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  • @llli*nhecht12's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:37 AM
    I'm struggling emotionally with breast feeding because my doctor wants me to supplement with my pumped milk using a bottle.. my LO lost 11% of her body weight in the first 5 days due to latching difficulties (she's a 37 weeker & I have extremely large nipples), but has been doing great since we introduced a nipple shield. She's gained back 4.5 oz, at a rate of about a half an oz a day, and the doctor says she should be gaining about an oz a day at this point. She's 11 days old, and still about 7.5 oz away from her birth weight. We've given her a bottle of 1-2oz a few times and she has still been latching okay, but after our visit the doctor wants us to let her nurse for only 5 mins or so and then give her the bottle because she thinks that maybe LO isn't getting enough when nursing - not because of low supply, but because she isn't sucking efficiently.It feels wrong to me. My gut is telling me she's eating fine - she has 8-10 wet and dirty diapers a day, she isn't fussy, and is waking to feed every 2-3 hours. She was also jaundice after birth and very sleepy which added to the feeding difficulties. I just don't know what to do - is there a way to measure what she's getting from the breast every feeding? Or does anyone have any advice on how to keep her sucking efficiently while nursing? I am just having a really hard time with this.
    1 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*sshields8401's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:49 PM
    My 3 month old DD started out gaining weight at an expected rate but she's slowed down significantly in the last month and I'm very concerned. Her pediatrician is not yet concerned and says we'll see how she gains between now and her four month spot (9/21). Here are all her weights to date: 5/20/17: 7 lb 9 oz 5/22/17 : 7 lb 1 oz 5/29/17: 8 lb 3 oz 6/21/17 : 9 lb 13 oz 7/21/17 : 12 lb 2.5 oz 8/8/17 : 12 lb 12.5 oz 8/22/17 : 12 lb 14 oz
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*jolyn.tang's Avatar
    Today, 02:57 AM
    Hi my baby is now 8 weeks old. She was born small at 2.24kg and couldn't get her to latch initially. Thus was pumping and feeding expressed breast milk (EBM) through bottle. Couple of weeks ago, I'm trying to get my LO to re-latch. And after a few attempts she managed to latch on the right breast. 1. She would latch for about 5 to 10 mins and sometimes she will cry after. 2. Sometimes she would also appear searching for nipple frantically, but after 3 sucks she will reject the breast and cry. 3. If baby only feeds for 5 mins; is that enough? Anyone experienced the same?
    0 replies | 12 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:04 AM
    Many babies start nursing wonky around this age, it is like a stage they go through. Obviously it can be a problem if baby is truly not nursing enough, but also at this age much shorter nursing session can be normal. Not a minute every time though! Have you tried changing up nursing positions, like doing laid back position or sidelying? Any improvement today?
    1 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:00 AM
    Take pump when you see the LC so she can have a listen and also check flange fit.
    5 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:58 PM
    Ugh that is the worst. Make sure you are staying well hydrated! very important. I hope the LC is helpful for you. Yes Many babies prefer to be held when sleeping at this age and do not appreciate being put down! This does not necessarily mean baby is still hungry, but even the non-hungry baby may want to nurse more. If you have some one else there to hold sleeping baby so you can get a break it may help.
    15 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:49 PM
    I think sometimes it helps to look at the big picture. This is how charts are designed- not to look at how much a baby gained two weeks here or there, but (once normal gain is established by about 2 weeks) to measure overall gain over several months. This is because it is normal for gain to be in fits and starts, not steady. From age second day of life(?) (5/22) to 8-22, a period of 3 months, your newborn gained 6 pounds. 6 pounds in 3 months is textbook, normal average gain for the newborn period. Gain rate will slow now, that is normal, babies cannot keep gaining so rapidly as they do as newborns, or they will become gigantic. Maybe your baby's gain rate slowdown came a little early, but that could be normal because baby gained so rapidly before that. A baby who is pooping several times a day at 3 months is almost certainly getting enough milk. By this age it is normal for poop frequency to reduce, even much more than that, even to only once every several days. It is also normal for poops to still be frequent- but in that case it is unlikely your baby is not getting enough to eat, nor is it likely baby is spitting up so much baby is not getting enough, after all what comes out as a poop obviously was not spit up! Also the vast majority of the time spit up (even lots of spit up) is normal and not a cause of slow gain. Fast letdown often = lots of spit up, and again this is normal and not cause of poor gain.
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:27 PM
    Also I have found white noise and sufficiently darkened room does wonders for lengthening sleep once child is developmentally able to sleep long hours. In my experience regular 8 (or longer) hour sleep stretches start happening for most kids, even the previously very wakeful ones, during the year after a child turns 3. Up until then it is very individual how long a child can manage to consolidate sleep.
    5 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*bunnyears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:13 PM
    That is so interesting and helpful. I will ask the pharmacy tomorrow if they test the equipment, I do find it a bit loud and am worried, but it has suction.
    5 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*bunnyears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:12 PM
    By finished I meant that I unlatched her and put her to bed. She was not happy with this. Usually I like to respect her and let her come off herself (although that is rare except at night when my breasts are engorged/hard/full) Thank you Maddie I have an appointment now (with your support) to see an IBCLC on Friday now. I also experimented today with laid back - it was a relief as I am so intensely exhausted after the last few days and had a strong headache. Thank you so much for the help (and for offering me a different, non-panicky perspective) :)
    15 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:00 PM
    Anything that feels like progress is progress- strikes are tough and can take time to get over. Pain in mouth for example from a small wound could cause a strike. Nursing actively engages every part of the child's mouth (palate, cheeks, tongue) and jaw so ANY pain even a headache or irritation like food caught somewhere can cause a nursing problem sometimes. If baby is saying no to skin to skin, maybe best to avoid it for now and go for something "suggestive" or at least with easy access. Can you wear a tank or something else with easy access? Of course if you can manage to nurse in a carrier go for it. What do carrier and shoes mean to your daughter? Going outside or somewhere special? Sometimes kids just say words that we cannot make sense of, but other times there is a meaning we can figure out.
    6 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:11 PM
    Ok in that case I think what you need is time (there comes a time in most kids lives where mom is no longer preferred and in fact dad is preferred) but you could also try to move things along by encouraging dad and daughter spend more time together during non stressful times so trust is learned. Daddy-child outings are the best way to start this off. Then eventually maybe dad could start being in charge of getting child down for naps or the "first" bedtime. Middle of the night wakings are usually the most stressful and consequently the last place alternative comfort measures (like dad instead of mom) are going to be effective. For encouraging longer sleep I would suggest first keep a log for at least 2 weeks of nap and sleep times, duration, wakings, etc. It can be really tiring to keep this log esp. overnight but try your best. Usually SOME kind of pattern emerges and from that information you can work on adjusting nap or bedtimes as needed, including your own if needed. If you want to directly approach night WEANING I would suggest offer your child a snack or water when they wake, or some other alternative like a book, whatever, and talk about it BEFORE it is the middle of the night. Talk about it for days before you actually do it. Talk aobut "nursing is for bedtime and wake up" etc. That kind of thing. I am pretty sure the no cry solution offers more than what those reviews are saying. There is also one specifically for toddlers and preschoolers. Some of the...
    5 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*butterfingers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:54 PM
    Hi and thanks for your responses. I looked at Elizabeth Pantley but her technique seems to involve the child learning not to nurse to sleep and this is not a situation I have so it didn't seem to fit. My ultimate goal would be for my daughter to not need me to comfort her at night at all routinely but I acknowledge this may be some time away!! So I suppose my more immediate goal is that her comfort does not need to involve the breast and therefore could be given by someone else, namely her father. She does not need to nurse to return to sleep but her desire is to nurse when she wakes and I guess she is pretty drowsy when she finishes. A week or so ago I went out for the evening and returned just after midnight to a screaming daughter with a stressed out daddy, she had been awake and mostly unhappy for the best part of two hours shouting mummy and milk. Not a situation I want to repeat but I would like the occasional night out. I guess I am weaning her from mummy rather than nursing? But I have never really tried to comfort her any other way, she has always asked for milk. In case it's relevant she does not nurse a great deal in the day now, morning and before nap if we are home and before bed. She will ask very occasionally outside of this and I wouldn't normally refuse. As for how long a stretch, at present she has no pattern at all so sometimes she will wake just as I am going to bed, once in the middle of my sleep and that will be it (these are good nights!)...
    5 replies | 188 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:52 PM
    Hi nhecht12, I am so sorry you are having this concern. It does sound like baby's gain is slow, but at this point you do not really know why. Is it because baby needs to nurse longer? more often? Is baby not able to transfer milk normally, or is your produciuton low? In a case like this, some supplementing may be appropriate. What is not appropriate is limiting time at the breast. There is no need to do this in order to supplement. Baby is proving they can gain while nursing, if slowly. This means baby is getting a good amount of milk from nursing- the difference between slow gain and normal gain is usually just a few ounces total per day. Limiting time at the breast is only helpful if MOM needs to limit the time because of time management concerns- in other words if the strain of nursing, pumping and supplementing is so great it is harmful to mom, then limiting time at the breast somewhat might make sense, but it is still likely to cause more issue for breastfeeding. 5 minutes? That is a ridiculous number- a baby this age typically will nurse from 20-60 minutes 10-15 times a day, that is normal, limiting a baby to 5 minutes is likely going to destroy your breastfeeding relationship. Of course it is also possible you are on the brink of getting baby nursing well, and no supplements are needed, it all depends on what exactly caused the slower gain and if that is self-correcting or not. Here are my suggestions: -If at all possible, see a IBCLC in person for a...
    1 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:46 AM
    I would suggest adjusting the position- how much you lean, and how exactly baby is positioned. The nice thing about laid back (and really most nursing positions) is that there are endless variations to experiment with. So she started crying while nursing, came off the breast, and refused to latch again? I am trying to understand what you mean by she was finished. .29 kg is a slightly over 10 ounces. This would be normal gain for 2 weeks because it would average out to 5 ounces a week, and while that is on the low end of normal gain rate, it is still normal gain, as normal average gain in the newborn period (2 weeks to 3 months) is 5-8 ounces per week. In the previous 2 weeks while supplemented, iirc, your baby gained 3 pounds. This is three times normal gain. There is no way that would be a sustainable weight gain rate. Of course it reduced and reduced substantially. Also because baby was gaining so fast when supplemented, it makes sense gain would slow down this much so things "even out" with overall gain. Weight gain happens in fits and starts and the most accurate way to measure gain is to step back and look at the big picture. At this point it is hard for you to do this because you are comparing time periods of supplementing to time periods of not supplementing, and that is confusing the issue.
    15 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:17 AM
    Pain = Injury. It is just a matter of degree. This is why we feel pain, so we stop doing or make adjustments to whatever is causing us to feel pain before the injury is severe. Just as nursing should not hurt, pumping should not hurt. To test your Symphony pump motor you would need to contact whoever you rented the pump from and see if they have the equipment to do that. They may not. It is possible that the old pump caused the problem and not the new, but it still hurts because you were injured and since you still have to pump the injury is taking longer to heal. It is also possible a plug or something has developed and that is causing more pain. Usually though what needs to happen is adjustments to pump setting, pump frequency/duration, and/or flange size. Some moms find lubing the flange with a little olive oil or other non-allergenic food based oil allows for more comfortable pumping when the flange is slightly small. It helps lessen the issue of nipple rubbing on the tunnel. Also being very careful about how you position the breast in the flange to lessen rubbing helps. Generally there are more issues caused by a too large flange than a too small one. This is because it would damage the areola to have it pulled too much into the tunnel and also because a large flange is not as effective and that might cause mom to put the setting too high. But that is general, your experience might be different.
    5 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*bunnyears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:17 AM
    Thanks m, this is very useful. I was wondering about this and a bit concerned at the look of my breasts. I wonder how one knows if injury is occurring, but it sure feels like it. Also, how do you detect a malfunctioning pump? I am renting the Symphony for now. Thanks.
    5 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*bunnyears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:16 AM
    Thank you MaddieB! That is all very helpful Have you tried adopting a more laid back nursing position? You leaning back (as little or as much as you like, but not flat on your back) and baby kind of on top of you? This often helps with "slippage" Yes, she cannot seem to get the milk out - I used to think it was because she couldn't "grasp" the skin as it's too soft. But maybe it is an anatomical issue. I am just done BF and she finished unhappy and crying, I am now pumping because without it I'm worried supply will drop. Pumping immediately yields me milk but she can't. I'm at my wit's end, she won't take the bottle either and rather be hungry. I am thinking she probably does have lip and tongue tie, I really didn't want her to undergo laser for it but I may have to at this rate.
    15 replies | 267 view(s)
  • @llli*bunnyears's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:12 AM
    She gained 0.29kgs - I actually don't know what it is in ounces. Yes, in the last two weeks. Sorry it was unclear.
    15 replies | 267 view(s)
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