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  • @llli*jenniferhan09's Avatar
    Today, 09:24 PM
    I have the Spectra S1 at home and generally pump 5oz during the morning session and ~3.5-4oz each session the rest of the day. I have the Symphony at work but can only get 3oz max. I have the let down and express modes at the highest levels that are comfortable to me. I started with the 24mm flanges because that's what I use on my Spectra, but based on the medela sizing recommendations I tried the 21mm flanges without any improvement. Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?
    0 replies | 6 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:56 PM
    Have you been able to find an answer to your question?
    1 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:53 PM
    How upsetting. I am so sorry!
    1 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 PM
    Lots of saliva is entirely normal if it is a reaction to teething, and while 3 months is a little early in general, babies can teeth anytime so it is entirely possible teething is the root of the saliva. But I would also say that my son (who teethed very early) drooled an incredible amount from about month 3-8, and it never caused latch issues. So I would again wonder if the root issue is still a poor latch. According to a quick search online, a side effect of Losec is nausea. Nausea certainly can cause excess saliva, so I wonder if it might be related. Also what form does the Losec come in? My oldest son as a baby was put on Zantac liquid for a while and it tasted so horrible (yes I tried it, it was absolutely disgusting even in the flavoring) he could not get it down and if he did, it made him gag. He was switched to Prevacid solutabs, dissolved in water. Those taste great and he sucked it in happily, but I have never been convinced it did much. I was later shocked to learn that his dosage (he was 4 months old) was the same as that given to me as an adult for firmly diagnosed GERD (I had an endoscopy) - and that dose caused ME intestinal discomfort and had to be reduced. In the intervening years I have become very skeptical of medication for reflux in infants. Not saying it is never needed, I just think GER in infants is over-diagnosed, meds are over-prescribed, meds tested only on adults are used for infants, and consequently quite possibly prescribed in a too...
    5 replies | 363 view(s)
  • @llli*lolaminis's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 PM
    Thank you for your response. Definitely need to try new nursing positions. The pain persists. Home pregnancy tests have come back negative btw. I'm having other uncomfortable symptoms too and wondering if they aren't all because of the mini pill. I've read lots of reviews and complaints that are pretty consistent with what I'm experiencing. Thanks again for replying!
    2 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*mjs.mami's Avatar
    Today, 06:31 PM
    I just want to share my story... To Whom It May Concern: I am an Active Duty service member and mother to an eight-month-old baby boy. I am proud to say that I have been able to provide breastmilk for my son his entire life. That was until January 21, 2017 when a package that contained close to 300 ounces of breastmilk was lost within the UPS network. I am away from my child due to military obligations, however; I made the decision to continue the breastfeeding relationship even though I cannot physically be present. I researched day in and day out the best way to ship breastmilk to ensure its safe arrival. I purchased the required supplies, I read the UPS regulations on the use of dry ice, I pumped four times a day to maintain my supply, I labeled and froze the breastmilk flat in five ounce bags. I arrived at the UPS location on January 20, 2017 ready to send the breastmilk that I produced to my husband. I paid $181.81 to have the package sent UPS Next Day Air with guaranteed arrival of January 21, 2017.
    1 replies | 19 view(s)
  • @llli*trifides's Avatar
    Today, 12:28 PM
    Sorry for the delay replying- we have a very unwell dog for the last 2 weeks so between him and the baby I'm not getting time to go to the pc. Thanks for your answer maddieb, I will go and chat to IBCLC again. I forgot to add that in the last 2-3 weeks she is producing much more saliva; because of this she has a very wet slimy mouth and when she feeds, the saliva transfers onto my breast and she keeps slipping her latch leading to her chomping down hard on my nipple. This is becoming more of a problem causing pain now rather than the tongue tie and I have some bruising where shes chomped. Is it normal for them to produce a lot of saliva around now? She is also on Losec for reflux and I'm wondering if its causing it? One final question- she is feeding every 2-2.5 hours daytime. Is this a lot or a normal stretch. Shes feeding for 45 mins so there's only 1.5 hours max between the end of one feed and the start of the next. Thanks!
    5 replies | 363 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:03 PM
    Even if there is another cause to the pain, that would not rule out being pregnant. In my experience pain at this age is often caused by a poor latch, and that is usually linked to baby nursing in a position that curls their body slightly, leading to baby tucking their chin and not being able to tilt their head back slightly to get that good, deep latch. Or just developing a "lazy latch" that is too shallow as they are so practiced at getting milk out they find they do not need to have a great latch anymore. So if you are not already doing so, I would suggest trying different nursing positions that might work better for a longer, bigger child, and/or encouraging baby to latch well from the start and to not sort of slide down the nipple as the session goes on.
    2 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:28 PM
    Where does the pain seem to be coming from? Nipple or some other part of your breast? Is it constant and unchanging or is it only some of the time or fluctuating in intensity? Have you checked visually all over, and used a mirror? Sometimes little blebs or friction blisters or teeth rubbing sores are hard to see.
    1 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:17 PM
    OK glad your nipples are healing. Your plan sounds reasonable. Again this is something that is indeed very common but is not really "normal." Being engorged- full to the point of breast hardness and discomfort- can cause several issues, including making it harder for baby to get a good, comfortable latch- So I do think your being engorged may have been at least in part to blame? The many risks of engorgement are another reason frequent milk removal is so important. On a side note, because mom will often pump until the milk stops flowing on both sides each time she pumps, and a baby often will not nurse until all the milk is out each time they nurse, and may even nurse one side and not the other at some or all sessions, is that prolonged periods of pumping instead of nursing can lead to something called overproduction, which sounds like exactly what it is- mom makes more milk than needed. This may or may be a problem, and is certainly preferable to low production, but serious OP can again lead to mom getting engorged and all the issues that creates. As long as you can get baby nursing instead of pumping soon, this is not anything to worry about, usually any op will fix itself given a little time. But should you find you are needing to pump instead of nursing many more days, I am just mentioning it as just something to be aware of.
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*econ1702's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:51 AM
    Hello- I have a five month old who has been exclusively breastfed. Two days ago I stared having severe pain on my left side only when he feeds. I breastfed my previous child for over a year with no issues so I would consider myself experienced in breastfeeding. I am pretty sure baby's latch is good, I have no visible nipple damage or thrush, no fever. I can pump on my left side and it hurts a little, but is bearable. But when I directly feed my baby on the left side the pain is terrible. Right side is totally fine. I just don't know what could be causing this? Advice???
    1 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*littlemissellie0705's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:03 AM
    Thanks for your reply. I have a Medela Pump in Style Advance. Today I have been pumping every 3 hours. I am back at pumping about 80ml each time. During one pumping session this evening my baby started to cry and I was able to pump more. This last pumping session I had giving my baby a bath and she cried and I could feel my breast getting full even though I had just pumped. My nipples are feeling 100% better than they did yesterday and tomorrow I am going to try to breastfeed again but this time with and without the shield to see if it makes a difference. If all doesn't goes well I will look into meeting with a lactation consultant. *fingers cross* It goes well tomorrow! Also I might add these past few days my breast have been engorged which I have read is common in early postpartum. Today was the first day that my breast did not feel engorged so I'm not sure if that would have been playing part into my breastfeeding problem.
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 11:00 PM
    Hi sorry did not see your reply before... Yes laid back- but laid back can be adjusted many ways, it is not just one position, but that is the general idea. The other position that seems to help with fast letdown would be side lying. I think Jack Newman has some info on breast abscess somewhere, if you are still looking for help with that. Oh here it is: https://www.facebook.com/DrJackNewman/posts/168086633342391 I forget if you have seen an IBCLC? It may help to have someone work with you on latch and positioning.
    7 replies | 299 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 06:04 PM
    Ok what you are pumping per session is entirely normal, even a little high for this early post partum. Intake of 1-2 ounces per nursing session is normal for a one week old baby. But remember that they eat very often! That is why it is so important to pump often if baby is not nursing. I doubt your supply is dropping. How much you can pump each time is not an accurate measure of your actual milk production. But this is a very important time for milk production and your body expects milk to be removed at least 8-12 times in 24 hours and if that is not happening, you may indeed have a problem with production going forward. A baby will usually want to nurse at least that much (although some are sleepy at this age and need to be encouraged to nurse often enough.) If a mom is pumping, she has to do her best to replicate what baby would do as far as frequency of pumping. Of course it is also important that the pump is working right, which is why I asked above questions about your pump.
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 05:53 PM
    I did have a similar experience with my first baby. I later learned sore nipples are the most common breast feeding issue and that pain while nursing is not normal. My best advice is to see a board certified lactation consultant ASAP. If you are at the point where you are in so much pain pumping seems preferable to nursing there is a serious problem and in person help is your best chance of solving it quickly. No reason to not try nipple shields as a temporary measure to see if they help baby get a better latch. But read about the issues so you know what to do to prevent them. Kellymom.com has a good article. If baby is not nursing at all it is imperative that you pump 8-10 times in 24 hours. What kind of pump do you have and is pumping comfortable? If at all possible I would strongly suggest keep nursing baby at least a couple times a day while you try to figure out what is wrong. Both you and baby will learn how to breastfeed by breast feeding. Injured nipples can get better while exclusively nursing, but some moms do find pumping instead helpful. This site and kellymom also have good articles on healing sore nipples.
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*littlemissellie0705's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 03:04 PM
    Hi all! I am a FTM and I'm 9 days postpartum. On day 7 my nipples were so sore/painful I turned to pumping before each feeding time in order to feed my baby and give my nipples a break. I bought a nipple shield yesterday and haven't used it yet in fear that it will just be as painful. I really rather just strictly breastfeed my baby but I'm not sure if this pain is normal. I tried different positions and tried putting more of my breast in her mouth but that made no difference. It does look as if her little chin is recessed so I think that may be part of my problem. Has anyone experienced this and has a nipple shield helped? Also I have been pumping every 3 hours as I said above and yesterday every time I pumped I was getting 75-85ml per pumping and today it has significantly drop to 50-60. This has me worried... Is it normal for my supply to drop like that being 9 days postpartum or am I doing something wrong? Any advice would help! TIA
    4 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 02:26 PM
    Haven't considered a sun lamp. I wonder if that would work. I am not all that concerned about me, but more about baby. She has been really gassy, and I suspect that it's partly due to thrush. And it does seem to bother her mouth even though they say it usually doesn't. She often makes a funny face and pauses when she first latches, like it is sore or itchy.
    17 replies | 520 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 01:48 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread Insomnia? in Weaning
    I have experience with onset of insomnia since becoming a mother. In my case I am old enough that perimenopausal hormone changes may be part of the problem, but I have no proof that is the issue. My personal belief is that becoming a mom changes how we sleep and for some moms this may lead to insomnia, but this is entirely my personal, untested or proven theory. Oh and I have had similar insomnia issues whether I was nursing a child or not. My insomnia also followed the pattern that I could fall asleep fine and then after 1-4 hours waking and not being able to go back to sleep. I hated laying awake, and if I read or got up to do something it just made it all worse. I was on antianxiety meds and sleep meds for a bit, and I certainly slept through but I did not feel more rested. I did think they helped as a one of two night thing to break a cycle of insomnia at times, if that makes sense. But overall I did not like how they made me feel. Honestly what has worked best for me to go to bed later. Where I used to fall asleep at 10 or 11, I now head to bed at 12 or 12:30 and read for about a half hour or until I fall asleep. When I started doing that, I do not wake up nearly as much overnight. My overall sleep is not that much more, but I get a longer sleep stretch and very rarely am I waking in the middle of the night for no reason and not being able to get back to sleep. I usually have to get up to pee, and my husband snores and that wakes me at times, but usually I am...
    1 replies | 159 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 01:34 PM
    What about a sun lamp? I do not know anything about them, just thinking outside the box. Breastfeeding experts including doctors who are well aware of any studies have continued to recommend gentian violet for many years. No rational medical professional would think risking cancer in an infant to cure thrush makes sense, so I think if experts say it is ok, it must be ok, but that is just my opinion. As far as being resistant, Newman notes gv does not seem to work as well as it used to and suggests combine it with other treatments, but he still recommends it as a generally effective treatment. He has a sheet that goes into detail about how to use GV if anyone is interested. http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-UGV
    17 replies | 520 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 01:10 PM
    Oh and I read today that there is some evidence the yeast is becoming resistant to Gentian Violet as it did with Nystatin.
    17 replies | 520 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    January 20th, 2017, 01:09 PM
    Unfortunately I don't live near a dermatologist or any tanning beds. I have read that sun and yeast are enemies. I also did the coconut oil and disposable nursing pads. Wish I would've kept up with it after it was gone last time as a preventative. The thrush won't automatically go away if you stop breast-feeding, but if you get rid of it, it will be less likely to reoccur. You won't pass it back-and-forth as easily and you eliminate that moist warm environment that yeast loves, at least on your nipples. We are at only 10 weeks old here so we have a long time to go. The study I was referring to was of mice, but there have been very few long-term studies in humans to prove the Gentian Violet is safe. We finished up our three days of treatment last night but this time baby still has tons of yeast on the back of her tongue. I am hoping it's dead and just hasn't fallen off yet.
    17 replies | 520 view(s)
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