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  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 09:08 PM
    One of the more experienced ladies will probably address this better, but I just wanted to assure you that what you're describing sounds very normal for baby's age - babies nurse for both comfort and food, so it's natural for them to want to just nurse a while for comfort even if they've just eaten. It's also natural for baby to sleep best when close to you, even if it makes you feel like you're getting nothing done. At almost 6 months, my baby still takes a nap or two in my arms, at my breast - she can nap up to 3 hours that way! It sounds like baby was getting over fed with the additional formula and that's likely why she was so "easy" - her tummy was so full, she was very sleepy! The max of 3 oz every 1.5-2 hours from your husband/MIL sounds more normal - I believe, if I remember correctly, you're supposed to pump 1-1.5 oz for each hour you'll be away from baby, so that sounds about right. I don't think it's likely you need to worry about starving her - is she gaining well? Having adequate wet/poopy diapers?
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:08 PM
    How has weight gain been? Unless a baby is not gaining well, there is no reason to supplement with anything. And the first choice for supplementing would always be mom's own milk assuming it is available. This is accepted science. There is lots more I could say about how your mother treated your child but I am restraining myself. If you would like to learn more about the biology of human sleep and why there are very good reasons that breastfed (normal fed) babies tend to sleep shorter stretches than formula fed babies, and for much more information you may find helpful, I suggest the book Sweet Sleep.
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*skyanne's Avatar
    Today, 08:10 PM
    Hi ladies. I'm starting to think maybe I need to supplement, but I'm not sure. DD is 12 weeks old. My last day at my temp job was Friday. I worked 10 hour days for two weeks straight, and pumped every two hours while at work. My mom watched DD. At first, mom was feeding her 2 oz of my milk and 2 oz of formula (4oz total) every two hours. After my last day at work, I found over 20 oz of unused breastmilk in her fridge. Apparently she decided to start feeding her 4 oz of formula and 2 oz of breastmilk (6 oz total) because "It helps her sleep longer and I've got stuff to do. Your milk goes straight through her". Mom says she slept well and really didn't fuss much. Now on the other hand, when my husband and MIL kept her, they paced her bottles and the most she took was like 3 oz, every 1 1/2 - 2 hours. They said she was really fussy and only slept 30 minutes at a time, if that. Now that I'm back to being a SAHM, I'm nursing full time again. I feel like I feed her constantly. Sometimes she gets really fussy and the only way to calm her down is to nurse her, even if I know she's probably not hungry. The longest I can get her to sleep without holding her or putting her in her sling is 20 minutes. At night she can go 6 hours without feeding, but she has to be cuddling with my boob. So I'm starting to wonder if she's really getting satisfied. Mom made it sound like she was the easiest baby ever when she was on the formula..... I really don't want to supplement, but I don't...
    2 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:36 PM
    How is baby gaining? Usually a baby who's mom has overproduction gains quite fast. Babies wake and nurse frequently because their biology compels them to, not because they are hungry (as in, not getting enough to eat.) Babies nurse for both hunger and comfort, all at once, all tied together, there is really not much difference to a baby why he is nursing, he just knows he has got to nurse. This is healthy and normal. I strongly suggest the book Sweet Sleep for any sleep concerns. It should at least assure you that have done nothing wrong, and will give you idea to try to maximize your sleep. At 6 weeks, there is really not much to do to increase an infants sleep. A 6 week old sleeps how baby sleeps and that is, in short fragments. Sometimes there really is an issue. For example, allergies or reflux, causing baby to have discomfort that harms their ability to sleep. But the fact is sleeping in fragments is normal for quite a while. If baby has been gaining very fast, due to your continued concerns, block nursing may be appropriate. The Morhbacher article I linked should give you good guidance there. Since baby was treated for tongue tie, especially, you want to be very careful about reducing milk production. But you can take it one day (or part of a day) at a time. A day or two of block nursing is not likely to permanently mess up your production. My middle child also clicked. Click click click all day long. He did not have tongue tie, but I definitely had fast...
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*brittany1212's Avatar
    Today, 05:44 PM
    Thank you for the reply. I know babies are all different, but I was hoping my baby to have some sort of progress in the sleep department by now. I don't mind nursing him frequently during the day, but at some point I'd like more than 2 hours of uninterrupted sleep and am just worried it's something that I'm doing wrong that's making him wake up hungry so often!
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*brittany1212's Avatar
    Today, 05:41 PM
    Thank you for replying & for the links. I was pumping about 2 weeks pp but stopped doing that a couple weeks ago because I was worried I was creating a problem and wanted to regulate my supply. I agree that 10 weeks seems a little long for these continued problems. I'm reaching out now for guidance because I thought it would be more regulated by now. I leak a ton, to the point that is soaks my shirt down to my waist. I never feel engorged like I did when my milk came in. I feel heavy if I haven't fed him in hours, but not painfully so. I do practice breastfeeding positions that help gravity control the flow and it helps a bit. But he still seems super fussy after feedings like he has a stomachache. He constantly has hiccups and is very burpy/gassy. He got his tongue tie clipped at 6 weeks. I thought that his clicking would subside, but it's still present and from what I understand it means he keeps unlatching? Does that indicate oversupply?
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 05:28 PM
    That is a good point. I've been trying to fill them to five oz, but you are totally correct in that I don't always need five oz . . . Apparently I have no ability to problem solve anymore! I have a bag with 1 oz in the fridge right now, so maybe I'll just add tomorrow's to it and freeze it, which would make it 1 1/2 to 2 oz. I've been wracking my brain as to how to deal with having "toppers" and you just gave me the answer! I think I've convinced my husband to get into the freezer stash to help with the first day back at work. I'm not totally opposed to him giving her formula at the end of the day if she needs it, but I'd prefer to keep it to a minimum. He really wanted to save the freezer stash so that he could go up to his parent's house without me for a week or two . . .at first, I thought that would give me a nice little break but the more I understand breastfeeding and pumping, the more opposed I am to that idea. I am pretty sure that will affect my supply, and I don't have that amount saved anyway. I've convinced him we'll just have to go up together for a long weekend (as much as I don't want to go, they can't come to us, so I need to. They really want to meet her and I don't want to keep her from them just because it would be easier to stay home). At any rate, knowing I don't have to pump like a madwoman this week to have what I need for Monday is a huge relief, and I'll just deal with the first morning best as I can. My plan is to nurse her around 4 am...
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:39 PM
    I'll add one more possibility to mommal's list, which is that this could be a letdown issue rather than a supply issue. A clue to this would be that your breasts feel full after the pumping session. Some moms do have trouble letting down for the pump - after all, it's a machine, not a warm and soft baby the sight and feel of whom instinctively will trigger letdown! Then mom starts worrying about the letdown and that further inhibits letdown in a vicious cycle, because letdown can be a very psychological thing. So, another thing to try is to get yourself in a good psychological space to enable letdown. Minimize stress at pumping times; try distraction (reading, music, surfing the net, watching TV or a movie - whatever gets your mind off pumping and your eyes off the drops of milk coming out); look at a picture of baby or daydream about him when pumping; try meditation or relaxation techniques.
    2 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:30 PM
    Between 1 month and a year, babies on average drink 24 oz in 24 hours, ranging typically between 19 and 30 oz. So, 4 oz every 8 hours should be plenty, maybe even a little more than he usually gets - a meal at the breast often varies from nursing session to nursing session, and could be 1 oz for a quick drive-by snack, 2 to 3 oz for a typical session, and maybe 4 oz for a longer session after a longer stretch of sleep, for example. If possible you'll want to pump 8 times a day too, if that is what you usually do, and make sure you are using a good pump - if possible a double-electric, maybe think about renting a hospital-grade pump for those weeks. Paced feeding will help maintain a breastfeeding style of feeding: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf. If baby has not had formula before you might want to check whether he will drink it before the day of the procedure. I think in all likelihood he will return to nursing after this period of time, if not, treat it as a nursing strike, not weaning, and use back-to-breast techniques to get him back to nursing. Personally, I've had separations of up to 5 days from baby for work trips, and never had a problem with them resuming nursing, in fact they were always eager to do so. I know there have been threads on here about the dental work/mercury issue, but since I've never faced this situation I've never looked into it. You might want to search the forums a bit more or...
    1 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 04:21 PM
    I agree. My brother has that horrible fear of flying, our grandparents lived abroad so we traveled a lot as children and he was always sick too (throwing up the whole flight) because of fear and anxiety. It was terrible, it really can be disabling. So I have sympathy for your husband. On the other hand, at one point I had a roommate who was a psychologist and one of her specialty areas was helping people cope with fear of flying. For example, at one point she had a client who was adopting a baby abroad so she absolutely had to be able to fly to bring the baby back home with her. There ARE ways of helping this. My brother too has learned methods to cope - like mommal he prefers not to fly if at all possible, but, for example, he will occasionally fly to see me and my family. Given that this not only affects your husband's personal life, but that he also needs to travel for work as well (or at least it would make his life easier if he flew!), I would think that this is something that is worth addressing for his own well-being as well as all of yours. The bride, on the other hand, sounds like she is doing everything possible to be accommodating - I think it's really lovely that she is not only inviting baby to come (I've known plenty of brides who absolutely will not consider babies at the wedding) but also your mom.
    15 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:55 PM
    Sounds great, enjoy the meeting!
    7 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 03:53 PM
    Keep in mind that you don't actually have to fill the bags before your freeze them. Yes, that means you go through more bags, but since you are supposed to use the milk within 24 hours after thawing, it's probably a good idea to have at least some of the milk stored in smaller quantities. For example, let's say it's a Friday (assuming you work Monday to Friday) and it's afternoon, baby has gone through all the milk thawed so far that day, and needs just one more 3 oz bottle before you get home. At that point you don't want to have to thaw 6 oz because some of it likely will not be needed until Monday, and by then it has been sitting around for several days.
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mamawin's Avatar
    Today, 03:20 PM
    My DD is 10 months and she eats quite a bit more than what your doc recommended (and she did at 8 months as well). She's been an enthusiastic solids eater from the start and while I didn't (and don't) want her to wean I decided that her weight gain was my first priority and thus have allowed her to eat as much solids as she wants. She was a slow-gainer in the first six months when she was EBF and dropped from the 50th to the 25th percentile. Since starting on solids, she's maintained well around the 35th percentile. At first, the additional solids did seem to cause her to take less breastmilk. Now, though, she has upped her intake again and is continuing to eat a lot of solids, which thrills me! I'd encourage you to offer something different, especially if you're going to limit it to the amount recommended by your ped. There really is no nutritional value in cereal and most fruit/veggie purees have a low caloric-density (ie they have very few calories per volume). Things to try: avocado slices, sweet potatoes sliced in rounds, tossed with coconut oil (a great source of healthy fat) and roasted, crumbled ground beef, shredded chicken, pulled pork and eggs. These are the types of things we give my DD because, again, weight gain is my first priority. We really only give fruit puree when she seems constipated.
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 03:19 PM
    :ita Neither your doctor nor everything else you have read is right. There is no absolute amount that a child "should" be eating at any particular age. No absolute ounces, no absolute calories, no absolute frequency of meals, no absolute types of food, no specific variety or lack thereof. Watch out for ANY very specific feeding guidelines because they are either 1) Entirely made up or 2) based on some variable and vague generalization about nutritional needs that may have nothing to do with YOUR child. As well as outdated, as mommal notes. If you really want to understand this issue in detail, there is an excellent (short and very readable) book called My Child Won't Eat. It is not only for people whose children "won't" eat- it explains in great detail the science (and lack thereof) behind infant feeding guidelines and is incredible reassuring to any parent who is concerned at all about weight gain or food intake- too 'much' OR too 'little.' In fact I strongly suggest every parent read it. But as mommal says, it sounds like you and baby are doing fine. Personally if I had any concern about my baby's weight gain, I would encourage more frequent nursing if possible and not worry about solid intake. But there is usually no reason to withhold solids. As you say, you just do not want to push them. One easy way to be sure you are not pushing solids is to offer solids baby can pick up, (or dip fingers in) put in mouth, chew and swallow on his own. As to your question,...
    3 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*flutey16's Avatar
    Today, 02:06 PM
    Let me just start by saying how wonderful this forum and website has been for us! I have an 18 month old that I still nurse on demand (since I work, that's only 2x a day during the weekdays, and around 4x day on weekends). I am on my 4th cycle postpartum - the first cycle, I didn't ovulate, and the last 3 cycles, I have been ovulating (after about 7+ days of ovulation signals) quite late in my cycle (around CD 20). I have been charting so I know that I am ovulating, just late. I also have very strong PMS symptoms (bloating, ovulation pain, headaches, nausea) in the week before ovulation. My total cycle is around 30 days still so my luteal phase seems short. Pre-baby I had typical 28-30 day cycles, with ovulation at the midway point, with about 3-4 days of ovulation symptoms beforehand. Is late ovulation due to my continued nursing? We would like to start trying for another baby in a few months and I'm concerned that I would need to start nursing in order for my cycles to regulate. I was planning on letting my baby just self-wean but now I feel conflicted. I'm also one of the lucky ones in that breastfeeding made me lose all my pregnancy weight and then some - I'm a few pounds under my pre-pregnancy weight. Would this also have an effect on my ovulation? I feel very healthy - exercising 4-5x week, eating well and regularly, sleeping well.
    0 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*mjenness's Avatar
    Today, 01:29 PM
    Thank you ladies for all of your responds. It's so good to be reminded that this is temporary and will get better. Just when my LO one cry I just feel like this will never end. I am back on block feeding however shorter than last time. Two feeding pre side instead of three. Hopefully this will help calm my milk supply down a bit and help ease her intestinal discomfort. I am determined to breastfeed as long as I can. It's just hard when she is crying in pain and unhelpful suggestion from people around make me doubt myself and feel like there is something wrong with my milk. The probiotic supplement. How should I go about doing that? Thanks again for all your input and encouragement.
    6 replies | 293 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:34 PM
    3 possibilities: 1. This is a normal adjustment to supply. Most moms start out making more milk than their babies need, but as time goes on supply adjusts to meet demand very precisely, without a lot of extra milk left over to make you feel full or to pump out. 2. This is a pump issue. An underpowered or malfunctioning pump or incorrectly sized shields can affect output. 3. This is a mini-pill effect. The mini-pill is supposedly safe for breastfeeding, but anecdotal reports of supply reduction after starting the mini-pill or other forms of progestin-only contraception, including them Mirena IUD, are common. If this were me, I would do the following: - Go off the mini-pill and switch to a barrier contraceptive (condoms, cervical cap, diaphragm, sponge, etc.) - Pump more often. - Make sure your pump is in perfect working order and that you have properly sized shields. - Consider using a different or more powerful pump.
    2 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:28 PM
    Would it help to see a couples counselor about the air travel issue? It sounds like your husband's feelings about air travel rise to the level of a phobia or an anxiety issue, and that should be addressed so that you aren't hampered by his fear.. And I say this as someone who is so anxious about air travel that I pray on take-off and landing, and throughout the flight if there's turbulence. I will happily take a car trip over a plane trip even though I know that artistically speaking, air travel is safer than getting in the car to go to the grocery store.
    15 replies | 257 view(s)
  • @llli*pr2000's Avatar
    Today, 12:27 PM
    I need to travel to Asia for a week. I have had supply issues and have been using the Medela Symphony. I checked the voltage label which indicates it should be fine for up to 240V (implying it can be used with an adapter abroad). However when I called Medela Customer Service they said they do not recommend traveling outside the US with the Symphony. They recommend traveling with the Pump In Style. I was originally using the PIS and since I had supply issues, the LC recommended I switch to the Symphony which has been great. I used to get less milk when I use the PIS, and I am afraid that a week of using it will cause my supply to tank. Are there any other hospital grade pumps that I can travel internationally with? Any other ideas?
    0 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. I just want to reiterate that your baby's nursing style sounds very normal. 10 week-old babies are generally fussy and gassy creatures. Constant short nursing sessions and 2 hour intervals between nursing sessions are also completely normal. I known here are a lot of people who insist that babies "should" routinely go 3 or even more hours between nursing sessions, but this is a complete myth, based on the feeding patterns of intensively scheduled, formula-fed babies. For example, my mom recently told me about the difference between me, a breastfed baby, and my cousin "Bob", who was formula-fed. I nursed on demand around the clock, sometimes nursing several times inside an hour, sometimes taking a break of 2-3 hours. Bob, on the other hand, received large bottles of formula on a schedule, with bottles of water in between to keep him quiet in between scheduled feedings.
    5 replies | 118 view(s)
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