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  • @llli*xiaoshira's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    not sure how much I can help... I've breastfed my daughter since birth but I have supply issues/she gets bottles at daycare and she throws a FIT during most daytime nursing sessions and is extremely annoying to nurse. How I cope with this is that when I know she's hungry + I have low supply, I feed her a couple of oz of EBM first and then latch her. Helps if it's during a tired time (before naps) too.
    4 replies | 209 view(s)
  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:44 PM
    You might be a positive example to some people and not even realize it! Congratulations, by the way, on dealing with the question beautifully!
    17 replies | 504 view(s)
  • @llli*xiaoshira's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:32 PM
    Just a followup question here (which I might also post in a separate topic) - I am sometimes too empty for my baby, and she just refuses to nurse when she's hungry and I don't have anything. She'll suck for a few seconds, figure out not much is coming, and freak out. This behavior, which happens most at the end of the day, then decreases my supply! Right now my solution is to give her 2 oz EBM and then put her back on the boob. Then she'll at least take it! But I know giving her EBM also decreases supply. Sigh!
    13 replies | 314 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:01 PM
    Well, if 4 oz of supplement is all it takes to keep your baby's weight gain on track, I think you're doing wonderfully well! When you pump, how much milk are you getting? When there's a lot of pain, it can be hard to respond to the pump...
    63 replies | 1928 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:59 PM
    Seeing as it took like a week to get to see anyone from either of the two WIC offices and several of the other things dealing with public assistance lately, I'm a little bit over them!!! (It took me DAYS of calling and calling and winding up in the phone loop for ages then getting hung up on repeatedly just to REPORT the baby's birth to Medicaid.) I've spent over a week where I was trying to supplement less than 4 oz. At about 3 3/4 oz we seem to maintain weight at 2-3 oz we loose a little ground over a few days and at 4 oz we gain a tiny bit.
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:03 PM
    You don't have a pump. A malfunctioning pump that is out of warrantee is not a pump. If you had an old infant car seat that was past it's expiration date (yes, they have expiration dates) would a free car seat program refuse to give you a new one and tell you already had a car seat? Even if it worked perfectly? No way. I promise you the hospital will not let a parent drive home with their infant in an expired infant seat. WIC should get you a NEW and proper pump. That is total nonsense! (I am mad at your WIC program, not you!!! But I admit it, I am mad. You have been working too hard to have to deal with this kind of nonsense.) You can play around with your pump or try a different pump if you like. Just be careful to not cause more damage. Pain is your body telling you something is wrong. But I can't help feeling you need a pump UPGRADE, not to try using a pump that is even less appropriate for your situation. 4 ounces is a really small amount to be supplementing. Which is good! But sometimes those last few ounces are the hardest to let go of. Have you tried reducing it further for just a few days and dealing with the fussiness? As far as weight gain 'staling'-how is that being measured? Weight gain is not typically steady. If your baby is a healthy weight at this point, a really think that a few days of not getting those 4 ounces should not hurt anything. If it scares you too much, maybe you can try going down only a little at first, to 3 or 2 ounces supplement...
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:35 PM
    on another note. I seem to be stuck at about 4 oz of supplement per day. So far when I try to reduce much below that, weight gain stalls and baby is hungry. Pumping isn't going well (seems to hurt no matter what I do even at lowest setting. Perhaps pump is bad.) 6 week follow up with OB this week, will ask if they have recommendations to help me get to 100% BF. While I am supplementing I'm scared to quit pumping but the fact that it hurts makes me worry that it is doing more damage than good. I do supplement using the Medela SNS so it isn't like I'm missing out on the stimulation. However, getting a good painless latch while using the SNS is often very difficult.
    63 replies | 1928 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:20 PM
    That and learning to nurse in a baby carrier. Though my babe seems to pass out quickly and sleep a lot in the carrier so I worry a bit that he doesn't eat enough on days he is in the carrier too long. I hope that as he gets older he will be more likely to wake on his own and demand food as needed. at night doesn't seem to be a problem, he spends a large % of that latched on while we sleep. He will root and latch in his sleep when skin to skin with me, except when in the carrier.
    63 replies | 1928 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:34 PM
    I did not get to try with a different pump (apparently since I have a pump, I can't get one through WIC and even if I could I would only be able to borrow it for a Month, but that would require giving me a whole different accessory kit and since resources are limited......bla bla bla.) But I have one of those hand operated piston things that can pump manually, even at the lowest setting it is a little uncomfortable. Perhaps that is because the electric has left me bruised or tender??? Perhaps I would have to wait a couple days without pumping and try that again to see what happens? Since I have extra tubes for the pump, I think I'll do an experiment. Cut a couple tubes and use an irrigation fitting T and a bit of the extra tubing to be able to reduce the suction more. Won't cost anything but a couple of spare bits of tubing which I have and won't hurt to try that. I managed to reduce the supplement down to 4 oz without issues but when I try to reduce down less than that the weight gain stalls and I have a fussy hungry baby. I may need more help getting to the 100% breast fed stage if it is possible. I have my 6 week OB appointment in a few days and I'll ask them if they have any recommendations, like a lactation consultant locally to recommend or medications (we do have a compounding pharmacy near by that mixed up the petocin (sp?) nasal spray so I expect they can do domperidone if I get a script for it. The Mother's milk tea, red rasberry leaf,...
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*elisabet's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:24 PM
    Its so nice to get all kinds of advise. Im actually at my in laws this weekend and I was asked if she was still breastfeeding and I just calmly said YES! And nothing more. And I got no more questions about it :cheer The best thing was that I didnt feel the need to explain and I was glad with my answer. My boyfriend sister has a girl who is 6m younger than our daughter and she is breastfeeding her, but regularly explains that she is about to wean her. I can tell she thinks her girl is too old for this stuff and weaning her is taking allot of effort. I have always been very understanding and supportive but she has not been the same with my choices :/
    17 replies | 504 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:33 AM
    But did you have the same issue with a different pump? Hospital grade, new pump? I thought you did? Generally, age of pump matters. Yes some seem to go years and years without a hitch. But in many cases, an older pump can seem to work but actually be malfunctioning, causing both painful pumping and/or poor milk removal, (not necessarily both together.) I was helping a mom a few years ago who had EPd with her older child for over a year. After having latch issues again, she decided to ep again WITH THE SAME OLD PUMP. She got ok milk extraction, but it was very very painful to pump. I told her it might be due to pump motor malfunction but she said the pump had always worked fine etc. Anyway, then she went away on a trip and forgot her power cord, and had to run the pump on batteries. Result-much more comfortable pumping! Who knows why, but it certainly indicates the pump was malfunctioning. The point is, pumps are machines and machines break down. A breast pump is supposed to extract milk efficiently and not hurt mom while doing so. If it is not doing those things, isn't it likely the issue is the pump, at least partly? But moms always blame themselves. I also wonder how much you need to be pumping at this point. Are you still reducing supplements? I am really concerned that this pain means continuing trauma to the nipples and breast tissue and that is a potential issue for many reasons.
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:34 AM
    I don't think I have thrush. The pain seems to be worst while actually trying to pump. If I have just pumped not too long ago (or have pumped more than a few times in a day), my nipples will be very sore and the aerola tender. This can make nursing uncomfortable when babe first latches on or if he gets a bit impatient and starts pulling or fussing or playing with the nipple. I have an OLD pump in style pump with the little rubber strength dial. I can hardly feel the difference between medium and low, it is all a bit uncomfortable. My nipples seem to move pretty freely in all the flanges. The medium leaves me feeling a bit bruised. I have the small that fits inside the medium which doesn't seal perfectly so I wind up with a dark red ring on the outside of that flange where it is inside the medium which doesn't seem good and it still leaves my nipples/aerola feeling bruised. The large on the personal fit connector seemed maybe slightly better as far as bruising but it leaves my aerola really swollen/sore along with the nipple and I don't think I get as much milk out using it. I also tried the extra large but that wasn't any better than the large.
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*pteroglossus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:16 AM
    Mine (2.5) will cry to nurse when she doesn't get something she wants, or if she get's in trouble. It's like a consolation to her. Maybe yours is stepping up the nursing because of more conflicts in other areas? Often I can distract. But if I am not too busy I just nurse her and the problem is solved immediately. Personally I would not give in to things like keeping the boobs out, or nursing right when I am abut to get in the shower. If she asks in a store I will just say ok we can nurse when we get home. I will often say "we can nurse when I finish X." Personally I would not try to potty train and do any major weaning at the same time. Whichever feels more important, do that first maybe? For me, it would be potty training first, but I see from many on the list that is not the case necessarily for all parents/kids.
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*avesnovuelan's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:54 AM
    I have pain with pumping also. How high of suction are you using? I can't turn mine up past 3. Also do you ever get nipple or breast pain when you aren't pumping? Any chance you could have thrush?
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*boob.traveler's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:50 AM
    Argh, this pump and dump myth lives on....I have the InfantRisk app on my phone. It actually says that morphine has poor oral bioavailability, that is, not much is really absorbed through the mouth. Probably safer than Percocet, which tons of c-section moms take while breastfeeding newborns, not toddlers! Both are yellow or "probably safe." What was the med you were sent home on? Really any opiate is going to fall in the same overall risk category.
    6 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*lllmeg's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 06:20 PM
    I think worrying is normal, especially if there were issues with an older child (or previously with the same child) and also if one baby has very different behavior than older sibling(s). I think it is pretty typical for baby to be more distracted when there is more interesting stuff going on, and having a four year old sibling probably means more interesting stuff is going on! IN one of my favorite books, My Child Won't Eat, the author talks about the concern that lead a mother to think something is wrong with how her child is eating (including nursing.) This section is called "Breastfeeding Without Conflict' And one part he discusses something he calls the 'crisis at 3 months.' I am thinking of you as I read this over. I truly cannot put down here what he describes so eloquently, so I can only suggest you get a hold of the book. Also If you pm me I will see if there is a way I can get this info to you. You may think it does not apply to you of course, but it contains so much wisdom overall about babies and nursing that I love it. But here is what I wonder about. In the normal course of breastfeeding, a baby in the early weeks is quite likely to have to deal with some fast letdown as a bit of overproduction is typical at this age. As milk production slows or 'levels out' the flow will become less, but not necessarily slow, if that makes sense. This is normal. Most babies will experience this to some degree. So I find it interesting that so many seem to have so much...
    4 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*safitu's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 06:15 PM
    So sorry you are going through this. I went through it and know it is very very stressful. It will get better. The first day or two after revision were the worst and it took about 2 weeks to feel sort of normal again. Any chance you have oversupply or overactive letdown? it sounds like the symptoms you were experiencing prior to revision *could* have been due to that. As the baby refuses to nurse, your breasts may be filling up and when she does latch she may be getting blasted. If you think this is the case maybe you can hand express or manually pump some off before latching her. You might also want to try to dream feed her, feed her in a laid back position when she is sleeping or drowsy. If it upsets her just try again later. I would also suggest skin to skin and wearing her in a sling or wrap (not sure how old she is?). Hope things are better now or will be very very soon.
    3 replies | 166 view(s)
  • @llli*safitu's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 05:51 PM
    My opinion, as someone who got a revision when everything was going fine (there were problems but I see now they were either normal newborn things or due to oversupply) ...If everything is perfect, don't get it clipped. No pain, good weight gain? Leave it alone and enjoy your time with your beautiful baby. My baby was gaining a lb a week before the tongue and lip tie revisions, after it her weight gain slowed. She began clicking, and swallowing tons of air, she refused to nurse temporarily, she stopped sleeping well and she stopped flanging her upper lip out. And mind you, I got the ties diagnosed and revised by Dr Kotlow, who is the fore most expert on tongue tie and revisions in the US (perhaps in the world). Personally, I would not even bother seeing the dentist. So he tells you the baby has a tie... the question is : does it cause any problems for YOU or your BABY. You dont have a magic ball to know whether it will cause problems down the line (dental, speech) but usually only the most severe ties cause those kind of problems, and if it were that severe you would probably have problems with nursing now. Also consider , at your baby's age, that you will need to find a dentist or ENT who does laser revision, as the nerve endings in the babies mouth are now developed so clipping with scissors would be very painful and require general anesthesia.
    7 replies | 207 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 05:24 PM
    Help?!? Pumping seems to hurt no matter what I do. I've tried different sizes of flange (from small, medium, Large and XL Medela.) I've tried lubricating with some edible oil but so far even when I wash it off, the baby objects to three different oils I've tried and the oil. The oil seemed to only help a tiny bit anyway. Most of the pain seems to be from the suction and pulling. I'm having trouble figuring out how anyone manages to pump at all let alone get enough milk out to pump exclusively. Are there ways to make it painless? Or is it just too painful for some people?
    6 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 02:36 PM
    It is hard to pump on top of taking care of a newborn and a 3-year-old! A lot of moms worry about being "empty" if baby wants to nurse right after pumping. The lactating breast is never empty though - at most baby just has to nurse longer to get all the milk he wants - which of course is great for further stimulating supply.
    4 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*modestguineapig's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 01:49 PM
    Thanks so much for the responses- very encouraging! I am pumping about once a day, usually after the morning feed when he takes a good nap. It is so difficult to coordinate pumping after feedings when I have a 3 year old to take care of on top of his erratic schedule.
    4 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*fshah's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 12:53 PM
    Thank you ladies! After first 2-3 months I enjoyed BFing my daughter very much. I also used to keep a blanket with me & would nurse her in the car if we were out & about. And after weaning her at 18 months, I missed the bond & closeness. With my little guy, I know I have enjoyed the first at least 6-10 weeks for sure. Even now, I enjoy the night feeds & any feeds where he is sleeping while nursing. When he is awake he is also very much distracted. Here is the thread about Fast letdown: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?119884-Overactive-letdown-amp-engorgement-in-mornings It came back up when he ate only 5-6 mins on one side only for 2-3 days & that resulted in me being full all the time. Once my body adjusted the supply we started to deal with slow letdown on left side & he used to get upset. He would only latch for 2 seconds & pull off & re-latch & this would continue until I change side.
    4 replies | 176 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 12:10 PM
    It's hard for toddlers to buffer their emotions. My toddler will go from content to crying in a heartbeat - whether because she's bumped her head, been told she can't have something she wants, or whatever else. (My LO got all upset by a piece of lint on the floor the other day - she thought it was a giant bug.) And nursing just makes it easier to get back to content from crying! The way I think of it, toddlers are realizing that the world can be upsetting, and nursing reassures them that they have someone who can help them cope with the upset. I can't tell you how often I wish my almost-four-year-old was still nursing so I could help her in the same way! Because there is still plenty that upsets her, too. I also think sometimes nursing gets caught up in the frustration that sometimes comes with parenting a toddler. My LO might be driving me crazy because of boundary-testing, stubbornness, etc and then constant demands to nurse can be one more thing that she is doing that is driving me crazy. But sometimes nursing actually completely changes the dynamic - maybe what she's really trying to do is get my attention, and nursing reminds her that she has it, and reminds me that really she is just this little person who can barely understand all the things she is feeling, let alone communicate them. And that she has an instinctual need to know that she IS being protected and cared for by someone who is capable of doing so, because at the age of two she most definitely...
    9 replies | 224 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 11:53 AM
    There is no window of opportunity for creating adequate supply. It is certainly a little easier to build supply in the first few weeks/months after birth, but it's not impossible thereafter. Remember, after the first few days, milk supply is literally in your head! Stimulation of the breast by nursing or pumping sends a message to the pituitary gland in the brain, causing the pituitary to pump out prolactin, which signals the breast to make milk. Want to make more milk? In general the best way to go about it is to give your pituitary more signal by nursing or pumping more. I think it's a great idea to work on weaning off the supplements at this point.
    4 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 11:42 AM
    You're not using a ton of supplements - baby's probably getting around 80% of his milk from you. My guess is that with a little effort you probably could eliminate the supplements. Definitely worth a try at least! Are you pumping at all when supplementing? Here's an article from kelly mom about weaning from supplements: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/basics/decrease-formula/ Of course you'll want to keep a close eye on weight gain and diapers as you do this. It looks like in that last week baby gained 5 oz which is on track (http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/weight-gain/, even without a full week post-clipping. So I think that's very encouraging. And it's great that latch is improving.
    4 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 11:31 AM
    IIRC- and it's been 8 years so take this with a grain of salt!- I started with 6 tablets per day (2 at breakfast, 2 at lunch, 2 at dinner). I think they might have been 5 mg tablets, though, so the dose would be the same. When I was ready to come off it, I tapered the dose, dropping 1 tablet a day, waiting a couple of days, and then dropping another. How has baby's weight gain been?
    1 replies | 87 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 11:23 AM
    I know it must be extremely hard to be worrying about what you will feed your baby if your milk runs out. I'm so sorry you had to toss your stash. At this point, I think it might be worthwhile to look into donor milk- available through milk banks or from trusted donors- and talking to your pediatrician about what formulas to use if baby has an allergy to the ordinary stuff. I know that there are formulas made for very allergic babies (e.g. Alimentum, Nutramigen), and if you need to supplement that might be the way to go. Regarding finding a doc who is willing to at least discuss the possibility of a fecal transplant, you might simply want to google "stool transplant Sweden". I did that and found some likely avenues...
    5 replies | 289 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    April 19th, 2014, 11:16 AM
    :ita with LLLMeg. In my experience, breastfeesing almost always gets much better for almost all moms. Most of the annoyances of nursing a young baby are just due to the baby being small, young, uncoordinated, fussy- basically, to the general characteristics of a young baby. There are certainly exceptions to this rule- there are moms who just don't enjoy nursing and never will, mostly due to the issues that LLLMeg mentioned above. But if you ever found yourself enjoying nursing your older child, or at least got to a point where it was tolerable, then you're almost sure to get to that point again.
    4 replies | 176 view(s)
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