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  • @llli*lenarx's Avatar
    Today, 05:50 AM
    Dear All, I'm not sure if this is the correct place to post. I'm looking for advice or anyone to share experiences with their child. My 7mo daughter has always been small but consistent gainer. We started introducing some solids at 6 mo and noticed she was taking less and less BM. She never drank much because she refused bottles and cups, so she often nursed throughout the night and still continues to at least 3 times per evening. However my nanny used to be able to sneak in a bottle while she was sleeping and that was enough. Now, even when asleep, she refuses it. While awake she eats a little cereal or yogurt, with great effort on the parts of the caretakers, but wont drink. Even if I am home to nurse her, she is often uninterested. I went to the pediatrician and we noted a gain of only 1 oz in 6 weeks! A visit to a pediatric gastroenterologist was recommended. We saw her yesterday, and even though this woman gets positive reviews from many, I did not like her at all. I felt she was rough and callous (maybe I am being a sensitive first time mom?). She immediately, without discussion, requested a stool sample, a blood draw for analysis and some radiology scans of the esophagus, etc. She also prescribed Zantac and Cyproheptadine, along with some fennel tea, brown sugar in water, probiotic and Colicease. I am more than fine with Zantac and the herbal supplements, however I am hesistant about the cyproheptadine because of the sedative and other side effects, in a infant...
    0 replies | 2 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:08 PM
    Friction blister? or really bad irritation- from a bite or a reaction to something? For the pain, have you tried positioning baby differently? Once when my daughter bit me and the injury made nursing very painful, I was able to greatly reduce the pain by "reversing" her latch. It meant basically laying down and pulling her over my shoulder so she would pretty much latch "upside down" but it really helped while I healed.
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:02 PM
    Are you saying there is one side (left or right) that is not getting as much 'attention' or that baby is refusing, or is your concern that baby nurses one side at a time? Nursing one side at a time is usually fine- Getting engorged is always somewhat concerning, mostly because it might lead to plugs or mastitis, or might indicate either baby is not nursing often enough or effectively enough. On the other hand, it is pretty common in the early weeks and usually resolves on its own with frequent nursing. if you cannot get baby to nurse more often overall to help stave off the overfullness, I would suggest hand expression as needed. If hand expression is not doing the trick, pump only as needed, on a lowish setting, just to extract enough milk to feel comfortable. I would not be concerned about low milk production at this point, because it sounds like you are making more than enough milk, again, assuming good weight gain.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*tomom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    Thanks for your replies. I guess I'm concerned that supply on the one side might diminish or I will stop making enough? I am getting engorged but more so at night when she seems to favor the one sided feeding more than both sides. Is that concerning?
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 PM
    Yes, I'll definitely ask her tomorrow. And not sure if this means anything, but I was closely examining my nipple and noticed that the pain was mostly in one area (that is about 1/4 the full tip). That area is swollen or raised a bit more than the other area. Does this mean anything?
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*lan3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 PM
    I appreciate the advice. My husband is around and I am hoping he can take over at the nighttime parent. He has attempted recently but my son just gets so upset because he is expecting me and nursing. It's hard to listen to and I end up going in because nursing him back to sleep is easier so I certainly hear what you are saying that perhaps it might not get me more sleep.
    2 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:22 PM
    You can introduce bottle any way and any time you like, or just leave it to the caregivers to introduce the bottle. There is no evidence a baby must have a bottle introduced at some specific time or some specific way or some specific amount of times before mom goes back to work. Yes baby may resist the bottle and it may take some work to get baby to take much with the bottle, but that will happen no matter when the bottle is introduced. So, do whatever makes you the most comfortable would be my suggestion, but certainly not more than one small bottle per day before you return to work. Remember the bottles before you go back to work are for practice only, and so can be very small- an ounce or less. I do not think you ever did explain why you cannot pump, but I thought you were planning to hand express at work. Can't you collect your milk when you hand express and keep it in some kind of an insulated bag? Freshly expressed milk can even be left at room temp (19° to 26°C) for several hours, or in a cooler bag with a cold pack for 24 hours- do you have a refrigerator or freezer at home? Here is more info on how to store your expressed milk. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/21_storingmilk.pdf If this will not work, then of course you will need to provide something else for your baby, and that would be either formula or milk donated from another mother. But certainly no reason to introduce formula until it is absolutely necessary- when...
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:00 PM
    Can you ask your LC if she posts on lactnet, and give her permission to ask about your case there (it's anonymous, for you, anyway... I am quite flummoxed by pain that bad, after pain free nursing, with nothing visible...I wonder if oral anti biotic should perhaps be tried even though it is unclear if mastitis is involved.
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:55 PM
    As long as baby is pooping/gaining fine, nursing overall at least 10 times per 24 hours, and nursing is comfortable and you are not getting engorged, this all sounds pretty normal esp. for the early weeks when milk production tends to be high, tummy is at it's tiniest, and so a baby may get full quickly- Which part is concerning you?
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 PM
    I pretty much left it alone (other than nursing and pumping w light compression) yesterday and today. Yesterday was fine. Today, my nipple hurts so bad that I cannot nurse. It's excruciating. Like crying it hurts so bad! I'm miserable. I'm gong to try to get into the dr tomorrow. But I'm guessing they won't do anything. I'm so upset and feel hopeless.
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*evergreen474's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:51 PM
    My son (almost 6 weeks) definitely prefers my left breast over my right. Maybe he just likes lying on that side, I'm not sure. But my left breast always seems fuller, consequently. He also sucks in his sleep. Both on my breast and I've even seen him do it while napping in his bassinet.
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    Yes mothers are terribly vulnerable in the post partum period. This is why it is so important for mothers to get good breastfeeding support and information long before baby is born, as well as during the post partum period. It is a medical crime that we don't get this in so many cases. Please don't turn your anger over the situation onto yourself- if you are angry, and you have a right to be- turn it where it belongs- a medical system and society that undermines a mother's ability to nurse her child from long before she even gives birth. I do think that book will be very helpful to you. if you do still want hands on help, are you sure your insurance will not pay for a LC apt, or there is no clinic in your area, or some way to see the LC for a lower cost or get a payment plan etc? Maybe your family could help pay. In case you were wondering, $180 is an entirely reasonable price for a consult, IBCLCs spend years on specialized training and lots of money on specialized education, and consults last 60-90 minutes typically and often include some type of follow up contact. You may also want to see if there are any volunteer (free) support groups near you- for support and companionship on your journey as well as bfding info. Some LLL leaders even do free home visits, and this might be helpful especially when you are seeking help finding ways to encourage baby to nurse more or latch better etc.
    3 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*anyi.cas's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:08 PM
    Wow! Many thanks for your feedback. I do appreciate it! Sorry for the confusion...I was in tears as I was typing this post. To answer your question, I would attempt to nurse on demand, but he would only last about 7 mins or less on each breast. He would fall asleep and wake up hungry, of course. I would attempt to nurse again but the same story repeats. I must also say that my close family did not support me much in the breastfeeding journey. I remember how they said so many times how I was just starving my baby and just allowing him to swallow air. I partially gave up, and now I cannot forgive myself from doing so. Due to trauma after delivery, I was in so much pain, could not even walk right for 3 weeks. Imagine, then, how vulnerable I was. I will definitively get the book you have recommended, but as far as getting a lactation consultant, I am afraid I cannot afford one right now. I just talked to one and the initial consultation is $180. Well, again...many thanks for your valuable input. I will put more effort into this and hopefully I will get some good results!
    3 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:51 PM
    Thanks for the helpful replies. So far, the problem has not repeated itself in the past 2 days. I did call Medela, and the rep didn't make a guess as to what might be wrong, but she was going to have me check several things. I had to go, however, but said I would call back if the problem reoccurs. It seemed to me that the suction did not change, just the frequency of the revolution of the motor, if that makes sense. I was able to pump as much as normal since it was only a 10 second glitch. If it's the power adapter, several stores around here sell a replacement for about $25, but maybe Medela would send me one? The pump is out of warranty. I used it part time with baby #1, but now am using it full time for baby #2 since I work during the day, 8 hrs, 4-5 days a week. I also use it every morning after the first feed just to build up a stash (for now, will use to mix with cereal when DD starts solids). I'm hoping it was just a power fluctuation in the outlet, which was one at work that I don't normally use. My back up plan if the pump goes out during work is to call it a day, go home, and use my sister's Freestyle which I have--I tried it twice and the pumping action is so different from the PIS that I don't like it at all, so it would be an emergency use until I can either fix my PIS or buy a new one (yes, I dislike the Freestyle and love the PIS so much that I'd buy a new one!). Unfortunately, my insurance does not cover a pump because it is a "grandfathered"...
    4 replies | 137 view(s)
  • @llli*tomom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:26 AM
    I'm currently exclusively breastfeeding my second little one. She is now 2.5 weeks old. She easily falls asleep at the breast no matter what I try. So sometimes she only eats from one breast (this is more common than her eating from both). However, when she does fall asleep she seems to still be actively sucking. She also seems to favor the left over the right. The right seems to have powerful let down because LO will unlatch and milk will go everywhere! I sometimes pump once a day after she has only taken one side for comfort and to keep up supply? Not sure if this is necessary or not. I also try reclining especially when she's on the right. Sometimes she pops off quite quickly (after only a minute or two). Seems content but then starts rooting if she gets moved. Can any of you provide some insight? Thanks!
    4 replies | 128 view(s)
  • @llli*ml102612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 AM
    Thanks for responding. I will say that my son is a very consistently good eater. He'll usually have scrambled eggs with cheese / or fortified oatmeal, and a fruit and yogurt smoothie for breakfast. Lunch and dinner is usually a protein with veggies and rice or pasta. He loves salmon and avocados, as well as yogurt, so I feel like he is getting plenty of healthy fats. He eats a varied diet and seems to eat quite a lot. He's gaining weight like a champ - when they weighed him at the pediatrician's last month, he was in the highest weight percentile he's ever been! I could continue pumping during the day for the next few weeks, but I just really question if it's necessary, especially with the added time it will add to my day going to another floor to pump now . I guess I could introduce formula - although he's never had it in his life, and at 11 months, I am really curious how he would take to it. I've heard babies who have never had it may not be amenable to it at this point!! We are planning to introduce cow's milk around a year for daytime feeds (although again, I've read that if a mom is still nursing a few times a day, it isn't really necessary?!) so I am a little concerned about introducing formula for only 3 weeks and then switching to cow's milk. Just seems like a lot of unnecessary transition, in my opinion.
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 AM
    This is a difficult question because the answer lies somewhere in the fuzzy boundary between guidelines for infant feeding and the needs of individual babies and moms. The US guidelines say that until 12 months, breastmilk or formula should provide a baby's primary source of nutrition. The reasoning behind that recommendation is that breastmilk (or formula) provide complete and balanced nutrition at a time when a baby's brain and body are growing faster than at any time for the rest of its life. It's hard to provide nutrition that is as complete and balanced using solids because babies tend to be inconsistent eaters; one week they will eat only peas, the next week it's Cheerios and air. So, if you were just nursing 3x per day, would that be enough to qualify as providing the majority of the baby's nutrition? I personally doubt it. Most moms need to nurse at least 8x per day when their babies are exclusively breastfed, and it's often stated that a mom should nurse at least 3-5x per day in order to meet a 12-24 month old's dairy requirements. So I would guesstimate that for most mom/baby pairs, you'd want to be nursing more like 5x per day, minimum, in order to meet an 11 month old's "dairy" requirements. So while that all sounds like I'm telling you to keep pumping, I think it's important to keep in mind that your baby is 11 months old- how different is that really from 12 months? Is it okay to nurse less than the minimum guesstimate given above? What if...
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:58 AM
    Your situation definitely sounds icky. This is definitely an area overlooked by the medical community. My LC referred me to a doctor when I had mastitis twice and had a mysterious lump (my midwife said was a plugged duct, but it was just a lump from having mastitis that needed to heal). I knew a doctor wouldn't help. She gave me the name of a breast specialist, who was of course male -- I just couldn't wrap my head around seeing a male doctor about breastfeeding issues (unless it was Dr. Jack Newman or something, but this was someone I'd never head of). Luckily I never got it again after the two times I had it, and never needed antibiotics. But it really is a "you're on your own" topic! What has happened when you've left it alone for a day or so? Does it get worse?
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*evergreen474's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:09 AM
    No, once the 2 of us figured out latching, nursing has not been painful. Besides this. Baby's weight gain has been great. He was born 7lbs 10oz and is now already over 10lbs. I really think the pain was because he was arching his back and pulling his head back with my nipple still in his mouth. My problem, I think, was finding out what was causing his discomfort while nursing. I think there might have been a couple issues that were causing him to be uncomfortable with breast feeding. First, he still had his umbilical cord stump. And while I'm told there are no nerve endings there, the stump itself was dry and hard and might have been pressing into the skin around his belly button. But that was removed on Monday. Also, I am trying different things with my diet. I have read that food sensitivities in young babies is not as common as people think. However, everyone in my immediate family--my parents, my brother, and myself--all have food allergies. It has been better these last few days and I'm no longer in pain. I just hope my little guy isn't, either.
    4 replies | 263 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:55 AM
    I'm hestitant to go to the doctor because she's just referred to me the lactation consultant in the past. And this is who I've seen for this and doesn't have any more advice for me. She said she could recommend an ultrasound, but that the doctor couldn't do anything unless it was an abcess or mastitis.
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:52 AM
    I think the original plugged area was behind or just above the nipple. I had the hard line going all the way up and also across the top of the breast at first. Now it's just the one spot with a little bit of hardness in a line going up. How long is too long to wait? We're going on vacation for Labor Day. So, the Tuesday after Labor Day when we return, it will have been 2 weeks of this.
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:47 AM
    Thank you for your responses!
    17 replies | 287 view(s)
  • @llli*ml102612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:22 AM
    My son will be a year old at the end of the month and I am so over pumping at work. Plus, the empty office I use to pump will be filled sometime in the next week or two and I will have to pump in another room 6 floors down which will be a big hassle. I'm ready to ditch the pump. Do you think it's ok, at this point, to rely on nursing my son three times a day during the work week and not leaving pumped bottles of milk during the day? I usually nurse in the morning, when I get home from work, and before bed. He sleeps through the night and has for a long time. He eats solids extremely well - he loves to eat, and I feel like he does a great job filling a lot of his nutritional needs with solids. We would nurse more on the weekends obviously when we are together all day. I've read on Dr. Jack Newman's site that by this point, a baby who is eating well and nurses 3-4 times in a day should be sufficient nutritionally. I just wondered if this was ok, and if I could just ask daycare to give him water with meals and stop the bottles? We are apart for 8 hours a day, and he is currently getting a morning and afternoon bottle of around 4 oz. each. My mom has been watching him for the last week and said it seems like he could probably take or leave the bottle - he doesn't fuss for it, or when it's over. What is the LLLI consensus on this? He's so close to a year and eating so well that I think if we just nurse when we are together he would be fine, but I obviously don't want...
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*puja's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:56 AM
    My lo is 18 week now...weight 7 kg height 64 cm I m exclusively breastfeeding him and he is growing well I think...I have not yet introduced bottle to him. .but now from next month I ll have to join my office ...so want your opinion that when should I start and how many times should I give him bottle so he could become use to it...one week before I have tried to give him bottle but he was not sucking just was playing with the nipple( for about 4 days once In the evening I tried so...)another thing I want ti know is that when should I start giving him formula because its not possible for me to express milk at work(I have explained earlier)...at home I want to nurse him but those 8 hours working hour milk will go waste in sink ..at home how much will I be able to express by hand(cant use pump as have said before) would it meet his 8 hours need so I think formula though very unwillingly I ll have to introduce ...
    1 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*diripouf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:26 AM
    Thank you so much for your reply - and for the tips about weaning. Yes your assumptions are right - LO is also getting what I pump. Per day, I give her 3 formula top-ups (of 60 mL / 2 oz each) and one of my breast milk which is usually a little smaller (40-50mL max). Unfortunately I can only pump that much per 24 hours… But the midwife said not to worry too much about that. The point of the pumping is to signal to my breasts that more milk is needed - and when they produce more, she will drink it rather than me seeing it in the pumping output. The midwife said her rather big weight gain last week was normal as she was "catching up". She will be weighed again on Monday, and if she's still putting on above average I will start weaning her as I really do not want to continue the top-ups beyond what is absolutely necessary for her health. I was a skinny baby too so I'm not expecting her to be super chubby... She only starts to become fussy and distracted on the breast after 8/10min - could it be that the fattier milk is more difficult to suck for her and she's getting lazy as she has been experiencing the teat? I'm being careful in how I bottle-feed her, I use peristaltic teats as I've been told that LOs needed to suck harder with them…. It's hard for me to get to a LLL meeting as I live far from the meeting place but I will keep this in mind if I struggle - thank you!!
    2 replies | 130 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:19 AM
    hi, I am typing one handed so please excuse typos. I don't think anyone can give you 'odds', there are just too many variables. Yes it is usually harder to relactate to a "full" milk production if milk production was not established during the first 4-8 weeks post partum. But you did give birth to your baby, which gives you a better chance of making more milk than an adoptive mother who is attempting to induce lactation, for example. So the 'should you give up' question is also unanswerable by anyone but yourself. Mothers have both relactated and induced lactation to the point they nurse their babies. Even if supplements are needed, there can be a nursing relationship, so the goal need not be 'exclusive' nursing. Here is what I see-you are producing 1/2 to one ounce per pump session- That's lactating, so something is working. And this is happening even with simply not enough milk removal. Here is how you tell the body to make milk. By expressing milk (or having baby nurse) the same amount of times a healthy, growing baby would nurse. That means at least 8 times in 24 hours. Anything less than that is simply not going to increase milk production in any meaningful way, because the body is not getting the message to make more milk- no baby nurses 4 times a day. All the galactagogues, water, and healthy eating in the world will not make a difference if milk is not removed with normal frequency. So pumping more than 4 times a day is not "extra" - it is necessary for...
    3 replies | 119 view(s)
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