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  • @llli*j323cole's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:23 PM
    As a first time mom I've been having a very very hard time with breastfeeding. We had issues latching at the beginning and I could only get him to nurse while using a nipple shield because I had very little to no help while I was in the hospital. We started having to supplement with a bottle at night and that one bottle turned into more as the weeks passed. My son is now 13 weeks and I'm not making nearly enough milk to keep him fed. I started taking fenugreek, drinking mothers milk tea, drinking as much water and Gatorade as I can stand, eating oatmeal and making lactation cookies and nothing is helping. I've talked with my family doctor and my ob and they are saying to do what I've already been doing for weeks. There has got to be a way for me to get back my supply so I can continue to breastfeed. I have been pumping every 3 hours and each time I seem to get less and less. The most I am pumping is 2 ounces from both breast combined. I don't want to give up but I'm almost to the point of just giving up and going 100% formula. :( any help would be greatly appreciated.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*ccquinn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:34 PM
    My daughter is 2 1/2 and we still have a good nursing relationship. She nurses first thing, before nap, before bed and (unfortunately) once at night. I'm ok with it. I was going to wait until she decided it was time to stop. Well, until 4, max... Anyway, I have periocular dermatitis and my dermatologist prescribed 6 weeks of milocyclin antibiotic. Ugh. I've read some horrible info stating that it may cause my milk to turn black! Do I have to wean? I'm so worried. I guess I could deal with the dermatitis until she weans and then start the antibiotic. Anyone have any thoughts?
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    Jessiesmum - that is a goal of mine, to feed in a sling or carrier but havent manged to make it work. I may take a couple of days wearing her topless in the house and see if she will attempt taking the breast while being carried. Another update is she has fed in my arms in cradle type position 5 times in the last 24 hours (falling asleep at the end sometimes!). This was such a big thing for me, she hasn't done that since around Christmas and I never get to cuddle her while asleep in my arms as a result. I held her for a two hour nap yesterday cuddled in that position and loved every second of it. I was so happy to have that cuddle. Just at a time I'm starting to get her used to napping in crib, what poor timing - ha!
    7 replies | 436 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Today, 08:03 AM
    Agree with previous poster! The baby led weaning site and book are great resources to know what foods you definitely don't give (like honey) and how to prepare foods safely so they don't pose a choking risk. Yes learn the difference between choking and gagging, gagging can be quite a show to watch and looks scary but I just remain calm so my lo doesn't become afraid. So far we haven't really had any scary episodes but it's good to watch some videos and learn what to do if a baby is truly choking (they will go silent and blue). We really just went for it with foods to be honest! Fruits, veggies, even bits of steak. I make foods for her to snack on to like porridge fingers, Apple crisps, veggie or fruit muffins (no sugar, there are baby friendly recipes). We would offer eggs once a week when we have them - her own little omelette. Cheese is recent for us, again just a little grated into veggie muffins or in omlette fingers. She loves slow cooked beef, which falls apart in mouth. We give her whole milk plain organic yogurt a couple of times a week, with fruit to dip in (we help!). We started off with foods being plain tasting and separate but quickly combined flavours and added flavours (no salt however). Last night I made chicken curry kebabs (mild, just curry powder and yoghurt as a marinade) and a homemade mint and cucumber raita. She loved it. It is messy messy messy but such great fun. We can now put a selection of three things in front of her on a plate and she'll...
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*etoile's Avatar
    Today, 07:54 AM
    I mash the sweet potato and squash. You could cut into cubes or wedges raw and roast or steam that way and it might be a little easier for baby to pick up. My son will pick up a piece of anything soft and squish it in his hand first so he does the work for me sometimes, haha :) I gave him a spear of raw celery last night and he loved gnawing on that! He doesn't have any teeth yet so I bet it felt good to his teething gums :)
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 06:38 AM
    Thanks for the reply! I am definitely going to look at the forum on the babyledweaning.com site. Are you mashing the sweet potato and squash? Anyone else have any input? :)
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:29 AM
    Great! Just keep in mind that bottles given for training purposes can be very small. 1-2 oz is totally sufficient. If you keep the practice bottles small, it means your baby will continue to nurse at a normal frequency, which means you won't need to pump to replace feedings that the baby misses. I'm glad you're not contemplating an 11 hour break! :) Actually, nursing on the plane can be quite comfortable, and is generally much easier than not nursing. A nursing baby generally just nurses quietly and falls asleep. A bottle-fed baby may resist the bottle- noisily!- and then not sleep because he misses the comfort of nursing. And then there's the possibility that the bottle will fall on the floor- and airplanes/airports are filthy. I suggest doing the following: - Treat yourself to a nice piece of nursing clothing, or wear your favorite nursing shirt, so that you can nurse really easily. - Bring a large, lightweight shawl that you can throw over yourself and the baby. She will likely nurse and nap very quietly underneath it. - Request to be seated by a window (that way you have privacy on one side), and ask for a bulkhead seat if that is available- it will give you more legroom.
    3 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*florida2001's Avatar
    Today, 05:17 AM
    Hi, I appreciate your long response. Advice very helpful. I tried yesterday putting breastmilk into bottle. She tried and refused in the first time, but then she was able to suck it. Even if she took little bit, it is good sign. I need to train her to do that. For issue #3 i agree, I didn't mean to not breastfeed her on the flight at all, I was just thinking to reduce the numbers of breastfeed sessions, because sometimes she likes to eat every 2-3 hours, and I know it won't be comfortable to do it on the plane or while waiting for the plane. Issue #4- yes the sleeping is becoming an issue for me, especially because I becoming tired and exhausted. I breastfeed her during the day every 2-3 hours, but she latch sometimes for 5min only. I found she is distracted by surroundings or she is not that hungry. I always try to find quiet place to not distract her, but seems like after 5-10 min she has enough. The longest breastfeed she gets is around 7PM before I put her sleep. She latch for 30 min and then fall asleep around 8PM. Between 11-12PM she is up crying, so I offer her breast and she latch for about 5-10 min falling asleep after. Then she is up between 2-3(sometimes 4AM) rolling over her belly and talking and playing with her hands or feet. I try not to breastfeed her as I want to teach her is bedtime;but she cries, because she is stuck on her belly(can't roll over back on her back) . I could go sleep to other room and close the door, but It makes me nervous,...
    3 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:53 PM
    Call Infant Risk! They are equipped to tell you the real risks of any course of treatment.
    1 replies | 41 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:51 PM
    :ita As moms, we tend to be very sensitive to perceived judgment. It's hard not to be, as you feel your way through the early stages of motherhood, when you are so unsure that you're doing it right... I personally think that the best way to deal with "judgment" is to not let it into your head. Whatever you end up doing with regard to breastfeeding, solid foods, choice of preschool, teen navel piercing, etc., just own the choice. "It works for me, it works for my family"- that has been my most successful strategy for dealing with criticism, whether it was meant to be critical or eas simply encouragement in disguise.
    24 replies | 1138 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:32 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! There is definitely plenty of reason to think that you can get your supply back up, but before we get into all that, can you tell us some basic stuff about breastfeeding and pumping that will help us tailor our suggestions to your situation? It would be helpful to know the following: - What sort of pump you are using. Is it a manual, a double electric, or a hospital-grade rental pump? - How many times do you pump per 24 hour period? I know you said you pump every 3 hours- does that include during the night? - What is your typical daily pump output- what are you generally getting per pump session, and what are you generally getting as your total for a 24 hour period? - How many oz of formula are you using in a 24 hour period? - How often does the baby get a bottle, and how much is in each bottle? - How many times are you nursing in a 24 hour period? - How does nursing feel?
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:52 PM
    You could lie on you back or recline with pillows propping you up with baby on top of you. For younger baby mom reclining rather than flat is probably safest but it depends on if baby is rolling over/pushing self up yet. Also many babies resist one position only to embrace it later, so I do suggest keep experimenting with side lying. Also I often sat on the couch, leaned back against the cushions, and leaned my head back and caught some z's nursing baby that way. It is not safe to lie down with baby on the couch because of the risk of entrapping baby between couch back or cushions and your body. But if baby is securely on top of you while you recline on the couch that is perfectly safe. A reclining chair is probably the least safe furniture to fall asleep with baby on, because while baby would again be perfectly safe as long as baby is securely on top of you, IF baby slips to either side and you do not wake, baby might get trapped between you and the side of the chair. However, there are probably ways to make even this safer. It is a matter of using common sense and knowing what the risks are.
    10 replies | 291 view(s)
  • @llli*csmf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:41 PM
    When he is tired and wants to nurse to sleep, I want to lie down to nurse him so that I can take a nap too. But he doesn't like that feeding position cos he's been held in a cradle position to nurse all his life. So he refuses to nurse lying down. You mean there's more than one position when lying down to nurse?
    10 replies | 291 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:03 PM
    I know this seems counter-intuitive. But it only seems that way because people tend to immediately 'blame' poor gain on low milk production, or only low milk production, rather than looking at baby's ability to transfer milk- poor milk transfer will cause poor gain just as much as low production would! So, what you describe with weight loss would happen if for some reason, baby is unable to transfer milk efficiently. Of course baby not gaining normally might also happen if mom is removing so much milk when pumping, there is not really enough milk "left" for baby when baby nurses. So when a mom is pumping as well as baby nursing lots, it might make sense to try to have pump output and supplements "match" more precisely. And this is probably most helpfully done if pump output is reduced to what baby actually needs in supplements, rather then increasing supplements to match pump output, because the goal (presumably, not every mom has the same goal) but the typical goal is more nursing and less pumping and supplementing. Here are my thoughts on weight checks. One, is that since gain fluctuations, rather than steady gain, is the norm, daily weight checks are far too frequent and may be unduly concerning. It is hard because then what do you use for your guide? You have to use pees, poops (assuming baby IS still pooping daily, if not, then poops becomes not very reliable) behavior, and more or less, your intuition on a day to day basis, with accurate weight checks every...
    24 replies | 1138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:37 AM
    So you mean if you lay down with baby in your bed when you want a nap, he will not fall asleep? What positions have you tried using when in the bed? (I mean during the day- if you prefer baby is in crib at night and that is working for you, that is fine.)
    10 replies | 291 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:31 AM
    Block feeding is certainly tricky when trying to deal with plugs. Block feeding requires that the breast be "blocked" -left for a time without milk removal in order to get full- so that the fullness tells that body to reduce milk production- and of course, leaving the breast to get full is something that leads to plugs and/or mastitis, especially in moms who are more 'prone" to developing plugs or mastitis. I would suggest that while 'draining' or emptying the breast may help with clearing plugs, it is probably not needed in preventing them. Personally I got rid of an enormous plug without ever really 'emptying' the breast, using very frequent milk removal by baby, -enough so it could get the breast softer but not empty- and vibration. By frequent I mean I encouraged baby to nurse as much as baby would when awake, which was often more than once an hour, and set my alarm so baby would nurse every 2-3 hours overnight. Some lactation consultants suggest that if a mom is block feeding, she can lessen the risk of plugs by hand expressing or pumping just enough to slightly soften the breast even when that breast is being blocked. Genna talks briefly about it here- http://cwgenna.com/blockfeeding.html There is also something called Full Drainage and Block Feeding- a technique for battling OP that is not responding to regular block feeding- basically you do everything you can to 'empty' the breasts ONE TIME (and then only as needed-but not more than once a day-...
    3 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*sef's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:56 AM
    I am frustrated for sure! We know he was losing weight because we were doing daily weight checks (no clothes, same time of day,etc.) on a scale our midwife let us borrow. However, the last few days, every time we put him on the scale we get three different readings! We tried changing the batteries but I think we need a new scale. Thank you for what you said about our situation being "rare." There is so much guilt when you are not able to EBF your baby despite every desire, intervention, and effort! And there is so much pressure to continue even if that means total and complete exhaustion ... When he was losing weight, I was pumping the same amount and he was nursing constantly but getting very few if any supplements of breast milk. I still can't seem to wrap my mind around why, if he is only receiving supplements of my own breast milk in addition to nursing, that he wouldn't be able to get away with no supplements. The book you suggested is in the mail! Right now I am nursing about 8-10 times a day. He gets one supplement before "bed" of about 2 ounces. Throughout the day he MIGHT also get a 1.5 supplement if he is showing signs of hunger after nursing (this usually happens in the afternoon). A few days I have pumped ONE less time. I've noticed my breasts feel fuller and he nurses longer. Every day I have more milk stored in the fridge than we will use that day (I am able to pump around 9 ounces lately). Thank you so much for your detailed response and suggestions!...
    24 replies | 1138 view(s)
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