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  • @llli*mommystruggless's Avatar
    Today, 01:00 AM
    I'm a first time mommy and having major breastfeeding issues
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:11 PM
    I am not sure you could be causing water intoxication if baby is getting very little water. But my question would be why your baby needs water at all, or juice. Breastmilk contains every thing a baby needs and nothing baby does not need. So it is perfectly hydrating and entirely healthy. If a baby cannot get enough breastmilk to gain normally, the appropriate alternative is infant formula, not water or juice. One problem with water and juice for the breastfed baby is they both will cause baby to nurse less and consequently, to get less breast milk. Most baby cereal is constipating no matter how it is prepared. There is no reason to start with cereals. There is also no rule that babies must start solids by 6 months. This is a generally accepted guideline for when solids are to be "introduced" but "introduced" is open to very wide interpretation. It does not mean baby needs solids every day or anything like it. Many babies are not really ready for solids until several months later. Assuming normal health and weight gain, you can probably eliminate solids or cut way way back on them. And if baby is NOT gaining well, solids usually make that worse unless they are very high cal, high fat solids as almost no baby foods are. Eliminating or cutting way back on solids would almost surely eliminate the constipation without having to take the possibly unhealthy steps of giving baby any juice or water.
    2 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:00 PM
    Hi! I think your baby is about 3 months old? Please let me know if that is incorrect. So, you now have a large stash of milk, possibly more than you are likely to need. So I am not really sure what you are asking, so I hope the following makes sense. If you are working a 10 hour day it is most likely you will need to pump 3 times when at work, at least to start. I am unclear if that is your plan? But the reason for that, even if you have lots of milk stored to give baby, is so that you do not become engorged and uncomfortable and possibly ill at work, and also so your milk production does not become harmed. Since it sounds to me as if you must have a pretty good milk production, I think it is entirely possible you will pump enough when at work to leave for baby the next work day. Of course you could freeze some of what you pump when at work, give baby some of the frozen milk, and rotate things that way so you use up the older frozen milk before it "expires." This would be perfectly fine. Just be sure everything is labeled very well for dates.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:44 PM
    Hi! So of course it is normal for poops to change once solids are introduced. I am not sure if nugget like is a problem (it depends on how moist over it is, how much it happens, etc,) but baby crying when she poops might indicate an issue...but maybe not constipation so much as, "hey this poop feels really different then what I was doing before and I am not sure I like it." On the other hand, straining to go, especially straining and NOT going, is clearly constipation, as are hard dry pellet poops as djs.mom suggests. Sorry to get so specific but the problem is, lots of times constipation is suspected when in fact all is normal. If you think your child is getting constipated from solids, I would suggest eliminate solids for now or cut way back. And no, breastfed babies are not more prone to constipation. If you do an online search about babies and constipation you will see that solids introduction is a time many babies start to have trouble in the department whether breast milk of formula fed. And the suggestion is the same for both- more breastmilk or formula, depending on which baby was eating before solids. Since exclusive breastfeeding gradually and slowly transferring to eating solids is the biological norm for all humans and indeed all mammals, this is a pattern that is not going to result in abnormal results. Usually what is causing the constipation when any baby goes from a liquid diet to solid introduction is that that the solids are being introduced...
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*ogomez0728's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:13 PM
    Mixing the water helped him get back to loose stools versus thick paste like stools or constipation.
    2 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*ogomez0728's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:12 PM
    I've started my 6mos old baby on solids. He will be 7 mos soon. I sometimes mix cereal into his baby food because otherwise he won't eat cereal. I've noticed solids cause him to be constipated. To loosen up his food I mix water. He also drinks juice with water but not even an Oz in one sitting. I'm very worried I'm causing water intoxication. What am I doing wrong?
    2 replies | 26 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:49 PM
    Not dark. But nugget like, and she's having trouble passing them. She cries when she tries to go. She produced several 'nuggets' today and yesterday with difficulty before having a more loose painless stool tonight.
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:22 PM
    :whatshesaid Yeah....the formula companies only mission in being in those hospital bags? Is to sabotage your breastfeeding relationship so they can make money. Nothing about your baby's bowels suggest an allergy or irritation. Which means that your baby may just be MORE sensitive to gas at this point. But even if that's the case, he will outgrow that and learn to fart without being too upset about it. IN the mean time, also try bicycling his legs and belly massages to push gas out and always always burp the baby!
    8 replies | 245 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:12 PM
    I would try dosing with motrin. I suspect that the increased night nursing may have to do with her 2nd year molars breaking.
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:09 PM
    So when you say constipation, you mean your baby since the introduction of solids has begun having small, hard, dark stool? Like rabbit pellets?
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*akse0929's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:46 PM
    My LO is 6 weeks and we have had a really tough road with BF'ing. After getting her tongue/lip ties revised at 4w followed by total breast refusal, things were just starting to turn around and we were getting into a rhythm. However for the past 1-2 days now, she will latch, suck, then get really squirmy and fussy and pull off. This will repeat and she will grow increasingly fussy/frantic to where she is barely latching/sucking properly. I've tried soothing her and switching sides, same thing. Eventually I have to give in and give her a bottle because so much time has gone by that she is clearly hungry and needs to eat as she's been too fussy to get anything at my breast and is practically knawing her own fingers off at that point. She calms down as soon as the bottle is in her mouth and eats just fine. I took her to the pedi today suspecting thrush as my nipples/breasts have been stinging and her tongue was looking white. Pedi said tongue looked fine and no thrush in her mouth but did see a "yeasty" diaper rash for which they rx'd nystatin and told me to put on my nipples too. If she doesn't have thrush in her mouth and can bottle feed without pain, then I assume I can rule thrush out as a cause of her fussiness while BF'ing?
    0 replies | 37 view(s)
  • @llli*virginiamom14's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:48 PM
    Hello everyone, I am currently on maternity leave with my three week old and my 2 year old. I was wondering if anyone had recommendations on baby carriers, especially ones that a baby can easily nurse in. I am trying to take my 2 year old out most days to parks, museums, etc. and my current baby carrier isn't particularly comfortable and I don't think I could nurse my baby in it. And any other suggestions or tips anyone has about dealing with a very active 2 year old with a newborn would also be greatly appreciated! We had relatives here helping until today so I am finally on my own and I am still trying to figure out logistics of everything (i.e. what do you do when both kids need to eat at the same time, that type of thing.) Thanks!
    0 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*skye0787's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:36 PM
    Hey everyone. I need some help and hopefully some of you. I go back to work next week, and right now I exclusively breastfeed but I pump too. Anyway I started pumping since LO was born. Right now, I have well over 900 oz of milk in a deep freezer. I also store milk in the fridge when I am the gym or in case of emergency. My plan is to pump the morning of if I have time, if not I will give what I have in the fridge. My think is if I use fresh milk plus whats in the fridge if I have stored it what should I do with all the other milk. My thing is I dont want for the freezer ones to go to waste. Do you think its possible that I can use the ones in the freezer. Mind you I dont work everyday due to working a 10 hour shift. So t he days I am not working I am breastfeeding and pumping. I am at a lost on how I should use this milk. Please give advice.
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:57 PM
    Hi ladies. I don't know if this is the right spot for this post. My beautiful girl is 7 months old and we have begun introducing solids. Mostly purees, in small amounts and we're still breastfeeding like crazy. We've skipped cereals and steer clear of the foods that I know to constipate (bananas, etc). I give lots of green fruits and veggies. But she still gets constipated. I don't feel like we're overdoing it with the amounts she's getting. The same happened with our first child (also EBF). Do breastfed babies tend to take longer to adjust to solids?
    3 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*tanusha's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:37 AM
    I contacted you before when I have concerns about my milk supply for my second child, and you’ve helped me tremendously. Now I have 3 kids, two sons of 8 and 5 years of age, and a baby daughter, she is 1 year 10 months old. I was breast-feeding my sons till 2 years of age and almost 3 years of age; and by the age of my daughter, they were feeding only once at night, or even not at all at night. My daughter was also doing rather good at night, she was feeding one or maximum 3 times per night. Until recently (one months ago) our work load has increased (my husband used to spend a lot of time at home with our kids, but he is on urgent projects for the last month and maybe for the next 2 months, so he works a lot during the day now; and I also got work increase, even though I work from home and usually stay close to my kids). To help us deal with the kids and our household, we asked our Mother-in-Law (who is the sweetest woman ever, and very soft with the kids) to move with us for the next 2 months, which she kindly did. And, simultaneously, my 1 year 10 months old daughter started nursing 6-8 times per night.. We practice co-sleeping, so I don’t get up to nurse her, but while nursing my daughter scratches my elbows and underarms severely (when I try to stop her, she protests). After she is done with nursing, she pushes me with both hands away, turns to the other side and continues sleeping. I sometimes also continue sleeping, but sometimes it’s difficult to fall...
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*dukes.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:40 AM
    Okay ladies, my baby is 8 weeks old today and I've I struggled with oversupply for about 6 weeks now. I began trying block feeding a couple of weeks ago. I started slowly, and did 2 consecutive days of 4 hour blocks. It worked! Then, when I went back to offering one breast per feeding, later that day my supply was crazy high again! So, I then did a day of 6 hour blocks, followed by 2 days of 4 hour blocks, followed by 1 day of 3 hour blocks. Worked like a charm. However, as soon as I tried offering one breast per feeding again, 12 hours later my breasts are busting at the seams ready to feed quadruplets!! What gives?! Should I just do an even longer duration of blocked feedings? How long is too long.. I'd HATE to decrease supply too much. Lastly, has anyone done the method of using a pump to "empty" both breasts, then commence a normal feeding schedule afterwards to "re-train" your supply? Curious if it worked? Thank you!
    0 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 28th, 2017, 06:40 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. I only want to add that for nighttime leaking, I suggest investing in a washable adult incontinence pad. They are less scratchy than a towel, they absorb better, and milk doesn't pass through the waterproof backing and get onto your bed. Plus, when your child is older it can become a waterproof pad you slip under their sheets. They cost about $20-30, but they are an investment I would make again!
    2 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 28th, 2017, 06:30 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Tantrums are normal, and you can deal with them compassionately while also not giving in to a child's unreasonable demand. It takes mountains of patience! I just want to point out that hating being separated from mama even for the length of a bathroom break is totally normal, and one of the unheralded joys of motherhood. I vividly remember taking a much-needed bathroom break and having my child pound on the door. "this is mama's private time!" I yelled, desperately. She ripped open the door and looked me right in the eye and said "No. I need to see you." Ah, the memories...
    4 replies | 244 view(s)
  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    March 28th, 2017, 12:32 PM
    Thank you both. I called my lactation consultant today, she suggested to pump a couple of times a day and see if the milk intake drops too much in the next week, then maybe go to once a day. She also says that his latch is ok, and not to worry too much.
    5 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 28th, 2017, 11:12 AM
    Hi gagliano. What you are experiencing is pretty common for the newborn period. Your milk production has been increasing every day since baby was born. So this is a common time for feeling super full if it has been a while since baby nursed. Leaking is 100% normal and in fact, it is good your breasts leak as this will act to alleviate some of the pressure and issues of engorgement. Latching at night when everyone is more tired is also commonly more of an issue. Usually as both you and baby become more practiced at latch in general, this will improve. If baby is capable of having a comfortable latch during the day, she is capable of having one at night. It is just harder due to the tiredness and you may be more engorged at night. Certainly this is one way to help a baby get a better latch. But it is not the only way. Aside from trying different positions and latch techniques, another way to alleviate the engorgement being a problem is to encourage baby to nurse with high frequency. The more often baby nurses, the less full the breasts will get between nursing sessions. If it is helping, fine to keep hand expressing before latching baby. But there are two potential issues you just may want to think about 1), if you are hand expressing milk frequently, that is going to give your body the message to make even more milk. 2) hand expressing before nursing delays baby getting to the breast. If baby starts out hungry and eager to nurse, but then putting baby to the...
    2 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*gagliano's Avatar
    March 28th, 2017, 08:02 AM
    Hello, I have a 10 day old baby. I've struggled to find a good latch with her since day 3 when my milk let down. She's gaining weight so she's definitely getting milk. Yesterday I was able to finally get a good latch on both sides in the side laying position. But then as we got into the night it didn't work anymore. Every night I have issues getting her latch correct and it's so painful. But I'm always so tired I end up just letting her eat since she is actually getting milk. Plus at night I'm super engorged. The last two nights I soaked two breast pads through to my bra and shirt and bed. I slept on a towel last night. Any ideas what could be going wrong? I hand express when I'm engorged before I feed her so that she can get a deeper latch. I try different positions and her mouth looks the way it should. I had a visit from a lactation consultant a week ago and of course things looked fine at that point and all she could tell me was to make sure I hand express before feeding so she can get a deep latch. I'm so discouraged and in a lot of pain. It feels like once I finally get something going and my nipples look healed for the day it gets bad again and I totally dread feeding my baby. :( help!
    2 replies | 125 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 11:13 PM
    My oldest child never threw tantrums. Ever. I thought I must be an awesome parent, at least in this area. Then came my second child and I lost that delusion! Second son had such intense, scary tantrums I was afraid he might hurt himself. I was so freaked out I asked our pediatrician what to do. He was (and is) our third pediatrician who we love because he never acts condescending, is entirely positive about breastfeeding and bedsharing, is generally awesome. We trust him. He said "put him somewhere he cannot hurt himself and let him have his tantrum." I was amazed. Really? Not try to help him? Not try to stop it? I could not get my mind around doing nothing in the face of these terrible tantrums. So I kept trying to keep my son from having tantrums. Over time, I learned some things that helped prevent or avert tantrums. But in the end I also learned that it really is true that sometimes he simply wanted something that I could or would not provide for him, and there was no avoiding it, he just needed to have his tantrum about it. Then it would be over and we could go on with life. Third child also tantrums, at 4, she still does on occasion. She had one today over not being allowed to watch TV. She is funny, she will cry and scream and then be happy as a clam afterward. Basically, do not fear the tantrums, is my point. For many kids this is how they deal with discomfort, frustration or disappointment, until they are old enough to learn to deal with these...
    4 replies | 244 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 08:28 PM
    Yes I agree with mommal. Here is what I wrote earlier but did not post as I was called away from computer: It makes sense. This actually can possibly happen- a baby might have nursing issues that would cause poor milk transfer that are hidden because mom makes so much milk baby does not have to be nursing effectively to get enough. When her milk production reduces to normal, the problem with baby's ability to transfer milk is revealed. I would think yes, most likely this is a very different situation now. But I am afraid it is impossible to know for sure without more time going by or a trained person watching a nursing session and concluding that there is no problem with transfer. This is why I suggested seeing an IBCLC, but it is possible they would not be 100% sure either. If you would like to see an LC again, maybe there are low cost clinics or some other way you can see your LC again or a different one. Often there are more resources available than you might have heard of. It never hurts to ask. To find out what may be available, you can call your LCs, ask any local LLL or other breastfeeding support group, breastfeeding coalitions, etc. Also your LC may be able to talk to you on the phone for a follow up.
    5 replies | 200 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 27th, 2017, 07:17 PM
    That makes perfect sense! When a mom-baby pair has a rough start, it can be very scary to back off on pumping and supplementing and weighing, etc. I think MaddieB gave excellent advice- in your shoes, I would back off on the pumping but still retain a few sessions per day. Continue to weigh the baby, keeping a careful tally of his intake. If you get through a week with no appreciable decline in his intake, drop another session and continue to weigh him frequently. Continue the process until you have dropped all the pump sessions. I know a lot of moms who have been caught in the consuming cycle of weighing, pumping, and worrying. But there is a light at the end of the tunnel! it gets better, I promise!
    5 replies | 200 view(s)
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