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  • @llli*justitia's Avatar
    Today, 03:45 PM
    My baby is 7 months old and I have also run out of my freezer stash. I'm pumping the same number of times at work and getting about the same volume, but I can't keep up with how much he likes to take at daycare. He is in the 80th percentile for height and weight, and our pediatrician said he is getting the perfect amount given his growth. My question is: if I need to send formula, should it be the same volume as the breast milk bottles (5 oz) I have been sending? Or do I need to send the larger volume that formula-fed babies take (6-8 oz)?
    5 replies | 1060 view(s)
  • @llli*justitia's Avatar
    Today, 03:36 PM
    I had a similar issue when I started back at work and started sending my baby to daycare. When he started going at 3 months, I sent 4 oz bottles. Almost immediately, daycare started asking for 6-7 oz per bottle. I asked my pediatrician, who asked the hospital lactation specialist, who said that breastfed babies should get no more than 3-4 oz per bottle. I believe this is to mimic what the baby would on average take while nursing. We noticed too that when a family member gave him a bottle at home, he was fine with 4 oz and cuddling afterwards. It was a little awkward, but when daycare asked again for more volume, I mentioned what my pediatrician said about breastfed babies, and they thankfully let it go. I did end up increasing to 5 oz because he is well above average for height and weight, and my mother-in-law felt he could take a little more. He has been growing perfectly on this amount. It's hard, but try talking with your daycare, and, as was advised to me, don't feel pressured to give more when you know that's not what your baby needs. A little more TLC after the bottles or a pacifier, if you are using them, may be more appropriate.
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*melissag's Avatar
    Today, 03:05 PM
    Thank you for your reply! It gives me hope :) went to the doctor she is gaining good weight :) I will try not to stress as much
    2 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:56 PM
    Even if you DO have Hep C, the current recommendation is that breastfeeding continue. There is no evidence that Hep C is transmitted to infants via breastmilk according to the CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/disease/hepatitis.htm
    2 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:52 PM
    This sounds like it may be that the "let down" (the moment milk ejects from your beasts) is a little fast or forceful. This is entirely normal and common especially in the first several weeks. After 4-6 weeks (or sooner) fast letdown usually begins to subside on its own. Some babies are fine with it, others object, and many have issues with it some of the time but not always. The quickest and easiest fix is to adjust your position so you are leaning back enough that baby can kind of be on top of you. Many moms find that this kid of positioning change solves this issue. Other ideas- nursing frequently helps, because there is less time for milk to 'build up" in the breasts. When baby unlatches, if the milk is flowing, let it flow into a cloth before putting baby back on. Some moms find it is needed to hand express a little milk before putting baby onto or back onto the breast. Here is more info: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/articles?tag=Fast+Milk+Flow If you do not think fast letdown is the issue, let me know.
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 12:41 PM
    :ita Medications and Mothers' Milk says it's commonly prescribed for mastitis, and is compatible with breastfeeding.
    2 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*mominoes's Avatar
    Today, 12:33 PM
    I've been back at work 4 weeks now and my baby (18 weeks) has been in childcare for the same amount of time. I am pumping at work and am running into a problem meeting my baby's demand. I have fairly consistently been able to pump 18 oz/day at work. In his first week at childcare, baby was drinking about 16 oz (3 bottles/day), then he'd want to nurse like crazy in the evening. Week 2, he started drinking 18 oz during the day (still 3 oz), still wanted to nurse a lot in the evening. So that was no problem, seemed like we were settling into a nice routine. However.... Week 3 he started burning through the backup milk I left in the freezer at childcare, so he was drinking more on the order of 20-22 oz per day, and he was SCREAMING for food when I picked him up. Meantime, I am still having trouble pumping more than 18 oz per day at work. I tried splitting his 18 oz into 4 bottles but he was still apparently getting hungry and needing milk from the freezer. This week, he seems to have leveled off at drinking 24 oz per day (4 6oz bottles). I'm still only pumping 18 oz (sometimes I manage 19.5, but that's really the max I can do). At the moment I am only going into the office 3-4 days/week so on the days I am home I am doing extra pumping to make up the deficit (and hopefully also boost my supply a little...). This is manageable (if a bit exhausting) while I'm only away from him 3-4 days/week, but at some point in the next couple of months I'm going to have to...
    1 replies | 33 view(s)
  • @llli*e.web's Avatar
    Today, 11:26 AM
    My daughter will be 4 weeks old tomorrow. She was born weighing 6 pounds, 9 ounces since she was born 3 weeks early, but now she weighs 7 pounds, 13 ounces. At the beginning of my breastfeeding journey with her, I had an oversupply...my daughter was having plenty of wet and dirty diapers, but her stools were green rather than the normal yellow color. Then when she was 2 weeks old, I got a severe case of mastitis - 104 degree fever, nausea, dizziness, severe fatigue, cold sweats, sore body, etc. My lactation consultant immediately prescribed me an antibiotic, which cleared that issue right up! 3 days later, my husband was rushed to the hospital from work for an emergency appendectomy, which resulted in him having to stay home for a week. So then I had to take care of him, my 19 month old son, and my 2 week old daughter. Not to mention, I'm getting practically NO sleep at night because my girl is awake very frequently to eat, and napping during the daytime is almost impossible with a toddler running around and a house to maintain.
    0 replies | 27 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Today, 09:53 AM
    Maddieb I agree with you too, when you said that I am in a transitioning stage from a mom of a baby to a mom of a little girl. This is probably where all my feelings are coming from and like you said, also there is something unique with babyhood. I am truly grateful for moms like you who take the time to give to moms encouraging words and help who just need someone who has been there before and know what it's like to go through so many emotions when your a breastfeeding mom.
    7 replies | 137 view(s)
  • @llli*lisa.meme's Avatar
    Today, 09:37 AM
    Mommal thank you for the last post. I had tears in my eyes. It is so true that all you want to do is bottle up those precious baby days. Yes ,I can see the fleeting days dwindling to weaning and my little one becoming a big girl. It is the hardest thing I have had to go through. It just breaks me down everyday. As a mommy we have to try hard to enjoy each stage of our childs life...but that is so easier said then done!
    7 replies | 137 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Today, 08:52 AM
    I couldn't agree more. I don't see anything wrong with a baby being comforted by breastfeeding, whether its to eat or just suck. Its completely natural. My son definitely taught me quite a lot in our journey. And yes I heard the term non-nutritive sucking, I preferred it to comfort nursing. It killed me he wasn't comforted by being at the breast. This one will just be so different and I just worry that I won't be prepared enough, but then again I feel like anyone hardly is ever prepared enough. Thanks again for the support and advice!
    9 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Today, 08:52 AM
    Thanks! I understand. Will do!
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Today, 08:50 AM
    Thanks for your response! Yes, nursing is comfortable for me. I think I'm mostly just surprised by how much of my day is spent nursing. I enjoy the closeness with my son, of course, but I can definitely understand how mothers joke about being a "milk machine!" I do have one other concern that I forgot to include.. Sometimes, when my son is nursing, he latches, and sucks for a few seconds. Then, he'll literally push the breast away and begin screaming. I've noticed this typically happens during nighttime feedings. Could his behavior just be because he is overtired? Or gassy? I know that he is still getting milk, because it usually runs out of his mouth.
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:42 AM
    My gut says it's safe to nurse with elevated liver enzymes as long as they don't indicate a case of Hep C, but for the real answer I would contact Infant Risk: http://www.infantrisk.com. Rapid weight loss after pregnancy is normal and nothing to worry about, and your weight loss wasn't really excessive. Most women lose around 15 lbs the day they give birth- the weight of the baby, placenta, amniotic fluid, etc. Another few pounds of water weight usually follow in the next few days. The toxin thing is both true and not true. Metabolizing fat cells does release stored fat-soluble chemicals, some of which are toxic. But again, most of the weight you lost was baby, placenta, and water. It's not like you lost a huge amount of fat, so whatever toxins have been released were probably very minimal amounts. Especially because we live in a less chemically toxic environment than humans in the not-so distant past. When is the last time you got doused with DDT, or used arsenic-based paint to freshen up your living room, or applied a lead-based cosmetic to your face? Your body is probably less toxic than your mom's, or your grandma's. And even if you did release lots of stored toxins, and wanted to avoid feeding them to your baby, your options are not great. You can avoid giving your child toxins via breastmilk by feeding her formula- which is full of the same environmental toxins that are in your milk, not to mention other weird stuff you probably don't want your child...
    2 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*jtmmh's Avatar
    Today, 07:34 AM
    So it's my 3rd child, he is 10 weeks old and I have always had minimal trouble breastfeeding, which is such a blessing! But this time I'm scared... I went to the dr for some routine bloodwork for our insurance provider. My blood work all came back normal except my ALT Liver enzymes. the range for normal they gave me was 6-29 mine was 53. The dr could give me no explanation for this result. I take NO medications and drink NO alcohol. I had a bad stomach virus two weeks before my test and I'm pretty sure I became dehydrated. I've tried to catch up since then, but it's hard to drink a ton of water. I am in a very monogamous relationship, so I know hepatitis isn't a concern. The only other factor that is odd is that I have lost a lot of weight quickly. I was back down to my pre-pregnancy weight in 8 weeks. I lost like 35 pounds. I know I didn't get enough calories in because I was chasing two other kiddos and didn't stop to eat. I have heard that losing weight too quickly in the beginning can release toxins in the body and possibly into breastmilk. Could this be happening? Is it safe for me to continue breastfeeding with elevated enzymes... Any insight anyone? I'm afraid I'll have to stop breastfeeding and it means so much to me and my family. Help please.
    2 replies | 52 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    :hug Puja, you are such a good and concerned mother. I completely understand why you are worried about your little one, even though I don't think you should worry. I still think the way forward is to let him come to solid foods in his own time. Are you allowing him to experiment with them, put them in his own mouth, squish them with his hands, feed them to you? All those things can help him build a good relationship with solids. Until then, keep nursing him as much as you can and give him formula milk to supplement.
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:46 AM
    Welcome to the forum! I think the way you get your baby back to the breast is to take a deep breath and either take the bottles away or reduce them as much as possible. The way I see it, bottles started out looking like the solution to the baby being fussy and maybe not nursing enough, and have now become contributors to that problem. I know it means that baby may act even more fussy than before- she wants to get fed and clearly she has developed some strong preferences about the way her meals are delivered. But I think what you do in this situation is to power through. You nurse the baby and if she comes off the breast and and refuses to nurse any more, you let her do that. You let her fuss, you find other ways to comfort her- rock her, take her for a walk, give her a quick bath. My guess is that after a while, she will get hungry again and decide that nursing is better than starving. Of course we don't want to starve her for real, but allowing some fussing in order to gain more nursing sessions sounds like the way to go- to me, at least!
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:35 AM
    :ita with the PP. In particular, I second her point that you have to be careful what you google- if you want breastfeeding info, it's generally best to stick to La Leche League and Kellymom.com. It,s not that other sites are always wrong or always have bad information, but there is a ton of bad information mixed in with the good and it's hard to distinguish between a site giving reliable information and one that just looks reliable but is peddling total hogwash. Stick with the trusted resources and you won't go wrong!
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*puja's Avatar
    Today, 06:29 AM
    I have lost my patience n my peace ....all the day I only think ,,how to put solids to his mouth...I have gone through all the advices of not force feeding,no special feeding schedule ,sharing own meal time but I failed...I could not bring his interest to food....doc said stop feeding meal let him feel hunger he will eat and I did that too.I didn't give him any milk for 4 hours but he was still happy and refused food....it's even not that I give him too much of milk he drink about 14 oz formula milk and breastfeeding twice..plz tell me what shall I do..
    1 replies | 40 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:26 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. Totally normal to feel sad when your baby is getting closer to weaning and all of a sudden you see that precious, fleeting stage of infancy and nursing disappearing. It's not that you don't want your baby to grow up. It's that you simultaneously want to see her grow and change and thrive and also want to freeze time so that you can keep enjoying the baby stage. My husband and I often talk about how much we wish we could have bottled moments of time when our kids, now 6 and 10 years old, were babies. We would uncork those bottles from time to time, just so we could smell their baby heads and enjoy their baby ways. Fand then recork the bottles before we had to change any diapers!
    7 replies | 137 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:21 AM
    :( What a bummer! I am glad you have a good boss, at least.
    9 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:20 AM
    :ita with the PP. Would it be possible to see a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC? It's not that i think something is wrong- most likely baby had a week of low gain after being sick, and is generally a slim, petite baby. But a trip to the IBCLC might he,p you spot a problem if there is one.
    2 replies | 107 view(s)
  • @llli*mrsjessnelson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:13 PM
    Hi Everyone! I'm hoping someone can offer me some help and reassurance. My sweet girl is 7 weeks old and we are still struggling to breastfed. She was doing great eating the first 4 weeks (although I did have some cracked nipples). She would eat on each side 5-10 minutes. Then we got mastitis, which led to thrush and everything went down hill from there. When she got thrush, she started fussing at the breast so I offered her a bottle. She started only spending about 5 minutes on each breast. Then at 5.5 weeks she started popping on and off the breast and pushing away, so I had to offer her bottles more frequently. I think she was coming on and off and refusing to nurse because I have an over-active letdown. I see milk squirting out when she pops off. I tried the laid back position but she still comes off and after going on and off a few times she gets frustrated and refuses to continue. Now at 7 weeks, she will only nurse until the letdown or after a pump but she gets mad when the milk is too slow as well. So she is currently only nursing a few times a day for a few minutes. The LC I met with a few times mentioned she has a stretchy posterior tongue tie, but wasn't sure that was the problem. Now I'm stuck pumping and almost battling her to take the breast. How do I get back to BF full time?! Would an over-active letdown start at 4 weeks- because she seemed to be fine with the flow then? Can I get her off bottles and to stay latched? Is the tongue tie part of the problem?...
    1 replies | 73 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:49 PM
    Hello and welcome! Yes everything sounds 100% normal. Is nursing comfortable for you? The vast majority of the time, if nursing is comfortable for mom and baby is gaining ok, all is well. It is not only normal but preferable that nursing is "inconsistent." It is no more normal for a baby to eat at precisely spaced intervals in precise amounts in precise amounts of time as it is for you or I to. The difference between a baby and an older child or adult is that baby is trying to gain as fast as baby did while still in the womb, when baby "ate" basically constantly. So there really is no way for a baby to nurse too often. But wanting to nurse shorter or longer, shorter or longer times between sessions, etc. are all entirely normal. Also, babies nurse both for comfort and for food, and the great thing is, both are happening at the same time! As long as you are following baby's lead (and also offering as much above that as you like) and baby is nursing with a good overall frequency, you should be fine. Here is an excellent article about nursing habits in the early weeks that may help: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/ Bottles in the very early days are usually not suggested because both pumping and bottles can interfere with the normal course of breastfeeding in multiple ways. If company is preventing you from nursing your baby, maybe it would be best to limit company. If bottles are needed, I would suggest keep them as small, infrequent, and slowly...
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mamatoleo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:31 PM
    Hi, there! This is my first post, & I hope I'm doing this right.. I'm a first time mom to an 11 day old. So far, he has been predominantly breastfed, but I have had his father feed him a bottle of expressed milk a few times when we've had company over. (No formula) My concerns: 1) My son has developed "little boobs" in the last day or so. When I googled it, many people say this is caused by hormones in my milk, it's common, & will subside after some time. Is this true? 2) Nursing is inconsistent. I realize that as a newborn, he is trying to get the hang of breastfeeding just like I am. Sometimes, he will nurse 30 min on each side and be content for a couple hours. Other times, he'll "cluster feed" an hour apart several times in a row, feeding as little as 5 or 10 minutes, and only on one side. It seems like it may be for comfort sometimes.. he will fuss and cry, frantically trying to get to my nipple. Then, as soon as he's there, he sucks for a few minutes, and becomes drowsy. His pediatrician said this is "normal." *Note: My son is meeting or surpassing the diaper guidelines. His urine is pale yellow and stools are typical as well. 3) My son sleeps much of the time whilst nursing. Even if I take him off and have him relatch, he will fall asleep again. He sucks pretty continuously, with only short pauses. Is this acceptable? I'm just amazed at how much he can consume! His stomach is only supposed to be the size of a ping pong ball at this age. There have been times...
    5 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:40 PM
    Yes I do not like the term either. I only use it because it is so often used in a way that undermines breastfeeding, (as in, "Oh, he is ONLY comfort nursing." but it really is a silly term. Presumably all nursing is comforting, and even if all that is happening is comfort (no milk transfer) why would you not want to comfort a baby? Often people use comfort nursing as another way of saying "non-nutritive sucking." You may have heard that one with your older child who had a physical barrier to being able to nurse. But that is another term that is often misunderstood. There is nothing wrong with non-nutritive sucking if it is comforting and the baby is getting enough to eat somehow! It sounds like you are way ahead of the game with your already deep knowledge and understanding of breastfeeding from your previous experience. Sometimes it is the babies who have the most trouble nursing or just can not nurse despite all efforts that teach us the most.
    9 replies | 174 view(s)
  • @llli*momma.d's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:28 AM
    Thank you MaddieB, that is actually very reassuring. And yes, my first had to be bottle fed from day one. He couldn't form a seal even remotely no matter what we tried, position, breast shield, his lip and palate were just way to open. Trying to hand express into his mouth didn't work either. Even with an SNS system he refused. He was only able to get roughly half an ounce from breast when he would try to nurse, and that was mostly due to my letdown reflex. I had no problem letting him, he just wouldn't. With this one I will definitely let him nurse as long as he wants, for both nutrition and comfort. I hate to use the saying "comfort nursing". I believe a baby needs comfort just as much as they need nutrition. I am familiar with paced and cup feeding. We did paced feeding with my first and some cup feeding after surgeries. I am so excited to breastfeed, now if only the little firecracker would make his appearance. Thanks for the advice and reassuring words. It does put my mind more at ease.
    9 replies | 174 view(s)
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