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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:21 PM
    From Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple, lactation textbook, Nancy Mohrbacher, 2010. On bloody stool: "If a baby has bloody stools and eliminating dairy from the mother's diet does not resolve them, they will most likely clear in time with continued breastfeeding." p. 520 (Italics mine) After description of a study of both breast and formula fed infants with bloody stool the results of which are too complicated to explain here: "If the baby's healthcare provider recommends suspending breastfeeding during a trial of hypoallergenic formula, suggest the mother discuss the possibility of continuing to breastfeed, as NO NEGATIVE OUTCOMES HAVE BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH THIS. P 521 (caps mine) Pm me if you would like to arrange to talk to me and I will read you the pages on the study.
    15 replies | 8887 view(s)
  • @llli*tomzgirl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:04 PM
    You gals are all awesome! Thank you for taking the time to share such valuable info with a newbie.
    8 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 PM
    No. Not for regular mastitis. If is also perfectly safe to keep nursing baby- did Dr. tell you to stop that as well? I am not sure what the concern about the pumped milk is??? I am not 100% sure about the pumped milk if it is MRSA which is a little trickier but I assume you would have mentioned if it is that. Are you getting antibiotics? how are you feeling? Here is more info about mastitis. http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/18_mastitiswhatcanyoudo.pdf and plugs: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/17_dealingwithplugsblebs.pdf
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:55 PM
    I would also suggest research lactation aids (Medela SNS, LactAid, or homemade.) Many adoptive moms are indeed able to produce milk, but whether they will ever make enough to feed baby entirely or to do so right away is a different story. Some do, some do not. A lactation aid allows baby to be supplemented as needed at the breast, so baby and mom continue to get the wonderful benefits of nursing at the breast while mom works on her production or even if she does not make quite enough. Plus baby nursing at the breast even with a supplementer is better for milk production. I strongly suggest that, within reason, don't let cost defer you from getting what is going to increase your likelihood of being able to breastfeed. If the cost of buying a new pump or renting a pump feels prohibitive, think about this...babies are expensive, but we tend to spend money on the wrong things. Almost everything on the typical new baby list from clothing to changing table to strollers can almost certainly be acquired for free as hand me downs or gifts, or for very cheap second hand. But in most cases, no one is going to get you what you really need to breastfeed- A new pump that is in impeccable working order (or a rented hospital grade pump) and a lactation aid, and perhaps a consultation or two with a good lactation consultant. So spend your money there is my suggestion.
    8 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*vf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:40 PM
    Thank you for your reply. So, after trying to decrease my "oversupply" I ended up with a very painful plugged duct that lasted for about a week and the breast is still tender and slightly harder over that duct. I also introduced avocado in my diet and my milk seems to be less transparent and bluish. So, no more "block feedings". I also saw the infectionist today and she recommended that we follow-up with her in 3 weeks and if there is no improvement than she would recommend to switch my baby to hypoallergenic formula... This is what I really do not intend to do... So, the only solution is to keep following the diet. I am now eating the following: oatmeal, pears, apples, avocado, buckwheat, turkey fillet and potatoes. Tried some pork and onion, but not sure if will continue. Grapes and sunflower seeds resulted in more blood in the stool. The stool looks quite normal for the past 3 days (mustardy but liquid) with small blood dots here and there. When I told the infectionist what I am eating she looked very puzzled and said she was expecting to hear that I am actually eating dairy or soy or wheat or fish and she would tell me to remove them from my diet. She said she didn't expect me to be on such a strict diet and baby still having blood in his stool. Actually, she was surprised to hear that blood appeared in his stool only one week after I started the diet. The reason for going onto the diet was the gooey, mucousy and greenish stools that my baby was having. The...
    15 replies | 8887 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:26 PM
    Ugh, it is very frustrating to be in between sizes: A couple things to think about - You can switch flanges as needed, and/or use a different flange size for each breast if needed. I am wondering it possibly you find that when you are fuller you need the larger and can use the smaller more comfortably when less full? If the smaller flange hurts but is otherwise giving you a better seal and better milk extraction, try lubing it up with olive oil to avoid injury. Play around with pump settings. I also used a symphony for a short time and found some of the settings really were too intense for me. Have you looked into alternative flanges from pumpin pals? http://www.pumpinpal.com/
    7 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*noodles610's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:05 PM
    I usually transfer them to Avent bottles prior to putting them in the fridge to avoid that issue. That way, if I need a quick feed and didn't pump, I just need to heat it up even at home. Is that bad?
    6 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:57 PM
    Absolutely. In my experience it was very simple and kind of relaxing in a weird way-, made simpler by the fact I was not worried about saving the milk.
    4 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:52 PM
    I hear you on the more sleep sounding nice! My babe's sleep is really all over the map, with so much teething, crawling around, head bumping, distractions, etc during the day. The only piece that I've found that I can control that SOMETIMES gets me a little but longer of a sleep stretch at the beginning of the night is to do a dream feed. And to nap when babe does during the day if it's been a rocky night!
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    Yes I agree suggest dad try pacifier or some other comfort measure if baby is not settling after a normal sized feeding. Nursing is as much about comfort as it is about the milk, but bottles are entirely about milk. When a breastfed baby is fussy and mom is there, it never hurts to offer to nurse and ask questions later...if baby is NOT settled by nursing, then other things can be tried. it is a bit different when mom is not there, as A baby may well try to comfort suck with a bottle and this results in overfeeding. So if baby is getting plenty of milk, other comfort measures will help avoid overfeeding. I will have to add this to my list of weird stuff breastfeeding is blamed for! Seriously I also think there is probably no reason to worry about one 6 ounce bottle or one day of baby eating more via bottle- it happens and may well be fine. I don't want to tease dad, I am sure he is doing a great job. It is hard to take care of a baby without the secret comforting weapon of nursing. some fussy baby ideas for dad to try? : http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf My husband has his own sling in a gentlemanly gray shade and settled all our kids beautifully just walking around the house doing his thing with them in the sling.
    13 replies | 212 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:33 PM
    The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine has a podcast, searchable in the iTunes app (and presumably probably just on their website too!) that has an episode on adoptive breastfeeding (and many other interesting topics that may be of interest!).
    8 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    If weight gain is normal, I think you work with the assumption that he's getting enough even if the feeds are short and few... Just keep offering and plugging along! Hopefully his interest will pick up with time. Is he getting a multivitamin, or has his iron been tested? Low iron can sometimes cause low appetite- or at least so I have read.
    4 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 PM
    After investigating the lipase issue potential, and so long as baby is offered water (really no benefits for juice)... I would feel like this just might be a really handy opportunity to ditch bottles altogether while you're at it. It's typically rec'd to do so at/before 12 months, right?, for their impacts on palate and tooth development, etc?. Nutritionally, breastmilk is still really important for the rest of the first year (and onward, of course), but he is getting it straight from nursing when you're home, you can continue to offer and continue to use it in baking/food prep, and I feel like you've got those bases covered. And so long as he is nursing when with you, and pumping when away, your breastfeeding relationship will still be going strong, no? Edited to add-- I guess all I'm really trying to say is that other than their ease of delivery, they're isn't really anything beneficial about bottles, so perhaps this can be seen in a positive light- that weaning off the bottles is happening 'naturally' (just talking about the delivery-method, not the content.)
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 PM
    Lucky moms know better, right? Pretty typical for non-mom caregivers to think that the baby needs "something else". But moms know that pretty much all needs can be filled at the breast, and they always know their babies' hunger cues better than the non-nursing parent. And even if a baby does want "something else", it doesn't hurt to offer the breast. Yes. The bottle delivers a fast, constant flow of milk, as opposed the ebb and flow rhythm of the breast. And while flow from the breast will slow or stop when the baby transitions from active, nutritive sucking to gentle, erratic comfort sucking, the flow from the bottle will remain constant regardless of what sort of sucking the baby is doing. Can dad swap in a paci when the baby has had around 4 oz? That might cut down on overeating from the bottle.
    13 replies | 212 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:14 PM
    Stronger suction isn't necessarily the road to higher production. Some moms actually respond better to lower suction. But a used pump is likely to have less power and that usually means less suction and less stimulation. One important thing to remember about pumping is that frequency is almost always the most important element of milk production for an exclusively pumping mom. If you're looking for something to max out, go for frequency. Suction and duration of pumping matter less.
    8 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:12 PM
    is he getting water or juice? Could there be a lipase problem? Will he take freshly pumped milk?
    2 replies | 76 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Take baby to bed with you and sleep when baby does.
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*icyburn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:02 PM
    Many thanks for your kind advises. I tried the laid back position & now he takes to that breast in that position. Best part is he now drains it better than before. He likes nursing to sleep so only issue now is the 3-4pm feed which he doesn't drain as he doesn't like sleeping at that time. He still wakes up 3 times for milk last night. Does any of your babies sleep through the night or only waking up once? If so pls share your tips! I just caught a cold on sunday.. and more sleep sounds heavenly right now. :)
    5 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:57 PM
    Ok so you may not need to change anything as weight gain is good. But since regular very long stretches of not nursing leads to lower milk production, and swaddling is a technique used to diminish waking frequency, you could try not swaddling, part of the night or all night to see if that increases overnight nursing frequency. Alternatively you could keep swaddling but wake babies up to nurse or dream feed once or twice overnight.
    3 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*ciantarah's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:52 PM
    OK, great :) I will nurse more often when I'm home, then. Somewhat related: My husband reports that DD consumed 6 ounces in a single feeding today, went to sleep for 30 minutes, woke up hungry and had 2 more ounces before she was sated. He does paced feedings and there was only a very small amount of spit up. He thinks maybe because she was in that eat/spit up cycle with me that that trained her to think if she is awake, she should be eating. He always thinks what I see as hunger signs are suspect and maybe she wants something else. Could she be taking more than she needs from the bottle even with paced feedings?
    13 replies | 212 view(s)
  • @llli*holliska's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:20 PM
    Thanks for your reply! Both babies have gained weight well and steadily since birth - one is 50th percentile and the other is 91st and the HV is pleased with them. Regarding the number of feeds in 24 hours, they are now eating 7-8 times, once in the night and 6-7 times between 7am and 7pm. When they first dropped the midnight feed I was becoming engorged during the night but that seems to have resolved now. Thankfully I seem to be able to keep up with them in the day. The boys are swaddled at night, as they have been since birth, but don't use pacifiers and are sleeping in the same room as me.
    3 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*nmdoa3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:06 PM
    After a long weekend of nursing and pumping every 2 hours around the clock to try to clear a clogged duct, I was diagnosed with mastitis this afternoon. My doctor suggested that I throw away the milk that I pumped (and stored in the freezer for when I return to work) over the weekend. Is this necessary?
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*seattlemama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:44 PM
    He's been gaining weight so far, although he is on the lower percentile side. I have tried different positions, and he gets distracted. We were cosleeping until he was about 5mo, but then he started moving around and seemed to need his own space, so we had to move him to a cosleeper and eventually into his own crib and room. I missed him in my room, so moved into his room in a separate bed for sleeping. Point im making is, cosleeping doesn't work for him, still I'm close to him while sleeping. He was nursing in sleep but now sometimes he wakes up and just plays instead of nursing.
    4 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:12 PM
    Breastfeeding behavior is kind of like the weather in some places-frequently changeable! In other words, I doubt anyone can predict this. On the other hand, it stands to reason that if babies are taking very long stretches overnight, more frequent nursing during the day makes sense. But another factor is age and growth- Weight gain rate usually decreases quite a bit starting around 3 months (and again after 6 months) and this might lead to both less frequent and shorter nursing sessions. Although this is not ALWAYS the case by any means.) How is weight gain going for both? so how many times a 24 hour day do babies typically nurse? Total. Any sleep lengthening techniques being used )Pacifiers, swaddling, babies sleeping in a different room than you? Assuming weight gain is in great shape and babies nurse frequently overall, a longer stretch at night is probably ok. But by longer I mean maybe 5-8 hours, not 12. That seems overly long for a regular thing. Are you getting engorged?
    3 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:01 PM
    I would suggest, stop pumping and bottles for a while until the issues resolve, unless they are needed due to separations. I understand the logic of 'I am pumping while baby gets bottle so it should not make a difference' but in practice it just does not work that way in many cases. Bottles and pumping both can cause all kinds of mischief and are best avoided IF possible especially in early months. (Of course, pumping a little -to relieve pressure due to engorgement- is ok, even if mom is block nursing she needs to avoid bad engorgement.) Here is article about block nursing dos and donts http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding 4 weeks is typically the height of milk production and it naturally goes down from here if it is overabundant. So it is very possible that stopping the bottles and pumping and encouraging baby to nurse very often (one side at a time) along with the laid back feedings and taking baby off if flow is crazy and letting it go into a towel, will take care of the issues without the risks of block nursing.
    2 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:48 PM
    I think more frequent nursing helps overall with forceful letdown issues, because the less time there is for milk to build up in the breast, the less forcefully it flows out. So if that "first" session after the long sleep is problematic, nursing during that stretch may help. It is not necessarily needed as long as the one long sleep stretch is in the 5-6 hour range and not longer. Also, fast letdown aside, when mom is back at work it is important to encourage baby to nurse as much as baby will when mom is home, but not at the expense of you getting that type of a sleep stretch. No harm in encouraging more nursing between when you get home and go to bed. I also want to reassure you that more frequent nursing is not going to increase milk production beyond normal. If a mom has low production, frequent feedings AND nursing both sides at a time usually help increase production, but in the case where production is overabundant, frequent feedings allowing baby to take ONE side at a time as baby prefers, won't. Why? Because a baby needs a certain amount of milk each day (it will vary slightly day to day of course) but what I mean is, if the feedings are closer together, baby will eat less each time to get the overall amount they need for that day. They won't take MORE than they need, and since the frequent nursing helps with the fast letdown, it will also help baby take a smaller amount when they nurse because the milk will not be coming like a firehose. SO there is not...
    13 replies | 212 view(s)
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