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  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:27 PM
    Update number who-knows-what: As is usually the case, supply did rebound fully after the dip at 40mg. I transitioned to 20mg/day (10/0/10) two days ago and have sustained 4-5ish feeds per day. I am amazed at being able to drop my dose by 83% and still have an appropriate supply! DS is doing extremely well and appears to be totally satisfied with the amount of milk and the option to still nurse whenever he likes. When he gets a large helping, he excitedly exclaims something like, "Milk!! Lots of it!" or, "Delicious milk!" mid-drink. It's adorable. He rarely wakes more than once or twice in 8-10 hours overnight to nurse. (This was my same boy who, until 1.5 would wake hourly!) We had occasion to visit his ped last week, and she was delighted at his growth--95th %ile height, 90th %ile weight, 95th %ile head. (Again, this is the child who refused effectively all solids until 2!) Height and head have always been >90th %ile, but weight dipped as low as 15th %ile when I began taking Dom after his weight plateaued, so it's rewarding to see him thriving! I'm now debating which pill to drop next, not that it really matters. :)
    59 replies | 4308 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:05 PM
    The longer nursing sessions are all about comfort and intimacy. If you can meet that need in part by other affection after you wrap up a nursing session (less so at night, as nursing is your tool for settling), I think you might be pleased at the result, and your dD will still feel valued and loved. :D I, too, have a boob magnet child. From about 3ish, when DS wanted to nurse non-stop and I needed a break, I'd let him go to town for 5-10 minutes after the milk stopped flowing, with lots of head stroking and kisses, but would then explain that my nipples become physically uncomfortable from the stimulation. He is generally happy with that explanation and seems sympathetic to my needs as well. As a post-nurse concession, I've offered for DS to snuggle and hold his boob of choice, to play with my hair as we cuddle, to receive a head rub, to do a combination of those things as we read, or to agree to a break period before resuming a time-bound duration of nursing. Different strategies work different days. Sometimes a little novelty--like building a nursing tent or bathing together and letting him float while latched on--make him feel extra special. When there isn't an urgent demand on my nipples, I find I feel a lot more generous in deploying them. I hope some of these ideas can help you. And, FTR, we nurse more than you at 3.5 and cosleep for naps and at night. So don't worry...there are like-minded--if even more crunchy--parents out there; we just might not be...
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*machy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:02 PM
    Hi, my son is starting to sleep most of the night with only one waking per night most of the time. I'm scared I'm going to lose my milk supply as Night time is the time I have the most milk and almost never have to supplement. I was hoping to be able to keep it to use during the day when I have a lower supply so I can eliminate the formula supplement. Pumping in the middle of the night is not an option. Is there a way to shift my schedule so I make more milk later in the day and less at night when he doesn't need it? He drinks it all in the morning or at least it feels like it.
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:53 PM
    Ok, I get it. I would suggest that whether or not your child will throw tantrums at 5, (or not listen to you at 15, for that matter) does not depend on how you parent now, or at least, not only on how you parent now. Anyone who claims it does is fooling themselves. You can't worry about how what you do or do not do today might affect your child years from now. This is where parenting/child rearing theories come in, and most of those are not worth the reams of paper they are printed on. Parenting is hard enough without trying to predict how what we do or say now will affect a child's personality or choices years from now. Your daughter is a real person with real needs now. And at three, utterly reliant on the adults in her life for everything. Children are incredibly powerless, and this must be tremendously frustrating. All you can do is meet those immediate needs as well as you can. And a basic human need is to be heard. A child is telling us something when they tantrum, when they cry, when they demand, and with the words they choose to use. And it is not always obvious what that is. I am sure I have mentioned the book "Kiss Me" a dozen times here. I have to say I truly love that book. He has one essay called "The Little Girl Who Always gets What She Wants" at the end of it that is just beautiful...
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 PM
    Ha ha, first off, please know that that Legendary thing is not me...the website deemed me that, for reasons I do not understand. Maybe it's nicer than saying "Won't shut up about breastfeeding." Anyway, please call me maddieb or Meg. I am too young or anyway, too stupid to be a legend. Ok, so it sounds like things are going really well, with baby more or less exclusively nursing, with the exception of the nipple injury, which I take it IS healing? Anyway, why, exactly, do you want to set up a pump schedule? And are you proposing something different from what you are already doing? I think I am missing something.... If pumping twice a day is working for you, fine, and if you want to pump in am and in pm, fine. There is no biological reason to pump on any particular schedule, so I would say, pump whenever it works best for you. Again while generally pumping is not required assuming baby is getting all baby needs at the breast, and instead is just extra work at a time moms really need no more work, there are situations it is a good idea to pump as I mentioned in my previous post. As long as you are not pumping to the point it triggers problematic OVER production, and as long as pumping is entirely comfortable and not causing further injury, then it is unlikely to be a problem. I assume your LC has been working with you on latch. here is a good article with overview of many latch and positioning ideas, just fyi: http://feedthebabyllc.com/latch-and-positioning/
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    Although i am quit certain she won't be fully weaned by 3, i do hope that at 3 the negotiations are successful a higher percentage of the time. My daughter is a very verbal communicator, but i can see that she gets overwhelmed by emotion and although i think she does understand me, it's hard to break through when she wants what she wants, especially if it's to nurse a long long time. As i just wrote to another responder, sometimes we are talking 30 to 45 min which really is beyond what i can do at this point. Although i do painfully endure it if i have the time and i can. I'm a working mom and with that sometimes comes guilt, even though i believe everyone has guilt in some form, no matter what they do. Bed sharing and nursing are things i don't discuss amongst friends. Most of my friends kids are much older - teens or 20s but even if they weren't i don't care for anyone's opinion. My point in mentioning that are that i can easily imagine what the input would be. Let her cry X days and it'll be done. No thanks - the physical discomfort of nursing an almost 3 year old beats the emotional distress that would cause her.
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:08 PM
    Nursing and almost 3 year old behavior are related but not related. Nursing sessions are at night before bed, upon wake up and upon return home from work. It is very difficult to get her off the breast and given my supply at this point, it is very very uncomfortable, often painful, but not so painful as compared to nursing her as a newborn back in 2012. Also comparatively she was a nurse all the time baby and to get to this point in the weaning process was a long arduous journey. She has self weaned to the level of nursing we are at today, but we've been stuck here awhile. As far as not getting off the breast, we are talking 30 to 45 min at times. Manageable as an infant or baby when the milk was flowing but nearly unbearable at today's milk flow and supply. When we're in bed at night and i nurse her down to sleep, she can be snoring away and i'll begin the process of gently, inch by inch, maneuvering my boob away and of course at that very last point where her mouth and my boob part company she wakes and wails and then we evolve to a major meltdown and subsequent long bedtime battle. Other nights she's just out and we're good. Some of the toddler behavior i described in my other response to maddieb.
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:05 PM
    Hi debbers, there are many moments I love nursing my 3-year-old and other moments where it drives me crazy. Or, I just need to take my older kid to school or go to work or whatever. I also seem to become really tender around ovulation time. I get through the "drives me crazy"/physically uncomfortable moments by telling her she can have X more sips (she usually negotiates on this - for example, if I say 2 more sips, she says 5 more sips, but then she sticks with the 5 more sips). I think feeling we both have a say in the nursing relationship works for both of us.
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*debbers's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:00 PM
    This is such a bossy, demanding time for the kiddo, sometimes i worry that my touchy feely acknowledgement and discussion of feelings will backfire and in a couple years i will be faced with a tantrum throwing, bossy 5 year old who does not listen. Ironically tonight she had 2 tantrums. I cooked baked sweet potato chips and piled them all into one bowl instead of putting on separate plates. I reached over to take one and she erupted and left the room screaming and crying. When i went after her and spoke softly to her she continued to scream and cry so i just waited patiently as there was no way to break through. Then i said, honey, i realize you are upset because i took a sweet potato chip out of the bowl... before i could finish my thought she screamed IT'S MY BOWL IT'S NOT YOUR BOWL AND THAT WAS NOT NICE OF YOU MOMMY TO TAKE MY SWEET POTATO AND PUSH ME AND SHOVE ME AND KICK ME okay well obviously that last part is not true and she has been adding that on to every tantrum lately. I continued to speak softly although i did say 'honey, mommy did take a sweet potato from the bowl but you know very well that i did not push, shove or kick you'. Anyway i coaxed her back (and was unable to navigate the bowl without triggering another meltdown.) Second tantrum was similar - she pooped in her diaper and when i approached her to change her more running from the room screaming (diaper changes are typically not an issue). Point being, i feel a little silly apologizing to a 2Y10M old...
    8 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:54 PM
    Thanks for the update!
    20 replies | 1008 view(s)
  • @llli*aprilfrogs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:05 PM
    Hi Legendary, Thanks for the reply and assistance. I have been pumping a couple of times a day, as I had seen a big dip in my supply while sick and was worried about losing my milk. Also, I am trying to build a little stash before I go back to work. I sometimes get called to stay longer hours and it would be good to have a back up. If and when we give a bottle it is usually only once a day and it is given by my husband. I haven't been pumping my second breast after nursing one to give in a bottle. Sorry if I wasn't clear. Since my daughter only takes one breast at a time I have been pumping the other breast as it is usually leaking and full. It is very time consuming and not what I want to do, as I want to breastfeed mostly for the time being. I am still having difficulty with my left nipple, as it cracked around the base and is still healing. The nipple shield is helping some. I hope to stop using them once healed. Our daughter lost 10% weight at her first check, but is steadily gaining back and we have another check in 2 days at her 2 week birthday to ensure she's up to weight. I have been meeting with a lactation consultant, but she's out of town till next week. I was thinking of setting up a pumping schedule for only a couple times a day for now after my daughter nurses. Maybe in the morning and then again at bedtime. Any thoughts on this? I was thinking it could help me keep a little reserve, but also keep the focus on nursing. Thank you for sharing the...
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:03 PM
    I want to preface this by saying I am not an expert or lc. Just a mom sharing what i think. I would encourage you to fact check everything. I agree that mother's milk tea is a good thing to try. Also, oatmeal seems to help some people. Lactation bars are so yummy. http://theecofriendlyfamily.com/2013/03/lactation-cookie-bar-recipe/ The dairy free version tastes a bit like coconut which I really like. It sounds like your session length is good and it is good that you are flexible with it. 20 mins is an average pump time that works for many mothers, but it is more important to figure out what works for you. 3 sessions over 10 hours is enough for some moms and not enough for others. Also, it sounds like you have good supply when you are at home, but you aren't responding as well to the pump. From my experience pumping more frequently and on a regular schedule may help you come closer to pumping the amount your baby is requesting. It's great that you are using paced bottle feeding and it sounds like you know that it will be important to work with the daycare to get them to do this. Now pumping in the car- I think if this works for you, it could be a great way to make your afternoons work. Being safe is most important. I was able to work it so I felt I was safe and it was such a great help for me.
    6 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:47 PM
    Yes, I totally agree. Do you even have to have a SW? I'm a little confused by all the SW and health visitor stuff. Why are they even necessary? They both sound ridiculous to me. What's worse, they sound incompetent in some ways, which cannot be helpful to you!
    13 replies | 424 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:16 PM
    It's not wrong, but it's not right, either. When a mom is told to nurse such and such side at such and such times, it usually means someone is overthinking something. Basically I would suggest that if all is going ordinarily, it does not matter what side a baby nurses from first. But since there is the concern baby does not get enough at the breast. I assume you want to do what you can to be sure baby is getting more at the breast more quickly. For that, I would suggest try starting with whatever side seems fullest to you and seeing how that works. That way, baby gets more milk more quickly from that breast, at the same time the other one is 'filling up." It is normal to not feel as full now that baby is nursing do much more often. Fullness is a symptom of not-frequent enough milk removal.
    3 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*bbmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:24 PM
    That made me chuckle. There are quite a few incompetent health visitors around these parts, unfortunately. If you remember me from when I was BFing my DD her weight loss was due to one of these incompetent hv's telling me to bf her exclusively till she was 6 months (when in fact she was very very allergic to my milk!).. And yes, I totally agree. This is a question I asked her (about how often to top him up) and she said, yes, after every feed, and that was after I'd already started to feed him 2 hourly! She decided how much extra DS needs based on how little weight he had gained over 2 weeks and what centile he was on in his 'red book'. As already said, I now nurse him every 2 hours, but quite often it's less than 2hrly (specially in the afternoon and evening). When ever I feel a let down, a tingle, he whimpers, sucks his hand, or anything that might possibly be him giving a cue that he wants a feed. I can't feed him too often, lol. I do breast compressions in the afternoon to evening as he gets frustrated if the let down doesn't happen quickly enough, so that gives it a little helping hand to happen. I start DS on the same side I finished on because that's what the health visitor said to do. Is that wrong? :shrug I agree that the other side would have more milk, but not by much since I'm nursing him on both breasts at each session. (I was originally only nursing him on one breast at a time and that was also back when my breasts actually felt full.. they haven't...
    3 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:15 PM
    Complain about an incompetent health visitor? Demand a second opinion from someone who knows about breastfeeding and normal gain? 5- 8 ounces gain per week reflects normal weight gain, but of course weekly gain is not the point. Gain rate tables/charts reflect average gain over months, not days or weeks. Individual babies will normally gain more or less depending on the week. Also, telling a mother to top baby off "after every feeding" shows ignorance about breastfeeding, because it is very inaccurate. A 2 month old baby might normally nurse as little as 6 and as often as 16 times a day. So which is it? Does baby need an additional 6 ounces a day, or 16? And how is the HV deciding how much 'extra' baby actually needs? iirc, one of the issues with weight gain was that baby was nursing quite infrequently. How many times a day is baby nursing now? If it is less than 10-12 times total, I suggest, increase nursing frequency. Nursing sessions sound fine and normal to me. If you are concerned baby is falling asleep or slowing down swallows to 'early' you could try breast compressions if you like. I am not saying they are needed, but they are not going to harm anything and may help baby get more at the breast each time. I don't understand why you are starting baby on the side he last finished on, however. Wouldn't the other side be more full of milk, typically? Baby is being topped off, so that means baby is getting a good amount of his nutrition from bottles. This...
    3 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*sacmd's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:38 PM
    Hi, I'm wondering if anyone can share any experiences that are similar to mine, and got better. My 4.5 month old has always been a very 'needy' baby in terms of touch. Until 6 weeks she literally would not be put down at all without screaming so we co-slept for sanity. Napping was in my arms, carrier, etc. Then, between 6 weeks and 3.5 months, things improved a little and we were able to lay her down in her crib for naps (short naps, never more than an hour) and at the beginning of the night at 7 pm, when she would sleep from 4-6 hours. She always napped better being carried or cuddled, but at least she would tolerate an hour while I threw together dinner, paid bills, etc. I tried to nap with her when I could. For the past month, she has hit the '4 month fussies', and I'm at work 3 days/week, and it is like having a newborn again! Doesn't want to be put down much at all, and now will nap only 20 minutes alone during the day, and will basically refuse to sleep in her crib at the beginning of the night unless she's totally exhausted--but then will wake up 40 minutes later and cry until we take her to bed. At which point she will sleep, but rouses much more unless our arms are around her or over her. Like, I have to physically touch her for her to settle (this is hard because she is restless, thrashing about and flinging her arms around. Not very conducive for my own rest at night). She is very clingy!! Has anyone gone through this stage and if so, when did your baby...
    0 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*bbmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:37 PM
    I'm in the UK. My sw is male. His wife bottle fed his children. He has no experience with breastfeeding at all. My LO has now regained the weight he should have put on and is back on his 'line' on the centile charts. I now wonder if he's gaining too fast thanks to an increase in my bfing him and the topups as well. He's a heavy lump now, lol, weighing 9lbs 12.5oz. He was weighed last week. He's now 11 weeks old! :) My sw is horrible. I'll leave it at that. Sorry..
    13 replies | 424 view(s)
  • @llli*bbmomma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:05 PM
    Hi ladies. I want to detail a typical nursing session by my son so that someone with a bit of experience can possibly point out where I am going wrong. I start by using the breast he fed from last during our previous nursing session. He latches well in the rugbyball hold position and sucks 8 or 10 times before I feel my breasts tingle and my LO begins to swallow. It generally goes 'suck-swallow-suck-swallow etc'and this can last for around a minute. Then he slows his swallows to every two or three sucks and after a further minute he is swallowing only every 6-8 sucks. After the 3rd or 4th minute he is falling asleep and will only suck 4 or 5 times every 20 seconds and then swallow. He pulls off or lets go by the 8th minute and I sit him up and wind him. We then repeat the process on the other breast. He gains about 5-8 ounces of weight every week which my health visitor says is not enough so I have been advised to give a 1 ounce formula top up after every feed. My LO nurses every 1.5 - 3 hourly and every 4 hrs at night. He has about 5-6 heavy wet nappies a day and poops maybe once every 3 days. His poop is green with yellow seedyness. Does anyone see a problem, and if so, have a solution to it? :shrug I want to ebf but my little man just seems to be lazy or something..and I've possibly not got quite as much milk as he wants/needs. Thanks for reading.
    3 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 AM
    Is nursing still uncomfortable? Is baby gaining ok? Have you been getting help with latch/positioning ideas to help nursing be comfortable? Because my suggestion would be to (if possible) stop all bottle feedings and just nurse. If you need to pump to build a stash for your return to work, then pump as needed for that. You probably need less than you think you do, because presumably you will be pumping during the work-related separations as well. Also, it is often suggested that moms pump some anyway if they are using nipple shields when nursing, as continued use of shields can lead to low milk production, so that additional pumping is a safeguard against that happening. But this does not mean baby needs to be given what you pump in a bottle. Also, how often you need to pump to safeguard your production is going to vary- some moms who use shields do not need to pump at all, and others pump after most nursing sessions, and everything in between. In other words, assuming baby can get enough to eat at the breast, there is no need to supplement baby with bottles, even if you are pumping. And there are good reasons to avoid bottle feeding for as long as possible, if possible. If a breastfed baby is supplemented, even with moms own milk, it messes up the normal breastfeeding pattern. This is why supplements should happen only if needed- if baby cannot gain normally without them. "Normal" breastfeeding pattern for a newborn is overall very frequent nursing, at...
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*kristalee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:15 AM
    Is your 12 month old eating solids? I find my son sleeps better if I give him a snack before bed (about an hour after dinner at 5.) but my son is also not nursing as frequently in general as yours. Some babies nurse more if they have stomach upset as its their only tool for comfort. At 12 months milk no longer needs to be your child's primary source of nutrition so solids may help stretch out nursing sessions and help lengthen sleep. I would definitely avoid dairy until you rule it out. It could be another food sensitivity tho. My first born had wheat, dairy and soy sensitivity/allergy but grew out of them by age 2.5 my second had a dairy allergy and I still avoid it at 15 months. He will eventually grow out of this. I know it's hard I'm still exhausted many days. Last night my 15 mo old woke up when I went to lay down, then at 2/3am my 34 mo old woke up because he wet his pull up and if leaked, then at 4-5am my 15 mo old woke up to nurse and eat before finally falling back asleep at 6. The latter is an almost every day occurrence. Praise Jesus that my husband is able to help me sometimes in the mornings so I can get another hour or so of sleep after nights like this. I have tried to set myself a 9pm bedtime no matter what the house looks like. (Tho I forget sometimes.) would it be possible for you to get to sleep earlier?
    5 replies | 414 view(s)
  • @llli*kristalee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:44 AM
    You know your nursing around your toddler when your toddler nurses his froggie when he sees you nursing his little brother.
    657 replies | 156915 view(s)
  • @llli*kristalee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:56 AM
    Update my son is almost 15 months now and still breastfeeds once or more a day. Usually wakes between 4-5am to breastfeed and snuggle. Tho periodically sleeps thru until 6 or 7am. I'm surprised I even have any milk left. I tested by hand expressing and there is still a good amount in there. I don't feel a let down at all and don't hear him gulping but I know it's there. I feel good knowing it helps balance out his nutritional needs even tho it's no longer the main source. I do notice he wants to breastfeed OR just snuggle more if I've been separated from him or if he's been busy playing for a while. He takes snuggle breaks more than BFing breaks tho. So I think he will probably fully wean before age 2.
    20 replies | 1008 view(s)
  • @llli*aprilfrogs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:47 AM
    Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and like most new Mom's in need of some guidance. Here's my quick story. I just delivered a sweet baby girl 12 days ago. I planned to breastfeed at home for 4 weeks, then pump and breastfeed in preparation for returning to work at 6 weeks. I hoped to have a little freezer store and our daughter used to switching between nursing and the bottle well before going back to work. The first week of nursing was hard, but we were doing ok. I had a few small damaged areas on my nipples, but nothing bad. Then the engorgemnt hit at the same time I developed mastitis pretty bad in the right breast. I was almost admitted to the hospital, but was able to stay home for recovery. I was relying a lot on my left breast to nurse and developed a large crack all around the base of my nipple. Let me tell you, one challenge after another. I was in so much pain and so ill that we decided I would pump as much as I could tolerate and bottle feed my milk. We had to do that for 3 days. Our daughter was really missing nursing and was suckling on anything at night. Bottle feeds are so much quicker and she missed our nursing time. I finally felt better enough to try again and with the assistance of nipple shields and we are making it. I'm just so unsure of how to continue this system. Currently, my daughter will breastfeed for 15-20 mins on one breast and then she is done. She won't take the other breast, so I've been pumping the other breast right...
    3 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 AM
    I agree with bxlgirl, there is nothing wrong, nor are you doing anything wrong, however I do think that your babies weight gain and that pump output suggests you are seeing milk production that is on the high side. Which is normal (as in, not really a big problem or unusual and also temporary) but can be problematic while it is happening mostly due to the issue of mom getting engorged. One thing to keep in mind is that pumping is not part of 'normal' breastfeeding. Every time you pump, you are telling your body to make even more milk than your baby needs. This can cause what is a normal, temporary situation to become one that is problematic. This does not mean, never pump. If it is necessary to avoid getting truly engorged and uncomfortable, then ok. The most important thing is to avoid that. However, I would suggest be very careful about only pumping when needed, and only pump just enough to relieve the pressure. I would also suggest hand expressing instead. But probably the best way to handle this period is to encourage baby to nurse as often as possible, night and day. Here is what you do not need to worry about: Baby wanting to nurse often, even several times an hour, this is normal, and this is actually good- the more often the better. baby nursing for short sessions is also normal, nor need you worry about baby not "emptying' the breast. It is also fine to let baby nurse one side at a time, as long as baby is nursing with good frequency. If baby wants...
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:56 AM
    Based on what you're saying about your afternoons and your commute, I would recommend trying this. I thought it was a crazy idea with my first and didn't bother with it, but knew I had to do it with my 2nd baby. I now can't believe I didn't do it with the first baby! If you're driving around for visits, you could probably fit a 10-minute session in on occasion. I keep one pump at work and one in my car (my free insurance one is in the car) so that makes it easier. Also, it wouldn't hurt to try some Mother's Milk tea for a little boost. It's not as harsh as taking fenugreek (which gave me oversupply 2x) but it seems to just get me an extra ounce or so here and there, which is something.
    6 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:04 AM
    Thank you for the help and ideas. :) Anywhere from 15-25 minutes. I set the timer for 15 minutes but will keep pumping if milk is still coming out until it stops. I have done longer when I'm on the phone, etc. I can try to do this--earlier is easier due to my work duties. I've been pumping as soon as I get in to work, which is pretty easy because I rarely get interrupted that early but as the day goes on I get more and more interruptions. It might help to put it on my calendar at 2 hour intervals--I can try that anyway. I've been able to always get in three sessions at least. This is not as hard when I'm in the office, but my job means I have visits and often meetings in the afternoons, and my visits are on a timeline. I often don't know until that morning or the day before that I have a visit--and my clients can be very particular about timing. A lot of them aren't awake until afternoon, and I'm out and away from the office frequently in the afternoons. So, it's harder some days than others. Some days it's easy but then the next day I might not have any time at all past noon. I'm bad about timing my visits to keep them short but I did buy a watch to keep better track and I'm trying.
    6 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:46 AM
    Hi mama, congratulations and welcome to the forum!! I'm not a doc but what you're describing sounds like a typical breastfeeding stage, where your body tries to figure out if you're feeding one baby or multiples. Your supply will taper down to the perfect level soon, but in the meantime, a girl has got to get some sleep, and especially the mother of a newborn!! You could try seeing if baby is really serious about sleeping: try giving a massage around her hairline like an annoying shampoo. Burp (or try to burp) her, undress her down to a nappy--all of these things can rouse a snoozing baby to nurse. One of the beautiful things MaddieB said around here is that nursing on cue is also nursing ont the mother's cue, so if you feel she should be nursing, go for it. But yours might be gaining well and ready to continue sleeping, despite your efforts. Mine did the same. Congrats, that is a baby that is developing well! So you could try some classic oversupply strategies, like the curious but effective practice to put raw cabbage leaves around the breast (during the night, yes, but just till you feel less full, not all night) or drinking a mint herbal infusion before bed, since mint can decrease supply. You can also pump the least bit possible to take the edge off, or do the pump equivalent of block feeding for just a few days: try to pump off from one breast and leave the other alone as much as possible, then the next time you wake up to put baby on the full side and...
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