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  • @llli*briley.lutes's Avatar
    Today, 09:44 PM
    Thank you! Her ped says the congestion is caused by the reflux and that the only thing I can do to help her reflux is keep doing the elimination diet. She's gaining weight fine so he didn't seem to think the difficulty I'm having nursing her was really an issue. It getss more and more difficult every day.
    2 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*searsmami's Avatar
    Today, 08:45 PM
    Thanks maddieb - my baby is almost 6 mos old now. It's a joy to nurse the infant, but I dread having to nurse the toddler. As mentioned, I never had an issue with "extended breastfeeding" and I figured I could tandem nurse. I used to love hearing my toddler's little pitter patter into my room in the morning, but sadly now I dread when he comes to the door because I know he's only coming in to nurse, and it often wakes the baby who is in my room. I offer cuddles, which we both appreciate, and sometimes he falls back asleep which is sweet. But in regard to tandem nursing, a few weeks into it (and nursing them separately/at different times) I had an irrepressible feeling that this wasn't for me. Unfortunately my entire body feels a sense of revulsion and I just want to scream...so I do "countdowns" and offer toddler snacks & distractions. We've been able to cut back on the bedtime nursing, and nursing in public, but ideally I think I would just like toddler weaned completely....Maybe that can't happen until the baby is no longer nursing either?
    20 replies | 7829 view(s)
  • @llli*shanghai's Avatar
    Today, 12:14 PM
    @mommal thanks for your continued advice and support and just reading my posts! It's very encouraging through this time. I let my LO comfort nurse as much and as often as she likes and it's how she falls asleep. I hope that is enough. I just don't want to fool myself into thinking that she's getting adequate nutrition from my breasts and continue to let her not gain weight. I really hope that some day it will click for her. By the way she is a tiny baby. She was 6 lb 15 oz and 20 inches at birth and lowest weight was 6 lb and 1 month later she is 7 lb 14 oz and 21 inches. I am now pumping 10 times a day for about 12 mins and am getting about 1-2 ounces from both breasts each time. I have about a 4 hour break at night and after that break is when I can pump 2 oz. I also find that I get the most milk in probably the first 6-8 mins and I can't seem to get a second let down. Is there anything else I can do differently?
    20 replies | 1043 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:19 AM
    :ita with the excellent post above!
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:14 AM
    :( Mama, I am so sorry that you are in such a rough place that you can't even watch your baby get a bottle. i know that it is very hard the first few times- I remember when I needed to give my oldest a bottle of formula, and I felt AWFUL. It felt like I had failed as a mom and a woman, all within 2 weeks of having a baby. It does get easier, I promise. Try to see the bottle as a tool that is helping you meet your breastfeeding goals and your goals as a mom. If you are going to exclusively pump, the ideal set-up is to have a hospital-grade pump. The PISA is a good pump but it is prmarily designed for the working mom who is relying on it only part of the time. If it's all you can get, that is okay! I would simply suggest looking into getting a hospital-grade machine, especially right now while you are trying to build supply. The best way to increase supply with a pump is to pump frequently and to empty the breast as much as possible when you do. Supply is created by demand, so every time you remove milk from the breast, your body gets a message to make more. This seems counterintuitive to a lot of moms- they think "Well, if I let the milk build up, there will be more to pump out". But letting the milk sit in the breast will cue the body to reduce production. So you are aiming to pump as many times as realistically possible in a 24-hour period. 8-10 or more pump sessions per day, with some taking place overnight, would be excellent. That is what I did when...
    20 replies | 1043 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:51 AM
    If you would like to nurse and baby isn't into it, there are ways to gently, subtly convince her that it might be a good idea. Like taking her into a dark, quiet bedroom where everything is very boring. Nothing to do but nurse, in that situation, right? Or sitting down in your favorite nursing chair- sometimes that can subtly cue the baby to start thinking about nursing and pretty soon she is crawling over to you...
    3 replies | 173 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:47 AM
    :ita This sounds like something that requires help from someone with specialized knowledge. If an IBCLC or LC is not available, talk to your doctor or midwife.
    4 replies | 153 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:37 AM
    Yes, your pediatrician is obviously wrong! At this point, I would be looking for a different pediatrician but I don't know that I would switch doctors if you can't find someone who is obviously better. What I look for in a pediatrician is that he/she be a good diagnostician, and know how treat disease. If my kids' doctor can do that, then I know I can just ignore their advice on things like sleep and breastfeeding. Then next time you go in, think about what YOU want to talk about, and what is of concern to YOU. Three are answers you can give that will short-circuit the conversation about breastfeeding and co-sleeping before it even has a chance to start. Of the doctor asks if the baby is breastfeeding, the answer can be "He nurses during the day." You didn't lie- you just conveniently forgot to mention that he also nurses at night. If the doctor asks where the baby sleeps, you can answer "He has a crib." You don't need to mention that he never uses it. ;)
    2 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:28 AM
    If you just got your period back, I think it makes sense to be very patient with your body. IIRC, the average chance of conceiving is about 30% per cycle. And if your cycle just started up again, you can kind of expect things to be a bit wonky for a few months, which probably puts the chances even lower for a while.
    5 replies | 337 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:44 PM
    Hi Sprocket. It is amazing how much progress you and baby are making! I think that whenever an IBCLC gives a mom a plan and the plan is tried, some tweaking of that plan is typically needed. After all we are talking about biological processes and human beings, not machines. It sounds like the pumping suggested is "just in case" pumping. It is not "You must pump 5 times a day or your production will tank" Or "You must pump 5 times a day because you do not make enough milk yet" but rather "If you pump 5 times a day, even if baby is not nursing super efficiently yet, we can be extra super sure that your milk production will be just fine. So do that, just in case." But the reality is that this specific plan (pumping 5 times every day but during the day only) is 1) Exhausting 2) worrying you and 3) making it harder for baby to nurse after you have pumped. Given any of those things, some tweaking of the plan would be in order. Ideally I would suggest calling your IBCLC and discussing the need for adjustments to this plan with her. She has seen you and your baby and is very familiar with the entire situation.
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:17 PM
    Hi pthgrl. I have three kids, all of whom nursed well into their preschool years. I have weaned 2 kids and am currently nursing a child who will turn 4 this summer. I attempted nightweaning my oldest child at 17-18 months of age but gave it up after a few months of worse sleep for everyone. He was a very, very frequent waker. I have experience nightweaning that same child at an older age and also transitioning two kids from the family bed to their own beds and rooms. I also used to run a nursing toddler support group where nightweaning and sleep issues was a common topic. So that is my experience in this area. Obviously every child is very different and it is not really possible to predict reactions to night weaning. In my experience, nightweaning can be done at any age, but it is not likely to be easier to night wean at 18 months than it is now. Kids usually start putting together much longer stretches of sleep and also may become more comfortable sleeping alone at an older age- think between age 3 and 4. If there is a time that night weaning becomes generally noticeably easier, my guess is that would be a more realistic age. This does not mean your child might not be easier to night wean before that, I am speaking very generally. I also have seen nightweaning or other partial weaning attempts turn into complete weaning or nursing strikes. While I would not say this is common, it does happen sometimes. Developmentally, the second year of life is one with many,...
    1 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*stina.hi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:32 PM
    Yes, it makes sense. I think I will at least reduce pumping for now, then stop altogether for a while and start again later. Thank you for your suggestions and help!! I appreciate it! :gvibes
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:43 PM
    Yes over time the lactating breasts soften more, feel less full or even empty, and by then if not before you will probably feel much more "even." But you may always produce more on one side than the other. Everyone is a little asymmetrical.
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:15 PM
    Thank you Maddieb for the info, this is very helpful! Will my breasts eventually "even" out once my milk supply collaborates with my babie's demand?
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:54 PM
    Yes obviously this is all patently ridiculous. You are right and pediatrician is incorrect - the problem is what to do about it? You could challenge the doctor and say can you please give me sources for the information you're giving me, you could bring your own sources to attempt to educate her, or you can find another doctor, or you can live with it knowing you're going to get poor advice in this area. It is frustrating that even young doctors still get little to no education in this area.
    2 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:45 PM
    Layne.cough yes it sounds like one breast makes more. This is typical. You can hand express as needed or encourage baby to nurse a bit more on that side as needed for your comfort. Going several sessions on one side regularly would act to increase production on that side while decreasing it on the other, so that might lead to more "lopsidedness". This is not an exact science and it probably makes the most sense to just approach the feelings of overfulness as feels right in the moment.
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:39 PM
    Ok so you have enough milk saved already for at least the first couple weeks back even if you did not pump at all at work. But of course you will have to pump, (or hand express) not only to continue to produce milk but to protect your self from getting engorged, getting plugs, mastitis, etc. How often you will need to pump is not knowable at this point, lots changes in the first several months of life. But generally speaking, The higher your milk production, the more often you will need to pump at work to prevent these issues. So while in theory it sounds great to make more than enough milk, in actuality it is the root of many possible issues. My wonder if at this point you can stop pumping altogether, or reduce it to at most one or two ounces once a day or less, as long as you can do that comfortably? Or stop now and start again in a month? Or whatever feels best to you. You may find that you need to reduce pumping slowly to avoid getting engorged. I think it is smart to keep avoiding bottles as much as possible as well. "Practice" bottles can be both infrequent and very small. Does that make sense?
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*stina.hi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:17 PM
    Yes, baby is feeding around the clock...generally 1.5-2 hours, but has been even every 1 hour this week (possible growth spurt?). I am feeding on demand and she is exclusively breastfed. I have not given her any formula in 2 weeks and she will take expressed breastmilk if I am away from her (which is usually only one feeding...I try to make sure she is fed and full before I leave). I don't pump after every single nursing session, but with the 3,6,9,12 schedule so I can stay on top of it. And it's been way less this past week due to exhaustion. I haven't pumped in the last 12 hours. I am hoping to pump at least every 3-4 hours at work. I am a nurse with busy shifts, so I'm not sure how that will impact my pumping sessions. My work schedule will vary, sometimes three shifts in a row, sometimes broken up (2 shifts in a row, off a day or few, then work 3rd shift). Some weeks I could work 4 shifts and some 2 shifts, but generally should be 3 shifts a week. Baby is gaining lots of weight! She was born 6 lb 6 oz and today is 8 lb 13 oz. Last week Saturday (8/23), she was 8 lb 3 oz. I guess I am underestimating how much breastmilk I should have saved up before work and worried that baby will not have enough when I am away from her. I just counted all of my frozen breastmilk and I have 91 oz! I didn't even realize I had that many oz saved up already! So,
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:09 PM
    Hi all, I have a 2 week old and am breastfeeding. So far everything has gone pretty well but my right breast always feels so engorged and full. My left one will get full and then I will nurse and it will be soft again and feel normal. Does this mean that the right breast is making more milk than the left one? I usually nurse on one side during one feeding and then the other side during the next feeding and continue to alternate. But even doing that my right breast still is always bigger and fuller. I do not want to increase my milk production, as I feel I have a pretty good supply. But I would like to relieve some of the fullness in the right breast. I have expressed a little by hand to try to make it more comfortable. Is it ok to nurse from the right side (the side that always seems full and engorged) at 2 feedings or 3 feedings in a row to get it emptied or will that just increase the milk production more?
    12 replies | 236 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:05 PM
    The general recommendation is to avoid pacifiers entirely until breast feeding/milk production is 'established.' Generally this means that if nursing is going well, no major problems, you can introduce pacifiers at about 4-6 weeks. But I disagree somewhat with this recommendation. It is shorthand and does not apply to all situations. I see nothing inherently wrong with occasional paci use earlier as long as it never interferes with nursing frequency. If a new mom needs a shower or an hour or two for a nap or some alone time, I would rather her baby was held by someone else and given a pacifier, than that baby was given a bottle. Conversely, it is not "safe" to introduce a paci at 6 weeks if the paci is used too much and decreases normal nursing frequency. Pacifier overuse can lead to poor gain or other breastfeeding problems at any age. Milk production and normal nursing rhythms could still be harmed no matter when baby is first given a pacifier. In other words, if and when a pacifier is introduced (and it need never be, of course- it is a convenience item and not a necessity) it is best done with awareness and care. Used only occasionally and only when needed to get a break for mom, but not to replace nursing sessions. Of course this is all assuming baby will even accept a pacifier, never a sure thing. If you would like to learn more about safely sharing a sleep surface with your infant, which might help baby be more settled at night, I suggest the book...
    10 replies | 316 view(s)
  • @llli*layne.cough's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:03 PM
    We have a bassinet on my side of the bed that we have been putting her in. I'll nurse her and put her in the bassinet...she will drift off for a moment but them just seems to fuss again and be wide awake. So I will pick her up and try to soothe her back to sleep. Should I use a pacifier at night if she gets fussy? I haven't used one yet.
    10 replies | 316 view(s)
  • @llli*shanghai's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:29 AM
    I wanted to give an update and it's therapeutic for me to write my thoughts out. A couple of days ago I was trying to nurse my LO at 1 am and I watched her struggle for 40 mins and I decided that with her insufficient weight gain, my vasoapasm pain, and our struggle to nurse that it wasn't fair to her to keep on doing this. My husband made a bottle of formula and she took it without any issues and was completely calm afterwards. I cried the rest of the morning and couldn't leave my bed because I decided to give up breastfeeding. My husband continued to give her a bottle the rest of the day and I have never seen her so calm before. I have not been able to bring myself to give her a bottle or watch her take a bottle yet so my husband and family are feeding her. I am usually in a different room when she's being fed. For most of the morning I couldn't even bring myself to hold her - I feel like I somehow failed her (I still feel this way and cry about it every day). I emailed my LC who luckily was on board but suggested that I try to exclusively pump (I have the medela pump in style advanced) so at least she can get some breastmilk. The LC recommended that I pump 8 times a day for 15 mins which I have been doing and am only getting about 1-1 1/2 ounces from both breasts each session and I can't seem to get a second let down. This is twice as much as I was getting when I was breastfeeding then pumping but still not enough to keep up with her intake. She currently gets about...
    20 replies | 1043 view(s)
  • @llli*sprocket's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:14 AM
    I had a 30 weeker who was diacharged from the NICU at 39w3d. We have been home two days. We have been working on breastfeeding for the last several weeks while continuing NG tube feedings and he finally "got it" about a week ago. I stayed in the hospital for the final days of his hospitalization to breastfeed on demand. He has never gotten a bottle and has been nursing on demand with no supplements for the last 5 days. Throughout his NICU stay I pumped milk for his NH tube feedings. By the end of his NG tube feedings he was getting 75cc every 3 hours (less when he nursed well). On average I was roughly matching or slightly exceeding this volume with my pumping efforts. My IBCLC has advised me to keep up the pumping at a frequency of 5x per day during the day with just breastfeeding at night. This amounts to pumping after most daytime feedings. I have found this difficult to keep up. On more than one occasion, I have nursed, gotten baby down and begun pumping only for him to let me know he wasn't quite done and wants to nurse a little more. Other times, I have pumped after a feeding only to find that he wakes up after 1 1/2 or 2 hours and has a difficult time satisfying himself. Sometimes he nurses very well and sleeps for 3 hours, so I do have time to make more milk for his next feeding, but in the mean time he has so thoroughly emptied my breasts, I don't get much and it feels kind of unnecessary. The rationale behind the pumping is that he hasn't yet...
    2 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*pthgrl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:10 AM
    Hi; I'm mom to two wonderful little girls; a 14 mo old strong-willed younger one and a 2.5 year old easy going sister. The 14 mo old is breastfed and she and I cosleep in her room. However, since I work outside the home, she mostly just nurses at night. She wakes 4-7 times a night to nurse. If she could, she would probably sleep all night with the boob in her mouth, but since I can't sleep like that, she will settle for being nursed back to sleep. She is a fairly poor napper and sleeper, and the slightest thing (colds, teething, which seems constant) disturb her sleep. (meaning I don't get much sleep at all...) I'm exhausted, especially if she has a cold/sick or is teething, because then she wakes more like 7 times a night, and often takes a long time to fall back to sleep. As a result, I don't function well at work and have less patience than I would like for the 2.5 year old (or for DH). When she is well and "only" gets up 4 times I night, I can manage (i.e. have gotten used to that type of interrupted sleep). Whenever she does not sleep well I get so exhausted that I think about night weaning. My first concern is that she might wean completely - which I don't want. Plus, when I'm not on the brink of exhaustion, I just love the cuddling at night :love ... We started night weaning once or twice but sleeping in my own bed (dad was with her) I missed her so much I gave up after 1-2 nights. Third, given that she is quite tenacious, she will cry for at least...
    1 replies | 90 view(s)
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