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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:18 PM
    Hi, I believe the current recommendation from the AAP (it may be slightly different among different organizations) is that babies are introduced to solids at around 6 months of age. You have done that. If baby has other plans and is growing and developing normally, in all likelihood nothing is amiss and you can continue to offer solids when and how often as you please and not worry. As far as I know, there is not any dietary requirement that is not met entirely by breastmilk at this age assuming you are starting with an overall healthy, nutritionally balanced baby. The most common concern MIGHT be iron, but this is more likely a problem if baby was predisposed to be low iron in the first place- for example, a baby who had their cord cut overly quickly after being born, as is the case with most caesarean and other emergency type births. Even then, there is no reason to assume there is any issue there. If you want, you can get an iron screen. My middle child - now 10 years old- born via caesarean- did not eat any solids at 8 months. He did not start eating much of anything until he was over a year old, and only began to eat with any regularity at around 14 months. At 9 months he tested borderline with iron and since he had no interest in foods we tried iron drops, but different doctors gave us different opinions about whether the iron level was a concern or not, and since he hated the drops we stopped those. His levels were normal at 11 months, even though he still was...
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 06:57 PM
    It's good information to be aware of, for sure! :)
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:42 PM
    Yes I agree I am not sure why a mammogram is being talked of in this particular case, that would be something I would personally want much more clarity on from doctor as you suggest. But many nursing moms are at an age or health history circumstance where routine mammograms are standard, or for whatever reason one is ordered, and lactating mom is told they have to wean baby in order to have one. So, just putting it out there that weaning is probably not needed, and would in fact delay any exam. Either mom can have a mammogram without weaning or a different kind of exam. I was talking generally, not about op.
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 PM
    Hi my daughter is 8 months old this week and still has not eaten solid food or pureed food. When she turned six months old I started to try pureed food with no luck since then I've been trying almost every day and all she does is spit it back out. I'm not too concerned about that since I know that it can be normal for babies to take longer to get used to new foods. I breastfeed her exclusively and I'm wondering am I enough since she seems to be fussier than normal. I'm nursing her every 2 hours and I pump one time overnight since she sleeps through the night . She doesn't have any teeth yet and I don't see any teeth coming in but my concern is her iron levels I heard that babies need iron after 6 months in age and they need it from food instead of mom. Am I understanding this correctly?
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Today, 11:46 AM
    First of all, congratulations for giving your baby the best nutrition you can! You have come this far and that is a huge achievement. :hug I am sorry you are dealing with all these, it is hard to manage a baby, older kids, work and a home! I am not sure if your plan is to stop pumping altogether, or gradually pump wean, so that you don't deal with clogged ducts. Whatever you decide to do, please give yourself a pat on the back for coming this far! :)
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*jovadee's Avatar
    Today, 07:51 AM
    My 1 month old seems to be struggling passing gas sometimes during the day. His poop and pee output is fine, about 6-8 poops (yellow and loose) and 8-12 pees a day. At times he gets fussy and crys and starts kicking his legs and squirming while pushing and turning red in the face. Rocking him usually calms him but, Any advice on how to help him pass it? Any changes I should make in my diet? Thanks!
    0 replies | 53 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Today, 07:27 AM
    So today I think I have finally reached my limit with pumping :cry At this point I am not sure that the benefits of sending breast milk to daycare outweigh the negative impact this is having on me and my family. I am exhausted, exhausted from pumping, washing/cleaning pump parts, worrying about pumping enough milk, missing out on every coffee break and lunch break with my workmates. I have no patience anymore with my kids or DH. I should arrive home from work and spend time with my children, instead I am pumping to cover next days needs, panicking about scaling milk before it is too late, while my kids are begging me to interact with them. I wanted to make it to 12 months and then switch to cows milk but it is just not working. I wouldn't have made it this far without the invaluable advice I got on this forum so a big thank you for that.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 03:55 AM
    Yes. Possible, but not sure that its necessary. I, like you, am wondering what they are looking for. Localized area of infection or abscess can be seen on ultrasound, not so well on mammogram even without the patient lactating. Generalized breast pain can be very obscure as far as imaging goes. We scan a lot of patients with pain and I have yet to see a cause for it. Mind you, I am speaking specifically from an ultrasound standpoint. Obviously there are clinical explanations for pain. You may have something going on that doesnt present on imaging studies. My question would be, if you have a history of mastitis, would that not be an explanation for your pain? The only thing I can think of is if they are wondering if there is a mass blocking a duct, which I would think would be the least likely cause. Not to say that its not worth investigating, that's between you and your doctor. But given that you are breastfeeding and I think without a localized area, it may be difficult to find with either mammogram and/or ultrasound. Just throwing this out there, hormones are thought to cause breast pain in many women. I am not sure of the severity of your pain and if you have associated symptoms of infection such as redness, swelling, warmth, fever, elevated white blood cell count, etc. But occasional shooting pain MAY be associated with changes in hormones. Again, NOT a doctor.. just speaking from a little experience in an imaging clinical setting.
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 PM
    Thank you kmrs! I was wondering what else aside a mammogram could be done for breast imaging for a mom with a young baby who is making lots of milk. I mean, for one thing, ow. I have personally had 3 routine mammograms while lactating, but in every case my child was 24 months old or older so I was making much less milk than I would have been with a newborn. So it is possible to have a mammogram when nursing. I nursed child shortly before.
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    I have 2 comments to add: I have sent a message to Jack Newman from their website. It tells you specific instructions on info to give and as long as you follow, they will reply. I got a detailed response very quickly. Id say within an hour. Second, I am not a doctor, but I am an ultrasound tech. When you go to have your ultrasound, my guess is the radiologist (Dr reading your ultrasound) would recommend you do ultrasound only since you are breastfeeding. If they want to follow it with a mammogram, I would question why. Not to say there is no possible reason and that there aren't circumstances that would warrant one, but I would question it. Ive been scanning 3 years and have never known a woman who was breastfeeding to have a mammogram. Do you have a targeted area of pain and/or redness, swelling, warmth (etc)? If your breast pain is generalized, you may want to look into a facility that does 'complete' breast ultrasounds. We don't do them at our facility but know where to direct people that are interested in that so you may have to look around, but I would personally do that before having a mammogram.
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    Well I can promise this is not a boy thing, not that that helps you any! Late onset nipple pain is sometimes thrush. Is that at all possibly going on? Some babies do seem to nurse more voraciously than others. We used to call these barracuda babies. And babies do get better at milk transfer as they get older, which sometimes results in shorter nursing sessions. But, it should not be painful or injurious to nurse, ever, at any age. This points to a latch issue. Can you go back to WIC for help? I am a little confused why they had an LLL Leader helping you at WIC- WIC programs usually have a peer counseling program (and those peer counselors may or may not be LLL Leaders.) Also, WIC programs without any lactation services commonly refer a mom in need to local LLL. But some WIC offices have full lactation services that allow mom and baby to have a professional consult with a professional lactation consultant (IBCLC) and this may be a good idea if possible, since it is a bit unusual for latch issues to arise at this stage. Your WIC program may be able to tell you about any low or no cost options in the area for seeing an IBCLC if they do not employ an IBCLC themselves. You can also work on correcting latch yourself using different positioning and latching techniques. Positioning that allows baby to have their head tilted back so they come to the breast more or less chin first- without a tucked chin, in oter words, is important for a comfortable latch and...
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mom2jesserfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    I never went through this with my last baby. Is it a boy thing?
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*mom2jesserfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:14 PM
    I've been EBF my 5 month old son. We've worked on his latch with a LLL consultant at my local WIC department for a shallow latch. All was going well until he got a bit bigger. His suction is really strong and the bigger he gets, the stronger he's sucking. He's going through a growth spurt and it's killing me. He is cranky and wants to nurse all the time. He's waking 1-2 times at night now to nurse again. He has plenty of dirty and wet diapers along with weight gain, so I know he's getting enough. On top of that, he's been biting down on my nipples and thinks it's funny when I scream in pain. I dread when the tooth finally pokes through! What can I do? My nipples are so sore and I flinch when it's time for him to nurse again? :cry
    2 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:58 PM
    You do not know there are food intolerances. It is suspected by your baby's pediatrician but in no way proven that your baby is sensitive to anything you eat nor to dairy or soy specifically. Doctors leap to food eliminations because it is easy- for THEM. After all, it is not the doctor that needs to figure out how to take a major dietary component out of their diet just to test a theory. Also, testing if dairy or soy or anything else is a problem need not be a long process. If dairy is causing a problem, then eliminating all dairy for several days should show at least some improvement. In the rare case a baby is reacting to something in moms diet, Dairy is the most common culprit by far so it usually makes sense to start with dairy. If there is any noticeable improvement, you continue with the elimination and see what happens next. If there is no improvement at all, you put dairy back in and try eliminating soy. Some moms do both at once, and you can do that, but then you will not know which food caused the problems, assuming there is improvement indicating one of them is the cause. Then if there continues to be improvement off the dairy, after a few weeks of that, you can drink a big glass of milk and see if the symptoms resume. Because any improvement on the dairy free diet may very well have been coincidence. Reoccurring plugs and mastitis and now the blood in baby's stool are all indicative of over production. I forget if that is going on or not? Blood in...
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:38 PM
    It's me again. Alright so as y'all know I almost got mastitis AGAIN roughly 2.5 weeks ago. I had already been dealing with sharp pains throughout the breast, red nips, and tinder nips. Roughly a day or so after the mastitis issue, baby started to get the mucus poops.. and by mucus I mean REALLY mucusy. Also, they stink (compared to what they use to be) and are explosive (which they have always been I feel like). Several days later, my OB put me on Diflucan and we've been doing a treatment for thrush even though baby shows no signs we were both being treated. I was treated for about a week and a half before baby started, but now we have him on Nystatin (per his PED). I stopped Diflucan yesterday as my 14 day supply was up. About 2 days ago, the sharp pains came back. They aren't as bad but around day 4-5 of taking the Diflucan.. they had almost completely went away, but I still had the red and tender nips. But the pain has came back in the last 2 days. Fast forward. PEDS wanted to do a stool sample, and has done 2 so far. Both have blood in them, so she wants me off dairy and soy to test that. She also has referred me to a GI specialist. I saw my OB today and she did a culture of my milk for both bacteria and yeast/fungus. She also put in a referral to have an ultrasound done and said if that doesn't look ok, then she wants me to get a mammogram. She then prescribed me another 14 day round of Diflucan. My question is, I have read so many bad things about it.....
    6 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:32 AM
    Ok milk coming out of a wound on the breast is normal, plus one of the articles I came across trying to find more info for you said milk can come out of the Montgomery glands anyway. I am glad you are healing. If you continue to have any issues or concerns can you see an IBCLC?
    6 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*roschambon's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 10:09 PM
    Thank you maddieb and mommal for the advice and words of encouragement. After two days of just leaving it alone and rinsing it wit mild soap and water, that "thing" subsided. There is still something that comes out of it from time to time but it is not that swollen and painful anymore. I even tried to smell the discharge and examined it and pretty much it's like milk to me not pus. Ive also noticed that everytime I nurse or pump on the other side, that's the time the secretion comes out. And it does start to look like milk to me. Again, thanks for all your help.
    6 replies | 219 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:38 PM
    Here's what I think is important to keep in mind when contemplating night-weaning: - You can expect sleep to get worse before it gets better. A kid who is very attached to night nursing is unlikely to give it up without some level of increased sleep disruption. - You can expect some crying, because kids usually don't give up their favorite method of getting to sleep without being at least a little upset. Crying doesn't mean that you're "doing it wrong" or being a bad parent. Crying in the arms of a compassionate adult is not the same as a baby being forced to CIO all alone. - Sometimes night-waking toddlers are genuinely thirsty. A sippy cup or bottle of water is a great thing to have on hand. - The more dad or some other adult can handle the night-waking, the better. Babies don't expect to nurse when dad comes in the room, but they do expect it the moment they see mom. - It may he lot o avoid easy access pajamas. The more you can keep your baby's handstand mouth off your breasts, the less likely it is that she will end up nursing. - Communicate. Explain what is going to happen in simple language. "We are going to bed. (YOur nursing word) is going to bed. We will nurse in the morning, when the sun comes up." In the morning, reinforce the lesson. " You slept all night long! Now that the sun is up, it is time to nurse!" - If you decide to night wean, just do it. Vacillating, giving in one night but not the next- IMO that's likely to make night-weaning...
    3 replies | 436 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:29 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Nursing moms are exquisitely sensitive to their babies' presence in bed- their sounds, their breathing, their position... If a dad is worried about rolling on a baby, then it's the dad who should be moving out of the bed. Temporarily, anyways! The goal has to be to maximize sleep for mom. My kids were both evening screamers, and they could not be consoled by anything for more than 5 minutes, not even nursing. It sounds like you have a baby who can be quieted with the breast, so I encourage you to view that as an asset. Spend the evening just nursing and cuddling. Maybe catch up on a few podcasts or read a book. Let other evening activities go for now. Seriously, there are moms out there who would give their eyeteeth for some quiet evenings of endless nursing!
    4 replies | 204 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:17 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Absolutely no danger to baby from ingesting some blood from mom- it happens all the time, with no harm resulting from it. Yellow milk may be a sign of lower production in one area of the breast. Lowered production can cause milk to appear more "creamy" than watery. And lowered production is very common after interruptions in breastfeeding, e.g., mom pumping exclusively for a few days, a case of mastitis that prevents one area of the breast from being drained, a mom being unable to remove milk for an extended period...
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:07 PM
    :hug Try to keep in mind that when you zoom in very close on a baby's weight gain, you start to see a lot of day-to-day fluctuation which makes it hard to derive useful information about broader trends. Some days a baby may gain twice the normal amount, some days he may not gain at all- and this is why we generally weigh babies only every month or so. A month's worth of faster-than-average gain and slower-than-average gain gets mushed together and you are left with an average that really tells you something. Right? Hang in there, you are doing an amazing job and even if you are headed toward 100% formula, that is okay. What is important is that you are and have been doing your best!
    41 replies | 1945 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 05:12 PM
    Ok sounds like things are going better, that is great. When a mom is having trouble with the laid back nursing position, it often is due to mom leaning back too much. There is no need to lean way back. You can be almost sitting up, just slightly reclined. Also, baby can be in any position at all, including cradle, and coming to the breast from any position. Yes usually the position is shown in pictures with mom leaned quite far back and baby in the same alignment as mom. But that is NOT the only way to do it. All laid back means is mom is not ramrod straight or hunched over baby. But again there is no need to master many positions at this point. If a traditional cradle hold works well for you, fine, as baby gets bigger and longer, you will both naturally find other positions that work as well.
    12 replies | 355 view(s)
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