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  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 06:10 AM
    Hi mama! You've been through a lot, congratulations on sticking to it this far! Two weeks old is still plenty young to learn good latching. I am not a latch expert so will let other mamas come in here for advice... But if you are using anything for sucking, such as a pacifier, I know that those are best to stop using if you have latch or low supply issues. Perhaps side-lying nursing will also help for both of you to relax and for you to move her so her nose is clear. I position my baby in a V with her feet on me and her face tilted up. My DD2 is 7 weeks and she tips her nose into the Boppy to tell me she wants to move closer and have another tipple. This kind of thing happens a lot :)
    1 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 06:05 AM
    In fact the maternity wards that I have been to here in Belgium have big signs out in front that say visitors can tire out the mother and also can be onerous for the hospital roommate. I found too many visitors to be tiring, indeed! Just follow your nose, you know what will work best for you and feel free to change your mind once you try :)
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 06:02 AM
    I just wanted to add some personal experience with nystatin vs diflucan - we did two rounds (so almost a month ugh) of nystatin and it improved somewhat the first week, then it was like I was just giving her water. No improvement at all. Did a round of Diflucan for baby (I was on diflucan as well), and it cleared it up.
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:43 AM
    Thank you everyone! DH and I will have a chat about these. He was already looking at secondhand bottlewarmers online when I said, 'hang on hon, I'm posting this on LLL first' :) We have until mid-July to decide and if he wants one, find a bottle warmer online at a good price, so that is why we wanted to look ahead :) I told your collective advice to DH and he was like, "I can just heat it up in hot water" me: "OK, but that will be at about 4 am" and then he got serious: "ah, bon". He just decided to look online for one. I think we'll try the setup with a tiny portable cooler with a frozen temperature insert and a refrigerated bottle of fresh milk inside since he goes to bed around 11 pm weeknights, it should still be at a safe temperature hours later since fresh breastmilk can stay even a room temp for a while. Dormir41, thanks for asking, the routine is coming along :) Yes I can do short kettlebell workouts almsot every day, which is my goal, although they are at 10 or 11 at night which is less ideal but with "un peu de patience" it will get better. Like the Beatles say, "it's getting better all the time" :gvibes
    7 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 05:26 AM
    OMG! That is a surprise turn of events. Looking at the date you might already be at work now so you know a bit. You already got some great advice too :) and yes, as you most certainly noticed, 40oz is a huge supply and fine. I recommend suing as high quality of a double electric pump that you can use (so if you have access to a hospital grade Medela--yes!--or otherwise a Medela (NAYY) is excellent). I bought one after trying one day back at work with a single battery pump. Also try to do what you can do pump at around the same time daily, which fortunately need not be an exact time, but try your best and you will pump more and reduce the incidence of clogged ducts etc. You probably already have great access to cold storage at work, so that is great! I highly recommend reading Kellymom's working and pumping articles. They helped me a lot! I will be returning to work for the first time pumping and doing 12-hr day and night shifts so you're def not alone (I work in disaster management/civil protection rather than the medical field).
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*sarah.yaxley's Avatar
    Today, 04:54 AM
    Hello! My daughter (8 weeks) and I have had a tough breastfeeding g relationship since she was born. There were complications with the birth and we were separated while I had to go back in to surgery 12 hours after she was born. That, extreme anemia and her teeny mouth meant that she wasn't getting the milk she needed and I was told to supplement her with formula. It was a slippery slope after that and I ended up stopping feeding her and exclusively pumping for 2 weeks. We're now trying again with feeding (still with top ups) using biological nurturing techniques recommended by the midwife but because she is older it's not as natural for her anymore and she seems to continually bury her nose in to my breast and has to delatch to breathe if I don't make a space for her with my finger. From what I've read it seems that this means the latch is no good, does anyone have any suggestions on how to stop this? Because it's baby - led attachment I'm not sure how much I should interfere? Sorry for the massive post!
    1 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 04:47 AM
    Everything I've read says to put refrigerated with refrigerated, but I've not found anything to back that up either. This is an interesting study and although it doesn't answer your question, maybe there is a similar study that will: http://www.dors.it/latte/docum/Unpasteurized%20Donor%20Human%20Milk.pdf
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 04:23 AM
    Thank you, Maddieb, as always, for your excellent information. I was reading the instructions on my bottle of vitamin d when I posted before, which says 1ml per day. I'm guessing they translated the IU to mls for ease in giving the medicine, but I'll double check to make sure that is the correct dose when I have the chance. The pediatricians office just said to follow the bottle instructions, now that I think about it. And, as a follow up to sacmd`s comment, I went on here last night because a friend of mine is currently pregnant, taking a medication for blood clots, wants to breastfeed, but can't get a consistent answer from her doctors whether or not this medication is safe while breastfeeding (& has to take it for six weeks after giving birth). I sent her the info infant risk and the medication thread posted on the forum so she can try to figure it out herself. Doctors are only human, too, and often don't agree. I so agree it's important to find one who listens and is appropriate and applaud anyone who will switch doctors as needed. I see issues all the time in my work in human services and encourage people to switch all the time if their dr won't listen to them and consider all aspects of what the person needs.
    16 replies | 627 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    16 replies | 627 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:21 AM
    I do not know what 1 ml means in terms of amount - in the US it goes by "IU" as in "400 IU." As far as I know, LLL does not say what the exact dosage should be. But, to get to your question, No. The change I was referring to was about whether D was necessary at all as a supplement, not how much to give. It was changed back in 2008. At that point, LLL officially agreed more or less with the new AAP guideline that vitamin D was an important supplement for many babies, when previously, supplement with D was considered only needed for babies specifically at risk of very inadequate D. New research had indicated the need for D supplementing even for breastfed babies (formula fed babies too, but that was done by putting the supplement IN formula, of course) because studies indicated that the population as a whole was low, with some populations very low, for various reasons mostly having to do with individual skin pigment, where one lives in relation to the equator, use of sunscreen, and time spent outdoors in the sun. So low D was understood to be starting in utero. At the same time, I think, the definition of what was 'low' changed, and adequate D was recognized more widely as vitally important for systemic health. SO, babies were being born low in D, so what was once an adequate amount in breastmilk was not any longer, according to the AAP. Not everyone agrees with this still- my kid's pediatrician and I had a long discussion about it because they did not recommend D...
    16 replies | 627 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:47 AM
    Yes they do, and those all sound like entirely normal feedings with no intake issues. I see that baby nurses 9 times a day. If babies average intake per session is 2 ounces, that is 18 ounces per day. This is a little on the low side, but what about adding a couple more nursing sessions? that would bring it up to normal range, and makes sense Because 9 times a day nursing is a little on the low side too... however, if you think intake is an issue that is what an IBCLC may be able to help you with. A couple of ideas that often help with long feedings/lower intake is switching sides frequently during each feeding and breast compressions as described here: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-BC But one thing has me confused. Are you exhausted due to long days with only very short naps, (which I totally get) or are you exhausted because you are not sleeping at night either? In your first post, you said baby nurses only once overnight. So I am wondering, are you sleeping on either side of this one session? Because nursing several times - at least 2 or 3- a night is the norm at this age...If baby is taking long sleep stretches at night, that might be keeping him from napping more during the day and also may be contributing to the slow gain. My questions re: formula were more for you to think about than to answer. By which I mean, if you did not want to supplement with formula, or are concerned that supplementing might be harmful to your nursing...
    11 replies | 479 view(s)
  • @llli*damevnv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:52 PM
    To answer above questions as best I can…. This is our first child. I used to work as an animator but I had to quit to raise the baby. You can't have a child and work 16 hour days for art directors who have no concept of how long their pointless revisions take, so I'm at home. We don't have family nearby, they are all out of state, so it's just me and the baby while my husband is at work. My fluid intake is good. The pediatrician wants us to give the baby 2 bottles of pumped milk per day, each with 1 teaspoon of formula added to 3oz of my milk. I figured the baby was getting enough milk because he made so many wet diapers. I weighed him before and after feedings today, and it looks like he took in 3oz at one feed, 2 and a half oz at another, and maybe 1 and a half or two at a different feed. Babies take in different amounts at different feeds, I suppose. I'll look into finding a lactation consultant. Am I okay with formula feeding at this point? Maybe only two teaspoons… I don't know anymore… I want to keep breastfeeding for the boy's health, but I feel like I'm chained to the glider and the nursing pillow the entire day and I'm still a big epic fail. I'm exhausted and just wishing he'd start taking his naps again. If I get his weight back up, do you think he'd start to nap again? He's just way too jumpy and playful… ALL DAY…. No matter what I do. 5 S's, no good. Can't swaddle because he's rolling over. Baby swing failed to get him napping too.
    11 replies | 479 view(s)
  • @llli*hippieasianmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:52 PM
    I am using a few weeks into pumping and using a Medela pump. I am wondering if it's OK for me to pump fresh milk into a bottle that has milk that has been refrigerated in the last 24 hours? I have researched the internet and have not read a clear and scientific answer as to whether or not this is OK. Or do I need to use a new container each time?
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:06 PM
    Excellent suggestions from the previous posters... This linked document is for your child's caregiver, it explains in detail how to bottle feed in a way that is less likely to be disruptive of the breastfeeding relationship. It also covers safe milk handling to avoid waste. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/23_safehandling_storageofyour_milk.pdf and this is a good video that demonstrates the paced bottle feeding part of it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs Some babies will not take bottles or won't at first. There are many alternative feeding methods caregiver can use should that be the case.
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:27 PM
    A Ton of Visitors during the Newborn Period? Is it possible to have a great start to your nursing relationship while being surrounded by a ton of visitors right after having a newborn? In addition, does having a ton of visitors promote bonding among immediate family members (for example, between mom, dad, and baby)? I remember nursing 20 to 24 times a day during the newborn period. Despite the societal norm, I did my best to keep visitors to a minimum particularly during those first newborn weeks as nursing seemed to necessitate this! My personal goals during the newborn period were focused on nursing, establishing my milk supply, survival, bonding with my newborn, having my husband bond with our newborn, and bonding and adjusting as a new family of three. Plus, my personality lends itself to processing huge life events mostly internally anyway.
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    Don't freak out! There are actually several moms in the medical field on this forum. Nurse last thing before you leave the house. Once at work, try to pump in the frequency the baby would usually nurse. For many this is usually every 2 or 3 hours. You will see as you get into the groove of it that everybody has their "sweet spot" of productivity, where the frequency and duration make the perfect most efficient outcome. Try to have the caregiver abstain from giving a bottle within an hour or so of your return, this way baby is hungry when you're back together. Make bottles small (2-3 oz or so) and have caregiver feed on cue, just as you would if you were nursing. Hopefully your pump space is peaceful and quiet. Personally, distractions from neighboring offices drive me nuts while I'm pumping. Pump until you're not getting any more milk, then pump a little more if times allows. I would bookmark a couple of fun blogs or websites on your phone as reading those makes the time go by faster. For storage, I prefer the freezer bags - the Target brand have never failed me. This way you can press the air out really well and put directly into the freezer when you get home. I keep my milk bags in a very small insulated lunch box in the fridge. I keep my pump parts in a long Tupperware - there's no need to wash in between pumps as long as you store your parts in the fridge. Think about keeping a glass of milk in the fridge, it's no different. My biggest advice is you have...
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*virginiamom14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Aw, good luck tomorrow, mama! I hope it goes well. I returned to work about two months ago when my son was 12 weeks old so I am by no means an expert but here are my thoughts. I make sure I have all of my pumping parts, bottles to store the milk, a cooler bag to carry the bottles and a wet-dry bag I store my pumping parts in in between feedings. (Instead of washing my parts after every use, I put them in the wet-dry bag and store them in the fridge.) I also make sure I have a towel/blanket to put over my lap to help catch any drips. I also have a hands free bra, which has been really helpful, and I make sure to bring my cellphone and headphones into the room so I can watch videos of my son while I'm pumping. I pump every three hours so that's three times during my work day. (I also pump after he goes to bed at night.) I found this works best for me and maximizes the amount I get per pumping session while also maintaining my supply. But it took several weeks to figure out the right amount of time to go between pumpings and what times of the day to do it. I store my milk in bottles that I will send with my son to daycare the next day. (I also have a freezer stash. To make sure that doesn't get too old, I freeze what I pump on Fridays and use frozen milk on Mondays.) I put it all in the office fridge but you could probably also put it in a cooler with an ice pack in it.
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*meliska's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:09 PM
    In a surprise turn of events, I found out about an hour ago that I'm going back to work tomorrow instead of next Wednesday. I have an 8 week old and BF on demand. I'm an RN, and I work 12 hour shifts on a busy unit. I'm a newbie when it comes to breastfeeding and pumping at work, so what do I need to make sure that I have tomorrow? How often should I pump? What do you guys do with your milk when you pump - straight into the fridge? Into a cooler? Dump everything into one bottle or leave them separate? I can leave my pump in the room with the cooler in it, or I have access to a fridge and freezer. I don't work more than two days in a row (only three total days in a week) in order to protect my supply (I'm afraid that pumping and not nursing for three days would cause a tank), so the milk will be going into the freezer when I get home. Do you use the same flanges? Different flanges each time? I have 40 oz in the freezer, thankfully, so I'm hoping we can make it through tomorrow and I pump enough to replenish what he eats. I'm freaking out a little bit. Lol.
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:20 PM
    It makes sense to me that that long stretch overnight could be when the plugs are forming. You may also find that with going back to work and using the pump during the day to maintain supply, that supply will go down somewhat. Often the combination of daytime pumping and long stretches at night without nursing are a recipe for supply decreases in moms working outside the home. So it may be a good idea anyway to add some nighttime nursing back in.
    18 replies | 705 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    Bring a cooler pack with ice packs in it. The milk is good for 24 hours in that scenario, certainly should be fine until you feel like walking down to the fridge or even until the end of the day. Alternatively, since you have a private office, you could consider investing in a small fridge, but that isn't necessary. Links to storage guidelines: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/milkstorage/ https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/21_storingmilk.pdf I also only washed at the end of the day, at least by baby 3. I think earlier on I rinsed them out after each pump, then realized that wasn't necessary. I did not store pump parts in the fridge. Definitely sanitizing after each pump is overkill. I also did not sanitize every day, just washed in hot soapy water. The only exception would be if you are dealing with thrush, then more frequent sanitization, either with the microwave bags or simply by boiling in hot water, can be useful (I went through that with baby 2, and got into the habit at that time of weekly boiling after the thrush episode was over, with no recurrence). Sounds like you have a wonderful setup for pumping!
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*scubamama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:12 PM
    Quick update: I've been pumping at work for a week and I can get in and out of the room in 35 minutes, less if I have to. I have a hands free bra, but can never work while I'm in there because I need to do lots of hands on massage to get the milk out. Buuuuut I've been getting plugged ducts every other day for the past week. Mostly in the same spot, although one time the other breast got affected as well. I got plugs so bad on Thursday that I eventually went for ultrasound therapy and massage to help work it out. By the end of it I was so exhausted that I ended up taking a sick day on Friday to recover. The therapist said that one reason I might be getting plugged ducts so often is that my baby sleeps an 11 hour stretch at night, and that is a very long time for milk to be sitting in my breasts. She recommended that I wake up once, maybe twice to pump during that time. Does this seem like a good idea? While I get that this allows milk to flow more, I worry that it will stimulate oversupply which will lead to more plugged ducts. @dormir41 - wow, that is an interesting setup! I'd still prefer the private room. It is in the same building as I am just on a different floor, so not that far. @smittenrunner3 - I'm pretty bad about drinking lots of water, but am really making an effort now. Really hope it helps. :(
    18 replies | 705 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:06 PM
    Glad you are making progress. My LO also likes to "touch the milk" and "hold the milk" (as she says). I guess they just associate the breast with comfort, period. Definitely lots of talking is helpful. They understand even more than they can express. When I was ready to nightwean, I told my LO that the milk went to bed during nighttime. She was very accepting of that explanation!
    6 replies | 346 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:57 PM
    OK. Well, I am sorry, Sometimes I see a kind of a-ha moment in the numbers, but growth is exactly as you described...it appears both height growth and weight gain slowed considerably between 6 and 9 months, but not head growth. Slowed, but did not stop. Baby kept growing, just much more slowly. Of course a slow down in rate gain (and I assume, length as well(?) is entirely normal. As is a slow down after about 3 months. But overall, there does seem to be entirely normal gain until 2 months, then a somewhat rapid slow down in gain, starting sometime before the 4 month check and continuing. So I do not know if this is a situation that warrants any intervention or not. My guess is not, and I hope Dr. Gonzalez has some ideas or can put your mind at ease. But I do wonder about one thing. SOMETIMES (rarely) slow gain is an indication of a problem- not with how much a child eats, or how much milk baby gets, but there is rather something else going on. It is missing the something else that would concern me. So I am wondering how difficult it would be to do a before and after nursing weight check (Or several) to try to see what baby is in taking when nursing. Another idea would be to pump once a day for a few days, or pump several times in one day, or some combo ...and try to get a clearer estimate of how much milk you are producing. I am suggesting pumping as well as nursing...not instead. So I do not mean, using what you pump as reflective of the total you make, but...
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*marleyking18's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:50 PM
    Great! Thank you both!! Quick q- my fridge at work is three floor down and at the opposite end of the building. If I was looking for a little more convenience than that far of a walk, what would you suggest to be the best method?
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bean161's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:53 PM
    :ita I keep my parts in fridge in between sessions in a plastic (tupperware type) container. Then wash in hot soapy water when I get home. Have been pumping over a year this way with no issues. (Can't wait to quit pumping lol :lol)
    4 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:14 PM
    Hi. here are some ideas: white tongue is common and usually does not mean thrush. But, babies may have no symptoms and it still may be thrush. Studies have shown that sometimes what is thought to be thrush or just nipple injury is actually a bacterial infection (rather than fungal) on the nipples. My understanding is you can have your nipple cultured to confirm this. The most effective treatment would be oral anti-biotics, although I suppose you might try anti-biotic ointment. I am getting this info from the lactation text Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple Sometimes thrush reoccurs if both mom and baby are not being treated aggressively enough, or there is something or someone else causing reinfection. I think diflucan is a proven effective treatment, but not nystatin. More on thrush treatment options- http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-CP
    2 replies | 82 view(s)
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