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  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:38 AM
    Hi all, I was wondering if I could draw from your collective wisdom about this issue. I am nursing a 2.5 y.o. and am in week 28 of my pregnancy (rainbow baby after a miscarriage at 9 weeks). The toddler nurses to sleep for naptime and bedtime. In the past few days, I experienced've BH contractions when I nurse. They feel intense and happen every 10 minutes or so. Last night I experienced 3 strong ones. I have read about this online and found different answers (a. that it doesn't matter, b. stop nursing, c. stop nursing only if I have four contractions in an hour).
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*robinc308's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:50 PM
    My firstborn has a life-threatening allergy to dairy. He wasn't formally diagnosed until he had an anaphylactic reaction to some butter on toast when he was 7 months old, but while breastfeeding him, I had suspected a problem very early on, and had cut milk out of my diet from when he was about 3 or 4 months old, until around 6 months, when he seemed to tolerate milk in my diet again. It kills me to think what I put my son through in those first few months: he was miserable and I *knew* something wasn't right, and yet everyone kept telling me that it was normal and some babies are just fussy. Well, I'm pregnant again, and due soon. I really want to breastfeed this new baby too, but I'm terrified that she will have allergies too. I know statistically her odds are higher, since she has a sibling with allergies, but I am at a loss as to what I can do to prepare. I hate the thought that I might cause her discomfort and pain because of something I eat. My son's allergist told me that early and frequent exposure is the best chance I can give her to avoid developing allergies, and suggested I give her one bottle of cows-milk based formula a day to give her the best chance of not developing an allergy, and either way, making sure that cows milk is part of my own diet, but I consumed a ton of diary with my son, and he's still allergic. Does anyone have any thoughts or experience on how I can approach feeding this new baby to both give us the best chance of successfully...
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*bettyb's Avatar
    Today, 02:23 AM
    It will have to be a c-section this time again. Last time it was at 38 weeks. Hopefully it wont be any earlier this time but we have to see how the pregnancy is progressing. I have a personal medical issue which would require a section anyway but also last time I had cholestatis of pregnancy so that determines how early I have to deliver. I didn't feel that out of it to be honest last time and once I was stitched up I was with my baby in the recovery room and could breastfeed straight away so that I was happy with. I am going to request the same again this time. Also I felt last time the baby should be dressed (in case they got cold - 1st time Mom :-)) but I know now that maybe I should just strip them down to their nappy and spend as much time skin to skin as possible? Would you be able to share a little of your birth plan because other than requesting to get my baby straight after the operation i am not sure what to ask. My consultant is very nice and accommodating so I can definitely run any requests I might have by him and see how I get on. Looking back I think it did take a couple of days for my milk to come in and I don't remember feeling the let down that everyone talks about. I will be more in tune this time for sure. Also last time my nipples were very sore and deeply cut the first 2 weeks, probably from poor latch from the tongue tie. From the start I could see my baby had a very shallow latch. It took a few weeks to heal, probably because I was...
    4 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:39 PM
    No, I never had Braxton Hicks at any point in any of my pregnancies. I am probably not much help there, I also never had a normal labor so I am not even sure what real contractions feel like. There is a lot going on hormonally in a pregnant mom, and the stimulation of nursing can cause many intense sensations in my experience, from great irritation to arousal. Tummy tightening and what you describe sounds familiar to me, but we are talking over a decade ago and I am not sure. I do not recall every feeling anything I thought of as a contraction. I would say kellymom is usually a very accurate source of information. When I nursed when pregnant, it was shortly after a miscarriage. As far as I know there is no reason a previous miscarriage would make nursing when pregnant unsafe, and nursing when pregnant does not cause miscarriages. What might be a concern...maybe, is previous preterm labor, or in a situation where preterm labor is suspected or threatened, and so mom is being warned off things that may cause a hormonal rush that could lead to preterm labor- namely, orgasm. Orgasm would cause a far larger hormonal rush than nursing.
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:24 PM
    Here is a chart that can help you count poops. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/02_diaper_log.pdf As long as baby is pooping typical amounts, you do not really have to worry about pees. As far as counting nursing, when I had to do this, I just took a piece of paper and put the date on top, and made three columns- first column for time (such as 3:30 PM) In the second column I wrote what side (Left or Right, of course sometimes baby nursed both sides) and how long baby nursed (such as L:15 minutes) and then the third column was for notes if needed ('Baby fell asleep nursing', or 'baby was fussy after nursing', or "baby did not want other side" or whatever. You can skip that third column if you want I just liked having it for notes. Of course you can also combine a poop and nursing frequency chart. This way you have a record- not just for yourself, but if it becomes necessary, to show the doctor if they are wondering how often baby is eating. There is no reason to keep charts like this if baby is gaining fine, and your baby may be. But it can help you just to have a handle on what is going on (without charting how could you possibly remember, it is all a blur) and also if anyone is questioning whether baby is getting enough to eat. This is a article I think can be helpful during these early weeks: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/
    3 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*hannah.seed's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:29 PM
    Hi, thanks so much for your response. I realize how many details my post was lacking, sorry about that. I decided to go get the baby re-weighed in a couple days using the same scale and then ill be able to ask the doctor some of the questions and get you some better details. I also realize from some of your questions that i dont even know how im counting times he eats, and how to count his poos and wees, so let me get a better idea of some of this and ill repost a new thread with a clearer scenario- thanks so much for your help...
    3 replies | 89 view(s)
  • @llli*honeybird's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:53 PM
    Hi, thanks so very much for the detailed reply. My pregnancy is normal and and my midwife has told me everything seems to be going fine. But I am wondering if my previous miscarriage might be a risk factor. I haven't talked to her much about nursing during pregnancy because unfortunately she is "old-school" and thinks toddlers should be weaned at a year old. A few minutes after she starts nursing, my bump tenses up and I feel a pulling in my pelvic region. This has only been the case in the last couple of days. I wlil definitely try drinking more water, and will also check out the book Adventures in Tandem Nursing. I read about the 4 contractions per hour on kellymon here (under the subheading "a primer on preterm labor"): http://kellymom.com/pregnancy/bf-preg/bfpregnancy_safety/#contractions I think that's the only place I read that. I've also read other moms say that they've experienced up to 8 contractions per nursing session with no issues and a full-term pregnancy.
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:44 PM
    Hi, I am sorry you are having this concern that has clearly rocked your confidence. If it were me, I would suggest research this more. Perhaps your allergist can suggest reading material for you because I wonder what the basis of her suggestion is. Perhaps you can discuss this with an IBCLC and ask them to point you to the current info and what exactly it says. Even if early introduction is recommended for dairy in such a case, and I am not sure it is, isn't a whole meal every day possibly overkill? and starting when, exactly? Introducing potential allergens earlier rather than later is fairly new thinking based on limited studies, and I am pretty sure it is not like you should introduce the allergen in the first few months even so...but I honestly have not read about this for a couple years and may not be up to date. The studies I am aware of about early exposure involve peanut butter and gluten and I am not sure how complete the agreement is yet that even these studies are a solid basis for changing the previous recommendations or how to change them. Biologically normally, a human baby would not have any reason to have dairy for a year or more, yet while dairy intolerances are pretty common at least among some populations, isn't a serious dairy allergy fairly rare? I am pretty sure if there was any evidence breastfed babies were more prone to serious dairy allergies than formula fed babies, we would know about that. Also of course many people- whole...
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:30 PM
    Hi. Generally speaking, nursing when pregnant with a normal (not at risk) pregnancy is safe. So I think the first thing to figure out is, are these feelings you are having actually benign or possibly a sign of early labor? In other words, is there any reason to think your pregnancy may be at risk? Have you called your doctor? I mean, how do you know this is Braxton Hicks and not actual contractions, or something else? I really do not know anything about BH. But in my experience with pregnancy, if some activity appeared to be the root of any contraction feeling or discomfort in that area, I would stop that activity. Not permanently, but certainly for the moment. Also I would drink water immediately. I wonder if what you are feeling may be related to becoming dehydrated when nursing?? Just a musing I really do not know, I just know that dehydration can bring on contractions and nursing can be dehydrating. Nothing I have read about or experienced- I nursed my then 2 year old when pregnant and he nursed frequently- would prepare me to give you an accurate answer as far as how many contractions in X amount of time would be "ok" And frankly I doubt anyone one else can either. If BH contractions when nursing has been studied in any way I would be very surprised. On the other hand, if this is info coming from a board certified lactation consultant or midwife or other health practitioner, perhaps there is more info out there I am not aware of. The most accurate...
    3 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:15 PM
    I had all 3 of my kids by C-section birth, so I could go on about that forever! But the first thing I have to ask is, is a VBAC even a possibility? While of course a mother can nurse her child after a C-section birth as I am proof of, there is no doubt C-sections tend to bring on a host of issues that are not typically present with a vaginal birth, especially a non-medicated vaginal birth. Also if scheduled C-section is needed, will it be scheduled for due date, before, after? Babies gain about a half pound per week in the last several weeks of gestation, so being born even a week or two before 40 weeks can make a huge difference in infant size and strength and again, while even premature babies can nurse, even nurse right away, even slight prematurity tends to bring on additional issues that it helps to be prepared for. Also can you tell me generally where you are? (what country?) How responsive to any special requests you might make regarding the birth do you think your hcps might be? one of the hardest things for me about C-sections was being out of control of my child's birth and loosing control of my birth plan. With my third child I designed a C-section based birth plan that helped me. In some ways that operation was the most traumatic and it helped tremendously to know that my husband and doctor were well aware of and capable of abiding by my wishes for the post birth experience of my baby, because for a while there I was too out of it to communicate...
    4 replies | 129 view(s)
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