Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Popular Forums Clear All
  • @llli*joshuas.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:44 PM
    Hi, many of you "know" me as I've posted here multiple times before. My DS is almost 2.5 and for the past several weeks, has really been ramping up his requests for nu-nu (what we call nursing). This confuses me. We had been down to around 3-4 times a day. Now suddenly he wants to nurse multiple times in the morning before work, and usually several times in the evening as well. He asks less often if we're out and about or if Daddy is around, but if it's just the two of us nursing seems to be his favorite activity. I asked him today why he wanted so much nu-nu and he said "because I miss you, Mama!". I don't know if I planted that idea in his head...I asked one time a few weeks ago after a period where I'd been working a lot if he wanted nu-nu because he missed me and maybe he caught onto that and it stuck? Or maybe that really is the reason. I don't know. I don't feel like I've been away from home an unusual amount the last week or two but we did have visitors in town and have been busy with Passover, etc. so maybe he's not getting as much one-on-one time as he usually does. I'm just somewhat confused and a little bit bothered by the fact that we seem to be going BACKWARDS with regard to nursing. I had thought he'd be well along in the weaning process by now. I am willing to continue nursing awhile longer but I don't know if nursing all the time is good for him at this point. His father thinks he should be weaned already (although he is tolerating our nursing without any...
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*brittyynicole's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:10 PM
    DS is almost 3 weeks, BFing is going well based on wet/dirty diaper output. Like poop every feed and constant wet diapers. I never knew BFing was such a science lol. My LO is more keen on the left breast, he will stay latched and swallowing for 20 minutes at a time, and then he will remove himself from breast and fall asleep. I usually do not offer him the right breast after. He doesn't seem to like being at the right breast as much, he will only drink for a few minutes off and on. I try to feed him from the right a few times before switching to the left. I'm worried that I'm going to give myself supply issues by doing this. I'm offering him the right time after time because I'm trying to "even" them out, otherwise my right breast is full and it can be sort of painful. Is that a bad thing to do? I really do not want to risk having supply issues by being uninformed. Also I'm wondering when it is okay to start pumping. I'm not trying to create a stock pile since I am a SAHM but it'd be nice to be able to take a bottle of pumped milk when I'm going out and I know it will be a longer trip. I'd just like to be able to pump a bottle to take out for now.
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*jrob327's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    Last drops of breastmilk? My son is 3 weeks old (born on March 27) and it seems like I have ran out of breast milk. I had an emergency c-section. My son was NICU for ingesting meconium and jaundice. Three days post-delivery, my breasts were engorged with milk. Yet, I found it very difficult to pump and my son couldn't latch on. Once we were released from the hospital, I manage to pump up to three times a day. I knew this was clearly not enough pumping sessions but I was in too much pain from the c-section and engorged breast. At best, I was able to pump 30-40ml per breast but he still didn't latch. One week later, I contacted Lactation Specialist for home consultation. She suggested renting hospital grade breast pump, showed various breast feeding position and gave me nipple shield to help my son latch on since he been drinking and formula in a bottle. All of her suggestions worked, but I was having difficulty my appetite, energy level, and physical limitations of c-sections coupled with taking pain pills (OxyContin and Ibuprofen). Some days I simply didn't pump. I tried to breast feed but my son seem not patient enough for breastmilk and wanted the fast flowing formula. As we entered the third week of being home, I notice my milk supply dropped drastically. I no longer felt the heaviness of being engorged. I pumped less than 20ml per breast and after 5min of breast feeding my son seem to lose interest or stop sucking. The irony was as I started to physically...
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*lcmpdx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:23 PM
    Traditional Medicinals Organic Chamomile with Lavender, it also includes lemon balm. I have a terrible head cold and want a cup of tea, this is the only thing I have on hand. Are these herbs safe while breastfeeding? Here is a link to the product: http://traditionalmedicinals.com/products/chamomile-lavender/ Thanks in advance for any help!
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:25 PM
    hi jrob 327. I am sorry you are having such a struggle. I want to assure you all is not lost as far as breastfeeding goes. Clearly your body is capable of making milk, since you became engorged after your baby was born. Because your baby was not nursing and you were unable to pump frequently, your body was given the signal to stop or slow down on the making of milk. So it did. OK. But now you can give your body the signal to START making milk (or more milk.) Yes it really is that simple, which does not mean it is easy or will not take some work! I can offer sympathy with the difficulty of C-section recovery. I have had 3 cesarian births. They are major abdominal surgery and can really, really mess with your entire system. And yes the pain meds as typically prescribed can make a mom feel utterly exhausted and even disconnected from her baby, depressed, etc. It's really really hard! Hopefully you are no longer needing the narcotics for pain management. Getting off the narcotics and getting some freedom of movement back helps in so many ways. Please check out the information bfwmomof3 has offered. And get in touch with local support like LLL if it is available. It sounds like you saw a good IBCLC, if you agree, keep in touch with her as well. With the above info and the advice from your IBCLC, You will know what you need to do to increase your milk production and get baby nursing again, and we and your local LLL or other breastfeeding support can give you the...
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*joshuas.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    Bfwmom, yes, I am confused/conflicted. On the one hand, I don't want to do anything to cause DS to wean. I'd feel guilty about precipitating it. On the other hand, I do hope he'll wean on his own within the next year or so. I think what really bothers me about this behavior is I feel like maybe it's DS' way of showing he's in some emotional distress about something. If that's the case I want to help him with whatever is bothering him. I also feel guilty about being gone a lot (although nowhere near as much as plenty of other working moms). He seems to really miss me right now and not be handling it very well. As far as the nursing itself--sometimes it's annoying, like when he won't let me cover my boobs even though he's not actively nursing, or when he wants to nurse right when I want to get in the shower, and other times I still really enjoy it. As for him, he unequivocally enjoys it. And that's great. But I have wondered if maybe I wasn't doing what I should be doing to help him move along, developmentally, to the next stage. Or if his sudden clinginess indicates distress that I need to address somehow. Nothing has really changed so I don't know why he'd be distressed now when he was fine before. But, it seems you and KatiePerry are saying that weaning is not linear and that toddlers just act like this sometimes, for no particular reason (thanks, KatiePerry, for your input! Much appreciated!). DS is my first child and I don't have much experience with toddlers this age...
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:14 PM
    My untested opinion is that maintaining equilibrium is about creating a number of meaningful "wins" for a child. Life is tough for toddlers: they have just enough competence and independence to long for freedom, but they're still aware of how inextricably they rely on us. In your shoes, I'd evaluate how much of your undivided attention your son is getting when you aren't nursing. Moving to part-time work will definitely give you an edge in being able to meet your son's need for dedicated mom-son time. I would focus first on activities he values most that bring you physically close with lots of eye contact, like reading while snuggling, wrestling, piggy-back-rides, making up riddles/jokes, etc. Based on my son's approach to nursing, a large part of nursing is the physical closeness and intimacy, not the milk per se. I'd also support the extra nursing. My guess is it's a short-term need that will pass if met.
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*avesnovuelan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    :ita In fact I have heard that a healthy mom who has milk that has turned soapy can sometimes donate it to a milk bank, since premies are often tube fed and therefore won't notice the taste. It is just as good as any breastmilk except for the flavor.
    10 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*karrieperry's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:10 PM
    I agree, it seems like weaning/nursing the whole experience can be very circular at times, definitely not a gradual linear process as I expected. And it is totally normal for a 2.5 year old to be uninterested in potty training. Just yesterday my friend was changing an almost 4 year old's diaper. And she's not uncommon in my group of friends. I would say by age 3 or 3.5 maybe a definite interest would emerge. My daughter is almost 4, and she is just now entering what I would call a "big girl" phase. She's extremely smart and has the vocab of a much older child, but that doesn't really mean anything. There will be plenty of time to be a big boy! So little time to be a very little boy! Even my potty hating daughter uses the potty now for the most part, she naturally realized that she didn't want that stuff in her pants. Same thing with my 16 month old who has a new desire to sleep in her own space vs. right next to me. Children grow when they are ready...but of course if nursing so many times is really starting to get annoying there is nothing wrong with saying "later" or after lunch, after nap, etc. My daughter went through a similar phase where she requested to nurse non stop for about a month. It was hard but she got past it and I didn't limit her too much except when I was really starting to get a little touched out. :)
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 PM
    Sounds like you'll be okay.
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*lcmpdx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:42 PM
    LO is 8 weeks, and if anything I have an oversupply that is beginning to regulate.
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:31 PM
    Here's a link from kelly mom about herbs to avoid while breastfeeding: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/herbs_to_avoid/ It looks like lemon balm can affect supply. But how old is your baby? And do you have any supply issues? If your breastfeeding relationship is well-established and you have no worries about supply, I doubt a single cup of tea will have any significant impact. Hope you feel better soon...
    3 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:23 PM
    Hi mama, sorry you've had a rocky start to breastfeeding. At this point, how much formula is baby taking in the day? Is he still nursing at all? Are you currently pumping? Are you still working with the lactation specialist? From what I understand from your post, your baby is still latching, even if only for a few minutes, so that's great, and also you are still making some milk - is that right? So what you have to do now is to increase your supply by more nursing and pumping, and then gradually wean off the formula supplements. Here is an article that explains this process in a step-by-step fashion: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/basics/decrease-formula/ The key is that you need frequent stimulation at the breast - by baby nursing, pumping, or some combination - to build your supply back up. A normal newborn nurses very very frequently to build up milk supply - 10-12 times or more in 24 hours, often nursing for hours at a time at times (cluster feeding). Also, it's important to use paced feeding techniques when bottle-feeding baby, so that bottle-feeding is more similar to breastfeeding. And not to overfeed baby with the bottle. Baby shouldn't be getting more than 2 or 3 oz at a time with the bottle, less if baby is also nursing in that feeding session. Breastfed babies eat frequent, small meals, and with the bottle it's easy to give large, infrequent meals - once baby has a lot of formula in his belly, he will not want to nurse for a long time afterwards. Also,...
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:19 PM
    my baby girl has an upper lip tie and we never revised it. I went through a lot between cracks, pain, latching issues, in the first weeks, month, better at 2 months and now at 4 it's fine. If there's no issues I don't see why you would need to. Even with my issue we outgrew it
    6 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:10 PM
    I don't really see weaning as a linear process, where children steadily nurse less until one day they stop. I mean yes, on average that is what happens but day-to-day, week-to-week, month-to-month - probably not. There could be many reasons that DS wants to nurse more this week than last week, all of which are developmentally appropriate. I think a lot of this is about your expectations of what DS should or should not be doing at this age. Because really, he's NOT a big boy, he's a very young boy! For example, potty training - my older two kids could be induced to sit on the potty at 2.5, were not interested in getting rid of diapers until after 3. And, as you know, many children who wean at their own pace do not do so until much later than 2.5. I certainly don't think it's in any way harmful for DS to be nursing at this age, whether a little or a lot. Whether and how much to limit that nursing I think depends entirely on how much it bothers you. So does it bother you that he's nursing a lot? Or is it more that you feel pressure to wean from DH, family members, society? Because you seem a little conflicted - just a couple weeks ago you were worried about DS weaning prematurely if your supply dropped....
    4 replies | 78 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:00 PM
    It's not uncommon for baby to prefer one breast over the other - for example, one breast may have a faster flow, which baby either does or does not like. If you want to even things out, then doing what you're doing - offering the right breast first - can help. And certainly reasonable to do if your right breast is getting too full (and not bad in any way). You might also try out different positions to see whether it's a positioning issue. For example, laid-back nursing can help with fast flow, and is illustrated in the following links, you can adjust as necessary: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/01_laid_back_breastfeeding.pdf http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/2010/10/11/some-ins-and-outs-of-laid-back-breastfeeding.html As for pumping, if you don't need expressed milk anytime soon, why not wait a few more weeks before you start pumping? Your baby is still very young and your breastfeeding relationship is still being established, so if there isn't a need for pumping, it's better to avoid it - otherwise there's the potential to interfere with the normal process by which your body regulates supply to match baby's demand. I guess I am also wondering, are you thinking that you will need to give baby a bottle of pumped milk when the two of you are out? Because it's really far less hassle to simply nurse baby when he is hungry than to worry about bottles and pumping. A lot of moms are uncomfortable with nursing in public early on, but with...
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:59 PM
    I'm definitely not an expert but if the right breast is feeling engorged or painful then I would pump it some just to avoid mastitis or plugged ducts. Benefit being you could then maybe store up some for later use. I've never so far been able to actually pump enough out to be worth storing. I don't seem to respond well to the pump (but I can use it enough to soften up a breast.) I've been struggling with low supply.
    2 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*garsmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:49 PM
    If there's one thing I've learned it's that baby sleep habits, and toddlers for that matter, never stay consistent! I mean, they do get better, but all those things the PP said seem to impact it. My DS gets disrupted if he gets any screen time at all (even just something in the background) so I have to be pretty militant about no computer or TV videos on while he is awake. Also around 16 months DS will not go back to sleep despite copious nursing if his diaper is wet. Used to be he could go all night without me getting up for a diaper change but no more! I'm hoping that means potty training is around the corner!
    3 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*sonogirl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:46 PM
    It's also worth noting that even if you do have a low storage capacity and a baby who needs to nurse very frequently, it will still generally get easier with time, because the length of those feeds will usually go down as baby gets older and more efficient. I'm pretty positive that I have a low storage capacity, and I also had (still have!) a very very frequent nurser--but what used to be all day on the couch transformed into a lot more mobility once the length of feeds decreased.
    60 replies | 1698 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:03 AM
    Probably not. Milk spoils when it is colonized by large numbers of bacteria. The lipase enzyme is just taking the fat and breaking it down into smaller components, which could conceivably make it easier for bacteria to thrive in the milk. But bacteria won't get into the milk any faster because of lipase activity.
    10 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*kbarlow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:47 AM
    This thread has references to great research on excess lipase. http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?59783-Can-diet-changes-help-with-the-Lipase-issue I'm new to LLLI and newly discovered excess lipase as well. Milk bad in 24 hours, have to scald before 12... Still testing. In a way, it places more pressure on me to nurse her rather than express/refrigerate/freeze, it may be better for her health in the long run. (Milk and other unknown allergies still ravaging her gut.) What's not clear to me is if even the milk tastes sour quickly, is it in fact rotten faster? Some babies don't mind the taste, I'm reading, so it must be okay. I have a picky baby (foodie takes after her mom).
    10 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:59 AM
    hi amberdawn, how is it going now? I agree with mommal important to keep trying. Sometimes babies get traumatised even by simple procedures and go on mini nursing strikes. vaccinations, blood draws, circumcisions, even just separations from mom, or severely stressful days may cause this in some babies. It's temporary. My understanding is that baby may need to learn to nurse with the new freedom of movement he has. So that may be going on too. Also maybe milk flow is less (or more) than baby prefers as he figures this out. I suggest that if things are still not going well, contact the dentist. He or she may have exercises to suggest. You may find the suggestions in this article helpful, especially the instant reward techniques? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/
    2 replies | 118 view(s)
More Activity