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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:30 PM
    Yes mothers are terribly vulnerable in the post partum period. This is why it is so important for mothers to get good breastfeeding support and information long before baby is born, as well as during the post partum period. It is a medical crime that we don't get this in so many cases. Please don't turn your anger over the situation onto yourself- if you are angry, and you have a right to be- turn it where it belongs- a medical system and society that undermines a mother's ability to nurse her child from long before she even gives birth. I do think that book will be very helpful to you. if you do still want hands on help, are you sure your insurance will not pay for a LC apt, or there is no clinic in your area, or some way to see the LC for a lower cost or get a payment plan etc? Maybe your family could help pay. In case you were wondering, $180 is an entirely reasonable price for a consult, IBCLCs spend years on specialized training and lots of money on specialized education, and consults last 60-90 minutes typically and often include some type of follow up contact. You may also want to see if there are any volunteer (free) support groups near you- for support and companionship on your journey as well as bfding info. Some LLL leaders even do free home visits, and this might be helpful especially when you are seeking help finding ways to encourage baby to nurse more or latch better etc.
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*anyi.cas's Avatar
    Today, 04:08 PM
    Wow! Many thanks for your feedback. I do appreciate it! Sorry for the confusion...I was in tears as I was typing this post. To answer your question, I would attempt to nurse on demand, but he would only last about 7 mins or less on each breast. He would fall asleep and wake up hungry, of course. I would attempt to nurse again but the same story repeats. I must also say that my close family did not support me much in the breastfeeding journey. I remember how they said so many times how I was just starving my baby and just allowing him to swallow air. I partially gave up, and now I cannot forgive myself from doing so. Due to trauma after delivery, I was in so much pain, could not even walk right for 3 weeks. Imagine, then, how vulnerable I was. I will definitively get the book you have recommended, but as far as getting a lactation consultant, I am afraid I cannot afford one right now. I just talked to one and the initial consultation is $180. Well, again...many thanks for your valuable input. I will put more effort into this and hopefully I will get some good results!
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Thanks for the helpful replies. So far, the problem has not repeated itself in the past 2 days. I did call Medela, and the rep didn't make a guess as to what might be wrong, but she was going to have me check several things. I had to go, however, but said I would call back if the problem reoccurs. It seemed to me that the suction did not change, just the frequency of the revolution of the motor, if that makes sense. I was able to pump as much as normal since it was only a 10 second glitch. If it's the power adapter, several stores around here sell a replacement for about $25, but maybe Medela would send me one? The pump is out of warranty. I used it part time with baby #1, but now am using it full time for baby #2 since I work during the day, 8 hrs, 4-5 days a week. I also use it every morning after the first feed just to build up a stash (for now, will use to mix with cereal when DD starts solids). I'm hoping it was just a power fluctuation in the outlet, which was one at work that I don't normally use. My back up plan if the pump goes out during work is to call it a day, go home, and use my sister's Freestyle which I have--I tried it twice and the pumping action is so different from the PIS that I don't like it at all, so it would be an emergency use until I can either fix my PIS or buy a new one (yes, I dislike the Freestyle and love the PIS so much that I'd buy a new one!). Unfortunately, my insurance does not cover a pump because it is a "grandfathered"...
    4 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*tomom's Avatar
    Today, 11:26 AM
    I'm currently exclusively breastfeeding my second little one. She is now 2.5 weeks old. She easily falls asleep at the breast no matter what I try. So sometimes she only eats from one breast (this is more common than her eating from both). However, when she does fall asleep she seems to still be actively sucking. She also seems to favor the left over the right. The right seems to have powerful let down because LO will unlatch and milk will go everywhere! I sometimes pump once a day after she has only taken one side for comfort and to keep up supply? Not sure if this is necessary or not. I also try reclining especially when she's on the right. Sometimes she pops off quite quickly (after only a minute or two). Seems content but then starts rooting if she gets moved. Can any of you provide some insight? Thanks!
    0 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*ml102612's Avatar
    Today, 08:41 AM
    Thanks for responding. I will say that my son is a very consistently good eater. He'll usually have scrambled eggs with cheese / or fortified oatmeal, and a fruit and yogurt smoothie for breakfast. Lunch and dinner is usually a protein with veggies and rice or pasta. He loves salmon and avocados, as well as yogurt, so I feel like he is getting plenty of healthy fats. He eats a varied diet and seems to eat quite a lot. He's gaining weight like a champ - when they weighed him at the pediatrician's last month, he was in the highest weight percentile he's ever been! I could continue pumping during the day for the next few weeks, but I just really question if it's necessary, especially with the added time it will add to my day going to another floor to pump now . I guess I could introduce formula - although he's never had it in his life, and at 11 months, I am really curious how he would take to it. I've heard babies who have never had it may not be amenable to it at this point!! We are planning to introduce cow's milk around a year for daytime feeds (although again, I've read that if a mom is still nursing a few times a day, it isn't really necessary?!) so I am a little concerned about introducing formula for only 3 weeks and then switching to cow's milk. Just seems like a lot of unnecessary transition, in my opinion.
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:08 AM
    This is a difficult question because the answer lies somewhere in the fuzzy boundary between guidelines for infant feeding and the needs of individual babies and moms. The US guidelines say that until 12 months, breastmilk or formula should provide a baby's primary source of nutrition. The reasoning behind that recommendation is that breastmilk (or formula) provide complete and balanced nutrition at a time when a baby's brain and body are growing faster than at any time for the rest of its life. It's hard to provide nutrition that is as complete and balanced using solids because babies tend to be inconsistent eaters; one week they will eat only peas, the next week it's Cheerios and air. So, if you were just nursing 3x per day, would that be enough to qualify as providing the majority of the baby's nutrition? I personally doubt it. Most moms need to nurse at least 8x per day when their babies are exclusively breastfed, and it's often stated that a mom should nurse at least 3-5x per day in order to meet a 12-24 month old's dairy requirements. So I would guesstimate that for most mom/baby pairs, you'd want to be nursing more like 5x per day, minimum, in order to meet an 11 month old's "dairy" requirements. So while that all sounds like I'm telling you to keep pumping, I think it's important to keep in mind that your baby is 11 months old- how different is that really from 12 months? Is it okay to nurse less than the minimum guesstimate given above? What if...
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 07:58 AM
    Your situation definitely sounds icky. This is definitely an area overlooked by the medical community. My LC referred me to a doctor when I had mastitis twice and had a mysterious lump (my midwife said was a plugged duct, but it was just a lump from having mastitis that needed to heal). I knew a doctor wouldn't help. She gave me the name of a breast specialist, who was of course male -- I just couldn't wrap my head around seeing a male doctor about breastfeeding issues (unless it was Dr. Jack Newman or something, but this was someone I'd never head of). Luckily I never got it again after the two times I had it, and never needed antibiotics. But it really is a "you're on your own" topic! What has happened when you've left it alone for a day or so? Does it get worse?
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*evergreen474's Avatar
    Today, 07:09 AM
    No, once the 2 of us figured out latching, nursing has not been painful. Besides this. Baby's weight gain has been great. He was born 7lbs 10oz and is now already over 10lbs. I really think the pain was because he was arching his back and pulling his head back with my nipple still in his mouth. My problem, I think, was finding out what was causing his discomfort while nursing. I think there might have been a couple issues that were causing him to be uncomfortable with breast feeding. First, he still had his umbilical cord stump. And while I'm told there are no nerve endings there, the stump itself was dry and hard and might have been pressing into the skin around his belly button. But that was removed on Monday. Also, I am trying different things with my diet. I have read that food sensitivities in young babies is not as common as people think. However, everyone in my immediate family--my parents, my brother, and myself--all have food allergies. It has been better these last few days and I'm no longer in pain. I just hope my little guy isn't, either.
    4 replies | 245 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Today, 06:55 AM
    I'm hestitant to go to the doctor because she's just referred to me the lactation consultant in the past. And this is who I've seen for this and doesn't have any more advice for me. She said she could recommend an ultrasound, but that the doctor couldn't do anything unless it was an abcess or mastitis.
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Today, 06:52 AM
    I think the original plugged area was behind or just above the nipple. I had the hard line going all the way up and also across the top of the breast at first. Now it's just the one spot with a little bit of hardness in a line going up. How long is too long to wait? We're going on vacation for Labor Day. So, the Tuesday after Labor Day when we return, it will have been 2 weeks of this.
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*henrysmom292015's Avatar
    Today, 06:47 AM
    Thank you for your responses!
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*ml102612's Avatar
    Today, 06:22 AM
    My son will be a year old at the end of the month and I am so over pumping at work. Plus, the empty office I use to pump will be filled sometime in the next week or two and I will have to pump in another room 6 floors down which will be a big hassle. I'm ready to ditch the pump. Do you think it's ok, at this point, to rely on nursing my son three times a day during the work week and not leaving pumped bottles of milk during the day? I usually nurse in the morning, when I get home from work, and before bed. He sleeps through the night and has for a long time. He eats solids extremely well - he loves to eat, and I feel like he does a great job filling a lot of his nutritional needs with solids. We would nurse more on the weekends obviously when we are together all day. I've read on Dr. Jack Newman's site that by this point, a baby who is eating well and nurses 3-4 times in a day should be sufficient nutritionally. I just wondered if this was ok, and if I could just ask daycare to give him water with meals and stop the bottles? We are apart for 8 hours a day, and he is currently getting a morning and afternoon bottle of around 4 oz. each. My mom has been watching him for the last week and said it seems like he could probably take or leave the bottle - he doesn't fuss for it, or when it's over. What is the LLLI consensus on this? He's so close to a year and eating so well that I think if we just nurse when we are together he would be fine, but I obviously don't want...
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*puja's Avatar
    Today, 01:56 AM
    My lo is 18 week now...weight 7 kg height 64 cm I m exclusively breastfeeding him and he is growing well I think...I have not yet introduced bottle to him. .but now from next month I ll have to join my office ...so want your opinion that when should I start and how many times should I give him bottle so he could become use to it...one week before I have tried to give him bottle but he was not sucking just was playing with the nipple( for about 4 days once In the evening I tried so...)another thing I want ti know is that when should I start giving him formula because its not possible for me to express milk at work(I have explained earlier)...at home I want to nurse him but those 8 hours working hour milk will go waste in sink ..at home how much will I be able to express by hand(cant use pump as have said before) would it meet his 8 hours need so I think formula though very unwillingly I ll have to introduce ...
    0 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*diripouf's Avatar
    Today, 01:26 AM
    Thank you so much for your reply - and for the tips about weaning. Yes your assumptions are right - LO is also getting what I pump. Per day, I give her 3 formula top-ups (of 60 mL / 2 oz each) and one of my breast milk which is usually a little smaller (40-50mL max). Unfortunately I can only pump that much per 24 hours… But the midwife said not to worry too much about that. The point of the pumping is to signal to my breasts that more milk is needed - and when they produce more, she will drink it rather than me seeing it in the pumping output. The midwife said her rather big weight gain last week was normal as she was "catching up". She will be weighed again on Monday, and if she's still putting on above average I will start weaning her as I really do not want to continue the top-ups beyond what is absolutely necessary for her health. I was a skinny baby too so I'm not expecting her to be super chubby... She only starts to become fussy and distracted on the breast after 8/10min - could it be that the fattier milk is more difficult to suck for her and she's getting lazy as she has been experiencing the teat? I'm being careful in how I bottle-feed her, I use peristaltic teats as I've been told that LOs needed to suck harder with them…. It's hard for me to get to a LLL meeting as I live far from the meeting place but I will keep this in mind if I struggle - thank you!!
    2 replies | 107 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:19 AM
    hi, I am typing one handed so please excuse typos. I don't think anyone can give you 'odds', there are just too many variables. Yes it is usually harder to relactate to a "full" milk production if milk production was not established during the first 4-8 weeks post partum. But you did give birth to your baby, which gives you a better chance of making more milk than an adoptive mother who is attempting to induce lactation, for example. So the 'should you give up' question is also unanswerable by anyone but yourself. Mothers have both relactated and induced lactation to the point they nurse their babies. Even if supplements are needed, there can be a nursing relationship, so the goal need not be 'exclusive' nursing. Here is what I see-you are producing 1/2 to one ounce per pump session- That's lactating, so something is working. And this is happening even with simply not enough milk removal. Here is how you tell the body to make milk. By expressing milk (or having baby nurse) the same amount of times a healthy, growing baby would nurse. That means at least 8 times in 24 hours. Anything less than that is simply not going to increase milk production in any meaningful way, because the body is not getting the message to make more milk- no baby nurses 4 times a day. All the galactagogues, water, and healthy eating in the world will not make a difference if milk is not removed with normal frequency. So pumping more than 4 times a day is not "extra" - it is necessary for...
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*anyi.cas's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:43 PM
    Yes, I am desperate and may even be a bit depressed. This is my story…I am currently 8 weeks post-partum. It was my goal to exclusively breastfeed my baby but it never happened. While at the hospital, I did put the baby at the breast several times and even used the hospital pump. I was only getting a few drops of milk. On the 2nd day of being at the hospital, I ended up giving the baby formula. Once at home, I continued in my attempt to breastfeed but with no luck. A few more drops of milk was coming in, but not enough. The baby did latch, but even after putting him 7 minutes at each breast, he was not satisfied. He cried, slept and woke up hungry again. Although he continues on formula, I occasionally put him on the breast for his comfort, to help get rid of his hic-ups, and because I just refuse to completely give up. After educating myself a bit more, I made a plan to make the breastfeeding happen. I rented a hospital grade pump. I have been pumping at least 4 times a day for almost 3 weeks now, I am drinking lots of water, eating oatmeal, drinking lactation smoothies. But, despite all of these changes, nothing seems to work. I may get a few drops from the left breast and between ½ to 1 ounce from the right breast. I know that I should be pumping at least 8 times in a day, but since I really don’t see any improvement, I wonder if the extra pumping sessions are worthwhile! I started taking fenugreek yesterday, but I just “feel” that it will not work. Since a milk...
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:27 PM
    Some things that may help with night-weaning: - Nurse more during the day; more calories taken in by day may mean less need for them at night. - Communicate. "Now is sleep time. We will nurse again in the morning" is a time-honored way of putting it. You LO is very young to grasp the concept, but keep communicating it and it will eventually sink in. - Have someone else take on the nighttime parenting. Babies typically ask to nurse only when mom is present. - Keep a sippy cup/ bottle of water available for nighttime wake-ups. Night-waking toddlers are often genuinely thirsty. One thing that I think you may want to accept is that weaning doesn't mean the end of nighttime parenting. Weaned babies wake at night just like nursing babies do. The only difference is that it's generally easy to get a nursing baby back to sleep- nurse them and they're asleep, right? Whereas getting a weaned baby to sleep typically requires more interaction and creative problem-solving. So you might want to think about whether or not weaning would really help you get more sleep! -
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:19 PM
    Welcome to the forum! The first thing I have to say is that I'm extremely flummoxed by the advice you got from the "consultants". Were these people medical professionals? If so, what kind? The reason I find their advice so suspicious is that breastfeeding doesn't make babies unwilling to eat solids, nor does it make them deficient in iron, folic acid, Vit. D, or IgA. In fact, breastmilk is a significant source of IgA; see this article from American Scientist: http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/pub/why-we-develop-food-allergies/1. It reads, in part: "New babies, however, produce little or no SIgA. They depend on other types of antibodies during the first vulnerable months of life, primarily residual IgG from the mother and small amounts of mucosal IgM. The only significant source of SIgA antibodies during this period is breast milk, which helps protect the newborn until her immune system is established. In developed countries, the child's ability to produce SIgA is quite variable, being completed between one and ten years of age. Babies in developing countries often establish secretory immunity much earlier, presumably because of greater exposure to stimulating microbes." Breastmilk does not have huge amounts of iron or Vit. D, it is true- but those issues are generally easy to solve with a daily multivitamin, or daily iron supplement plus plenty of sunshine (Vitamin D is made in your skin when it is exposed to sunlight). Okay, so all that being said,...
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:46 PM
    Great suggestions above, but just wanted to add that I am exactly where you are right now, only with my 11 month old! She was nursing to sleep, nursing through naps (sometimes 2-3 hrs!), and waking every 1-2 hours at night. I am not pregnant (I've checked multiple times lol), but not only do I have some nursing aversion feelings, but when I nurse her for any extended period, I get incredibly nauseated. I always have pain when nursing, too. I finally decided something had to change or we would be headed towards completely weaning way too early. I am using Elizabeth Pantley's No-Cry Sleep Solutions chapter on the nursing sleep association to try to get baby to sleep on her own for naps and longer stretches at night without relying on nursing to fall asleep/get through multiple sleep cycles (that's our main area of struggle) - and it's working. It's NOT easy, in fact the night before last I was in tears, ready to give up completely, but last night she wouldn't even nurse to sleep for bed; wanted my husband to walk and sing to her (that's usually our nightly routine before she nurses to sleep), and then he laid her down in bed and she slept for 4 hours straight. First time in MONTHS. Then today I was able to lay her down for her nap (again using Pantley's method) and she slept 2 hours where before she would always wake or start to stir 30-45 mins into her nap. It might be worth checking into for you. I think it is harder when you're the only one doing the nighttime parenting,...
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:32 PM
    My nipples always hurt excruciatingly when I have plugs; in fact, that's usually what first clues me in that I have a plug, not finding the hard spot! And yes, my whole breast usually feels bruised after its cleared, even if I wasn't very aggressive in getting rid of it. Was the original plugged area there behind the nipple? Sometimes I'll have a really bad plug that actually is a line of hard lumps stretching all along a duct from almost at my armpit down to my nipple, and it can take a while for all of those lumps to go away - maybe you had something similar and have cleared most of it, but there's still a bit left. I would be very careful, especially since you are sick already, to take it easy to avoid mastitis. As MaddieB suggested, I might consider seeing a doctor if it continues too much longer, just to make sure nothing else is going on.
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*phx2nash's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    Hello everyone. This is my first time joining any type of forum or posting something online, so please be patient and give any type of advice you may have. My situation is really long :( I am currently attempting to nurse my third child. He is 7.5 months old. I successfully ebf my two dd's over a year each. I have never been a great producer, but had a great experience with my girls. From day one ds has loved nursing. So I thought things were fine. He wanted to nurse constantly, but so did my other two. He was a slow gainer but was meeting all milestones. Then at his 4 month appt my pedi said he was a little over 10 lbs and I should top him off after feeds. I freaked out (having never given formula before). I also just assumed I was the problem and not producing enough. I went to see a lactation consultant that is pretty good. She has tried to support my goals all along-continuing ebf. She determined he is a lazy eater and just wants to comfort nurse all the time, so he isn't efficiently emptying the breast, which caused my supply to dwindle. We began trying everything- adding a couple of pumping sessions, fenugreek, goats rue, mothers milk tea, acupuncture, etc. this didn't do much to increase supply. So I started taking reglan. This is where everything goes down hill. I took it for 2 weeks and didn't see much difference, so I DECIDED TO STOP TAKING IT. I read I should wean off of it but I felt so terrible while taking it that I couldn't keep on it once I...
    0 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:58 PM
    Kellymom has an article on weaning off formula supplements. Unfortunately it is all too common for a mom to be told to supplement baby and sent on her way, and this usually results in early weaning. So it is great you are ready to get proactive about weaning baby off the supplements. If my conversions are correct, baby gained well above average in the last week, and is getting about 8 ounces or 240 mL of formula per day. Typical intake for a normally gaining one month old is about 25 ounces total per day (Some gain fine on much less, some need more, this is an average.) So 8 ounces is not all that much, but is certainly too much to drop supplements suddenly. How much expressed milk are you getting from pumping each day, and is baby also getting what you pump? This would mean the weaning off supplements process may take longer. When weaning off supplements, wean off formula first and then the expressed milk. You will want to keep pumping for as long as baby is taking supplements but once you have dropped entirely or greatly reduced the formula supplements, you can probably start safely reducing how often and how long you pump. While weaning, be sure baby is being fed supplements in a breastfeeding supportive way. Cup feeing, spoon feeding, or very careful, paced bottle feeding with correct positioning, to avoid over feeding. If for some reason it looks like you will need to supplement for much longer, it probably makes sense to consider an at the breast supplementer...
    2 replies | 107 view(s)
  • @llli*rosieg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:48 PM
    Hi, I'm not sure if I'm posting this in the right place. Apologies in advance as its a long one, so here goes... I need help regarding my 19 month old and sleep. He's always been a boobie baby, much preferring to nurse than eat and it wouldn't have been an unusual thing to have nursed 8+ times per day. We were advised by his consultants to stop breastfeeding completely and up his food intake as he was/ is deficient in iron, folic acid, vitamin D and also igA. We managed to stop feeding completely in the day and his eating has become so much better now, however night time is a completely different story. He has his feed to get him to sleep at around 9 and will then sleep until about 12 and that a when the "fun" begins. A good night consists of him thrashing around all night, waking up every 45mins and being latched on at least 90% of the night. A bad night starts the same with the tossing and turning, being latched on until 2am when he's wide awake running between our room and our 4 year olds room.Usually by about 2.15am I take him downstairs to prevent my husband or my eldest waking up. We can be up between 2 and 4 hours when he eventually falls back to sleep. He's not yet slept an entire night and on average he's getting between 6 and 8 hours most nights of broken sleep. As he only has one nap of two hours just after lunch, I don't know where I am going so very wrong. I no longer wish to breastfeed because physically and mentally I am exhausted, there doesn't seem to...
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:41 PM
    Sometimes it just takes time, from what you describe it sounds like there may be a very painful but small plug right behind the nipple? If this continues I am wondering if you want to see your doctor just to rule out any other potential issues. In my personal experience with plugs, sometimes all the efforts to clear the plug cause deep bruising that can make nursing painful for a few days.
    13 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    Is the overwhelming annoyance with the nursing sensation something new? Some moms feel this way- it is sometimes called nursing aversion- when they are pregnant or there is some other hormonal change going on- ovulating or menstruating, for example. Have you discussed your child's sleep difficulties with her pediatrician? Some times sleep disturbance has a physical cause. Allergies, for example. These can be food or environmental. There are a couple things to think about in a situation like this, because moms can feel very conflicted about nursing for many reasons, and when a mom feels conflicted, it can greatly increase/create resentment of the nursing child or the nursing relationship. Are you (or anyone else) concerned that your child nurses more than is normal? (or should not be nursing at this age?) Do you think or have you been told that you are somehow doing something wrong by nursing your child? Do you think or have you been told that you have "created" a problem? While the sleep does sound unusually disrupted, it is very typical for a 17 month old to nurse a great deal- even more than they did previously. And nursing a child does not "cause" a child to sleep badly or need to nurse more.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*bugsmomma1013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:45 PM
    My daughter is 17 months. She has to be nursing all the time. Shes always been like this so its not teething or something like that. Im getting really sick of it. I want to be done. She eats in the morning and then when we get out of bed she does it again. And throughout the day. Anytime she falls asleep in the car as soon as we get home she nurses. She does it to fall asleep, half way through nap time, after nap time, before bed. Its driving me insane! And the worst part is at night. She eats every1-2 hours until 3 or 4am. At that point she has to be latched on ALL NIGHT. Most of the time shes not even sucking shes just latched on. And the way she is sucking I hate. The way it feels is like a really annoying tickle feeling and I cant stand it. If I dont let her at any point day or night she will scream bloody murder for hours. At the very least I need the night feedings to end. I cant do it anymore. All I want to do is cry. Ive tried night weaning several times but she just screams for hours. My husband works night so I dont have any help. I dont know what to do anymore.
    2 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*lan3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    Hello! I posted once before in the early stages of breastfeeding my son. I am in need of some advice. I switched my work schedule in February to spend more time at home with him. I now work W/TH/F 12pm-midnight. I get home and typically fall asleep around 1am. My son as of a month ago was still waking twice a night typically around 2 and then 4 I would nurse him for just a few minutes, lay him back down in his crib, easy. He would then be up for the day around 7/7:30 but this is very exhausting for a mom who just worked 12 hours in an ER. Recently (the past month) he has only been waking once at night around 3/4am. I know this is normal, nursing him is comforting, etc but it is just getting to me. I am very over the night wakings especially on the nights I work. He still nurses in the morning/wake-up before both his naps and the occassional pre-dinner snack. What is the most gentle way to encourage the end of overnight feedings? I would also like to fully wean him over the next 6 months or so, any advice? Thanks in advance!
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*diripouf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:09 PM
    Hello everyone My LO is 4.5 weeks now and has been getting formula top-ups since 1.5 weeks ago, as she was not putting on enough weight. She lost 8% of birth weight in the first 4 days and then put on only 20 grams in the following week, and 50 grams the week after. She was not back at her birth weight at 3 weeks so the midwives insisted that I start giving her formula top-ups, and start medication as my supply was low… so I complied. My breasts also never felt that engorged, so it made sense. So I have been pumping my breasts at the end of each feed, giving her around 4 x 60mL of formula top ups each day, and she has put on 290 grams last week (yay!). She feels stronger and more alert. The issue is that I have not been told HOW I am supposed to wean her off these top ups… I can feel that she is getting used to them, and I do not want to continue them endlessly!! Pumping and topping up is a pain, and I would really like to go back to exclusive breastfeeding…
    2 replies | 107 view(s)
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