Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Forums Last 30 Days Clear All
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:45 AM
    Hi laylas.momma. The behavior you describe could mean many things and is usually simply normal. Slow weight gain could be an indication of low milk production. But it is also possible that the problem is with how well baby can transfer milk. Or slow gain is related to baby not nursing often enough or not nursing long enough when baby nurses. Very rarely, poor gain has nothing to do with intake and indicates there is a medical concern. Also, gain is tricky to measure especially in the first several weeks for multiple reasons. Since baby is pooping within normal parameters, that would seem to indicate that baby is getting enough milk and in fact what you are seeing with the gain is scale or human error with the weight checks. Since you are concerned, my best recommendation to you is to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) for a complete breastfeeding assessment. They should watch baby nurse, do a before and after nursing weight check, take a full history and discuss with you your baby's nursing patterns. They should be both trained and experienced. If you see a competent person, they should either be able to offer reassurance, or, if there is a problem, give you a common sense and breastfeeding supportive plan for addressing the problem. They should also provide follow up appointment(s) or at the very least follow up contact. Unfortunately, too often when there is a question of gain, many pediatricians turn to supplementing baby too quickly and...
    1 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    Today, 08:13 AM
    My one month old recently started tugging at my nipple and stretching her whole body when she feeds as if she's trying to get more milk but is frustrated. Last night she would cry when I pulled her off and fuss even on the boob. I should add that she quickly gained back to birth weight but since that weight gain has been slow (.5 ounces a day). We get plenty of pee diapers but poop frequency varies - some days multiple smaller poops and some days 1-2 larger poops. It seems as if she wants to nurse constantly during the day, but will go 4+ hours at night if I let her. I also had mastitis about two weeks ago and was treated with an antibiotic. Are these signs my supply is low? We have a weight check on Tuesday and doc may recommend supplementing. How can I supplement while also attempting to maintain my supply so she can still benefit from the health benefits of breast milk?
    1 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:50 PM
    :ita The first thing to try in a situation like this is nursing the baby a lot more often, including overnight. And the first thing to avoid is reducing production. Also, there is no such thing as "low calorie milk". Where in the world did your doctor come up with that absurd idea? When it comes to weight gain, what matters is the overall volume of milk, not the quality of that milk.
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:34 PM
    Hi maddox. Has anyone suggested nursing/feeing your baby more often? It actually would be pretty unusual for a baby to get enough to eat to gain normally nursing only 5 times in 24 hours. Normal feeding patterns for this age is 6-12 times in 24 hours. So my best suggestion is to encourage your baby to nurse more often. This is likely to help with every issue you are having- the slow gain, your feeling of being overly full in the morning, and plugs. Additionally more frequent milk removal will ensure that you make enough milk going forward for your baby. And while your expressed milk looking "watery" is actually entirely normal and does NOT mean it is "low calorie," nursing overnight at least once or twice will also probably lead to your milk not being so watery looking when you pump in the morning. I would absolutely not suggest continuing to try to decrease your milk production. In the normal course of things, milk production gradually and safely decreases on its own when and if needed as long as baby is nursing with normal frequency of 6-12 times in 24 hours. I very much doubt the problem is that you make too much milk. It is that your baby is not eating often enough.
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 PM
    Hi allirawlins. How many hours are you separated from baby? I have an alternate theory of what is going on or at least, what might be contributing to the night waking. It seems unlikely to me that one week without bottles would cause bottle refusal in a baby who has been eating from bottles just fine for two months. Maybe a period of adjustment, but not something ongoing. On the other hand, a baby waking more frequently overnight at this age then they did a few weeks or months prior is entirely normal. In particular it is very common that a baby who began to "sleep through the night" earlier than average as your baby did, would start having more frequent night wakings at some point down the line. Sleep consolidation does happen as a child gets older, of course, this means that as a person ages they gradually sleep fewer hours overall but more consecutive hours at a time. But in babyhood and toddlerhood, a frequent waking pattern is entirely normal, and a child may bounce around in their sleep patterns quite a few times. If your baby is eating more at night, then they need less during the day. So the night wakings may be contributing to baby's lack of interest during the day. I would not suggest limiting your child's ability to nurse at night, but would instead suggest finding alternate ways of getting more overall sleep yourself. If baby is truly becoming hungry during the day but refusing to drink your milk, there are some things to think about.
    2 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddox's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 AM
    I'm engorged every morning and I'd like to reduce the amount of this morning feed without affecting my overall supply for the remainder of the day. My baby is 6 mo and she's been sleeping through the night for the last 4 mo, so I thought the milk supply would have corrected itself by now. My lo eats 5x a day; weekdays I pump 3x and bf 2x; weekends I bf all 5 feedings. She's getting plenty to eat but she's been in the small weight range and recently stopped gaining weight and my doctor determined my milk was low calorie so now I add a scoop of formula to her bottles at daycare. (her weight gain is now back in track with this method). I'm wondering if my engorgement in the morning is causing low calorie milk because the morning milk is pretty clear compared to the rest of the day. I started pumping for less time (was doing 20 min, now only 15) but that hasn't changed anything after several weeks. I'm also prone to clogged ducts, unfortunately, so that's why I've tried gradual solutions so far. Does anyone have any tips to reduce my morning engorgement? Or does anyone have experience with low calorie milk?
    2 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:44 AM
    That is fantastic news!
    21 replies | 1077 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:43 AM
    Fussy evenings are the worst! Especially when you have a baby who won't nurse for comfort at that time. I think when you are in that situation, you do what you have to do. If a paci makes it possible for you to get through the evening, use it. It's probably a temporary thing. As your supply and OALD calm down and your baby gets more adept at managing the milk flow, he will probably discover how to nurse for comfort, and then you can ditch the paci.
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:41 AM
    There is a good chance that the lump is another plugged duct. What can happen with blebs is that they form a callous over the pore where the milk exits the breast. The milk backs up in the ducts behind the blocked pore, and voila, you have a plugged area. Sometimes the bleb completely seals off the ductwork behind it, and sometimes it just causes that area to drain slowly. If the lump feels softer after feedings, then you probably have a slow drain. My strategy for dealing with blebs that caused plugged ducts was to get a sterile needle and gently pick at the bleb until milk was able to flow out again. A lot of moms think that maybe a doctor or nurse should do this, but I think this is something you do yourself, as you are the only person with nerve endings on both ends of the needle and are therefore best equipped to know when you have gone too far. What have you tried so far? I know you said "everything", but there could be something you missed!
    1 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:28 AM
    Awesome! Enjoy your trip! :D
    5 replies | 291 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    February 17th, 2017, 08:21 PM
    Sounds like your LO is developing quite the opinion about bottles. It sounds like what my first two sons did when I first went back to work--refused the bottle for a few days, then grudgingly accept (my second would only take a sippy cup made for 4 months and up), but also begin waking all night long to eat. My first one woke every hour at night, and I am not exaggerating. Thank goodness we were cosleeping or I would have been a zombie. If she is eating a lot more often at night and in general while you are home, she is making up at least some of the milk she is not drinking from the bottle while you are gone. I am not sure which sippy cups you have tried, but I would lean towards trying one or two others (Philips Avent or Tommee Tippy come to mind) and not worrying about the bottle. Also, maybe now is also the time to start doing more solid foods when you are gone?
    2 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*nursingmomkml's Avatar
    February 17th, 2017, 03:04 PM
    Tips for dealing with and preventing clogged ducts: Reduce stress and rest! Obviously, while you are experiencing painful clogged ducts neither of these are really possible. For me the solution was the supplement lecithin. When my baby was around 4 months old he started to get distracted during nursing which interfered with good drainage of my breasts. In addition I went back to work and increased pumping... This led to reduced let down and repeated painful clogged ducts that didn't resolve by next feeding or pumping session and sometimes lasted a few days. Even if one clog got solved, another one would appear. I tried everything (different nursing positions, massage, heat before and cold after, cabbage leaves, releasing pressure to prevent engorgement, etc.) and was ready to give up breastfeeding all together. While I sometimes had some success with 30 min combination of massage, plastic hand pump and hand expression under hot shower after taking ibuprofen, real relief only came when I finally gave in and tried lecithin. This supplement was mentioned on several blogs, both in US and Europe. Lactmed (https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/newtoxnet/lactmed.htm) says that there is insufficient evidence to make statement about its safety for nursing mothers, so you may want to check with your doctor. I started with 4 doses of 1200mg per day as suggested on several blogs (i.e. one every 6 hours) and within 24 hours all clogged ducts were gone! After weeks of suffering, my breasts finally...
    9 replies | 1919 view(s)
  • @llli*banu's Avatar
    February 16th, 2017, 03:51 PM
    I have a nearly 7 week old newbom and he's going through some wonder week or sleep regression Stuff I guess.whatever, the problem is I did hate pacifiers in the past with my DD I hate them now and I hate the idea of Soothing the baby with them instead of nursing.But I have to admit I need them.I'm dealing with OALD.I feel Especially at the witch hour with all the crankiness and exhaustion of the day at its heighest point the last thing my DS wants is another dip of milk!! At last I tried the paci and it worked ( no surprise,Hah?) I do afraid of having to deal with nipple confusion or supply issues (because he'll be sucking the paci instead of my nipple) but it seems to be the most rationale thing to do. Or he'll cry into tears in my arms until he falls asleep
    1 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*lil-as-mama's Avatar
    February 16th, 2017, 09:03 AM
    Thank you so much. Being distracted and active is at least part of the problem. He wants to play with my shirt, investigate the Boppy, etc., and if he hears a sound it's all over. But that has been more of an issue relatively recently, and he's always been a fast nurser, (though he's faster now), so I don't know if there might also be a too slow/too fast issue going on as well. Not sure. What you said makes sense about how it might be easier to get him to nurse more often than to get him to nurse longer. I'm going to try to offer more and in different ways like you suggested and see how he responds to that. It can't hurt anything to encourage him to nurse more while I look more into whether the weight gain is really a problem or not, and I wouldn't mind if he changed his patterns a bit, as you mentioned... Sometimes when he has a particularly "light" day of nursing he seems to make up for it by nursing more often at night. I'm glad that he's getting it at some point but that's definitely a less than ideal pattern for me. :)
    4 replies | 275 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 11:34 PM
    If your baby is nursing exclusively and gaining normally, there is nothing wrong with your milk production. Even brand new pumps can malfunction. There might be something up with the motor. Have you double checked any tubing and connections? Changed the membrains? Flange fit can be a but tricky. Generally, a too large flange will reduce the pump's ability to extract milk, and a too small flange will cause pumping to hurt. So you could try a smaller flange as an experiment. Since you are only needing to express milk for convenience, it might not make sense to up grade you pump. But that might not help anyway. Some moms respond better to hand expression than pumping. Some moms respond better to manual pumps than double electrics. And some moms simply have a great deal of difficulty extracting milk even though baby is able to get plenty. But I certainly do think that low of a milk extraction warrants a call to Medela for help troubleshooting your new pump and if they cannot help you, asking about getting a replacement. If nothing helps, even with pumping only a half ounce a day, it would take less than a week to have enough milk stored for a separation from baby of 3-5 hours. Most moms find morning the time of day they respond best to a pump. This article may be helpful to you: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/pumping_decrease/
    1 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 08:35 PM
    Yes. And in whatever other ways you might think of. I think it makes sense sometimes to think about how all other mammals behave and how humans 'started out.' By which I mean, naked, or clothing mostly for protection and warmth, rather than modesty or decoration. In other words humans developed as a species and lived for hundreds of thousands of years with the breasts always available to baby, usually visible, or at least very easy to get to. We also usually held our children before they could stand on their own or walk, but in a wide variety of ways and positions. In a sense, the breasts were constantly being "offered" from every direction imaginable. As far as length of nursing time possibly being a problem, I think you are right, that can be a problem just as not nursing often enough would be. You mentioned increasing nursing frequency, and that is why I made a suggestion about that. But I also mentioned frequency because I think it is often easier to increase nursing frequency than to keep a baby at the breast longer than baby seems to prefer. This is all assuming baby really needs more milk due to slow gain, which again I do not think we are 100% sure of. On the other hand, more nursing time for baby is certainly not going to cause any harm. For increasing length of sessions, it can be tricky. If baby is losing interest because of slow flow, then breast compressions or switching sides might help. If baby is instead just getting lots of milk fast, then...
    4 replies | 275 view(s)
  • @llli*cb05's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 07:11 PM
    Hi! My 5 month old has always had trouble with her latch, yet has gained weight and is growing. She is EBF and I am able to pump at work. Since the beginning of January, I developed a milk bleb and toward the end of January had my first clogged duct. I was able to massage it out. Since then I've had a few more and the bleb is still there. Just recently I have this lump on the underside and base of nipple (same side as bleb) and I was wondering what this was? Anyone have something similar? Also to the moms, how do you get rid of this bleb? I've done everything the internet and doc have told me to do but it has not gone away. Can anyone relate? What have you done to get this away?
    1 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*andys.wife's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 06:43 PM
    I'm a first time mom and baby is 3 months. I've been trying to pump some but I can't get anything. In the mornings I can get .5oz total but in the afternoon I won't even get a drop. I have a brand new medela pump in style backpack. I think that the flange fits based on diagrams I looked up online but honestly I don't know for sure. Could be supply issue...I'm a stay at home mom so it's not absolutely necessary, however, I feel so tied down feeding all the time and it would be nice to be able to give a bottle on occasion and I would like to have a small freezer stash.
    1 replies | 108 view(s)
  • @llli*lil-as-mama's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 03:09 PM
    Gosh, thank you so so much for all of this, this is extremely helpful. I just ordered the book on Amazon. :) We are looking into getting a different doctor. I think you're right that his weight gain started slowing earlier, but I didn't notice that until you pointed it out and I looked again at the numbers. (His doctor was never concerned until just now because it was at this last appointment that he dipped into a lower percentile). My milk flow did seem to be faster at first and has now regulated more, so, that could have something to do with it, and of course there could always be a scale error. I don't think infrequent nursing is the problem, since he still nurses about every two hours (and always has, or more) but I don't know if nursing too briefly could be part of the problem? He finishes very quickly so maybe he isn't really done? Once he comes off he usually isn't interested in getting back on. Regarding offering to nurse in other ways...do you mean in other positions? Simply showing it to him while he's playing or something without picking him up and interrupting him? Thank you so much!!
    4 replies | 275 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahgresh's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 12:23 PM
    I did email dr. Jack newman who replied to me quite quickly. Here ispart of the email. " It is worth knowing that Candida (“yeast”, “thrush”) does not grow on normal skin.* Therefore, if Candida is difficult to treat or returns after treatment, there is an underlying problem which is not being addressed.* The underlying problem is usually a poor latch.* And why does the baby not latch on well?* Because of 1. “Technique” of positioning and latching the baby on click* What is a good latch 2. Use of artificial nipples such as bottles and nipple shields and 3. The baby has a tongue tie.* And a baby who “clicks” at the breast has a good chance of having a tongue tie. Some tongue ties are obvious, but many tongue ties are more subtle and require an evaluation that goes farther than just looking, but includes feeling under the baby’s tongue as well and knowing what to feel for.* Unfortunately, few health professionals, including lactation consultants, know how to evaluate whether or not the baby has a tongue tie.* 4. The mother has had a decrease in her milk supply.* Late onset decreased milk supply is common and can cause late onset sore nipples.* Why? When the milk flow slows, the baby tends to slip down on the nipple and/or pulls at the breast." What was happening at the time thrush was present? My daughter had cut her first 4 teeth. She became mobile doing nursing acrobatics. Her latch had changed and I could hear clicking at times. Of course my milk supply is not as...
    21 replies | 1077 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahgresh's Avatar
    February 15th, 2017, 11:46 AM
    I would like to thank you for the info with Dr. Jack Newman. I did email him and he answered my questions quickly with a very detailed email along with videos.
    21 replies | 1077 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 14th, 2017, 05:05 PM
    Ok it is great you are beginning to heal. Good you are hand expressing, you would not believe how often mom are told to not nurse or not nurse on one side and no one bothers to say "but the milk still has to come out!" Sorry you have to deal with this during a move. Ugh! Band aids, great idea. Hope things start improving soon. If they do not, you might consider seeing a lactation consultant. Sometimes just getting an additional set of experienced eyeballs on the problem helps.
    3 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 14th, 2017, 04:57 PM
    Since you do not feel terrific about this doctor, can you get a second opinion (or switch doctors?) Gain usually slows after 3-4 months, and in some cases of very fast gain early on, it might reduce pretty significantly. But from what I am seeing, the gain rate drop off started between 1 and 2 months. Is that your impression as well? From my calculations, baby has gained 3 pounds and change in the last three months. (Between month 1 and month 4 checks.) This averages out to 1 pound a month, and yes, that is definitely on the slow side...but I am not sure how alarming this is, given what happened before that- Before that, baby gained almost 3 pounds in one month? From birth (or rather, from date of lowest know weight) to one month? So, that sounds like very very fast gain. Altogether the gain from birth weight is 5 and a half pounds, 6 pounds if you go from lowest known weight. This would be pretty close to average gain but still a tad on the low side.
    4 replies | 275 view(s)
More Activity