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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:58 AM
    There are many reasons why expressing milk while away from baby might become harder as baby gets older. In other words it might be related to the plug or it might not. First it would help to know how much you were typically able to express before, and what you are expressing now, and how that differs from the other breast? By this age many moms see a natural reduction in the amount they can express at once. Are you seeing no change at all in your ability to express milk in the other breast? Do you feel as though there is milk, but you are just not able to get it out when expressing? Did you try pumping as well? A few ideas that may have caused this- The plug led to overfullness and your body got the message to reduce production in that breast. In that case, your child nursing lots should increase production and help the issue. There are still plugs or inflammation (swelling) in the breast causing poor milk removal. That side has for a while not been 'stimulated" enough with frequent/effective enough milk removal, which would lead to both the plug AND a reduction in production. Your milk production is reducing a bit naturally (perhaps you had more than enough before) and where that is obvious is in the amount you are able to express. Since babies are better at milk removal than anything else, some mom find they need to actually be making more than enough milk to express much milk.
    1 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*gilismom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:11 PM
    Hi KNowledgeable Mamas! I have a five month old (my 4th child), EBF. I had a plugged duct for five or six days this week and got rid of it with lots of breastfeeding. I tried to go back to work yesterday and hand express there - which usually goes very well for me - and from that side, nearly nothing came out. I had to run home to BF her! Is this a result of the plugged duct? Will this resolve after a few more days of BF'ing my daughter? I need to be able to go back to work and pump/hand express and in gen'l be able to be away from my baby for a few hours..... Thanks so much!
    1 replies | 142 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:34 AM
    :ita of course! I hate that they put a number on nursing sessions, as it so often leads to moms worrying when baby wants to nurse more and clearly confuses health care providers who do not understand that the often stated number (10-12) or time line (every 2 to 3 hours) are MINIMUMS and that most babies nurse more often and in cluster patterns and in many cases much more often! Enjoy your dear new baby and how much easier it will be this time around. Sounds like you are both doing great.
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:24 AM
    Hi dcs123. I would suggest figure out about how much you will need to leave and then work backwards from there. For example. The average daily intake for a breastfed baby of 1 month or older is 25-35 ounces per 24 hour day. So if the separation is for 3 entire days - 72 hours, baby can be presumed to need between about 70 and 100 ounces total. So, in that case, say you have 2 months (60 days) to pump the 100 ounces. If you have op, then when you pump you probably get at least 2-3 ounces, right? In that case, you could plan to pump once a day and have enough in 35-50 days. But it is also possible that pump output will decrease as your milk production reduces to more accurately meet your baby's need. So I think pumping once a day about 2-3 ounces each day would make sense for those numbers and increase if necessary. You want to avoid pumping too much to avoid making your overproduction problematic. This way you are leaving some cushion in time so that when there are days you cannot pump etc. there will still be enough milk for you to go on your trip. Even if you did not have quite 100 ounces it would probably be fine- remember that would represent the max baby might need.
    1 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:48 PM
    So baby has never wanted to nurse more often than every 3-4 hours, even when offered? Has weight gain been normal? As a baby gets better at transferring milk and moms milk production increases over the first several weeks, babies do tend to nurse shorter periods, and even 8-10 minutes for a whole nursing session could be entirely normal. But I agree that nursing every 6 hours is much too little for a 6 week old baby. More common at this age is more like 10 times in 24 hours or more. I would suggest do not worry at all about fat content or anything else about the 'quality' of your milk, and I know of no reason to be worried about 'foamy' poop that other wise looks entirely normal. There is a wide range of normal look for infant poop, if a poop is truly problematic, it is very obvious. Also fussiness at the breast is rarely anything to worry about. The only thing you report that sounds unusual to me is the low nursing frequency. But that could be normal too (as long as baby nurses at least 6-8 times in 24 hours.) If your baby is gaining well, probably no worries. But often a baby will nurse more often overall if they are offered. No need to wait for cues. Also it does not have to be every such and such hours but rather when you feel like it, with baby nursing more often some parts of the day. Encouraging baby to nurse overall more often certainly cannot hurt.
    1 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:37 PM
    Block feeding reduces milk production- but while it is being done it may worsen the issue of fast letdown, at least at first. This is because fast letdown increases the longer milk sits in the breast and you have to let milk sit in the breasts for longer in order to "block" a breast. So if for example baby is nursing every 2 hours, and you are blocking each breast for 4 hours, every time you switch, baby may be getting the same or even more flow than they did before- even if your milk production is beginning to reduce. About 6 weeks is the typical peak of milk production and after that, assuming mom makes more than enough, her production will begin to reduce on its own. So one strategy would be the forget block nursing, nurse more frequently or as frequently as baby will but maybe one side at a time, and see if that helps with the flow while your milk production naturally reduces over time. If you want to keep block nursing, you can still encourage baby to nurse frequently, so that only when baby switches to the "blocked" side will the flow be fast. The issues you are seeing are temporary and not hurting your baby. It is normal for babies to spit up and some spit up a great deal. it is very normal for newborn babies to have lots of gas, even some painful gas, explosive poop- none of this is unusual for this age and it will reduce overtime even if you do nothing. It is important to understand that there are cautions one should take when block nursing. Here is a...
    1 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*dcs123's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 05:42 PM
    Hello! I'm EBF my 7 week old. I have an oversupply, so I only pump when the baby gets a bottle (so she can get used to it). I am going on a trip in a couple months over a long weekend. When/how much should I pump so that the baby has enough to eat during my time away from her? TIA!
    1 replies | 101 view(s)
  • @llli*megkl15's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 05:32 PM
    I talked to a lactation specialist that told me to block feed (my baby eats every 2 hrs) to help with my oversupply and forceful letdown. My baby is almost 7 weeks and has gained almost 1lb per week, recently he's been spitting up a lot when he feeds, just opens his mouth and milk pours out. He seems fussier than usual and I have been giving him gas relief. His bms are very explosive, runny and yellow. I'm just wondering if block feeding will help my issues, so far it's been 4 days and I have seen a little improvement but not too much
    1 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 12:42 PM
    Thank you for your reply, and that all makes a lot of sense. I switched back to the pampers with blue strip they gave me at the hospital and now I see he's peeing a lot so I wonder if I was missing the pee due to the poops like you said. Yes, I had to do all that weighing, waking, etc. with my twins. Plus pumping after every feeding etc. It was so much work and while it was worth it, I'm so glad not to have to do that this time. This time, the hospital staff seemed to think it strange that I wasn't going by "feed him every three hours" or whatever but this baby was cuing to eat a lot more than that--more than the "12 times per day" rule even. So they thought I was feeding him a lot but were also happy with his output. Of course the two go hand in hand! I just want to establish a good milk supply so I'm not worried about him eating so frequently right now. Still way easier than what took place with the twins! :)
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*amelia428's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 11:00 AM
    Thanks. Yeah I definitely don't want to go under. But apparently draining it can just lead it to fill up and again and again. I hope I can just leave it as is and deal without it getting bigger :/
    2 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 09:30 AM
    Oh help me. Why did the doctor tell you to do the extremely serious intervention of no longer nursing your child if (as is correct) the mucous is nothing to worry about? What is wrong with these doctors???? Ok, first to clarify- yellow is the color of most baby poop and all poop has mucous in it and is "runny." But I guess you are seeing something outside the norm for your baby? Mucous occurs naturally in the body and is required for the digestive system to work. When you or anyone one else poops, there is some mucous. You just do not usually see it. An infant who is pooping frequently and the poop is going into a diaper may have more visible mucous just because the poop is so much more visible in that circumstance. Has there been any other changes in the poop- how often, how much, consistency? A child who has more mucous than normal may have some kind of inflammation going on, a cold, tummy virus...many possibilities. Another cause in breastfed babies is if mom has overproduction and/or baby is not nursing with normal (high) frequency. Please note even if this is the reason, it is not a reason to stop nursing! Or it could just be a temporary entirely normal thing that goes away as mysteriously as it came. Extra mucous is formed to protect the child's system from whatever might be trying to invade the system or causing inflammation. In other words, the mucous itself is usually all the "treatment" your baby needs. It is not harming baby, and if otherwise baby...
    1 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*sophiewalter's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 09:03 AM
    Hello to all moms over here, I have questions for you. I have been breastfeeding my daughter for 2 months now and few days ago I noticed that her poop was not like before, it was yellowish. We went straight to doctor and she said it's mucus and that we should not be worried about it, but to stop breastfeeding her just in case. We are going again in few days to see how it's going but she is still pooping something yellowish and it's runny. Did anybody experienced the same mucus in stool problem with their babies?
    1 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*eviesmom67's Avatar
    July 19th, 2017, 08:51 AM
    Hi, all! I'm so confused with what my daughter has been doing lately. A few days ago, she had a day where she would feed every 6 hours instead of her normal 3-4. After that day she went back to feeding every 4 hours or so, but with less hunger cues. She went from feeding 40-45 minutes to 15-20 minutes and also went from feeding on one side until I switched her to refusing to nurse on one side after 8-10 minutes. She will spit out the nipple, cry and pull away if I try to get her to latch back on to that side and isn't satisfied until I put her on the other side. Also noticing nighttime is the worst with fussiness at the breast! I don't believe I'm overproducing since I see no signs of that and I consistently get the same amount when pumping at the same time each day. Expressed milk looks the same as far as fat content too. I've also noticed since she's started this new feeding ritual, she's been more fussy and has had foamy, yellow poo. It's the same color as always, is seedy and looks the same in her diapers. I only noticed it was foamy since she pooed while she was naked before a bath. I read that this could be a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance, but I've also read in some places that it would be green as well. Anyone have any insight or tips? I know that both she and my body will become more efficient in feeding and the time at the breast will shorten, but does this happen so suddenly? I've been so confident in breastfeeding until now and I'm getting worried. HELP!
    1 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 11:21 PM
    Yes this falls under the normal column. Also very normal. Have you considered if bedsharing might work for you? If not, or if you are and baby is still so wakeful, I suggest tag team these long midnight hours and take naps as you can during the day so you both get enough rest to function. This won't be forever but this overnight marathon is par for the course in these early weeks. If you want more info on bedsharing let me know. Other suggestions: If baby has nursed to sleep, I would suggest let baby sleep and don't try to burp baby. Go ahead and hold baby sleeping baby upright for a while before putting down but let baby sleep. A baby who is taking that long to burp probably does not really need to burp. A baby who needs to be burped and has a pain due to trapped air is going to let you know they need help and burp quickly when they get it. This can happen at any time, not just right after baby nurses. Newborn babies spit up whether they are burped or not. It is normal. Changing a baby is used as a technique to wake and stimulate babies who are not nursing often enough for a good reason- it can be very stimulating to a baby to have their diaper changed. So if you are trying to NOT stimulate but rather, settle baby, try avoiding changing baby overnight unless it is REALLY needed- if baby has had a blow out or is clearly leaking. Instead if baby stirs just immediately nurse baby back to sleep again and you may find baby will go more quickly into a deeper, slightly...
    1 replies | 145 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 10:21 PM
    I think draining it is different than what a surgeon will do. If you go under the knife I believe they will remove the tissue that would re-fill if you just drained it. And it may be less common because of the cost and also...you may have to go under to get that done and there is always a risk with that and a lot of people prefer not to do that if they don't have to. I think the ultrasound is a good idea as is the lecithin.
    2 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*lpetix's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 09:12 PM
    Please tell me if this is part of "normal newborn behavior". Every night starting around her midnight nursing session, she begins this cycle of frequent feeds, spit up/burping/ diaper changes. What i mean is, she nurses about 15-20 minutes, then takes about 15 minutes to get her to burp (sometimes she spits up if we put her down before keeping her upright for a while), then we try rocking her to sleep after swaddling and rocking, which works after 20 minutes, but then she wakes up as soon as we lay her down in her bassinet-- then we try changing her, then rocking her again, but still won't let us put her down-- at which point it's been an hour and then I try nursing and sure enough, she takes the breast and is hungry again and the cycle repeats, never falling asleep unless she's in our arms. This continues usually through 2 or 3 feeding cycles. One other side note that makes this process difficult is she seems to really dislike being swaddled- we use the swaddleme velcro swaddle blankets and as soon as she's in it she makes these grunting/straining noises trying to wriggle out and makes herself more upset sometimes. She does better in the muslin swaddles, but those don't last longer than 10 minutes and I don't feel comfortable leaving her in that over night as I'm scared of it unwraveling and suffocating her. - she is 16 days old - already past her birth weight and continuing to gain appropriately - during the day she generally falls asleep much easier and is more...
    1 replies | 145 view(s)
  • @llli*amelia428's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 06:49 PM
    Apologies if this isn't in the right place! I saw my OB today for a large breast lump that used to be a clogged duct but has not gone away and grown in size. She didn't know much but thinks it's a galactocele and referred me for an ultrasound and consult with the breast surgeon. Of course they can't see me until next week. From reading online this seems fairly uncommon. People can leave it as is or get it drained - but draining seems to risk it filling again and/or infection. Does anyone know anything about what I can do to treat this other than draining it? Are there any home remedies? I'm managing the pain from the weight of the cyst with Advil. I'm also heating, massaging, taking lecithin, and a million other things. I'm hoping someone will miraculously have a cure - or at the very least have had this and can tell me what route they took. Thanks!!
    2 replies | 150 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 03:42 PM
    Hi and congratulations! Most likely the poop is hiding the pee. If baby is pooping normally no need to worry about pee, (assuming baby has proven they CAN pee, as your baby has.) Pees are something that are watched in the absence of normal poop amount or normal gain to make sure baby is not getting so little milk they are in danger of becoming dehydrated. No baby who is in any way dehydrated would have those lovely wet and frequent poops, also poops being yellow at 4 days is great sign all is well. A baby who is getting enough breastmilk to poop like that could not possibly need more fluid than they are getting, and a baby who is already starting to gain 4 days after birth is clearly getting enough milk. Cluster feeding of course is normal and very good. You may have had to do lots of measuring or other interventions before with newborn twins??? If so, just know that normally that is not needed and you can probably relax a bit now that things seem to be off to a good start. This is a good article on the early weeks you may like: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 02:16 PM
    Update, so of course ten minutes after I posted this, he peed. Would still love to hear what everyone would think or do, and is it normal to have all these poops but have gone 12 hours before a pee?
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*jollycat's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 01:41 PM
    Hi, I have a 4 day old. He has a poop after pretty much every feed and they're yellow now with seeds. We saw doctor today and he's started to regain weight. However he hasn't peed for 12 hours. Lots of poop, but no pee. I breastfed my twins so I am pretty confident this time around about keeping his interest at the breast etc. He's currently cluster feeding. Any thoughts or advice on the pee? Doctor wants me to call if no pee by 7pm. Thank you!
    4 replies | 202 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 09:18 AM
    Hi and welcome. Nursing strikes are common at this age. I am going to link the best article I know about getting the reluctant to nurse baby back to the breast. You may have to try many things, and many of the same things many times. But as long as you recognize this as a strike and not weaning, in other words if you keep trying to get baby back to the breast, you are likely to be able to nurse your baby again. While baby is not nursing it will be important to pump often enough to maintain normal production levels. Add hand expression to your routine if needed, it may help. Even if you are not producing well for the pump, still pump or at least hand express. It is not necessarily important that you then give what you pump to your child...if they are eating pretty well and gaining normally it may not be, basically it is up to you if you do that or save the milk. In the article you will see ways to use expressed milk to get baby back to the breast. http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/ I am not sure what you mean when you say you have a very regular schedule- is when to nurse mostly baby's choice or yours? I would suggest think about relaxing or eliminating any nursing 'routines' or schedules as you try to get baby back to the breast and instead, offer frequently. Scheduling nursing sessions is a common weaning technique, so having a schedule could increase the likelihood baby actually will wean earlier.
    1 replies | 279 view(s)
  • @llli*aphasiac00's Avatar
    July 18th, 2017, 07:11 AM
    My 15-month-old son is now on his second day of refusing to nurse. We have a very regular schedule that has gone smoothly and uninterrupted for most of his life. But starting yesterday, he will bite my nipple, point at it, and shake his head no. I pumped last night and this morning and he drank it all out of a cup. I'd rather not get into that habit, though, because I've never produced much with pumping (no letdown, little is expressed -- IDK, my body just doesn't want to respond to a pump). Any advice or suggestions? He has 8 teeth and hasn't done this before, but could it be teething? It is such a sudden development and my breasts feel too full even after trying to pump. Thanks for your help!
    1 replies | 279 view(s)
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