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  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:44 PM
    Definitely makes sense! I am willing to try anything to skip supplementing! When you say nursing more frequently, with 2 oz feed, how often would you say that is. Every 2 hours? Because I can't quite get my head around the timing of it all. If we nurse for 30 mins, then playtime for 15-30 mins, there is only 1 h left for putting to sleep and actual nap (which would be around 30-40 mins then) Is that enough?!? With the pumping - if the ml consumed start to drop meaning my supply is dwindling down again, wouldn't it be extremely hard to get it back up? The stress of losing my milk is almost unbearable to me after endless nights of pumping. Also he still squashes my nipples. It's no longer painful but they do come out with a crease line across them. Is that an indicative sign that he is not nursing effectively? I don't think he does empty the breast well because there is so much more milk pumped after the feed but maybe he actually nurses fine and its normal to have that much milk left?
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:08 PM
    This is a great question! It really speaks to the heart of the concerns of a lot of moms: how do you KNOW when you can safely skip the supplemental bottle and just nurse? Part of the reason this is a great question is that it is a tricky one. On the one hand, if the baby is able to transfer milk well, then you can just put him back on the breast and trust that if he wants to eat, he will find a way to get milk out because even a breast that feels empty still has milk in it. But if you have a baby who has difficulty transferring milk, putting him back on the breast may mean a lot of effort for little gain. I think the way to sort this dilemma out is with time, and the scale. You have a healthy, growing baby, right? That means you have time to play with your baby's feeding pattern, because it's not like he's a scrawny baby who is in danger of failing to thrive. He can withstand a couple of days of you trying something new, even if it means his intake is a bit lower than ideal for that couple of days. So if this were my baby, I would try to skip the supplement any time the scale indicated that the baby got 60-70 ml at the breast. This may mean that he will want to nurse again very soon after he last nursed, and that's fine- unless it makes you too sore, in which case you might want to take a break, and give him a small bottle while you pump. But that's just one approach! You could also give very small supplemental bottles after he nurses- let's say 30-50 ml....
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*isabelofmtl's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:02 PM
    I have a3.5 yo DD and a 6 mo DS. I also dislike resorting to TV or iPad but I will use those tools if needed. My DS is at that distracted stage, maybe at the tail end? Crossing my fingers... Anyway, another thing I find I can do to nurse him with DD around is to do side lying in my bed with dd on my other side. The baby can't see his sister and she is quiet because we're lying down, putting the baby to sleep or whatever the explanation needs to be. If dd gets bored, she can go play by herself in another room. Or she can bring books and "read" quietly behind me while I nurse. I also use a sound machine, which helps smooth out startling noises.
    7 replies | 460 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Hi insimom. It is rarely a good idea to pump and bottle feed rather than breastfeed. It is something that can be done if baby cannot nurse for some reason, of course. But more typically, assuming baby actually needs supplements, (breastmilk or formula in bottles) they can be given while mom and baby continue to nurse and work on improving milk transfer or milk production, or both, whichever is required. Additionally, a newborn being sleepy at the breast, nursing for long periods, and drinking a bottle after nursing are not reliable indicators that baby is not getting enough milk at the breast. We have very little info here. We would need to know baby's age and complete weight check history, how much baby is given in bottles daily, poop output, etc to even begin to advise you with much specificity. Since you are bottle feeding and thinking that is required, that indicates breastfeeding is in trouble or soon will be. My best suggestion in that case would be to seek in person help asap- a board cert. Lactation consultant (IBCLC) or volunteer breastfeeding helper like a LLL leader. Generally for a sleepy baby, you want to try to make sure latch is good. Breast compressions and/or switching sides can help baby stay more awake. Stroking baby, pumping the hand or foot, verbally encouraging baby, jiggling baby's chin etc to "rev up" baby again can also help. If baby needs supplements, giving baby a very small amount of supplement prior to nursing may give baby the...
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:21 PM
    Thank you for all the help! The only problem I have with putting him back on the breast after he acts hungry post feed is that my breasts have so little milk in them that he just suckles on them. He doesn't swallow anything. If that's the case is there really a point of making him sit at the breast? Last question. If we keep going at this rate and he finally eats enough of the breast if I stop pumping will my supply significantly decrease? I would love to ditch the pump sooner rather than later but I'm scared I'm "over supplying" now (been pumping since he was 2 weeks) and if I stop pumping my milk will decrease and he won't be able to get the oz he needs out of the breast. I feel he goes for the easy milk and is not willing to work for the harder one.
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:35 PM
    Thanks for bumping- I meant to get back to you but then life/kids/stuff got in the way. Baby not taking the bottle: this is a tough issue. The only thing you can do is too keep trying different approaches. Different milk temperatures, different bottles, baby held more upright, worn in a sling, etc. something should click, if you give it enough time. Increased supplements at night: if baby is truly not taking enough during the day, it may be a good idea to feed him more at night. I would watch his behavior and diaper output very carefully- if he still seems hungry after feedings at night, or his diaper output drops below adequate, you may need to up the supplements. But I wouldn't worry about this yet! It's not an emergency situation, and hopefully he's going to get the hang of daytime bottles soon. Regarding pumping enough for supplemeting and for the next day's separation: you are right, this may not be possible! Do what you can with the pump, and use formula to cover any gaps. That's what it's for! Here's how you minimize milk wastage: - Do not mix breastmilk and formula in the same bottle unless baby refuses plain formula. Unfinished formula must be discarded after about 1 hour, but unfinished breastmilk can go back in the fridge.
    28 replies | 1333 view(s)
  • @llli*cas.tex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    Hi! Yes, same scale and nude. Nurses. 10-12 times a day Wet diapers around 6-8, dirty diapers that aren't just streaks are about 2-3 Before formula her 'scoopable' poops where maybe one and they where yellowish/brown Nursing feels good, I can tell that she is emptying them pretty fully. She starts off gulping, then dozes off some and does some soft sucking until I believe I get another let down and I hear more gulping. I usually have to mess with her a few times during feeding and wake her with burping between breasts. She spends about 20-35 minutes nursing. Thanks
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:24 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Questions for you: - Has the baby always been weighed on the same scale, and in the nude? Or has she been weighed on a variety of scales, and states of dress/undress? - How often does baby nurse, in a 24 hour period? - What is the baby's wet/poop diaper output? - What were the baby's poops like before you started supplementing with formula? Were they yellow or green? When she pooped, was the amount "scoopable"- that is, could you scoop the poop up in a teaspoon, or did it soak right into the diaper? - How does nursing feel? - Does the baby fall asleep while nursing? If so, does she seem to start dozing relatively early in the feeding?
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:19 PM
    Your measurements weren't wrong- what's wrong is the fact that the rest of the world uses metric, and the US is still stubbornly mired in pounds and ounces and acres and feet! :lol If this were my baby, and he ate 2 oz and then still seems hungry, I think I would just keep switching him from breast to breast until he seemed satisfied. Even if that resulted in very short intervals between feedings. The caveat is that if he truly cannot transfer milk well enough, or nursing is really hurting you, then it may be advisable to stop the feed at a certain point and give a bottle so that you can go pump. This is what makes the scale such a useful tool; using it, you can determine whether the baby is really flagging at the breast and needs a supplement, or whether he's doing pretty well and you can just tough it out and keep nursing. Remember, the breast is never really empty- milk is being made even as it is being removed. At 8 weeks, falling asleep after feeding is something you probably can't expect to happen after every feeding. Baby's old enough to have some alert time between feedings. It's textbook normal to have smaller feedings occurring at shorter intervals during the evening- that's what cluster feeding is. A 1.35 oz feeding is fine, as long as baby has another one a short while later. If you offer both breasts, you're feeling sore, and baby has only take 40 ml, I would give him a small supplement- 30 ml is fine- and then offer the breast again. If he...
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*cas.tex's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:14 PM
    My daughter is 2 1/2 weeks & latches great. Birth 6.4lbs-1 week 5.11lbs- 2 weeks 5.11lbs. The Dr is concerned because she hasn't gained & is still jaundice but since she has a great latch she was going to give her one more week before we start needing to supplement and worry. It's been 5 days and she still hasn't gained and has started acting hungry after I feed her and is eating way more often 2-2 1/2hrs instead of 3 and she is also very lethargic and wakes up crying frantically for food. Yesterday I started giving her an ounce of formula on top of what she is getting from me during two feedings and it was like she was a different baby. Happy, content and stayed awake happy for once. I've pumped a few times and at most I get 1 1/2 ounces, but usually get only an ounce. I didn't make enough for my first baby by 2 months so Im worried the same thing is happening. I want to do the best for my baby and hate the idea that I'm starving her. Help please
    2 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    28 replies | 1333 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:02 PM
    Awesome! Thanks for the update.
    14 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:02 PM
    As long as you are feeding on demand, and you are willing to offer the second breast if the baby comes off the first still seeming hungry, and the baby is having adequate wet/poop diaper output and weight gain, there is absolutely no need to monkey with the pump or worry about losing supply. The doctor's advice would be good if the baby was having trouble gaining weight and you were struggling with supply. But under normal circumstances, there is just no need for a mom to pump as long as she is home with her baby!
    1 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:21 PM
    Use madela nipple shield .. It helped me a lot .. I havebeenthrough ur situation
    3 replies | 311 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:19 PM
    My baby latches on and sucks for couple of mins and falls asleep when I put her down she awakes and again wants to be on my breast, this way I keep on nursing her for hours and she still remain hungry .. If I give her bottle she eats immediately easily 2-4 oz. How do I make her nurse effectively? Should I pump n give her bottle ? My body does not respond to pump well too
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*insimom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:10 PM
    I have gone through same. I started using madela nipple shield and in a day started feeling better. I have been nursing my new born since last 3 weeks with nipple shield
    3 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*mehouseholder2's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:07 PM
    First, thanks so much for the advice! Its good to know that there are some answers! He is at daycare from about 7am, till about 4pm. Sometimes he is there until 4:30, depending on when my husband can pick him up. He gets nursed typically between 3-5 am, and then between 6-6:30am before he goes, depending on his mood/fussiness. He hates having to get up in the morning (who can blame him really) I have been thinking he is being overfed for about a month now...I had been sending bags with 5 oz in them...but have (this week) switched to 4 oz bags, or 3.5 oz bags. I did notice that yesterday when I nursed him all day ( I stayed home to try and boost supply), he was perfectly content with nursing every 2 hours, and getting what I thought was 3-4 oz at each feeding. I do believe that I have communicated effectively that they are not to get rid of breastmilk. Sending the bottles might be the next step, as opposed to letting them warm up the bags and place in bottles. I'm also going to request that they only use the small bottle I sent with him, not the 8 oz larger one. Good idea! Today, I have successfully pumped 3-4 oz at each pumping (having pumped 3 times).
    7 replies | 289 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:21 PM
    Hi. Today at my 6-week postpartum check-up, after telling Dr. that my 6 week old baby feeds off one breast every 2 hours(she pulls off or falls asleep), Dr. advised me to pump the other breast that she didn't feed off of. Then two hours after pumping, offer Babe that same pumped breast. I told Dr. I was leery of the pump since I don't want to make more milk than my baby needs. My doctor was concerned that I would start losing my milk. Is this true? Should I be pumping my other breast?
    1 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*nirebear's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:55 AM
    Thank you! I was thinking that it must decrease supply as I'd done it early on when I did have oversupply. Now I don't think I do as I don't leak unless feeding from the other boob so I don't want to mess with my supply too much. I'm all for being lazy and not doing anything, so doing nothing and just hoping sleep will get better is quite a good strategy for me! Thanks for the advice :)
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*mommyof5as's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:14 AM
    Update. Baby girl is now 9 weeks and her weight is up to 7lb 4.5oz.. Her pedi was thrilled at her 2/mo check up yesterday
    14 replies | 378 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:05 AM
    Thanks! Apologies for the wrong measurements. I'm not from US and often forget! So would you say if the baby eats 60 ml (2 oz) I should not top him up? If he still acts super hungry what's the top up amount I should give him? 1 oz (30 ml) or more/less? I tried not giving him any top up after 2 oz feed but he just would not fall asleep. I was rocking him for 30 mins (usually passes out by 10 min) and he didn't even flinch. If that's the case should I offer him breast again (no swallowing as breasts are empty) or should I just give him bottle? And how much given he hasn't already eaten for 30 mins. We got new scales last night and turns out as predicted by the feel of my breasts I don't produce quite enough in the evenings. He only ate about 40 ml (1.35 oz.). In that case what should be the top up amount? Do they also eat more at night? Because I know lots of babies cluster feed so I'm assuming they must be getting more in the evenings?
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 AM
    Who was that somebody who put the bug in your ear about foremilk? They need a little remedial education! Foremilk/hindmilk "imbalance" is actually the spbiggest non-issue in breastfeeding. Unfortunately, it's a myth that just. won't. die! Here's why it isn't actually a real thing: - There is actually no such thing as either foremilk or hindmilk. There's just milk. The milk that comes from a full breast is relatively more watery and lactose-rich than the milk that comes at the end of the feeding, but at no point does milk switch from foremilk to hindmilk. As the breast empties out, the milk becomes gradually less watery and more creamy, but foremilk isn't just skim milk and hindmilk isn't pure cream. Maybe a better way to express this is to say that all foremilk contains hindmilk, and all hindmilk contains foremilk? - Foremilk is not "low calorie". A baby will gain well- often exceedingly well- on the so-called "foremilk" alone, provided she gets enough of it. - Block feeding does not change the ratio of foremilk to hindmilk. It just decreases supply. It is something you might want to do if you have a significant oversupply, but if you have normal supply, you do NOT want to block feed. - Overactive/fast letdown is often caused by oversupply, but not always. There are moms with fast letdowns who have normal or even low supply. So, where does that leave you regarding your baby's sleep? Well, I think it leaves you with a normal baby who is sleeping in a...
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:10 AM
    So I translated everything into oz- which makes more sense to me because of the stupid way we Americans have eschewed the metric system. I'm going to post the amounts here in oz, in case other non-metric moms want to take a look: - Baby gets 60-70 ml, or 2-2.4 oz when feeding at the breast, according to weigh-feed-weigh measurements - Baby gets a top-off of 50 ml, or 1.7 oz, of EBM - Mom has read that an appropriate feeding for this age is 100-120 ml, or 3.8-4.1 oz - Mom is pumping 1-1.3 oz after nursing Based on those amounts, here is what I am thinking: - Baby is actually getting a normal amount when nursing. 100-120 ml is a very large feeding for a breastfed baby of any age. 60-70 ml (2-2.4 oz) is actually a complete, albeit more average, size for a feeding. Breastfed babies compensate for the smaller size of the average feeding by feeding frequently, often as much as 10-12 or more times per day. - If baby can get that much at the breast, you probably don't need to be supplementing. So it makes sense to get a scale and really put in some hard work with it. If baby can always get 60-70 ml when nursing, he doesn't need the top-offs. He just needs to nurse more often. I think there is a good chance that the long stretches in between feedings are the result of baby being stuffed to the gills.
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
  • @llli*mashenka1985's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:07 AM
    our pediatrician told us, that loosing weight at the first 10 days after birth is normal for babies, because the survive the stress of the new environment and get ready to receive the food in an unusual way (breastfeeding). As for the milk supply - one of the two breastfeeding consultants has told I should pump in order to have more milk and the other told be right the opposite - never pump, if there's no extreme necessity. The baby and only the baby should be the one, who generates and regulates the amount of your milk by sucking. Pumping more than the baby eats may lead to overproduction and result into constant pumping and discomfort. I might be wrong, but when my pediatrician has noticed the baby doesn't gain weight - she simply said I should apply the baby as often as the baby would take the breast. If you are afraid to overfeed the baby - it's almost impossible while breastfeeding only. "If one decants after each feeding, there will be much more milk than it’s needed, and it can lead to milk stagnation – lactostasis. The only real reason for pumping is when you have alcohol in your blood." http://motherhow.com/breastfeeding-dont-believe-in-rumors/
    6 replies | 993 view(s)
  • @llli*mashenka1985's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 AM
    I'd agree that the insomnia issue cannot be fully explained by the hormonal shifts after weaning. There's something deeper to dig through. You might be surviving the hidden depression, where insomnia and anxiety may be the symptoms. There should be some other explanation than weaning to that... I'm sorry you have to go through this.
    5 replies | 384 view(s)
  • @llli*nirebear's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:33 AM
    I have an overactive letdown, but not oversupply. My daughter is 8 months and not sleeping great. Someone said to me that it might be that she's getting a lot of foremilk during the day so not taking on the calories she needs because of my let down - she doesn't tend to hang around for long feeds so generally has the letdown then gets distracted and pulls off to go and play with something. If I block fed on one side for 2 feeds to increase the amount of hind milk she's getting, will it reduce my supply? and is it silly to do this?
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*nichole67's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:42 AM
    Hello mama's this is my first post and i need help. So here is the low down. For the past three months i have been eping. I breastfed my lo for the first two months with nipple shield. My lo was diagnosed with lip/tounge tie after two months of hell, hungry baby dropping wieght. Laction came to the conclusion that if i wanted to continue with breastmilk it was best to ep. Been eping and really would like to get baby to breast. I have tried to latch her and she screams when i put her in nursing position. I try while she is asleep and she will not go for it. Every now and then she will latch in bath tub . She is lazy and wants the instant reward. The only thing i have not tryed is a sns.I have the supply and really want to get back to breast for my sanity. Giving up is not an option! Please help!!
    0 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*jessie90's Avatar
    February 10th, 2016, 09:44 PM
    Hi Mommal, I didn't read your response as critical at all!!! So no worries :) I know everyone just tries to help here. I hired baby scales and weighed him for 2 feedings (scale broke after that so I am getting new one today) and he took around 60-70 ml. So I topped him up extra 50 ml of EBM. I read somewhere they meant to eat on average 100-120 ml each feeds so I went by that. Sometimes I do wonder if he needs the top up but then he comes off the breast very unsatisfied and when I try to burp him he just goes into "I want more scream". So I put him back at the breast before I offer bottle but then he just suckles on the breast without swallowing anything. If he does that for another 10 min I just take him off, give him bottle and start play/sleep routine because I need to pump. And I know if he tried harder he would get more milk because now I am able to pump 30-40 ml post feed which would satisfy his needs completely. It's so frustrating. If I take him off without the bottle and try to put him to sleep he will be either rooting on my arm the whole time or just sit wide awake for hours. Also if I give him bottle with less milk as soon as I take it away from him he goes ballistic and cries like I seriously hurt him or something. Breaks my heart so I give him more until the cry changes from horrible scream to little whimpers. If he has a lot of EBM then he doesn't cry at all. I always took his cry as "I have empty stomach mummy" so I topped up if necessary.
    8 replies | 155 view(s)
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