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  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 01:53 PM
    Fes, thanks for your informed reply! That is interesting about thyroid issues which can crop up in relation to pregnancy. Some of the weight gain could be due to water retention, right? Fes, my DD2 is just over 4m now and I am still at the same weight as I was when I quickly shed 10kg in the first month, but there's more to go... I feel your pain. Saraelizabeth, if your supply drops quickly, can you try increasing it by switch feeding and taking a nursing vacation (do nothing but rest and nurse) to pump it up?
    10 replies | 425 view(s)
  • @llli*andie613's Avatar
    Today, 01:13 PM
    Sorry to hear about your difficulties. Both my 2 babies had a TT. With DS, his was corrected at 9 days but not before I had cracked nipples and mastitis. His latch continued to be shallow and lipstick shaped for about 2 months. I was also doing the football hold. Then a local LLL leader came to observe and helped. She had me do cross cradle position, using lots of pillows to prop baby up to the breast. She also showed me how to gently tug baby's chin down to encourage a deeper latch. It seemed that by 3 months the pain had gone and the cracks had healed. With DD, I recognized the TT early and had it corrected. Cross cradle is working well--I think it's helpful to be able to hold baby with one hand and breast with another. This time the latch became comfortable by the end of the first week. Again I made sure to bring baby to the breadth using supportive pillows, adjust the latch by tugging her chin down to get more breast in to form a deeper latch. Not sure if this is helpful to you, but I wanted to share.
    6 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 01:10 PM
    It sounds like your little one is cluster feeding, which is totally normal. There is not much you can do other than make sure you have someone bring you food, water, etc. As for sleep, side lying nursing really helps, but your little one might not have head/neck control for that, so perhaps you may want to try laid back nursing. Nancy Mohrbacher has youtube videos on this if you want to check them out.
    1 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 12:09 PM
    That sounds painful! My daughter sometimes does that, but not often. She seems to be distracted by other things when she does it, and not as hungry, so I try again later. But if yours is waiting for letdown, does some expressed breastmilk on your nipple help?
    1 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*stepbelt's Avatar
    Today, 09:52 AM
    Hi, OP here. I got a PM from stubborn.mama and thought I should post what I told her on the board, just in case it helps anyone else (I didn't realize this thread was active again). Long story short, the nursing situation with my son hasn't gotten a lot better over the past 2.5 months. He still needs to be sleepy or asleep to feed, and I can only feed him in one specific location in our home otherwise he rejects it. His weight gain has been very slow (1-2 oz per week), and on the length-weight growth chart, he doesn't even register anymore. I think he's around 0.1 percentile. So, I have continued to spend a lot of time searching for answers. Well, just yesterday we saw an amazing lactation consultant and I think we may have arrived at an answer. This was the most thorough assessment my son has ever received--she listened to our history and did a very thorough physical exam of his mouth, and during a brief nursing session she listened to him sucking and swallowing with a stethoscope. It turns out he has all the classic signs and symptoms of a tongue and lip tie. He has a very bad latch even when he does feed (even though I was told by the nurses in the hospital that it was fine!), so he is not getting adequate milk, and he has developed an aversion to nursing because it is not comfortable for him. I really trust this lactation consultant--she is the most knowledgeable person I have ever spoken to about the mechanics of breastfeeding and the anatomy involved. We are...
    12 replies | 886 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:27 AM
    Ok I thought more about you last night and I wonder if I am being overly pessimistic about your milk production. I wonder if you might be ok milk production wise if you can increase nursing frequency and lesson/eliminate supplements when you are awake, nurse right before sleep and right after, and expressing milk and/or nursing very well ONCE over the night- in the middle of the night between the before and after nursing sessions. I don't know. Some moms do make plenty of milk even if newborn baby sleeps without nursing for a couple longish periods of about 4 hours each day, so it is possible. But this is something that would depend on your personal capacity of milk production and also your personal milk storage capacity- and these are factors outside your control. They differ mom to mom. So I think it would depend on how your body is responding to the overnight period of no milk expression or nursing.
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:09 AM
    I agree with mommal. There are chemicals in formula too, you know. Your baby like all human beings is exposed to chemicals all the time. Hairdressers also nurse their babies and as far as I know are not told not to due to where they work...you know what I mean?
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:56 AM
    Do you mean you nurse your baby exactly at those times every day, or is that an example? If you are nursing on a schedule, is that because otherwise baby will not nurse often enough to gain normally? Nursing 7 times in 24 hours is on the very low end for nursing frequency, and breastfeeding usually goes better if baby is offered the breast whenever baby cues (as well as whenever mom feels like it.) In other words, schedules mess up breastfeeding most of the time, however, sometimes a baby does need to have the breast offered more than baby cues because baby is not nursing often enough on their own. So at the other times, Is baby awake and happy prior to feeding, but cries during? Or is baby asleep but you wake baby to nurse? Etc. What I am wondering is how do you know baby wants to nurse at all? What cues are typical? Cues do not mean baby acts super hungry...babies nurse for many reasons, and if baby is super hungry by the time baby nurses that can cause issues. Also does baby take a pacifier and when and for how long? 10 minutes nursing session duration can be plenty long enough for a 2 month old. The session length does not concern me, that sounds normal. But the low frequency and regularity of nursing every 3 hours on the dot seems out of the ordinary. Interesting! Do they suspect the issue is reflux? I am wondering why they think baby should be straight up and down- this is something that can help if reflux is the problem. I am also curious if they...
    3 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*shannonlaning's Avatar
    Today, 07:18 AM
    Thanks for your reply! I haven't had her weighed in 2 1/2 weeks (since her two month checkup) but her weight was good then. I am going in today to get her weighed hopefully. I know that I have fast let-down in the morning for sure. She gets overwhelmed but I don't think that it happens at other times during the day. I nurse her on this schedule: 7, 10, 1, 4, 7, 10 and then once in the middle of the night when she wakes up. The only feeding she actually roots around for milk on and acts super hungry is the 7 PM feeding. Other than that, she seems content. I used to nurse her on both sides for around 25-35 minutes total. She fussed a little if she needed to be burped but about 1-2 weeks ago it got really bad. Only nursing for 10 minutes and refusing to nurse anymore. I have tried every nursing position in the books. I called the hospital yesterday to talk to the lactation department and they recommended having her sitting facing me on my lap and nursing her completely upright. It went okay yesterday doing that, but not great. She hated it at the 10 PM feeding which she usually never fusses at. She wanted to lie down more and she was fine when I changed her position to cradle. Haven't had tongue-tie assessed. But she has had several check-ups and the doctor has mentioned anything. I will get it looked at though. She cries at all feedings except 10 PM and the middle of the night. I have tried feeding her with less time in between feedings and she is not hungry and...
    3 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. How has nursing been going in general? Does everything feel okay when the baby latches and nurses?
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:17 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I'm sorry to say that I'm going to answer your questions with a lot more questions. First, can you tell us a little more about what the lactation consultants did at the consults? Did they check the baby for tongue and lip ties? Did they do pre- and post-feeding weigh-ins to determine milk intake? What explanation did they give you for the scrabbling and pain? Second, can you describe the cracks? Are we talking about large single cracks at the tip of the nipple that gape wider after the baby nurses, or multiple small slit-like cracks? Third, when the baby unlatches, what does your nipple look like? Is it symmetrical, like a pencil eraser, or asymmetrical/creased/wedged/ridged/shaped like a new lipstick?
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:02 AM
    My understanding is that manufacturers recommend that moms not get these treatments while pregnant or nursing because the chemicals haven't been studied in terms of harmful effects on the fetus/baby. Honestly, it seems like these treatments aren't really that safe at any time, see http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/04/fashion/04SKIN.html?_r=0 Anyway, that brings us to the question of what you should do now. Pump and dump for an unspecified length of time- unspecified because no-one knows how long you'd need to do it- and potentially jeopardize your nursing relationship with your very young baby? (Even babies who move easily between bottle and breast can start rejecting the breast once they have been exclusively bottle fed for a while.) Or continue to nurse, prioritizing your nursing relationship over the unknown risks of chemical exposure? I personally would opt for continuing to nurse. Your baby is getting exposed to chemicals from the blowout just by being around you, as they are in your hair. It's not clear whether or not the chemicals are in your milk. And if you'd be feeding your baby formula during the duration of your pumping and dumping, then that's another, different risk that you'd be adding to the mix. If you want a definitive answer on safety, I suggest contacting Infant Risk: http://www.infantrisk.com
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:41 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. How weaning proceeds depends on your goals and needs. If you are desperate to stop nursing because you no longer enjoy it, that's one thing. If you still enjoy nursing but think you have to wean because the calendar says it's time, that's another. If you can give us more of a sense of the whys of your weaning needs, I think we'll be better able to give you advice.
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*thereseagustind's Avatar
    Today, 12:53 AM
    Hi mommies. Im new here. Sorry bear with me. My lo is only 2months old. Had my hair colored yesterday. Aparrently my stylist offered me brazilian blowout which to my excitement i said yes. Now i am having anxiety if it is safe while i am breastfeeding my lo? Or should i pump and dump and if yes, for how long? Thankyou
    2 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*pirateslouch's Avatar
    Today, 12:43 AM
    My daughter is almost eight weeks old and I've been experiencing extreme nipple pain since day one. My nipples were scabbed I think the first or second night. The scabs fell off weeks ago but now they're raw and cracked and just won't heal. I've seen two lactation consultants and spent $500 and they both said her latch looked good, and that she has a really strong suck, but she chews toward the end of the feeding so they said to take her off. Actually, I think it's more like she sucks during the let down and chews in between. When I do take her off before she's ready she goes INSANE! And it's so so hard to calm her. She wants to chew on me until she falls asleep. I've been bottle feeding during the day and breastfeeding at night but I fear her chewing is getting worse so today I tried to breastfeed all day and the pain just kept getting worse and worse until I ended up in tears. I feel like it will never get better. Should I try and bottle feed for several days and see if my nipples can heal up completely and then go back to breastfeeding? How do I stop her from chewing withOut constantly taking her off? This is so depressing. Will my nipples ever heal? And I've used every nipple cream I could find.
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:41 PM
    Hi, Can you explain why are you wanting to take steps to bring nursing frequency down? It is fine if you do, I am just trying to understand if this is your preference or something you think you have to do? I mean is this due to wanting your child to wean entirely soon, or to stop pumping at work or..? Weaning can be a very gradual process and when it is, issues like engorgement are avoided. I get it she will get less at day care...I guess, although I never understood why moving rooms means a child gets less breastmilk, but anyway, why are you needing to base your nursing frequency around how much your child gets at day care? Maybe I am missing something. If you are finding that you are engorged at work due to your child's nursing more frequently on the weekends or at night, you have a few possible choices. You can take the pump weaning more gradually (keep pumping at work for a while in other words. ) You can pump but for shorter time or pump less often, you can pump but discard the milk, hand express instead, etc., whatever makes it easier or more doable.
    2 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 PM
    Many thanks will set up a make shift bed - fingers crossed!
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:53 PM
    Hi and welcome! I do not understand what those numbers are referring to- you mean she has nursed 17 times in 5 hours? Yes overall it is 100% normal for a breastfed baby to kind of "wake up" at one to two weeks of age and want to nurse essentially ALL THE TIME. Unless, based on output (poops) or weight gain baby is not getting enough, this is normal breastfeeding frequency. Even if baby were not gaining well, the issue would be the low gain and not the frequency of nursing. You might want to consider if bedsharing is appropriate for you. Here is some basic info, and you can get much more from the book Sweet Sleep : http://www.llli.org/sweetsleepbook/tearsheets if you are insane with needing sleep, you may be too tired to safely bedshare, or after reading up on the science, you may find that your particular situation is not one that is safe for bedsharing for some other reason. In that case, you can instead give baby to another responsible adult, go into another room, and sleep. You can have baby brought to you periodically to nurse. An alternative is to express some milk, and give baby to someone else with feeding instructions, and go into another room to sleep. Try to put together at least 4 but no more than 6 hours of continuous sleep. It is amazing how much more functional you can feel after even 4 hours of consecutive sleep. But you want to keep it short as a long stretch of no nursing will harm milk production and cause you to become engorged. If you...
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:02 PM
    Hi there, looking for help and advice! I am a FTM with a 9 day old. For the last few days I thought I was getting the hang of this, but today baby wants to feed constantly and has had very little sleep very cranky seems to be only happy when on the breast. I was afraid that I wasn't producing enough milk but she has had 3 dirty and 7 wet diapers. I have an app to time feedings 17 so far with 5 hours and 20 minutes and she is still going....is this normal?? Going a little insane here needing sleep!
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*lexwex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:57 PM
    Hi there, looking for help and advice! I am a FTM with a 9 day old. For the last few days I thought I was getting the hang of this, but today baby wants to feed constantly and has had very little sleep very cranky seems to be only happy when on the breast. I was afraid that I wasn't producing enough milk but she has had 3 dirty and 7 wet diapers. I have an app to time feedings 17 so far with 5 hours and 20 minutes and she is still going....is this normal?? Going a little insane here needing sleep!
    1 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:52 PM
    Ok, unfortunately this leaves you with a real problem I am not sure how to solve. The lactating body must have milk removed from the breasts every few hours night and day, or milk production will reduce. (or never get where it needs to get in the first place.) This may be from a pump or from baby, or even hand expression, but something has to be removing the milk every 2-3 hours. If milk is not removed, Aside from production reducing, (or never getting where it needs to get in the first place) mom may be come engorged, get plugs, get mastitis...the milk sitting in the breasts for long periods will make you ill, in other words. So, I wonder how this has been working, going 8-9 hours with no milk removal? How are you feeling? How are your breasts feeling? I can tell you for sure that from a safety pov, Sidelying nursing with baby next to you when on meds that are this strong is not safe unless another responsible adult is right there, watching and entirely awake every time you nursed for the whole time baby was beside you. This is entirely aside from whether the medication levels in your milk at this point when they are affecting you so strongly are safe, which I am not sure about... Pumping actually might be doable. There are cases of ill, comatose new mothers "being pumped" while they were unconscious. But of course this is extreme and I have no idea how you feel about this or whether you and your husband could get you into a position where this is possible. ...
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*stubborn.mama's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:33 PM
    Haha this situation inspired my username for sure! Sucks hard. But we can do it. I keep telling my dh that if my ds ever changes his mind and turns around to start nursing again, I want to be there, ready.
    12 replies | 886 view(s)
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