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  • @llli*lmxo's Avatar
    Today, 08:14 AM
    Hello! My daughter is 27 months old and she wants to nurse constantly. Shes always been this way but now that shes this old im getting a little concerned that its too much. She eats and drinks alot throughout the day with her normal meals. We co-sleep and she nurses 1 or 2 times during the night. I only work 1 day a week so im with her most of the time. When im at work, shes fine and takes cows milk from a cup. She wants to nurse in any kind of situation (not just to sleep, out of boredom, when shes upset) but just all the time throughout the day. So I would like to know 1) Is this normal and do I need to cut down her feedings? 2 ) There is one scenario in particular that I would like some advice on: When I tell her "no" about something (no candy, no jumping etc..) she immediately wants to nurse. Sometimes I let her but other times I think that she needs to just tough it out and I should NOT let her nurse in this situation. 3) I want to wean her soon. (Not sure when bc im dreading it) Is it ok if I just continue as is until I start the weaning process? I guess Im picturing weeks of screaming tantrums if I try cutting down on feedings now and then again later, weeks of screaming tantrums with the real weaning. (Ugh)
    0 replies | 5 view(s)
  • @llli*longtalltexan's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    I wanted to give an update for anyone who might find this thread useful in the future! Around week 10 is when everything started to settle down for us. He got big enough to handle the heavy milk flow, and I stopped spraying with every single letdown. By slowly increasing the time, based on his reaction, the feel of my breasts, his grassiness levels, and the quality of his poop, I ended up settling into 4-6 hour nursing blocks, which I have to track with an app because otherwise I will never remember which side I last nursed on and when. I also found that I had to use other forms of comfort or ways to get him to sleep sometimes if he gets too overtired or upset. Then, once he's asleep, I can get him to nurse much more lightly, which helps him stay latched and drinking. And of course, I probably could have done none of this and time still would have corrected most of it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ We're at three months now and nursing is a dream! I still have spraying let downs sometimes (I don't go anywhere without a diaper or burp cloth), but he's gaining great, his gas is much reduced, and his poop is generally curdy and yellow.
    6 replies | 420 view(s)
  • @llli*1sttimemummy's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 AM
    Hi everyone. I am new here, desperately need your advice :) My son is 18weeks old, EBF. Starting around 11-12weeks he doesnt have much interest in feeding. He can be on a breast just3-5min and thats it. I dont have any problem with milk supply, i always check after his refusal by pressing and there is always a good flow. Then I offer him second breast, sometimes he can take it for another couple of minutes but mostly he refuses it. During the nights he can be longer as he is sleepy and not distracted by anything. Day or nights I feed him by demand and it is usually every 3-4hours. We get around 4-5wet nappies and usually 1dirty nappy daily. Sometimes he can pass wet wind which is yellow mucusy. For the last month his weight gain was under 400gr which less than 1pound. And I weighed him yesterday to see the difference since then he gained only 30gr for the last week. I am very concerned about weight gain and loss of appetitte as he used to gain up to 120-180per week before and there is a dramatic change, only 30gr. I tried to feed hin in a quite room with closed curtains, for the last 10days cbedsharing (as I read somehere bedsharing babies tend to gain more weight:shrug), talk to my HV who says it can happen to some babies they just gain weight very slow. Even if it happens why he used to gain min 120gr each week and went down to 30gr now. What can cause this? I very concerned about it and desperately want to ebf but started to think about formula top up(( just for...
    0 replies | 17 view(s)
  • @llli*yum24's Avatar
    Today, 12:30 AM
    Im currently using large. I gave my son 2 bottles of expressed milk for past 2 days and he is pulling at breast.doctor said it could be because of bottle(nipple confusion) so, I stopped pumping all together since yesterday. I'll try small shields when possible & update you. Also, is there a way you can suggest I can pump (even if it is 1oz/day) & freeze it and breastfeed at the same time. My son feeds every 2 -2.5 hrs.if I pump in between, he will go hunger so, I'm confused. Thanks for the responses !
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:28 PM
    I am pretty sure it's too large. My nipples are fairly small (and my areolas are huge!). Areola ends up in the tube definitely. Like half of what's in the tube is nipple and half areola. I was hoping it wouldn't make much difference because it's even more money for the alternative flanges but I guess I have to get them.
    13 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:04 PM
    One thing to know about allergies is that while the tendency towards allergy is inherited, specific allergies are not. That is, if you (or someone in your family) have an allergy, it's more likely that your child will have an allergy. But there's no reason to think that your child will have the same allergy that the other allergic family member does. So while I think you should feel free to eliminate nuts if it causes you not hardship, you probably don't need to take that step. It might be a good idea to start nursing her at night instead of letting her have the paci. Long stretches of time without nursing allow lots of lactose-rich milk to build up in the breast, so by the time morning roles around baby is likely to ingest a ton of lactose. All fine and healthy, but also potentially a cause of intestinal irritation and green poops. :ita EXACTLY! Focus on the baby. If she's generally happy, healthy, and gaining normally, weird poops are something to keep an eye on but nothing to freak out about. If baby is clearly sick, unhappy, not gaining- THEN you start taking poops more seriously.
    4 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:57 PM
    I am sorry I did not understand the weights correctly. this all must be very frustrating- It is normal for 2 week old babies to be hungry and want to nurse/eat most of the time. Spitting up is usually normal but if you think the formula is the cause, I wonder how much baby is getting at once? In my experience with breastfed babies, they spit up more if they got more than they could handle all at once. Baby's tummy is the size of his fist, so that is why babies must eat frequent small meals. Can you see the LC again and bring your pump? I wonder if the flange is sized correctly. When you pump, does your nipple move freely in and out of the tunnel? Or does it rub? That might indicate flange is too small. Conversely, does your areola get pulled in along with the nipple or is there a lack of a seal? That may indicate flange is too large. Too large flange in particular is not going to work correctly in extracting milk, but a too small one might hurt or injure you or cause you to not be able to pump at a high enough setting because it hurts.
    13 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    Wow, that is wild. I worked in daycare years ago and we NEVER would have dreamed in a thousand years to tell a mother what to feed her child at home! Home was home and 100% not our business. Good for you for standing your ground. People can get set in their routines and methods and think their way is the only way. You are teaching these caregivers something important - that there is another way. I hope they can open their minds to take it in.
    9 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Hi I also used nipple shields in the early weeks with my oldest. I get being over it! I found I had to be persistent but patient. I tried every day to get baby to latch without the shield, usually a few times a day. But if it was not working and baby and I were getting frustrated, I let it go, nursed with the shield, and tried again later. One side came about two weeks before the other. In my case the shield was given to me by a lactation consultant I started working with when baby was a week old because my baby took an hour to latch and when he did finally get on there the latch injured me. Over the ensuing weeks I continued to work with this IBCLC and another she recommended to improve baby's latch. This was very important, I could not even think about weaning baby off the shield until he was latching well. So I would suggest, if you can get hands on help with latch and positioning, do that. There really is no substitute for effective hands on help. Otherwise figuring out latch and positioning takes trying different things and seeing what works best for you.
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    I think that generally speaking the two most common causes of baby refusing one side is 1) Baby cannot get a good latch on that side or 2) Baby can latch but the flow is either too fast or too slow. In most cases at such a young age, the issue would be fast flow, unless mom has very low milk production. Another reason flow is slowed is not by low production but by a milk duct plug or engorgement that causes inflammation inside the breast that makes it hard for baby to extract milk. If you are able to pump without any issue, you can probably rule out a plug or engorgement causing a problem, and I assume milk production is normal. But the breast being engorged might also make it hard for baby to latch. Some questions: When did this start? Any reason to think you are engorged or that the milk flow on that breast is very fast or forceful? Any reason it might be harder for baby to latch well on that side? When you pump about how much do you get? How many times a day do you pump? Right now, are you continuing to nurse on one side and is baby gaining fine? Or are you supplementing with what you pump?
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*rogi2430's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:18 PM
    Thanks all for the help and insight! I really appreciate it.
    6 replies | 245 view(s)
  • @llli*luz3stelar's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:03 PM
    Thank you both for your replies!! She had her 4 month checkup and shots today (we skipped rotavirus and will do it at 6 months just in case). The pediatrician is still hoping it's a virus and I'm feeling slightly more confident that it is. I still don't want to rule out allergy entirely but I'm willing to take a slower approach to figuring out what is the cause. My baby did have a few bumps that looked like a rash on her bottom/back that make me suspicious, the doctor said it could be heat rash. My fiancé did remember today that his mom was allergic to nuts, and I've been eating tons of nuts, so I may try eliminating those later on just to see if it helps. No nuts would not be as big of a sacrifice as the dairy/soy free diet has been. :( Oh and the reason I've continued eating food with soybean oil and soy lecithin is because the GI said it was okay. I did think it was weird and haven't had large quantities of foods containing either one just in case. I do need to do more research on how to rule out allergy, as the GI was clearly not helpful at all. I REALLY appreciate your feedback about the hindmilk issue. I've never done anything to increase my supply aside from eating healthy, staying hydrated and nursing often. When my oversupply developed it was because of pumping for a freezer stash and also at work. She's been sleeping/not eating for really long stretches at night since 6 weeks (on her own, I always offer but she prefers the paci at night) so it's not a recent...
    4 replies | 134 view(s)
  • @llli*marklaus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:16 PM
    I can't believe they were so pushy and even said to offer cows milk!! And told you to use formula at home! They must have very little experience with EBF babies! Sorry you had to deal with that.
    9 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*lindseyschwochow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:30 PM
    What a struggle! My baby is 6 weeks old and we are working on getting rid of this stupid nipple shield. It was given to me at the hopsital because I have flat nipple and had a spinal headache post delivery. The shield helped us a lot but I'm so over this thing. Washing them constantly in the middle of the night, losing them, the pain I still have and I just don't think it's nessasry any more. My issue is that he is so used to just sucking the shield into his mouth he doesn't understand the 'open wide and latch' concept. He just wants to suck my nipple up into his mouth like with the shield and it's super painful. His latch without the shield also seems to slip off a lot and he does the same where he just slurps my nipple back into his mouth. I have large breast which is difficult in itself but we both end up frustrated trying to work on getting this latch right. Any advice how to get him to work on his opening up wide to take in more of my nipple and areola? I want to breastfeed for as long as I can but I don't want to do with with this shield.
    1 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*sljordan1117's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:09 PM
    My husband and I are planning on having a 2nd baby, and this time I want to buy the best breast pump I can get. With my daughter, I bought 3 pumps.....one hand held, one single electric, and one double electric. Both of the electric ones lost suction after a little while, so I'm looking for something that's a bit more hardy. I realize it'd be expensive, and I don't care. I have a couple of years before we try for another baby, so I have time to get the money together, but I don't know what breast pump works best. Any suggestions? - Little information on me. I'm a stay-at-home mom, so I won't be exclusively pumping. I mostly need to pump so I can bottle feed while out.
    0 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*super.mommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:06 PM
    Hi, everyone My little one (2 weeks old) is not latching from my left breast. He tries, but he immediately starts to cry a lot and rejects it. This started one day and out of the blue. At the moment, I'm extracting my milk from that breast with a breast pump. I don't know why this is happening. What do you suggest me to do? I'll appreciate your help. Thanks a lot.
    1 replies | 62 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:52 PM
    Oh no the birth weight was 3520g he's still way below birth weight (he lost about 10% and is still about 10% below). Birth weight wasn't recorded in the red book so I didn't think to include it. The 10th is day 3. As for how it's going, I tried the new pump today and was disappointed that I only got about 10ml out of it in over 15min. Yesterday a couple of minutes of hand expressing got me 10ml. I had just had the baby on the breast before but I don't know if that effected it. Even after nothing more came out into the pump I could hand express more. It seems like it only manages to get stuff out during letdown and then nada. I am hopeful it increases over time though. A breastfeeding advisor who we saw at an outpatient clinic phoned today, she doesn't like the "give him formula till he is stuffed" advice, she thinks we'd be better off replacing two feeds with entirely formula and pumping during that time and the rest of the time trying to keep the baby on the breast - the fact he has stayed relatively stable in weight taken overall suggests she thinks that that would be enough. My husband is getting very frustrated with formula feeding, the baby cries to be fed but he spits most of it out and then a lot more comes out as he vomits it up during the day. We have no idea how long we're going to have to do it and how much we should invest in equipment. He's hungry, but he seems overfull too...
    13 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:21 PM
    If only I could have mustered this much insight and wisdom when my first baby was only 5 weeks old! It took me ages and ages to figure out that I was much happier when I trusted my baby and my instincts!
    4 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 AM
    Question Mommal - why should it be a soap free bath? I've been giving my 7 almost 8 week old a bath every night and using soap in the water.. is this bad? Sorry, not trying to steal the thread.. just wanted to know why you said soap free, to make sure I am not doing anything wrong.
    4 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:34 AM
    Thank you, mommal!! As a first time mom, so many people try to "help" by giving their advice or throwing in their two cents on a situation. While I can appreciate that most have good intentions, a lot of the time they don't know what they are talking about. I find this to be especially true when it comes to breastfeeding. Having this forum as a resource at my disposal has helped me tremendously! I know that no two babies are alike, and the term "normal" is very loose. That being said, your response just gave me the reassurance that I needed. I know we have instincts for a reason, and now I feel that much more confident in my decisions. Thanks for your help! :)
    4 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:49 AM
    In response to llli.maribelcarrero, I do not use pace feeding. She is exclusively breastfed when I am around, no bottles after she gets home or during weekends. Regarding the daycare, I can guarantee that they are not doing pace feeding. They are used to filling a bottle with 8oz formula and making the babies drink it. I lost my cool with my baby's nanny this morning when she pushed formula again! She asked me to introduce formula at home. I told her my baby does not like it, and nor does she get any bottles at home. She proceeded to tell me that I should not let the baby decide, and this is where I lost my cool. I told her it is my decision, the baby is doing great, she will NOT get any formula, and I am fine with it. She then asked me to give her cow's milk.:angrypin At this point, seeing how angry I was, the daycare owner stepped in and told me they will do as I say. I gave them 3 bottles of 3 oz each and asked them to feed her at appropriate intervals. I also told them I am resuming my nursing during lunch, and they obliged. Hopefully, this will set them straight.
    9 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:40 AM
    Baby has always been skinny (but very tall)- 25th percentile for weight, around 90th percentile for height. I think they are comparing her with formula fed babies- evidently much bigger than my daughter. She is the only baby who is exclusively on breastmilk, so her tiny bottles are an anomaly to them. I did not think much of the daycare's comment, but thanks to you ladies, I see how inappropriate it was. I love seeing my baby, the daycare rules allow every parent to go in without any prior notice. My baby was nursing, and getting to see her mother. Thanks for knocking sense into me!
    9 replies | 178 view(s)
  • @llli*nap's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:33 AM
    Hi, I would like to share my experience with bf because right now I’m in struggle… I had a c-section and by the time I had my baby with me had passed about 10 hours. I did know very little about breastfeeding, but I did know that I want to do it. Actually I always thought maybe that maybe my breast would not be able to produce enough milk because they are too small (and I always find them kind of weird, I never like them), but I tried. My baby was bottle-feeding while she was away for me (she was with me from 9 AM to 10 PM) and nobody explain to me this super important rule about supply-demand (that now I now). I really try hard to boost my supply once we were at home. I tried with coconut oil, oats, mate with milk, etc. Once I knew about the importance of free demand I try it too. I even tried metoclopramide. My baby was born with 2.850 kg and by her first month she didn’t gain the weight that was supposed to. We tried to feed her more often at night (she could sleep 6 hours straight since her first month) and then on her second month she was better about her weight. Finally we tried to do exclusive breast feeding, but at night she was kind of fussy and we give her a bottle (3 or 4 oz) and then she was fine.
    0 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:02 AM
    How is it going? I am taking a gander at those weight checks and wow, they are wonky. I have never heard of a baby gaining weight between birth weight and day two- this period is usually when baby loses the most weight...And all the fluctuations up and down are very odd. I just do not get it. Overall, baby at day 12 was the same weight as birth weight. If only a birth weight and a day 12 weight were taken, showing the exact same weight as they do, that would be considered normal. Because babies usually lose weight for first few days and then begin to gain, typically regaining back to birth weight at some point between 1 and 2 weeks- and some healthy and normally gaining babies take a little longer than that to gain back up to birthweight. Not sure what this means or if it is relevant, but I just wanted to point that out.
    13 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:06 AM
    "Regressing" is just another word for "how babies actually sleep". I know there's this trope out there that babies "should" sleep longer and longer stretches as time goes on. You can even find all these convincing-looking but completely reality-free charts out there, showing how much a baby "should" sleep at a given age- e.g., 3 hour stretches at 3 weeks, 6 hours at 8 weeks, 12 hours at 3 months, etc. (I made those numbers up! See? Anyone can do it. :p) What you should expect from your baby's sleep is for his patterns to shift almost constantly throughout the first year. Many babies are somewhat sleepy in the newborn stage, but just when you started to think that 3 hour sleep stretches were bearable, the babies start to wake up around 3 weeks and require more nighttime nursing at that point. Many babies also start sleeping through- that is, sleep a single 5 hour stretch- somewhere in the first few months. While some will continue to sleep long stretches, many if not most will revert to frequent night waking and nursing whenever growth spurts, teething, illness, or new developmental milestones kick in. Naps are similarly erratic. You can probably expect naps to gradually consolidate over time, so that you'll see lots of short, unpredictable naps in infancy slowly giving way to a few more predictable, longer naps as the baby gets older. At 5 weeks, all bets are off in the nap department. You might see a few long naps, but you're much more likely to see...
    4 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 AM
    The way I got a scale was by renting it from my IBCLC. I have also heard of people renting them through medical supply places- do they have those in the UK? With the Domperidone and the hospital-grade pump, I think you should start to see an increase in output. I also encourage you to keep trying hand expression as you pump with the rental- I found it measurably increased the amount I saw in the bottle as I got better at it. And I know this sounds bonkers, but don't cry over spilt milk. If hand expression wrings more milk out of the breast than pumping, it's okay if the milk just ends up in a puddle. I mean, obviously you want to get the milk to feed the baby. But the act of removing milk from the breast is good for supply even when the milk ends up wasted. That was hard for me to accept when I was pumping and desperate to increase supply, but it's really true. You're doing wonderfully well, just keep at it! :cheer
    13 replies | 329 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:25 AM
    My instinct is that the shield size isn't right, and therefore the nipple is getting constricted as you pump, and that's leading to milk coming forward but not being able to come out, IYKWIM. Can you try a different size of shield?
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
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