to lay down and "rest" while nursing so we continued. During a different pregnancy nap time/bed time were also painful. Don't tell anyone, but I actually used tv at nap time, nursing was so painful. I remember telling her she could snuggle up with me in my bed and watch a tv show to rest. It gave us both a break. If you can find some quiet activity now that he starts to associate with resting/nap time that could help for later. Or even putting him in his room to play quietly with a timer and hope he falls asleep, or at least you've gotten 15 mins :) I've never experienced low milk supply so I can't be of much help on that, sorry. I didn't always follow the nurse the baby first. In fact the nurse I had told me that was only important the first few days before your milk comes in. And she also said a toddler nursing can help establish supply, because they already know how to nurse.
    1 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*cej2014's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    Thanks for giving me an avenue to get that rant out! Just wanted to update that things have gotten a lot better. LO's latch feels so much better than a week ago, I think she needed time to adjust to her new teeth coming in and I just needed time to heal a little from some rough nursing during teething and her cold. Hopefully that can give hope to someone who might find themselves in a similar situation. Also, I never did start a dream feed. I gave it a try but could never get her to respond (I guess she is a deeper sleeper than I thought!) One night she even started to fuss around 10:30, great time to do a DF for me...I went in to sooth her and tried to nurse and she just stared at me, not interested, and went back to sleep. mommal honestly the comfort factor isn't what keeps me going - my girl is really not much of a comfort nurser so it's just not my first instinct with her when she's upset. But, it is always helpful to remember why I chose to breastfeed to begin with! -great health/nutritional benefits for baby (by far #1 for me) -Saves us SO much money vs. buying formula, even with the nursing bras, and nipple creams, and LC visits, and pump parts -SO convenient - I groan about cleaning my pump parts so I can't imagine cleaning and sterilizing bottles all of the time. (I do think the convenience argument can fall on both sides though...as sometimes i think about how convenient it would be to just pull out a bottle or let someone else wake up with the baby once in a...
    9 replies | 431 view(s)
  • @llli*gold86en's Avatar
    Today, 08:54 AM
    Maybe it is bruised? I get a dull pain once in awhile with no other symptoms as well, and it goes away after a day or two. Not sure if it is my nursing toddler causing the bruises or what --- you'd think I would remember getting hit or tugged hard enough to create the bruise, but I never do...:shrug
    3 replies | 91 view(s)
  • @llli*cej2014's Avatar
    Today, 08:40 AM
    Personally, I would just watch it for a bit. Enjoy the sleep! I would imagine if he isn't getting enough during the day/one night feeding, he'll start to wake up again. When my LO started sleeping longer she started to nurse more vigorously and for longer first thing in the morning to make up for it.
    3 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*aurealuna's Avatar
    Today, 08:21 AM
    This was my gut feeling, too. When I am well-awake, this gut feeling kicks in. It just seems... mean. Actually, I had read about the Dr. Jay Gordon method during a previous thread that I posted. We had already more or less been in the 2nd stage of his method anyway when we started, so for a while we had completed it and she was sleeping a good 7-8 hours uninterrupted. However, about 2 weeks ago the problems started up again with a fury. She is now throwing mega-tantrums if she wakes up in the night and I don't nurse her, and she pushes my hand away if I try to pat or comfort her. I have to wait until she has thrashed around a good 5 minutes before she exhausts herself. Then I cuddle her and she falls asleep. However, last night was the worst. She woke up repeatedly even just 2 hours after going to bed. I think she woke up about 4 times in just one hour between 10-11 pm, then periodically throughout the night. Probably she is teething? What can I do to retain the night weaning progress in such situations? As usual, even last night I refused to nurse her until it was light outside (around 7 am). It was not at all easy for anyone. I guess part of the reason I was considering pushing the weaning is that sometimes I just feel really tired of nursing. I love the moments when we are talking while she nurses and such, but in general I would prefer to be cuddling with her in the same way without nursing (like that ever happens! :lol )...
    3 replies | 75 view(s)
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