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  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:02 PM
    Hi there, looking for help and advice! I am a FTM with a 9 day old. For the last few days I thought I was getting the hang of this, but today baby wants to feed constantly and has had very little sleep very cranky seems to be only happy when on the breast. I was afraid that I wasn't producing enough milk but she has had 3 dirty and 7 wet diapers. I have an app to time feedings 17 so far with 5 hours and 20 minutes and she is still going....is this normal?? Going a little insane here needing sleep!
    2 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*minasmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:53 AM
    Hello all, So I am 33 years old and the mother of 3 but this is my first time trying to breastfeed. My little one is 13 days old and I began nursing her as soon as she was born. She lost 4% of her body weight at her first checkup which was 4 days after birth and she had a touch of jaundice which cleared itself up a few days ago. I have read through the FAQ but still have questions which I am sure will sound silly to some of you more senior breastfeeders....lol My first week I was very engorged and she would nurse until full but still leave me fairly full feeling. I opted to not pump because I was told this might lead to more production than she needed. That overly full feeling went away and for the past few days, I have felt a normal (what I feel to be normal) amount of fullness in the breasts before she nurses. The feeling isn't painful but just full. Question - is this the normal cycle of how milk comes in and then levels out to supply the baby with what it needs? Question - Baby is feeding more often now and cluster feeding at times and is acting like she is wanting more food than I am able to provide - Is this considered in the norm for the cycle of milk production as well? I do not have an updated weight for her as her 2 week apt hasn't come up yet but she does look to be gaining weight and is fitting in her clothes better. Our latch is fairly good and I know to break the latch if there is pain and get a better one - I have larger breasts and nipples and...
    1 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*mommytoac's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:19 AM
    My son was born on May 30th and I need to have a medical procedure done on September 3rd, so he will be right at three months old. The procedure is Mohs surgery and it is to get rid of an area of skin cancer on the side of my nose that was discovered when I was pregnant. It could take anywhere from a couple of hours to all day. It just depends on how long it takes them to remove all of the cancerous tissue. Luckily, only a local anesthetic, Lidocaine, will need to be used. From what I have researched, Lidocaine seems to be pretty compatible with breastfeeding. My surgeon knows that I'm breastfeeding and recommends waiting five hours after the last dose of Lidocaine is administered before I breastfeed. However, he also said that he tends to err on the more cautious side. So here is my predicament...obviously I want to do what is safest for my son, but I would also like to limit any unnecessary stress as well. Do you guys feel that Lidocaine is safe enough where my husband and I could bring our son with us and I could nurse him myself in between procedures? Our other option is to have my mom watch him while we are gone. This would most likely be the first time he would be without me and I would also need to introduce a bottle prior to this because he has never had one before. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you!
    1 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*pui106's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:26 AM
    My supply seems to be diminishing. I pump 3x at work and used to be able to get 15 oz. I also pump 1 side in the middle of the night and first feed in the morning (~6AM) and I used to be able to get 4-5 oz from each pump. Yes, my son only drink around 10-12 oz a day so I have been freezing a lot. Recently, my pumping output has dropped a lot. It first started from the drop at work. I can only get 10 or less oz. Then since couple days ago, the other 2 session has dropped to 2.5-3 oz each only. I understand it's all about supply and demand. But I haven't changed any of my pumping schedule hence I don't understand why the changes. 3 days ago, I think I have developed mastitis on both side. Part of my breasts harden and hurt so bad and I also had flu like symptom and fever of around 102F. I rest at home for a day and the second day the fever was gone and the pain wasn't as intense hence I didn't see a doctor. However, I have notice further drop in my pumping output. This morning for example, I only got barely 2 oz from my first pump at work. It is taking forever for a letdown and even I have a letdown, only droplet comes out. This is really scaring me. Can my supply go back up again? My goal was to breastfeed my son till 1 year old and he's only 4 1/2 month now. What should I do now? He doesn't even nurse well at home.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:57 PM
    Hi there, looking for help and advice! I am a FTM with a 9 day old. For the last few days I thought I was getting the hang of this, but today baby wants to feed constantly and has had very little sleep very cranky seems to be only happy when on the breast. I was afraid that I wasn't producing enough milk but she has had 3 dirty and 7 wet diapers. I have an app to time feedings 17 so far with 5 hours and 20 minutes and she is still going....is this normal?? Going a little insane here needing sleep!
    0 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*pirateslouch's Avatar
    Today, 12:43 AM
    My daughter is almost eight weeks old and I've been experiencing extreme nipple pain since day one. My nipples were scabbed I think the first or second night. The scabs fell off weeks ago but now they're raw and cracked and just won't heal. I've seen two lactation consultants and spent $500 and they both said her latch looked good, and that she has a really strong suck, but she chews toward the end of the feeding so they said to take her off. Actually, I think it's more like she sucks during the let down and chews in between. When I do take her off before she's ready she goes INSANE! And it's so so hard to calm her. She wants to chew on me until she falls asleep. I've been bottle feeding during the day and breastfeeding at night but I fear her chewing is getting worse so today I tried to breastfeed all day and the pain just kept getting worse and worse until I ended up in tears. I feel like it will never get better. Should I try and bottle feed for several days and see if my nipples can heal up completely and then go back to breastfeeding? How do I stop her from chewing withOut constantly taking her off? This is so depressing. Will my nipples ever heal? And I've used every nipple cream I could find.
    0 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*thereseagustind's Avatar
    Today, 12:53 AM
    Hi mommies. Im new here. Sorry bear with me. My lo is only 2months old. Had my hair colored yesterday. Aparrently my stylist offered me brazilian blowout which to my excitement i said yes. Now i am having anxiety if it is safe while i am breastfeeding my lo? Or should i pump and dump and if yes, for how long? Thankyou
    0 replies | 7 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:41 PM
    Hi, Can you explain why are you wanting to take steps to bring nursing frequency down? It is fine if you do, I am just trying to understand if this is your preference or something you think you have to do? I mean is this due to wanting your child to wean entirely soon, or to stop pumping at work or..? Weaning can be a very gradual process and when it is, issues like engorgement are avoided. I get it she will get less at day care...I guess, although I never understood why moving rooms means a child gets less breastmilk, but anyway, why are you needing to base your nursing frequency around how much your child gets at day care? Maybe I am missing something. If you are finding that you are engorged at work due to your child's nursing more frequently on the weekends or at night, you have few possible choices. You can take the pump weaning more gradually (keep pumping at work for a while in other words. ) You can pump but for shorter time or pump less often, you can pump but discard the milk, hand express instead, etc., whatever makes it easier or more doable.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    Many thanks will set up a make shift bed - fingers crossed!
    2 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    Hi and welcome! I do not understand what those numbers are referring to- you mean she has nursed 17 times in 5 hours? Yes overall it is 100% normal for a breastfed baby to kind of "wake up" at one to two weeks of age and want to nurse essentially ALL THE TIME. Unless, based on output (poops) or weight gain baby is not getting enough, this is normal breastfeeding frequency. Even if baby were not gaining well, the issue would be the low gain and not the frequency of nursing. You might want to consider if bedsharing is appropriate for you. Here is some basic info, and you can get much more from the book Sweet Sleep : http://www.llli.org/sweetsleepbook/tearsheets if you are insane with needing sleep, you may be too tired to safely bedshare, or after reading up on the science, you may find that your particular situation is not one that is safe for bedsharing for some other reason. In that case, you can instead give baby to another responsible adult, go into another room, and sleep. You can have baby brought to you periodically to nurse. An alternative is to express some milk, and give baby to someone else with feeding instructions, and go into another room to sleep. Try to put together at least 4 but no more than 6 hours of continuous sleep. It is amazing how much more functional you can feel after even 4 hours of consecutive sleep. But you want to keep it short as a long stretch of no nursing will harm milk production and cause you to become engorged. If you...
    2 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:52 PM
    Ok, unfortunately this leaves you with a real problem I am not sure how to solve. The lactating body must have milk removed from the breasts every few hours night and day, or milk production will reduce. (or never get where it needs to get in the first place.) This may be from a pump or from baby, or even hand expression, but something has to be removing the milk every 2-3 hours. If milk is not removed, Aside from production reducing, (or never getting where it needs to get in the first place) mom may be come engorged, get plugs, get mastitis...the milk sitting in the breasts for long periods will make you ill, in other words. So, I wonder how this has been working, going 8-9 hours with no milk removal? How are you feeling? How are your breasts feeling? I can tell you for sure that from a safety pov, Sidelying nursing with baby next to you when on meds that are this strong is not safe unless another responsible adult is right there, watching and entirely awake every time you nursed for the whole time baby was beside you. This is entirely aside from whether the medication levels in your milk at this point when they are affecting you so strongly are safe, which I am not sure about... Pumping actually might be doable. There are cases of ill, comatose new mothers "being pumped" while they were unconscious. But of course this is extreme and I have no idea how you feel about this or whether you and your husband could get you into a position where this is possible. ...
    3 replies | 184 view(s)
  • @llli*stubborn.mama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:33 PM
    Haha this situation inspired my username for sure! Sucks hard. But we can do it. I keep telling my dh that if my ds ever changes his mind and turns around to start nursing again, I want to be there, ready.
    11 replies | 846 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:26 PM
    It is possible and in fact probable that baby actually lost a little more weight days 1-3 and was on her way back up in gain by the time she was weighed at 4 days. Just an FYI. At your next weight check, use the lowest known weight and the day it was taken as the number to measure gain from- not birth weight and day. Be aware that different scales might mean scale error, and baby should be weighed carefully on a digital infant scale wearing nothing or only dry disposable. Yes assuming baby is nursing with enough frequency and enough efficiency to gain normally. Efficiency usually improves over the first couple of weeks. it is normal for a baby to kind of wake up and nurse much more often, more voraciously, and seem more hungry starting one or two weeks after birthdate. But it is not normal for baby to actually need more than mom can provide. It happens, it is just not normal. As long as baby is pooping enough, that is usually a good indicator things are ok between weight checks. Weight gain and poop output is much more reliable an indicator of baby getting enough than anything else including behavior. Here is info on what to look for as far as poops go: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/02_diaper_log.pdf When is next weight check? Everything else sounds pretty normal to me but if you having latch pain you will need to address that. There are lots of things that can help, but the best thing usually is to get in person help if...
    1 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:33 AM
    This would be my personal choice. I am basing my opinion on this: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search2/f?./temp/~Z1pQlo:1
    1 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:26 AM
    First It is possible that nursing more often may lead to baby taking one side at a time more anyway. Some moms have such bad overproduction they need to block feed in order to quickly reduce production- this means, they "make" baby stay on one side for a length of time...but I do not get think block feeding is appropriate in your case at least not at the moment. I think it is fine to follow babies lead while nursing even if you are sort of not following baby's lead by waking baby a bit more often to nurse more often overall. So if baby stops nursing but is still alert I think it is fine to offer the other side, but if baby falls asleep nursing on the first side, then let baby do that? (usually?) Pay attention to how you feel too- if baby has nursed on the right and you are feeling really full on the left, go ahead and encourage baby nurse on the left if you like. Another variation is that If baby stops nursing on one side and pulls off, you can also offer the same side again...what is "right" will typically change nursing session to nursing session...you and your baby will probably get a feel and know what is best at the moment. Breastfeeding rhythm really is more or an improvised couples dance than a choreographed one. Here is something I learned early in my breastfeeding struggles with my oldest- Use all videos/ pictures/descriptions as touchstone suggestions to experiment from, not rules to follow minutely...you and your baby will fit 'best' together in a way...
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*mysticpizza's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 AM
    Duh. That makes total sense to me now that you mentioned it! Thanks! Although it makes me cringe at the thought of waking him up now that he's finally starting to sleep in longer stretches, I'm definitely going to try it to see if it makes a difference. As far as him feeding on both sides, I offer the other side to him to see if he's interested, and he almost always is. Should I try stopping after one side to see how long (or if) he stays content? Thanks for the video links. The woman in the large breasted video made me laugh... "I can't imagine having a 9-10 lb newborn and trying to hold it up." Mine was 8 lb 11 oz at birth :) I'm going to try out the position she was in though; maybe that'll help!
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:36 AM
    Based on you pump output and developing mastitis, I think you probably had some over production. What is weight gain like? You may still have a plug, and you may still have mastitis. Mastitis is notorious for mom feeling better and then relapsing. If you are at work right now, my best suggestion is to go home, stay there as many days as you can, get in bed with your baby, and rest and nurse as much as baby will. I am more worried about the mastitis reoccurring or plugs forming than your milk production, but this idea would help with both. if this is not possible, then up pumping frequency at the very least. But a mother with mastitis is sick and should not be at work. If symptoms recur, I would suggest considering anti-biotics. Yes with frequent milk removal. but you may never pump 4-5 ounces at a time again, this was on the high side to pump every session. Milk production tends to naturally and normally reduce at this age if not before if mom had overproduction in the early months. Your body wants to make enough milk, not all this extra. Also please have your pump(s) checked, change membranes, check tubing connections, find a place to test the suction, make sure flanges fit still etc., I would also ask why you are pumping over night and in the morning. If it is because you are feeling full at those time, I suggest that is an indication baby is not nursing often enough overnight. This can harm production and also lead to issues of engorgement/ mastitis.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 AM
    Ok, first off I suggest encourage baby to nurse more often. If your baby is audibly gulping and choking and your pump output is high, I think you have a little oversupply (probably a very good thing in this circumstance with the TT) and when that happens, the flow may cause baby to clamp a bit at the breast, or to pull back a tad so your nipple is no longer in the "comfort zone" in baby's mouth. The easiest and safest way to help baby with a fast flow is to nurse frequently. I know it seems counterintuitive to nurse more often when nursing hurts, but ultimately nursing more often should help. (Pumping -unless it is during a separation from baby- may increase your milk production beyond what you and your baby can comfortable handle so be aware of that when pumping.) Does baby always want to nurse both sides or is that your idea? There is nothing wrong with nursing both sides (unless a mom has bad enough over production it is causing problems) but it is not necessary assuming baby nurses often enough and is not interested in both every time. Basically, assuming good weight gain and frequent enough nursing, it is ok and may help to let baby nurse one side at a time if and when baby prefers. I think you want to at least consider and (hopefully) rule out thrush as a factor based on the nipple color: see: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-CP Ok so you are trying breast sandwich already, great. Here are many other ideas. If football is working best,...
    5 replies | 100 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 AM
    OK, I do not know what that is. Is it a cream designed for use on the nipples by nursing mothers? Because using the wrong type of cream (or a "right" one that is wrong for you- that you have a reaction to) can cause problems including severe irritation and bleeding. If not, I suggest you use something that is. Alternatives (for example, food quality pure coconut oil) sometimes help some moms, and if you have a specific skin condition that is not necessarily related to nursing maybe there is something else you need....but ordinary skin care products (moisturizers) are not typically appropriate for use on the nipples of a lactating mom. one idea that is usually safe is to allow your own expressed milk to dry on your nipples. If you have any sense that your cream is in part the issue, it might make sense to stop using it, & just only let your own milk help for a day and see if things feel any better NOT using it. 2 creams that are accepted as helpful when there is nipple pain/injury for many but not all moms are purified lanolin (there are a few different brands) and APNO, which is something a pharmacist must compound for you. ( see: http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_content&id=76:all-purpose-nipple-ointment-apno&Itemid=17 ) In addition, there are special nipple creams available in health food stores or well stocked baby stores that avoid using lanolin as some moms cannot use it (although most can.) Some moms are going to react to antibiotic creams...
    4 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 AM
    There are many things that you can do to increase your breast-milk supply but the best thing is to be sure that baby is sucking at the breast often. The reason for low breast milk could be that you were expressing milk in order to relieve engorgement. Expressing milk does not provide the same stimulation to the breast that a baby's sucking does. Your milk will increase and decrease in direct response to sucking stimulation from your baby. If a baby get sick they will intend to breastfeed more and mother who feed often during the first day of when the baby is sick will have more milk for her baby the next day. when a baby has fever they need more liquids during this time to keep them away from dehydrated. Drink purified water is the best thing. Always you need to drink purified glass of water right by when your breastfeeding or pumping. You must have plenty of liquids in you to create milk for your baby. Drink mother's milk tea which has the herbs in it like anise, fennel and coriander. It can help you to increase the breast-milk production. I had come across this information about how to increase breast milk. http://www.momjunction.com/articles/simple-ways-increase-breast-milk-supply_0076173/
    7 replies | 2466 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 AM
    The solids food will make her less hungry for breast-milk. Even if she is still nursing, she likely won't be taking in as much with a tummy full of solids. The breast-milk or formula milk is necessary for proper brain development during the first year.
    4 replies | 3931 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:17 AM
    Usually I use to give potato, carrot, sweet potato and spinach in to a crock pot. So I thought to make little different. I followed from few steps this site to make http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/baby-food-nutrition-9/making-baby-food. It was good, my LO loved it.
    10 replies | 2688 view(s)
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