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  • @llli*jovadee's Avatar
    Today, 07:51 AM
    My 1 month old seems to be struggling passing gas sometimes during the day. His poop and pee output is fine, about 6-8 poops (yellow and loose) and 8-12 pees a day. At times he gets fussy and crys and starts kicking his legs and squirming while pushing and turning red in the face. Rocking him usually calms him but, Any advice on how to help him pass it? Any changes I should make in my diet? Thanks!
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Today, 07:27 AM
    So today I think I have finally reached my limit with pumping :cry At this point I am not sure that the benefits of sending breast milk to daycare outweigh the negative impact this is having on me and my family. I am exhausted, exhausted from pumping, washing/cleaning pump parts, worrying about pumping enough milk, missing out on every coffee break and lunch break with my workmates. I have no patience anymore with my kids or DH. I should arrive home from work and spend time with my children, instead I am pumping to cover next days needs, panicking about scaling milk before it is too late, while my kids are begging me to interact with them. I wanted to make it to 12 months and then switch to cows milk but it is just not working. I wouldn't have made it this far without the invaluable advice I got on this forum so a big thank you for that.
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 PM
    Hi my daughter is 8 months old this week and still has not eaten solid food or pureed food. When she turned six months old I started to try pureed food with no luck since then I've been trying almost every day and all she does is spit it back out. I'm not too concerned about that since I know that it can be normal for babies to take longer to get used to new foods. I breastfeed her exclusively and I'm wondering am I enough since she seems to be fussier than normal. I'm nursing her every 2 hours and I pump one time overnight since she sleeps through the night . She doesn't have any teeth yet and I don't see any teeth coming in but my concern is her iron levels I heard that babies need iron after 6 months in age and they need it from food instead of mom. Am I understanding this correctly?
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:40 PM
    I usually held baby in different positions to help them get gas out in either direction. I played around with this as no two babies were exactly alike in what worked. Generally I would rub and pat them bringing my hand in the direction the gas should go, but this varied. Some people like more specific infant massage for this as well, there is the "I Love yoU" massage for example. http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/parenting/child-rearing-and-development/bringing-baby-home/infant-massage/get-set I also found that holding baby most of the time with babies head above tummy often helped a fussy baby and if that was NOT working, the "magic baby hold" helped. It is described here along with several other fussy baby tips: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf I also found simply laying baby 'draped" tummy down on my forearm helped. My husband held our fussy first born like this most of the time. Responding to crying quickly and nursing with high frequency and whenever baby cues or even anticipating cues may also help. No parent can prevent a baby crying of course, but lots of crying may increase gas due to baby swallowing air. Also, frequent meals means that meals are overall smaller and easier to digest. Gas is entirely normal and so is gas pain the vast majority of the time. Your baby's gut is developing and so his body is still figuring this all out. No need to worry that there is some kind of diet issues...
    1 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:18 PM
    Hi, I believe the current recommendation from the AAP (it may be slightly different among different organizations) is that babies are introduced to solids at around 6 months of age. You have done that. If baby has other plans and is growing and developing normally, in all likelihood nothing is amiss and you can continue to offer solids when and how often as you please and not worry. As far as I know, there is not any dietary requirement that is not met entirely by breastmilk at this age assuming you are starting with an overall healthy, nutritionally balanced baby. The most common concern MIGHT be iron, but this is more likely a problem if baby was predisposed to be low iron in the first place- for example, a baby who had their cord cut overly quickly after being born, as is the case with most caesarean and other emergency type births. Even then, there is no reason to assume there is any issue there. If you want, you can get an iron screen. My middle child - now 10 years old- born via caesarean- did not eat any solids at 8 months. He did not start eating much of anything until he was over a year old, and only began to eat with any regularity at around 14 months. At 9 months he tested borderline with iron and since he had no interest in foods we tried iron drops, but different doctors gave us different opinions about whether the iron level was a concern or not, and since he hated the drops we stopped those. His levels were normal at 11 months, even though he still was...
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 06:57 PM
    It's good information to be aware of, for sure! :)
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:42 PM
    Yes I agree I am not sure why a mammogram is being talked of in this particular case, that would be something I would personally want much more clarity on from doctor as you suggest. But many nursing moms are at an age or health history circumstance where routine mammograms are standard, or for whatever reason one is ordered, and lactating mom is told they have to wean baby in order to have one. So, just putting it out there that weaning is probably not needed, and would in fact delay any exam. Either mom can have a mammogram without weaning or a different kind of exam. I was talking generally, not about op.
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Today, 11:46 AM
    First of all, congratulations for giving your baby the best nutrition you can! You have come this far and that is a huge achievement. :hug I am sorry you are dealing with all these, it is hard to manage a baby, older kids, work and a home! I am not sure if your plan is to stop pumping altogether, or gradually pump wean, so that you don't deal with clogged ducts. Whatever you decide to do, please give yourself a pat on the back for coming this far! :)
    1 replies | 54 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 03:55 AM
    Yes. Possible, but not sure that its necessary. I, like you, am wondering what they are looking for. Localized area of infection or abscess can be seen on ultrasound, not so well on mammogram even without the patient lactating. Generalized breast pain can be very obscure as far as imaging goes. We scan a lot of patients with pain and I have yet to see a cause for it. Mind you, I am speaking specifically from an ultrasound standpoint. Obviously there are clinical explanations for pain. You may have something going on that doesnt present on imaging studies. My question would be, if you have a history of mastitis, would that not be an explanation for your pain? The only thing I can think of is if they are wondering if there is a mass blocking a duct, which I would think would be the least likely cause. Not to say that its not worth investigating, that's between you and your doctor. But given that you are breastfeeding and I think without a localized area, it may be difficult to find with either mammogram and/or ultrasound. Just throwing this out there, hormones are thought to cause breast pain in many women. I am not sure of the severity of your pain and if you have associated symptoms of infection such as redness, swelling, warmth, fever, elevated white blood cell count, etc. But occasional shooting pain MAY be associated with changes in hormones. Again, NOT a doctor.. just speaking from a little experience in an imaging clinical setting.
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 PM
    Thank you kmrs! I was wondering what else aside a mammogram could be done for breast imaging for a mom with a young baby who is making lots of milk. I mean, for one thing, ow. I have personally had 3 routine mammograms while lactating, but in every case my child was 24 months old or older so I was making much less milk than I would have been with a newborn. So it is possible to have a mammogram when nursing. I nursed child shortly before.
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
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