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  • @llli*noelle.black's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:36 PM
    I have been breastfeeding my 6 month old son since he was born (pumping while at work for him to use at daycare during the day). Last week the stomach bug left me pretty sick. I was too sick to pump for 3 days and only nursed a handful of times during those few days to try and give some precious antibodies to my little boy so he wouldn't get it. I've been pumping a few times a day since then and nurse him every time if I can but I am not pumping much at all now. I'm still on the dehydrated side but getting much better now and taking in as many calories as I can. I'm worried my supply isn't going to come back because of those three days... am I right? Or is there still hope? Anything I can do to help get it back to where it was? If it'll come back in time, that will make me feel better but I'm just worried right now and stressing about it...:(
    0 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:35 PM
    Thank you! These are awesome resources! We also ordered a couple new types of bottles that are supposed to be easier for breastfed babies. The nipples look shorter so maybe they won't trigger her gag reflex as bad either. One is called Mimijumi and costs $30 but has a money back guarantee if they won't take it. The other is a Bare Perfe-latch. Hoping she will like those.
    6 replies | 263 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:52 AM
    I had the same thing happen around 6 weeks. Now I really think it was just the pique of a fussy period overall. I have a fast letdown but it never bothered her before. Starting at 6 weeks she would act so hungry and I would have to bounce her around and sing to her to get her to eat little bits at a time in between fussing. Even in the middle of the night. I was really worried and exhausted.. it just lasted about a week and is nursing just fine now.
    3 replies | 255 view(s)
  • @llli*sarahfv's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:48 AM
    A quick update.. I spoke with my endocrinologist and even though I've been off medication for 10 months now and my prolactin level is back to being abnormally high, the MRI showed no significant change in my tumor! So I am free to continue nursing as long as I want!
    7 replies | 369 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymemommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:17 AM
    I will ask my doctor if I can do that, mommal. I would really love to see what she is actually eating. There is a breastfeeding clinic about 40 minutes away, so I could go in there and have them weigh her before and after. If her weight does not pick up here in the next week on my own scale, I think I will make the trek and do that. I do have to say, she's only been on the Zantac for 36 hours, but she is like a different baby. She is eating much larger portions, is much happier, and is actually eating more often. She NEVER ate within 2 hours of a previous feeding and she has done that 3 times yesterday too. I think I am on the right track with the Zantac!!
    5 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:13 AM
    I want her to comfort nurse. But when she pulls off multiple times because she is frustrated by the flow I have to give it a break, for the sake of my nipples! What positioning adjustments? We lay back a bit every time we nurse - is there another position I could try?
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:10 AM
    Yes. It has been very trying and overwhelming, because I never had a fever, nor any of the typical mastitis symptoms. I never felt a plugged duct or anything like that, and when the dr. said it was just mastitis I knew that wasn't it because it was starting to protrude from the bottom of my left breast. I've had it drained 5 times now and I havent been able to relax as I am afraid it will happen again on my good breast. The only thing I can think that may have caused it was I had a severely cracked nipple on that side, and once I started bleeding and LO was spitting up my blood I started nursing less on that side, without really pumping.
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:46 PM
    I agree with mommal. I am not quite understanding. When baby wants to comfort suck, are you ending the breastfeeding session, or is baby? Comfort nursing is normal and important. If your milk flow is so bad baby is refusing to nurse for comfort, that will rectify as your production and the fast letdown calms down. If baby is willing to keep trying despite the reaction to fast flow, let her keep trying. And try positioning adjustments to help lower the flow or help her handle it better. I would also sometimes let milk flow into a towel for a few moments and they re-latched baby. Also, The fast letdown that is probably causing the pulling off, sputtering etc. will be helped by nursing more often. It might not be immediate, but it should begin to help if baby keeps nursing frequently consistently.
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:32 PM
    So that kiwi-sized lump you talked about in a previous thread turned out to be an abscess? If you don't mind me asking, how did you figure out what it was, and what was the treatment? As MaddieB pointed out, feeding "on demand" can be more complicated than simply waiting for the baby to ask to be fed. It can also mean that mom feeds the baby when her own body is demanding to release some milk. Feeling full, or feeling engorged? That's a cue from your body to try to get the baby to nurse. If the baby won't nurse- because she's too deeply asleep or too full- then you have 2 choices. You can simply put up with the fullness and try to nurse the baby again a little later. Alternately, you can hand express of pump just enough to restore comfort. What you generally want to avoid is thoroughly emptying the breast, because that will perpetuate or worsen oversupply. Please don't worry about your baby getting overfull. One of the beautiful things about being a baby on a breastmilk diet is that your tummy deals with being overfull quite easily. Too full? The excess part of your 100% liquid diet will get disposed of as spit-up, which is messy but completely harmless. I think a lot of moms get caught up in a destructive pattern of worry about the amount of milk their babies ate. It would make sense if they were bottle feeding, because it's so easy to overfeeding/underfeed a baby when you are using a bottle and the adult is in charge of the feeding. But when you're...
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 08:10 PM
    Found my favorite article about constipation in infants and young children: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0201/p469.html
    5 replies | 158 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 05:56 PM
    I am trying to nurse more often, but it's been difficult because she will nurse until (what I assume) is full, and then wants to comfort suck, which isn't possible because my letdown frustrates her. So she pulls off, sputters, cries, re-latches, pulls off, sputters, cries, repeat. They say breastfed babies can't overeat but I believe her tummy is getting way too full. If that doesn't happen, she is extremely difficult to wake up, period. So I try for about 30 minutes and then give in and pump, because I feel so engorged. My hope is that I don't necessarily have an oversupply, and that baby will grow into my let down once my supply is full established. In the meantime, I'm struggling to comfort her (I'm trying not to give a paci) and keep myself comfortable (without resorting to pumping/expressing).
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 03:23 PM
    It would probably be best to encourage your baby to nurse more often. What happens when you try to do that? And what are you a trying? "On demand" became a saying to counteract the destructive idea of feeding schedules. In that case, it simply meant, do not put a baby on an every 4 hour feeding schedule and instead nurse when baby cues, which would typically be way more often than that. But the problem with the idea of nursing "On demand" is that there are many instances where a baby does not cue as often as is optimal, or where an infant's cues are subtle and cannot really be described as "demanding" to be fed. What I suspect is happening here is that because you have overproduction, your baby is getting plenty to eat even with a low nursing frequency and really does not need to nurse more often to gain normally. Fine for baby. But for your breast health, and your ongoing ability to breastfeed, you need baby to nurse more often. Nursing more often is perfectly fine, is NOT going to hurt your baby and it is also NOT going to increase milk production. It will not increase milk production because the more often your baby nurses, the less they will take in at once. So overall the message to your body of how much milk to make is unchanged. Frequent nursing promotes NORMAL milk production, not overproduction. What promotes overproduction (and increases production if that is needed) is pumping "extra" milk out. Breastfeeding does not really require so much...
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*maderamoon's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 01:35 PM
    Hi there, I have a question about my DD. She is 5.5 weeks old now, and has been exclusively breastfeeding since day 1. Her eating habits aren't as consistent with what LC's usually recommend, and while supply is a big concern of mine, a bigger concern is clogged ducts (im currently getting over a breast abscess). Sometimes she eats every 2.5-3 hours. Sometimes it's every 5-6. Sometimes she drains both breasts. Sometimes she only snacks on one and falls right back to sleep (when this happens I feel so engorged!). Most of the time my breasts still feel full though. Her weight gain is great, and she has plenty of poopy/wet diapers. My question is, can I continue to let her feed like this? Is this what "on demand" feeding is like? Will it effect the general health of my breasts? Should I pump during those times when she goes longer or just snacks, and if so, how long (I also don't want an oversupply, I already have an OALD!) I'm terrified of getting sick again as it has left me exhausted and overwhelmed, not to mention with a disfigured breast. It would seem has breastfeeding would be easier but it requires much more thought then I anticipated
    6 replies | 135 view(s)
  • @llli*feetea's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 11:00 AM
    Oh that's really helpful, thank you mommal :-) Especially the bit about how long it takes to resolve - so to be patient and give the treatment time to work its effect. I've also been thinking about how much lactulose I should be giving him - the doctor said to take 2.5 ml a time, when the bottle says it should be 5ml for ages 1-5. I've been giving him the 2.5 ml but since he's over 1 year old and big for his age - over the 99th percentile - I wonder whether he shouldn't be on 5ml instead. I'll mention that to the doc when I see her. Very grateful for your advice :-)
    5 replies | 158 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    January 14th, 2017, 07:23 AM
    I think the best thing you can do is to stop thinking of it as an imbalance and start thinking of it as oversupply. "Imbalance" implies that there is something wrong with your milk. But there's nothing wrong with it other than overabundance, which is in my experience a better problem to have than not enough milk. My experience with oversupply is that there is no way to tell how fast your body will respond to corrective measures (block feeding, full drainage, etc.). Some moms respond really fast, in just a day or two. Others take months to get things completely under control. One thing up that I found to be true is that the process is not completely under your control. Sometimes oversupply will come roaring back for no reason. It's kind of a "2 steps forward, 1 step back" process.
    1 replies | 159 view(s)
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