Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Popular Last 7 Days Clear All
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    April 17th, 2017, 01:38 PM
    Hello, As with my last post, I am 'almost' exclusively pumping for 6 weeks and my baby is 11 weeks. I noticed that my breast returned to it's pre-pregnancy size and I think I am starting to ovulate. Is this my body telling me to wean? Or, have I accidentally sent signal to my body that I am to wean? How should I tell my body that I am not ready to wean? And that I still want to breastfeed my baby?
    5 replies | 210 view(s)
  • @llli*tobysmom's Avatar
    April 22nd, 2017, 04:40 PM
    First time mom with a four month old baby. Exclusively pumped for six weeks following a NICU stay at birth (born a month early), then transitioned to a nipple shield eventually because baby would not latch without it. At 15 weeks, baby all of sudden latched without the shield and we were elated! :clap Baby has been nursing without the shield for three weeks and is doing great--weight gain is good, lactation consultants have confirmed he is eating 70-100 ml each feeding, which is plenty, and baby seems happy and more comforted by the breast. Went from 30 minute feedings to being done in 8-10min. However...mama is not doing well. Without the shield I have been having extreme nipple soreness. It is worse on one side than the other, and worst with the initial latch although it hurts throughout the nursing session on both sides. Both nipples are cracked. On the side with the most pain the nipple often is lipstick shaped or a little flat after nursing, which made me question the latch but I went to the lactation consultant this week and they thought the latch looked good and that wasn't the issue. Suggestions were to pump 5 minutes before each feeding to elongate the nipple (apparently I have a fairly short small nipple and baby has a hard palate) or to go back to using the shield. I'm resisting the idea of pumping because of the logistics involved and making it more difficult to feed baby on demand, plus washing all those pump pieces. Would hate to go back to the nipple shield...
    4 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*ftm2016's Avatar
    April 18th, 2017, 03:32 PM
    Hi- I have a 5 month old baby who is exclusively breastfed. I am having a lot of difficulty with her sleep patterns. she has never been the best sleeper but since she was 3.5 months she wakes up every 1 to 2 hours to nurse-- most of the times she only nurses for a minute or two and goes back to sleep. During the day she only takes long naps if I nurse her back to sleep. Is this normal? Everyone tells me that by this age babies should be sleeping longer stretches. I am so exhausted and she also seems like she is not well rested as she gets fussy during the day. I don't have the heart to do any sleep training like cry it out-- Does anyone have any advice for me or words of encouragement? How will I ever get my baby out of the nurse to sleep cycle? :(
    3 replies | 222 view(s)
  • @llli*bachandl's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 08:51 AM
    My baby girl was born at 37w2d. Labor was 52 hours. Had complications and was in the hospital for a week from NICU to Peds. Able to get her colostrum by bottle but would only eat that way and had to keep her stimulated. She would either not stay latched to my breast or scream uncontrollably. The past 4 weeks I have been pumping after she finishes off a bottle, which could be anywhere between 2 to 4 hours between feedings. The past week she has gotten the hang of latching. Some feedings will be sufficient yet others she is still fussy afterwords, which is kind of where we're at now. Sometimes I can feel the milk let down, others I can't. She will latch and "feed" for 45 minutes to and hour. Afterwords, I lay her down thinking she's in a deeps sleep, but for only about 30 minutes to have her wake up and scream again. Butt has been changed, gripe water or gas drops given, and burped. She still polishes off 60+ml bottle.
    3 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*dukes.mom's Avatar
    April 18th, 2017, 12:46 PM
    I just started back to work today, but will only be working half days for a total of 20 hours. This morning I nursed my baby at 8 before I left, and then pumped at 10:30 and got 10 ounces from that session. He took two, three ounce bottles while I was away, one at 10 and one at 12, and I got home at 12:45. However, I only pumped once at 10:30. Is this okay to do since I have such oversupply? Or do I need to continue to pump each time he eats while I'm away?
    3 replies | 243 view(s)
  • @llli*sam.fischer's Avatar
    April 18th, 2017, 01:24 PM
    Hi all, I have a 6 week old and am having some real challenges. I haven't been able to get in to see a LC yet but could use some help in the meantime. The last couple weeks she has started nursing 3-6 minutes and then coming off crying and super fussy. I KNOW i have fast letdown because it sprays far and intensely when I take her off during letdown. I have tried all the strategies suggested to me to help; taking her off during letdown, nursing reclined, nursing laying down etc. Nothing seems to calm her down after that initial 3-6 minutes. I try to burp her and she often will burp a few times and I try to re-latch her. Sometimes Itry on the same side, sometimes on the opposite. Maybe I will get a minute or so out of her if I'm lucky. But she always comes off crying and screaming. She seems like she wants to re-latch but she won't and if she does she just cries and comes off again. I initially thought maybe she was just done but she never ends nursing seeming content . She has always been a spitter but has gained weight well. When I weighed her myself a week ago she had gained 2.5 lb over birth weight. So I just literally have no clue whats going on. It is so stressful i have considered exclusively pumping because I just feel stressed all day. It just seems like she hates nursing and finds no comfort from it. She also has been having what seem like painful mucousy poops (normal in color) The only exception to all of this is in the middle of the night for her 2 nursing...
    3 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*crr.2017's Avatar
    April 21st, 2017, 01:03 PM
    My 1 month old will fall asleep at the breast sometimes after 5 minutes, sometimes after 20. She will stay asleep for awhile and then wale up screaming like she's still hungry. How do you know when they are done? Feedings take forever and I feel like I always have my boob in her mouth.. please help
    2 replies | 172 view(s)
  • @llli*cagirl1214's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 07:19 PM
    My son turned 1 on April 5th and he's my 3rd. I breastfed my first until he was 2 and my 2nd until he was 14 months. My youngest has always been a biter and though my older 2 bit too, it was basically a one day thing. I said no, put them in their bed a few times and they stopped. My 1 year old will not stop biting me no matter what I do and it's been this way since he was probably 5 or 6 months (even before teeth). Recently he has started nursing until letdown then stopping and trying to bite but I know when he is about to do it because he pulls back so I stop him and he gets upset but when I try to feed him again after that he does it right away again and does literally nothing else until I give up and he gets no milk. This has been going on for a few days. Of course everyone around me says he is self weaning which I don't believe but I don't know how to get him to stop or to nurse normally. He has 7 teeth and is working on #8 but I don't see why that one would be so bad that it's all caused by teething. I already can't eat eggs because he is allergic to them so he's really not making this BF journey an easy one for me. lol Any advice?
    1 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*bellefiresmomma's Avatar
    April 17th, 2017, 09:19 AM
    She eats from my right breast without issue and refuses my left completely help please
    1 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*mimi.momma's Avatar
    April 17th, 2017, 03:44 PM
    Hello! (First time poster here :)) We have a 16 month old who has always nursed to sleep. We co sleep and she naps in our bed. She has always been difficult to get to sleep, and there were many many MANY months where I would spend hours everyday trying to nurse her down. She has never let my husband put her to sleep, or even soothe her if she wakes up, she will scream until I come in to take over. We have accepted this (however, a little grudgingly) and have felt fairly successful with figuring out what works. We have recently made an international move, and anticipated her need for extra "support" during this massive transition. I feel like we are on the road to being in a normal routine. That said, we've had a few unforeseen hurdles leading to a switching of roles. I will be returning to work full time and he will be the primary caregiver for a little while. This is a drastic change, as I have been with her 24/7 for the past 16 months, and she is EXTREMELY attached to me. During this move, for the last month, I couldn't even go to the bathroom without her crying and banging on the door. The last week or so, I have been leaving her with Dad for short trips out and it seems to be going really well. Dad is great and I never had any doubts in his abilities, yet they both needed to learn how the other operates, so to speak. He is making great progress anticipating her needs and she has bonded with him in such a sweet way. However, starting in a few days I will be gone...
    1 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*ogomez0728's Avatar
    April 17th, 2017, 10:32 AM
    LO is 8 months. I'm returning to work and my shift can go anywhere from 5 to 6 hours long. I tried pumping for his eating when I'm gone, but I only get about 3oz out. I plan on using supplementing formula when I'm gone, then breastfeed when I'm home. I want to slowly cut back on breastfeeding and wean him without the engorged feeling. I find I'm only engorged after a full night sleep from 9pm to 7am. What is the best way to cutback to ease into weaning without pain?
    1 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*florida2001's Avatar
    April 20th, 2017, 04:50 AM
    hi, Im 17 months postpartum, nursing only once or twice a day and still no period. how do I resume the cycle? I would like to conceive, but not sure if this can happens if my cycle is not back.
    1 replies | 141 view(s)
  • @llli*bluemoontide's Avatar
    April 19th, 2017, 11:27 AM
    My son is 10 weeks old. He was born with low blood sugar and they supplemented with formula in the hospital. To make a long story short, he's about 50/50 breastmilk/ formula. I've tried increasing my supply by pumping 8 times a day, power pumping, and using fenugreek (9 capsules a day) but nothing seems to increase my supply. The pumping is VERY time consuming and I just want to give up on that because it doesn't seem to make a difference. BTW, I am a bariatric patient. I don't know if that makes a difference.
    1 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:05 PM
    Hello, I am hoping for some suggestions. My 9 month old has happily taken a bottle since I went back to work at 4.5 months, but the last couple weeks has been not very interested, some days only eating two instead of three. Today he is pretty much refusing it altogether. He seems interested but takes a couple sips and then doesn't want it. My husband has also tried the milk in a sippy cup today. He doesn't eat solids yet (not interested). He figured out how to scoot around on his belly a few weeks ago. I am just wondering if this might be a phase or he has just decided he doesn't want a bottle anymore at all? He nurses fine when I am home, every hour and half or two hours. Suggestions on how to get him to eat? He is not a big baby, under 10th percentile in weight.
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*fortheloveofboys's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:36 PM
    My 7 day old is still having pretty brownish stools. He feeds 15-20 minutes every 2 hours sometimes a little less and refuses to take the breast again. Im wondering if he is getting what he needs. Having wet diapers but not completely saturated. Very confused Doctors appt on Tuesday to check weight gain. Any advice is deeply appreciated
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*dukes.mom's Avatar
    April 18th, 2017, 03:22 PM
    I just started back to work today, but will only be working half days for a total of 20 hours. This morning I nursed my baby at 8 before I left, and then pumped at 10:30 and got 10 ounces from that session. He took two, three ounce bottles while I was away, one at 10 and one at 12, and I got home at 12:45. However, I only pumped once at 10:30. Is this okay to do since I have such oversupply? Or do I need to continue to pump each time he eats while I'm away?
    0 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*mimi.momma's Avatar
    April 17th, 2017, 03:51 PM
    Hello! (First time poster here :)) We have a 16 month old who has always nursed to sleep. We co sleep and she naps in our bed. She has always been difficult to get to sleep, and there were many many MANY months where I would spend hours everyday trying to nurse her down. She has never let my husband put her to sleep, or even soothe her if she wakes up, she will scream until I come in to take over. We have accepted this (however, a little grudgingly) and have felt fairly successful with figuring out what works. We have recently made an international move, and anticipated her need for extra "support" during this massive transition. I feel like we are on the road to being in a normal routine. That said, we've had a few unforeseen hurdles leading to a switching of roles. I will be returning to work full time and he will be the primary caregiver for a little while. This is a drastic change, as I have been with her 24/7 for the past 16 months, and she is EXTREMELY attached to me. During this move, for the last month, I couldn't even go to the bathroom without her crying and banging on the door. The last week or so, I have been leaving her with Dad for short trips out and it seems to be going really well. Dad is great and I never had any doubts in his abilities, yet they both needed to learn how the other operates, so to speak. He is making great progress anticipating her needs and she has bonded with him in such a sweet way. However, starting in a few days I will be gone...
    0 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:10 PM
    You sound like an a mom experienced with baby poop. Is this your first baby? "Brownish" could be entirely normal, sometimes it takes a little longer for poops to transition, also sometimes it depends on how you define "brownish." "Seedy" is a common look but not a requirement for typical breastmilk poop. What is more important is how much baby is pooping. How many times is baby pooping in 24 hours, and how much is there when baby poops? If you had to scoop it up, would you use a teaspoon, a tablespoon or a ladle? (If that visual does not work for you choose your own, just use something generally familiar.) Also, are the poops very moist, loose, liquidy? Or still very sticky, tarry? And how many times in 24 hours is baby nursing? Every two hours would mean 12 times, which would be normal frequency. But is this total number approximately correct?
    1 replies | 30 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 PM
    How many hours are you away from home and how many ounces was baby eating during you work hours before he stopped taking a bottle? Is he fussy, seeming miserable and hungry, or generally happy? It is entirely possible your baby is getting enough milk while with you if baby nurses often enough. So I would say there is probably no reason to stress about this if baby is overall healthy. Baby being on the smaller side is not in any way a problem either, what you would want to be careful about would be a big drop in gain rate, or baby not gaining at all. Baby actually losing weight would be potentially quite serious. and still no go? Your husband could also try an open cup, and continue to offer solids in a variety of tastes and textures.
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:32 PM
    Spit up is normal. Pain while spitting up might indicate reflux. Crying while nursing could indicate any number of things. Very young babies should probably not be ingesting anything other than breastmilk, infant formula (if they are not breastfed) or medicines approved by doctor. I know people give their babies gripe water for colic, I did myself with my oldest, and I assume that is similar to what is in this "tea?" But even with the gripe water, the recommended dose was so much it was potentially a problem if given too often. (could fill baby up on something with no nutrients.) Later I learned research does not indicate gripe water helps with digestive issues. Neither do gas drops. There is some evidence probiotics help in some cases. Additionally, herbal ingredients are not always "safe." In fact, due to lack of regulation I would be very cautious about direct ingestion of any herbal product for a very young child. For example: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20041112/herbal-tea-for-infant-colic-unsafe This does not mean a nursing mom should not take a medicinal herbs. Many moms take herbal galagtagogues and their milk is perfectly safe for baby. But whenever medicinal herbs are used, it is important to research the potential side effects. Interestingly I cannot find an ingredient list on that baby tea website. Plenty of misinformation about colic, infant behavior and breastmilk though.
    3 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    Hi world wanderer. Mommal has not been able to check on the forum as much lately due to busy life and probably missed your response, and I missed it too. Since it has been a couple of weeks, can you tell us what is going on now? Any changes from when you last posted? Thanks.
    5 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:08 PM
    Most commonly, those are signs that the milk flow is a little fast for baby. Things that help with fast letdown- try leaning back position (baby kind of on top) to nurse, encourage baby to nurse more often, (usually very helpful.) Or, you can try taking baby off when baby does this and let milk flow into a cloth for a few moments then put baby back on, and/or express a little milk before baby nurses. You also can just let baby figure it out. It depends how much it is really bothering baby. Fast flow is something your baby can usually learn to deal with just fine, unless it is really fast or baby has some kind of latch or sucking problem.
    11 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:42 AM
    Unfortunately, it is entirely possible tongue tie was "missed" by your doctor. Many doctors think that tongue tie does not matter in infancy and that it would only be an issue if speech or eating issues occurred later. You can find info online about tongue tie and breastfeeding but it is a tricky area because diagnoses is tricky (there are different types of tongue tie that cause nursing pain) and also treatment does not always help with nursing pain. But if you see another LC you two can talk about that. I think seeing someone else makes sense if that is possible. I am not saying your first LC was wrong, but it does sound like there was a lack of communication there and your instincts and the facts seem to point to a latch issue, so that is what you would want your LC to be working with you on at least until every other possibility has been addressed. While a LC can certainly gather information while watching a baby nurse, there is no way to tell a latch is "fine" ONLY by how it looks when baby nurses. Here is an article that suggests what should happen at a consult with an LC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html The LC who wrote that is an expert on latch issues so you can poke around her site and see if anything helps. Have you tried nursing in a leaning back position- in a relaxed, supported position, leaning back for example, against the couch back or a pile of pillows, with baby more on top of you? This type of positioning often helps a good deal with...
    4 replies | 254 view(s)
More Activity