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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:01 PM
    Generally it is suggested to avoid pacifiers for the first 6 weeks or if there are breastfeeding problems. But, if you understand the problems with pacifiers and are careful to avoid them, I think a pacifier can be used safely in any situation. The problem with pacifiers is that just like bottles, they are a breast replacement. But unlike bottles (or the breasts) they provide no nourishment. So pacifier overuse is linked to poor weight gain. Baby is given the pacifier too often/too long and this prevents baby nursing enough. Also, baby not nursing enough causes a problem with milk production. Another problem when pacifier interferes with normal nursing frequency is when mom is over producing, she gets more full between sessions and baby has an even stronger flow to deal with than if they nursed more often.
    13 replies | 501 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Today, 08:18 PM
    Is it advisable to give the baby pacifier to calm her, it is very difficult to see her cry for so long :( Although, we did try to take her out on stroller which worked once , the next time she started crying later and stroller did not help :(
    13 replies | 501 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:48 PM
    Ok so what you want to think about is the daily total number of nursing sessions, since babies do not tend to nurse in a regular every such hours pattern, but more like a clustering pattern, typically. What is important is that newborn nurse at least 10-12 times in 24 hours. More often is fine and usually can only help. Many babies in the newborn period need to be awaken so they nurse often enough overall. Poops sound ok in amount, on the lower side but certainly within the range of normal output. So that is a good sign all is probably well. The real test will be weight gain, but here are some things you need to understand about weight gain in the early days so you can avoid problems. most babies lose some weight after they are born, and only start gaining again after 3-5 days or so. So if you have a "lowest known weight" from sometime after birth, use that as the measure, not birth weight. Because it is entirely possible baby is gaining just fine, but still below birth weight. What you want to see in most cases is baby back to birth weight by 10-14 days of age, although some babies who perhaps got a bit of a slower start on gain take a bit longer and it is not a problem. Weight checks at this age must be done with great care. Digital infant scale properly used, baby naked or in a dry diaper only, no blanket or anything else on scale unless it is also weighed (a light paper scale cover is fine.) Who ever is doing the weight check should be very careful and...
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*fortheloveofboys's Avatar
    Today, 05:53 PM
    This is my second child. Breastfeeding didnt go so well with my first. I'm very determined to make this work. I think i may have spoke too soon. When i posted this he was only pooping 2 to 3 times but it was a pretty large liquidy amount. While he is now pooping more frequently (5 poops today) i would say only a teaspoon maybe tsp and. Ahalf. He is feeding about every 2 hours sometimes 4 but that's because i kind of forget and when he sleeps i just kinda let him be. I was having some difficulties nursing but i do feel more comfortable
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:28 PM
    Ok that all sounds fine then. My middle son would not eat anything until he was 14 months so I know how that goes. funny he likes peanut butter. My kids never ate much peanut butter, which drove me nuts because it is so easy to prepare and take anywhere. But they like sunflower seed butter. Your husband might be reassured by the book My Child Won't Eat. Wonderful book by a pediatrician about all the normal variations in eating habits, including with bottles and nursing, and not a guide for making kids eat.
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Today, 01:59 PM
    Yes I nurse him before I go to bed if he hasn't already woke to eat. I am still pumping as much as before while I am at work, in addition to pumping first thing in the morning after he nurses (something I started a while ago to make a freezer stash). My husband was concerned he would suffer from malnutrition if he didn't eat while I was at work, but I didn't think so... I am very familiar with baby-led weaning, I did it with my other two sons. He, however, just does not put things in his mouth (even toys). He sits at the table with us at every meal time, and I try to always give him something, whether it is something we are eating or another item, and he just rolls it around for a couple minutes and then pushes it onto the floor. I know he will come around eventually, it is just his sudden refusing the bottle that is throwing a monkey wrench into things and making me wish he would eat something sooner rather than later. I have tried cooked carrots, sweet potato wedges, beans, banana, pear, ham, turkey, celery (more as a teething aid), oatmeal, peanut butter (off of a celery stick), puffs. The peanut butter is the only thing he wanted more of, but he still isn't EATING it yet. Thanks a lot for your input.
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:57 PM
    Ok so I see baby nurses overnight, and during the day, and the total is about 6-7 times in 24 hours. So this may be enough but since baby is going so long without eating during the day right now, if you not already doing so, I would suggest consider waking baby when you come home if that is needed in order to get one more nursing session in. Sometimes baby will just nurse without waking as well. If that is not a good time for you to offer, you can try a different time. ... Ok for a 9 hour separation 9 ounces is normal/expected from newborn period on. As baby ages and growth rate slows, baby tends to not be as hungry, so some drop off in that amount around this age would probably just be normal. A more dramatic drop off as you have seen might be related to many things, and my even be temporary. As long as baby continues to nurse lots when you are together this should be fine. You do not mention pumping, but I assume you are continuing to pump at work with the frequency you did before? For dad, I have a couple suggestions aside try a regular cup. 1, whenever HE (dad) eats, offer baby some of whatever dad is eating. Babies learn to eat by mimicking. It is ok if he does not eat anything, but I think it is important to keep offering. Offering just means putting food on front of baby in a form he can safely eat it. A 9 month old is capable of picking food up and biting and chewing, so while you to not want hard stuff, baby can handle needing to bite and chew as long as...
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Today, 11:55 AM
    I am away from 12:30-9:30 pm , but he goes to bed at 7:15. He was eating 9.5 ounces per day. Yesterday he only ate two ounces. He does get fussy after a while, from being hungry, but he doesn't want to eat. Yeah, no go on the sippy cup. I keep offering different foods, he isn't into any of them except he likes peanut butter pretty well. He doesn't even put things into his mouth usually, and doesn't like us putting things near or into his mouth so it is difficult to get him to taste things willingly. I am not worried about him being too small, just that he didn't gain much weight between his six and nine month checkups, maybe half or 3/4 lb. My main concern is the sanity of my husband who has to deal with the fussy baby that results after several hours of not eating. I am hoping it is just a phase. He nurses at least three times during the night before wake up, and 3-4 times in the morning before I go to work.
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:08 AM
    Are you certain your pump is working correctly and you are nursing or pumping often enough? What would be more concerning is how you got the plugs in the first place, as non-optimal milk removal is the primary cause. Non-optimal milk removal is the primary cause of low milk production as well, so that would be the connection that would be most likely. While plugs might make it hard to pump as much while present, once they have cleared, they should no longer have any impact on milk removal nor milk production. You mean leaning or kneeling on hands and feet over baby? I have also had good success with this when I have had plugs, but not sure if that is what you mean. Heat is purported to help milk flow, but because it can increase inflammation, it is no longer suggested for direct application to the breasts in most cases of plugs (some moms do find it helps of course) but what is more suggested now is cold on the breasts to relieve inflammation and, if needed, heat on the back or shoulders. Good overall tips on plugs: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    Today, 04:11 AM
    Hello, Yesterday, I had lumps on my right breast and it was painful to move or to lift my right arms. Even though I tried warm and cold massage multiple times, the pain progressed throughout the day and my breast slowly felt like a rock. Pumping and nursing were initially unbearable. In the afternoon, I tried nursing on inverted position and it miraculously worked wonders on my breast. My right breast didn't have any more lumps and it felt that it was really relieved of any clogged ducts. Although, there is a white spot on my nipple but it doesn't hurt or there's no more pain when pumping or nursing. After that, I pumped as normal however, my pump output have been considerably low than normal. It is already low to begin with. Now, it's depressingly low. With a 2 hour gap, I normally would be able to express around 30ml and with a 3 hour gap, I around 50-60ml. Now, with a 3 hour gap, i would only be able to get 30ml. :( Help? Thanks in advance.
    1 replies | 68 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:10 PM
    You sound like an a mom experienced with baby poop. Is this your first baby? "Brownish" could be entirely normal, sometimes it takes a little longer for poops to transition, also sometimes it depends on how you define "brownish." "Seedy" is a common look but not a requirement for typical breastmilk poop. What is more important is how much baby is pooping. How many times is baby pooping in 24 hours, and how much is there when baby poops? If you had to scoop it up, would you use a teaspoon, a tablespoon or a ladle? (If that visual does not work for you choose your own, just use something generally familiar.) Also, are the poops very moist, loose, liquidy? Or still very sticky, tarry? And how many times in 24 hours is baby nursing? Every two hours would mean 12 times, which would be normal frequency. But is this total number approximately correct?
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 PM
    How many hours are you away from home and how many ounces was baby eating during you work hours before he stopped taking a bottle? Is he fussy, seeming miserable and hungry, or generally happy? It is entirely possible your baby is getting enough milk while with you if baby nurses often enough. So I would say there is probably no reason to stress about this if baby is overall healthy. Baby being on the smaller side is not in any way a problem either, what you would want to be careful about would be a big drop in gain rate, or baby not gaining at all. Baby actually losing weight would be potentially quite serious. and still no go? Your husband could also try an open cup, and continue to offer solids in a variety of tastes and textures.
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*fortheloveofboys's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:36 PM
    My 7 day old is still having pretty brownish stools. He feeds 15-20 minutes every 2 hours sometimes a little less and refuses to take the breast again. Im wondering if he is getting what he needs. Having wet diapers but not completely saturated. Very confused Doctors appt on Tuesday to check weight gain. Any advice is deeply appreciated
    3 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:05 PM
    Hello, I am hoping for some suggestions. My 9 month old has happily taken a bottle since I went back to work at 4.5 months, but the last couple weeks has been not very interested, some days only eating two instead of three. Today he is pretty much refusing it altogether. He seems interested but takes a couple sips and then doesn't want it. My husband has also tried the milk in a sippy cup today. He doesn't eat solids yet (not interested). He figured out how to scoot around on his belly a few weeks ago. I am just wondering if this might be a phase or he has just decided he doesn't want a bottle anymore at all? He nurses fine when I am home, every hour and half or two hours. Suggestions on how to get him to eat? He is not a big baby, under 10th percentile in weight.
    5 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:32 PM
    Spit up is normal. Pain while spitting up might indicate reflux. Crying while nursing could indicate any number of things. Very young babies should probably not be ingesting anything other than breastmilk, infant formula (if they are not breastfed) or medicines approved by doctor. I know people give their babies gripe water for colic, I did myself with my oldest, and I assume that is similar to what is in this "tea?" But even with the gripe water, the recommended dose was so much it was potentially a problem if given too often. (could fill baby up on something with no nutrients.) Later I learned research does not indicate gripe water helps with digestive issues. Neither do gas drops. There is some evidence probiotics help in some cases. Additionally, herbal ingredients are not always "safe." In fact, due to lack of regulation I would be very cautious about direct ingestion of any herbal product for a very young child. For example: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20041112/herbal-tea-for-infant-colic-unsafe This does not mean a nursing mom should not take a medicinal herbs. Many moms take herbal galagtagogues and their milk is perfectly safe for baby. But whenever medicinal herbs are used, it is important to research the potential side effects. Interestingly I cannot find an ingredient list on that baby tea website. Plenty of misinformation about colic, infant behavior and breastmilk though.
    3 replies | 238 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    Hi world wanderer. Mommal has not been able to check on the forum as much lately due to busy life and probably missed your response, and I missed it too. Since it has been a couple of weeks, can you tell us what is going on now? Any changes from when you last posted? Thanks.
    5 replies | 231 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:08 PM
    Most commonly, those are signs that the milk flow is a little fast for baby. Things that help with fast letdown- try leaning back position (baby kind of on top) to nurse, encourage baby to nurse more often, (usually very helpful.) Or, you can try taking baby off when baby does this and let milk flow into a cloth for a few moments then put baby back on, and/or express a little milk before baby nurses. You also can just let baby figure it out. It depends how much it is really bothering baby. Fast flow is something your baby can usually learn to deal with just fine, unless it is really fast or baby has some kind of latch or sucking problem.
    13 replies | 501 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:42 AM
    Unfortunately, it is entirely possible tongue tie was "missed" by your doctor. Many doctors think that tongue tie does not matter in infancy and that it would only be an issue if speech or eating issues occurred later. You can find info online about tongue tie and breastfeeding but it is a tricky area because diagnoses is tricky (there are different types of tongue tie that cause nursing pain) and also treatment does not always help with nursing pain. But if you see another LC you two can talk about that. I think seeing someone else makes sense if that is possible. I am not saying your first LC was wrong, but it does sound like there was a lack of communication there and your instincts and the facts seem to point to a latch issue, so that is what you would want your LC to be working with you on at least until every other possibility has been addressed. While a LC can certainly gather information while watching a baby nurse, there is no way to tell a latch is "fine" ONLY by how it looks when baby nurses. Here is an article that suggests what should happen at a consult with an LC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html The LC who wrote that is an expert on latch issues so you can poke around her site and see if anything helps. Have you tried nursing in a leaning back position- in a relaxed, supported position, leaning back for example, against the couch back or a pile of pillows, with baby more on top of you? This type of positioning often helps a good deal with...
    4 replies | 319 view(s)
  • @llli*vedimama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:21 AM
    While feeding, sometimes she coughs and adjusts her throat a lot. Seems like she has some discomfort doing that. What could the reason be? sometimes after a while after feeding she makes gagging in the mouth type actions , but nothing happens/comes out
    13 replies | 501 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    April 22nd, 2017, 09:48 PM
    (I should clarify that I said baby doesn't have a tongue tie... rather I don't think baby has a tongue tie. I asked the doctor to check and was told there wasn't one. Could be that something was missed but I would hope not.)
    4 replies | 319 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    April 22nd, 2017, 09:31 PM
    Thank you so much for the detailed reply! That's exactly what I was thinking about the latch which is why I went to see the lactation consultant--I was surprised when she didn't see a problem after watching baby eat and I wasn't sure what to say in response to the nipple/palate comment. I actually feel better because it sounds like this is something I can still work on without having to move backwards---I think maybe I will seek out a different LC for another try at help. I'll also check into the cultures to rule out anything bacterial--I didn't realize that can be there without any big symptoms. I don't think it's an issue of being too full--sometimes I am too full first thing in the morning because baby's sleep patterns haven't gotten predictable yet, but it doesn't seem to be an issue for baby eating then and my supply is well regulated during the day. Baby does not have a tongue tie. As far as working on latch, I've tried the basic positions--cradle, cross cradle, side lying, football. Cradle is the worst for pain and football is the best (if not comfortable at least more bearable). So I've been focusing on trying to make that one work and follow videos on proper latch. Baby also first latched without the shield in the football position so I think maybe that one allows him a better hold. I have trouble getting it to work when out and about though so often find myself trying to deal with cross cradle or be stuck on my couch. :/ I've done the breast sandwich. ...
    4 replies | 319 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    April 22nd, 2017, 08:25 PM
    Hi tobysmom, I am sorry you are having this problem. Is it possible there was a misunderstanding here? Nipples becoming cracked and sore is almost always a sign of a latch problem. The nipple shape you are seeing after your baby nurses is also a common indication of shallow latch. Also, if the problem is not latch, why are you being told to pump to elongate the nipple? That is a method to improve latch. It certainly has no other purpose. Also, if your nipple is "too short" again the only problem with that, is it might cause a poor latch! I mean, too short for what? This means, too short for baby to latch onto properly! I have a question with this idea I will get into below, but that is what 'too short' would mean. As far as your baby having a hard palate, I have no idea what this means. All babies like all adults have both a soft and hard palate. The trick with latch is to get the nipple back to the soft palate. And this can happen even with short nipples and with brand newborns with tiny mouths so it can certainly happen if your baby is 4 months old.
    4 replies | 319 view(s)
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