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  • @llli*arlomomma's Avatar
    Today, 06:30 PM
    Hi! My 4 month old within the past few days has started screaming when I put him to the breast. It is extremely distressing! I feel like maybe he is teething? In the middle of the night and in the morning he will eat calmly and like normal, but for the rest of the day and evening he just cries and screams as soon as I put him into the position to breast feed, he does not even latch. I've tried different positions, traditional cradle, football, standing and walking, laying down, bathtub, sitting on my knee... I've gotten him latched in the tub and while standing and walking around but not for long enough to do a full feeding. I've tried expressing some milk so he knows it's there and we've already dealt with oversupply and spraying in the past and that's pretty much resolved. Tonight he had a bottle because I didn't know what else to do. Is this a nursing strike? Any suggestions? I plan to ask his Doctor tomorrow because he has his 4 month appointment but I wanted to see what advice I could find tonight! Thanks!
    0 replies | 23 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Today, 06:00 PM
    I also had bloody scabbed nipples with each baby. It took my infants 3 weeks to master the skill of latch suck breath and swallow. My nipples did not hurt while the baby was actively nursing, but they hurt during the initial latch on and afterwards they were so sore I could not put clothes on. In desperation i put a sliver/eyelash amount of A&D ointment on my scabby bleeding nipples and lo and behold it helped!
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:06 PM
    Yes it is safe to give your baby that milk. But you want to be very sure your pump is not causing further injury, or that defeats the entire reason for pumping. Look at flange size, suction setting, pump condition etc. I offer several suggestions for a similar situation with nipple pain and injury in this thread: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?125167-7-Days-and-having-so-much-pain-please-help! Additionally, if you are going to bottle feed for a few more days, you want to be careful to do it in a breastfeeding supportive way. Are you using bottles to feed baby or an alternative? Paced bottle feeding technique? Here is info on healing sore nipples: causes and fixes: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/sore-nipples-breasts/ healing tips: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipplehealing/
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*nmur0's Avatar
    Today, 04:53 PM
    I was told at the hospital that I was latching my baby on well but I knew something was wrong because I was in so much pain when my baby first latches on & I wasn't getting all of my aeriola in her mouth which I remember being told from my first child. Now my nipples are cracked, bleeding, & in constant pain, so I decided to pump instead. Unfortunately the first time I pumped today my nipple bled & I got blood into the milk. Is that safe? Is there anything I can use to heal my nipples faster? I've tried breast milk but it looks like that may take a few times to heal.
    2 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 04:47 PM
    :ita Moms can get driven crazy with the idea that the breast must be "emptied." And it is nonsense. I had some overproduction- I probably never had an "empty" breast for the first several months with my babies, even after marathon nursing sessions. The only time getting the breast more "empty" is important is if you have low milk production. Usually, as long as baby is gaining well and you are comfortable, nursing is going fine. Again, nursing more often is my best suggestion for avoiding engorgement, plugs and mastitis. As mommal explained, 3 hours is actually a rather long time for a baby to "go" between feedings as a regular thing. Once or twice a day you can often get a longer stretch, and if you are lucky it will be at night. But much of the time baby may wish to nurse with much more frequency and encouraging frequent nursing is the best way to avoid those issues. I am not sure you really have to switch around positions now. I am thinking that increasing nursing frequency is going to help. But if you do need to do this for now, as far as will you 'always' have to do this... breastfeeding circumstances are almost never "always." Things change, in other words. Babies grow rapidly and typically become more efficient at the breast, and at the same time milk production reduces (when needed) in order to meet baby's actual need. So while it is possible to get engorged and plugs etc. later on, this is more commonly an early weeks issue. On the other hand, as baby gets...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:27 PM
    :ita Can you post a weight history for the baby? It might help us see whether what is happening was a period of slow gain followed by normal gain, as one would expect when a baby is sick and then gets well, or has this baby really been gaining slowly on a consistent basis. KWIM? Can you see a different pediatrician? If you feel like your child's doctor has already decided that her weight gain is abnormal and supplements are required, it can really help to have someone with fresh eyes take a look at the baby. Did you ever figure out what was making the baby sick?
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:22 PM
    If you're like most moms, you have probably seen a lot of advice saying that babies "should" feed every 3 hours. That's actually the absolute minimum for a real baby. Real babies usually feed at least 10-12 times per day, and often feed significantly more often than that. Some of the feedings will likely occur in clusters, during which the baby may ask to feed every 30 minutes. And the baby may sometimes go longer than 3 hours- perhaps taking a very long nap at some point during the day. Watch his diapers. As long as his diaper output is normal, he is getting enough. Other good signs of baby getting enough weight are things like him outgrowing his outfits and needing a larger size of diapers. And of course weight gain- if you really feel nervous about that, stop in at the pediatrician's and have him weighed. The co-pay is almost always worth the reassurance. Just remember that proper weighing procedure should always be followed, so you want to see baby weighed in the nude, always on the same scale, and never on a bathroom scale. It may help to write to down the baby's weight at appointments, because it's common for data to get entered wrong. Don't worry about it! You have a 5 week old baby. That's still very early days and you can really expect a lot of challenges at this point. It's 100% common to have to vary your nursing position and to have to work very hard on positioning when you have such a young, small baby.
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:05 PM
    Very doubtful that you will always have to support the breast. 5 week-old babies can barely lift or control their own heads. Older babies, though- they have more head control, more strength, they are bigger... I am also a chesty mom and supporting the breast is something I had to do early on, but by a certain point I didn't have to bother. Not quite sure when that point was, but I am thinking it was around 3-4 months? Certainly less than 6 months! A few things to try: - Supportive nursing bra. It is generally advised that moms avoid underwire bras while nursing, because they can contribute to plugged ducts. But with my second kid, I found just the perfect underwire bra for me, and it propped my breast up just right so that I didn't have to use my hand. You might want to look around and see if you can find the perfect bra for you. - Use a rolled-up washcloth (or two, if you are extra gifted in the breast department) tucked under the breast to prop it up into the right position. - Try the biological nurturing/reclined position, or the side-lying position. Please don't worry that your nipples don't look like the nipples in the videos. News flash: no one has nipples like the ones in the videos. We're all shaped a little differently, and even the moms who you or I might look at and say "Whoa, she has perfect breastfeeding breasts/nipples!" can find themselves struggling, especially in the beginning when they are nursing a newborn. The shape of your...
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:51 PM
    There is an app called "Breathing Zone" that I really like for when I have trouble falling asleep. It walks you through a short session of deep breathing, which can really help shut down the anxious, monkey-mind part of your brain and help you relax. It's just a few bucks, so worth a try IMO!
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:49 PM
    It shouldn't be the norm, though! I usually don't advocate switching pediatricians- I feel that if you have a doc who is a good diagnostician, he/she is worth keeping- but if you feel like your doc won't give you good explanations when you ask, it might be time to look for someone else.
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*shloimom's Avatar
    Today, 02:45 PM
    I am very well endowed and when I nurse, I need to hold my breast the whole time or the weight of my breast will end up pulling my nipple out of the baby's mouth. AT the same time I also need to hold my breast tightly to keep it compressed as I also have flat nipples and large areola and so to get a proper latch I need to press down with my fingers in a "C" or "U" shape. Right now my baby is only 5 weeks old, but will I always have to do this? My hands are starting to hurt and it makes nursing slightly uncomfortable. Someone told me eventually my nipple will no longer be flat, but so far with breastfeeding exclusively for 5 weeks, the second the baby is off, my nipples go back to being flat. Anyone else like this? I always get so discouraged when I watch videos on how to latch and I see the womans nipple looks like the nipple from a bottle. Not mine! It is not long and protruded. It is short, thicker and rounded (and that is only when I see it when it comes out of the baby's mouth. Otherwise, it is flat.)
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*newmama2015's Avatar
    Today, 02:12 PM
    I never tried not to give any supplements in a given day. The max stretch was 10 hours of breastfeeding only. I would then do both breastfeed and supplement so I can sleep and rest for a bit to keep going for the next day.
    9 replies | 385 view(s)
  • @llli*shloimom's Avatar
    Today, 01:07 PM
    oh and how do u nurse football hold in public??
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*shloimom's Avatar
    Today, 01:05 PM
    Thanks for the quick response! He is gaining weight fine so really I shouldn't be worrying, but of course I still am and want to be sure he continues to gain weight. As I said, I had issues with my other children and that is probably what is making me nervous this time around also. I am finding that if he only nurses on the positions where I feel less milk comes, he is still hungry soon after the feed. Even now when I offer the side that does seem to have a lot of milk flowing, he is hungry sooner than 3 hours after the start of the feed. I just want to be sure he is getting enough and also want to understand why I cant just nurse in one position and drain the breast that way. Will I always have to keep switching around positions? And yes, if I don't it seems I can get plugs and possibly mastitis...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:28 AM
    Nursing position matters if it matters, and I think it is common for it to "matter" more in the early weeks. It matters for moms comfort, babies preference, baby's ability to latch normally, etc. Baby preferring or nursing 'better' in position A on one side and position B on the other is common. I guess what you are describing is that you feel that baby needs to nurse in both positions on both breasts in order for you to not get plugs. This makes sense, the breast is round, and so baby might need to nurse from different angles to milk the breast "better." Also, to avoid plugs, probably your best bet is to encourage very frequent nursing and making sure latch seems optimal, and avoid practices where regular or prolonged pressure is brought onto the breast (watch how you hold your diaper bag, bra fit, even wearing a seatbelt for prolonged periods, sleeping on your front etc.) More on plugs: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/mastitis/ I am curious why you need to listen for gulping, or are concerned baby might not be getting enough. Has weight gain been an issue? Milk production issues in the past, etc? Is nursing comfortable for you? If all is going normally there, my suggestion would be to relax and nurse baby how you and baby choose. Personally I found I could do football hold discreetly in public just fine with a few adjustments, but If one hold is not working in public for you, can it simply be avoided when in public? If you would like more NIP tips I think...
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    Did baby lose weight ever, or only dropped percentiles while baby was still gaining? Have all weight checks been on the same infant digital scale? Done carefully, with same type of units, baby in a dry diaper or naked, etc. Which growth charts are being used? A 4 month old being frequently fussy, nursing more at night than they did before, and sleeping in short stretches is all entirely normal. In other words, less sleep does not equal not enough food into baby. A baby pooping 2-3 times a day would indicate baby is getting enough to eat. Exactly how many times in 24 hours does baby typically nurse? Has this increased or decreased since you started bottles? A couple things to know is that 1) Weight gain is not the only indication of normal growth. Length growth is normal I take it. How are the other measurements- head circ, developmental milestones? Scales matter. Scale error is real and causes these problems. Babies do not gain steadily. They gain in fits and starts. In other words no gain for a week at 4 months is entirely normal. Weight gain rate normally slows starting at 3-4 months.
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*shloimom's Avatar
    Today, 09:59 AM
    I am currently nursing my 5 week old in both football hold and cross cradle hold. I am finding though that on one side I can tell the milk is flowing and he is gulping when nursing in the football hold and on the other side I hear the same, but only in the cross cradle position. If I nurse in the other hold, I do not see him swallowing as much and I just don't feel like the milk is coming through as much as in the other position. Is that normal? I don't remember experiencing this with my others (they were not as good nursers as him though and I nursed them for a very short time). The issue with this, is that nursing in football hold in public is super hard and I would like to eventually switch to just nursing in cross cradle position, but seeing that he isn't getting the milk in that position worries me. Also I do not think that nursing in just one of those positions is fully draining the breast. I feel like I need both positions in order to feel that my breast is drained. I know this because I was nursing my son in football hold more on my left breast and a few days later was in a lot of pain. I then realized I hardly nursed in cross cradle hold on that breast and once I started to, I felt less full and the pain went away. So on my left breast my milk flows better when nursing cross cradle and on my right it's when in the football position. Any advice? Normal? What do I do..?
    5 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob4751's Avatar
    Today, 09:21 AM
    Thanks everyone! I am very grateful for this resource. My pedi was robotic and short on explanation about all of this when I called, which made me wonder. I have had this happen several times with mentioning bedsharing etc... It seems she is most concerned with liability...not what I expected from a pedi at all, but I am starting to understand that this is a norm.
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:19 AM
    Thank you both for the suggestions! I do have significant trouble falling asleep, so naps are hard - I've probably been able to take 2-3 the past month. Both of these things don't help my exhaustion levels any! Thank you, in particular, mommal, for the tips - we will certainly be trying them. My husband usually walks and sings to baby girl before she nurses, so we're going to try doing it the other way around for nighttime sleep and put her down drowsy. That nursing-sleep association is STRONG.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*lulua89's Avatar
    Today, 07:13 AM
    First of all, thanks to everyone contributing to this website. Where I live, it's almost impossible to find a decent lactation consultant and LLL has been a life saver. Now to my problem. My daughter was born weighing 3.5 kg on the 50th centile. She's exclusively breastfed and was gaining well for 2.5 months, always on the 50th centile. At the age of 2.5 months she suffered from diarrhea and since then has been having problems gaining weight. At 3 months she weighed only 5.4 kg. After 1 month she gained only 100 grams and she's on the 9th centile now. She's latching well and swallowing. She poops 2-3 times a day and wets her diaper 6-7 times. When she's awake, she laughs and plays, but gets frequently fussy and only naps very occasionaly for 30 minutes or so. At night, she wakes up every 2-3 hours to feed (before, she used to sleep for 4-5 hours straight)
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:32 AM
    I nursed my kids until they were 3 years old, but the only way I did so without resentment was because I weaned them down to 1-2 nightly nursing sessions at around 12 months, and none by age 2. I think Estervegan gave a great suggestion about naps, but if that isn't possible for you or just isn't enough, here are the things that helped me night-wean my kids: - Communication. It helps even if your LO isn't very verbal yet. Let your LO know ahead of time that the milk bar will be closed for the night. "You are going to sleep. Mommy is going to sleep. is going to sleep. Everyone is going to sleep all night long. You can nurse in the morning, when the sun is up." In the morning, following a successful night, reinforce the lesson: "You did such a good job! Everyone slept all night long. Now that the sun is up, let's nurse!" - Try to get baby to go to sleep without being on the breast- that is, try something like nursing her and then putting her in bed awake and getting her to sleep by telling her a story, or nursing her and then lying down next to her. Inter posing that gap between nursing and sleep can help break the sleep association, and get her to form a new sleep habit. - Keep a sippy cup or bottle of water available. Night waking toddlers are sometimes really thirsty. - Sleep with a pajama top on. Sleeping nude or in easy-access pajamas means the battle is half-lost before it even begins- the easier it is for your LO to get her hands on your breasts,...
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:06 AM
    I had one kid who would routinely go a week between poops and one who pooped 3-5 times a day until close to a year. Both 100% normal. I'm a little surprised that the doc told you to go to the ER if you see another bloody poop. My guess is that he/she didn't want to explain the difference between bloody poops that are of little concern and ones that are a medical emergency. If you see small streaks or specks of blood in the baby's poop, that is no big deal. They are probably a result of either a small tear, or some sort of intestinal irritation (which is quite common when mom has or has had oversupply, but can also come from illness or allergy/intolerance to something environmental or in mom's diet). If you see blobs of what looks like red jelly- a.k.a. currant jelly stool- that is suggestive of a medical emergency and you go to the ER without stopping, because that is a symptom of a very serious condition called an intussusception. Most bloody poops are nothing to worry about!
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:18 PM
    Sounds to me that your baby is doing fine. The frequent bowel mov'ts are not problematic and if you are seeing little strains of red in the feces it does not warrant a trip to the emergency room .
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*esthervegan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:10 PM
    I loved reading your post ! I totally relate to the don't offer/don't refuse method of mothering a nursing toddler and I chuckled in recognition of my self in your situation. I too had a nursing child who was going strong and breastfeeding 8-10 a day at that age. And I too had to sit up and use the cradle hold for every feed. When I was at my wits end a LLL Leader shared her coping method at a meeting. She napped during the day and that made all the difference when her little one woke for night time nursing. I did that too and it saved my sanity.
    4 replies | 83 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:48 PM
    Baby has been gaining rapidly, right? Average or above? Above average would indicate op. That is probably the most reliable indicator. It does not mean op is a problem, because op can be there without it being a problem. Since normal, average pump output when pumping is replacing a feeding is 1-3 ounces, regularly pumping 1.5 ounces shortly after a baby has nursed is an indication of high or high-normal milk production. I would not worry about baby's nursing frequency or nursing for comfort 'upping' production. Nursing frequently is not going to do this, because the frequency of nursing does not substantially change what a baby intakes overall. (Unless mom has low production- in that case, more frequent nursing helps increase production to normal.) Likewise, offering both sides is not likely to be any problem at this age. It is usually best to leave this up to baby- if baby wants both sides, fine, if not, fine also. But overall, a baby needs what they need, daily. In other words, a baby who is nursing frequently needs smaller amounts each time. Also, nursing frequently is actually an excellent way to alleviate or reduce the possible ill effects of overproduction for both mom and baby. So I would suggest just keep following baby's lead on this. Pumping after nursing sessions, or between sessions, or anytime mom is not actually separated from baby or for some other reason is missing a feeding WILL act to increase milk production. Is it a problem? That depends on...
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynasmom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:12 PM
    I've got an overactive let down too and Lo is 3 months. I did block feeding and basically stop feeding when lo decides let down is too much (so I keep a blanket or bib handy to catch all the excess milk). I also only feed on one side during each feed unless lo decides she wants more. I did notice that she can handle my let down when she is extremely hungry (when I've been at work all day). I'll also say we've just got into the routine that when she starts coughing on the milk I take her off for a bit and when she releases during let down I just cover it up til it passes. She still gets angry but understands it's part of eating now. Also, I have noticed that it's easier to feed now that I know this, not sure if my let down has become less overactive since these techniques.
    2 replies | 1252 view(s)
  • @llli*ubaz's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 PM
    Thank you so much @llli*maddieb! Your lovely reply really puts my mind at ease. I'll keep doing what I'm doing, stop focusing so much on the bloody weight of his diapers and wait for him to get over how interesting the world is :P Thanks again, i really appreciate it.
    2 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:04 PM
    Mommal has given you excellent feedback. My suggestion is, do not forget that you and your baby are biological partners. During the process of a baby weaning, (to solids or anything else) your body will also require "weaning." So you may find that even if you are sure you want to stop pumping at work now that your baby is turning one, you may find that for your own health and comfort this needs to be done gradually. There is no right or wrong choice as far as whether to keep pumping at work, how quickly a baby might incorporate solids into their diet, or in how long to nurse your baby. There are as many pathways in this as there are nursing pairs. Also, there is no reason to make this choice at one year or any other particular age. If what you are doing now is working for you, you can keep going as long as you like, whether that be for another week or another year. If it is not working for you, you could transition to something else at any point.
    2 replies | 235 view(s)
  • @llli*scoob4751's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:47 PM
    No rash or anything! He has never had a rash. I am not sure about my production, honestly. That mystery is a bit frustrating. I know I spray a little when he pops off the boob at the beginning of a feed, but that's it. I pump roughly 1.5 oz after a feed, so it seems not much? (I work on Fridays only, so I pump once in a while to stock up). He has always done a lot of comfort sucking as he rejects a paci, and sometimes is on my boob every hour, so this might be amping up my supply...I mostly always nurse one breast only per feed, as he seems satisfied. I used to stay on that same breast for 2 hours generally to curb overproduction if he wanted to suck, but lately he seems hungrier and I am never am engorged so I might offer both breasts within 2 hours...maybe that is amping the production... He was born 8 pounds and is already 17 pounds. Anything I should do?
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
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