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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:52 PM
    Hi. I just checked my copy of Medications and Mothers Milk which is a tad old- 2010 (it is updated every two years I believe) Anyway, coumadin is rated L2, "safer" - this is the second highest safety rating, which is a very good rating for safety. Personally I would not hesitate to nurse my child when on a medication rated L2. But there is no way I can explain in detail the rating system or why Hale rated the medication this way. I would suggest contacting www.infantrisk.org to get a more clear explanation. I see this medication is in the toxnet database as well and you can read about it and lactation here: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search2/f?./temp/~7EsecW:1 As you can see, it is not contraindicated for nursing mothers. As far as relactating, any mother can possibly relactate, and in fact, any woman can possibly induce lactation- even if she has not given birth! Whether or not this means you will be able to make enough milk to exclusively nurse again is of course unknowable. But you have some big things going for you. First, you have nursed 2 children before, so you know your body is able to produce plenty of milk, and your body 'knows' it too. 2) it sounds as if you nursed (exclusively?) for a month prior to your illness, thus establishing a milk production for this baby. Both of these things increase the chances you will be able to relactate. I would also point out that the benefits of breastfeeding are not all or nothing. Any amount of your...
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*scubamama's Avatar
    Today, 05:31 PM
    Sorry to hear this! My baby went through a phase where she was rejecting one breast. Not sure why she started doing this, but I remember being really frustrated and worried. One thing that helped was offering that side in a side lying position while she was more relaxed. After about a day of offering but not pushing it, she started nursing from both sides again. Good luck!
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*shelly5889's Avatar
    Today, 04:32 PM
    I have two questions. Can I will you lactate for my five month old and number two is it safe since I am on Coumadin? I have breast-fed both my children till 2 1/2 years old but with my new baby I had blood clots in both my legs and my vena cava which led me to take the Coumadin and was in the hospital for one month. This all happened in one month after I gave birth. My baby was an excellent nurse her. Actually the best out of all my children. I try to pump while I was in the hospital but I became too weak. I had home health for a month and then went back to work but I feel that something is missing and I wish we could breast-feed again I feel bad every time I make her a bottle of formula. Do you think it's possible?
    1 replies | 43 view(s)
  • @llli*amcmanus17's Avatar
    Today, 03:24 PM
    Thanks ladies, i was thinking soft wash cloth but wow, thats a lot of wash cloths! Thanks again.
    5 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*naturegal64's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 PM
    I've tried getting in touch with 2 different LCs over the past week or so. One cancelled on me because she got sick & the other never called me back. I've tried calling again today so we'll see. Today has been much better, my breasts are definitely softer than yesterday & not causing as much pain (still sore but bearable). LO usually takes 40-60mL from the bottle after BFing so I will continue pumping that amount as long as its comfortable. Since he came 5 weeks early, my thought is he just hasn't developed the sucking muscles to get milk from BFing effeciently & he has a very small mouth. And my flat nipples certainly don't help the situation, even though I use a nipple shield for help. Thank you for your help, I really appreciate it!!
    6 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 01:00 PM
    It IS really emotionally draining - I remember freaking out even with a very brief nursing strike when my baby had a stuffed up nose. I had to actively tell myself to relax and that really helped. Good luck!
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:58 PM
    You've gotten lots of great advice, I thought I'd just link to milk storage guidelines - either the cooler or the fridge is fine. Hope your first day is going okay - agree with others that it is hard to go back but gets better. http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/milkstorage/ https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/21_storingmilk.pdf Over time I accumulated multiple sets of pump parts, what I found was most efficient for me was to set up the flanges/valves/membranes/bottles in advance and then pull them out when I needed them. I initially rinsed out parts after each pumping, later realized that I did not need to do that. Sometimes I spent my pumping time relaxing, reading, looking at these forums, other times I worked (including charting!), other times I ate while pumping.
    5 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*dvdfad002's Avatar
    Today, 12:52 PM
    Thank you for the link...lots of awesome advice! Need to learn not to force the issue... "Casual" offers.... I didn't think it would be this hard. I think it's more of a case of being emotionally draining Wish me luck
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Here are the LLL guidelines, which do say refrigerate before combining: http://www.llli.org/faq/milkstorage.html Same with Kelly mom: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/milkstorage/ I've never really understood it - I guess when you add the warm milk to the cool, it warms up the cool milk? Not sure. There have definitely been occasions where I did not wait for the fresh milk to chill before combining it with already chilled milk, but if you want to go by the book, chill the milk before combining.
    2 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:44 PM
    Glad to hear things are getting better...
    8 replies | 199 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:43 PM
    I think you are doing great. Baby's gain sounds normal, so does not prove overfeeding, but of course does not disprove it either. The long sleep stretch does help explain why baby takes so much at each meal. He has to! Again, more normal/typical would be baby nursing 10-12 times a day, more or less around the clock. If baby is being swaddled for sleep, gets a pacifier, or sleeps in a separate room from you, these have all shown to unnaturally lengthen infant sleep stretches (as does overfeeding as you suspect.) For more on the science of infant sleep and many ideas for you and your husband to get more sleep, I suggest the book Sweet Sleep. Be aware infant weight gain typically slows after 3 months- from average~1 ounce per day to average ~3/4th ounce per day. (please note these are averages and estimates) So if gain slows a bit now, don't let that worry you overly. It could just be normal. Try not to worry about this. It is a common worry but pretty much unfounded. Yes, you don't want to PLAN to regularly pump right before a nursing session. But this is going to accidentally happen on occasion and is not anything to be worried about. OK massage is good idea to try, I agree. BTW did we discuss pump type at all? What kind do you have? Here is a nice pumping chart you can use if you like. Note it does not have a schedule, you just mark off when you have pumped. Moms often find this much more manageable than following a strict schedule. Take it day by day. Some...
    6 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:43 PM
    :ita Kudos to you for advocating for yourself and making things work as best as possible. Happy to hear that there is a lactation consultant supporting you through all this and that they have been accommodating to your needs. Hope everything goes well on Monday.
    6 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:40 PM
    This is so interesting! My mom stayed with me after each of my births. She is very social, loves to put on dinner parties etc. So within the first couple days of my coming home she was cooking for people and having them over to meet the new baby. They were close friends but I still found it exhausting. If I wasn't nursing I wanted to be sleeping or soaking my sore bottom in a warm bath or, for after having my younger two, giving a little attention to one of my older kids. I did have a small number of close friends visiting me in the hospital and that was fine, they were sensitive to the fact that I might be tired and did not overstay their welcome. I don't have family nearby so I didn't have a constant parade of people coming and going - I really think that would have been very tiring. I agree with PPs, if there are going to be visitors, they should be people who understand what's going on in the postpartum period, and are sensitive to mom's needs and baby's, ready to offer support but also ready to be quiet or even leave!
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:36 PM
    My experience with visitors after my first baby was born taught me that the only person I wanted in my house after my second baby was born was my mother. Everyone else was welcome for a very short visit, and then they had to leave.
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*bfwmomof3's Avatar
    Today, 12:28 PM
    Hi mama, Nursing strikes are really stressful, hang in there! This article has a lot of great ideas for getting baby back to breast: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/ I think being very casual and low key about offering is important, in my experience. It's hard to be low-key and casual when stressed about the fact that baby is refusing, but if baby senses the stress he is all the more likely to refuse. I've also found that my babies seem unable to resist wanting to nurse when we're both in the bathtub together naked, so you might want to try that out, along with the other suggestions in that link. In addition to encouraging your toddler to nurse, you might want to consider doing some extra pumping to keep up supply.
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 12:28 PM
    @llli*mommal replied to a thread Oversupply? in Too Much Milk!
    I personally think it would be a good idea to throttle back on the pumping. You could simply use the pump or hand expression to take 2 oz total after nursing, or if you're not that uncomfortable, just put up with the fullness until the next nursing session? I think that shelving the bottles for now may be a good idea. But watch your baby's diaper output and weight gain very carefully as you do so. Those long nursing sessions could be totally normal, or they could be an indication that he's not yet all that good at transferring milk. If the latter applies, then supplemental feedings may need to be part of your life for now. If nursing is going well- again, díaper output and weight gain are going to tell you if it is- then I would stick with the general recommendation for woking moms, which is to introduce bottles around 4-6 weeks (minimum). Just because you started bottles early doesn't mean that you have to keep giving them.
    6 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*peppermintp's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    Hi, Thanks again. Totally agree that I am over feeding/supplementing. It was so stressful in the beginning with his weight loss and pressure for him to gain that it things got out of control. For the past 5-6 weeks, I'd say baby is gaining on average 5-7 ounces (as I said, he's currently 11'3 at 12 weeks; birth weight was 8'13 but was likely inflated due to fluids). I weigh him once a week, on the same scale at the Public Health office, naked. I think I can definitely pump 6-8x/day. I realize that I need to suck it up and do it, if I want to EBF. So far today (it's late afternoon) I've pumped 4 times. I will add hand expression as well, thanks for the suggestion! By massage I meant massage, prior to nursing. Breast and nipple massage (I figure it can't hurt at this point, ha!). I thought I read that somewhere or saw it in a video. I do add compressions when nursing and baby has stopped sucking. He is sleeping through the night (average 7.5 - 9.5 hours), which is great for sleep, but I realize that this is due to the sheer amount of formula we've been pumping into him!! I've warned my husband that this will come to an end if we get serious about getting rid of formula. I was pumping before I went to bed, but still would go about 6 hours without nursing/pumping because I would "sleep when the baby sleeps"…a few times I set my alarm to get up and pump. Or, sometimes I was afraid that if I got up to pump, he would wake to feed, and I would have no milk left...
    6 replies | 180 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:18 PM
    Yes. Normal milk production relies on frequent and effective removal of milk from the breasts. This is achieved by: Nursing frequently, for as long as baby wants, and encouraging baby to nurse at both sides each session if possible, or even switching sides more than once of you and baby like. If baby is not able to nurse well or often or long enough, and/or, supplements are being given, it is important to express milk another way. Ideally at 9 days this would be with a hospital grade pump. But if that is not possible, any breast pump (that does not cause you pain or injury) can be used, also, you can hand express. You could also try breast compressions to help baby get more at the breast with less effort. If you have truly have low production that is not corrected soon you can consider more aggressive methods (power pumping, more powerful galactagogues etc. But I do not think you are there yet. Nursing does not "tire a baby out" any more than any other way of feeding. In fact, nursing is less stressful and calming for baby then other feeding methods. So this myth was disproven long ago. Nursing for any length of time when there is not enough milk, or baby cannot get enough milk out, will result in low gain, but the problem there is the lack of milk transferred, not how long baby nurses. Supplements will help if baby needs more calories. It sounds like they already are helping. Limiting time at the breast will not. The only reason to limit time at the breast is if YOU...
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*boycrazy's Avatar
    Today, 11:36 AM
    That is great advice. Thank you for being so thorough! I was told to limit so that he did not tire out before getting the supplement, but feeding after supplements is a great idea, and i would bet I can argue for lifting the time limit if he has had the oz the pediatrician requested first. Prior to yesterday 10-12 times per day was how often we were nursing. Last night he went 3 hours between, but thismorning, as he has gained some strength, he has been demanding the breast at 2 hours, so back up to normal. I will be attending a lll meeting monday, but the leaders advised me that they don't have LC. They said they are able to give me some coaching though. Hopefully that will help if it is a transfer problem. I will be pumping by tomorrow, we are in rural texas, and this hospital doesn't have a pump to use, although I have a single low power one, and will rent a hospital grade Monday. I do think I will stick with the syringe for now. With my 5 year old, once he had the bottle, he seemed to think nursing was too much work. I was kind of bullied into supplementing him early on as well. Do you have suggestions if it is a supply issue? I feel that my diet and fluids should be sufficient, and i have started mothers milk tea, but any advice would be appreciated :)
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*dvdfad002's Avatar
    Today, 11:27 AM
    Hi there I hope that you will be able to give me some words of encouragement as well as advice. I was forced to attend training out of my city for 6 days/5nights. I had left my 5 month old with EBM (unfortunately I couldn't take him with me :cry ). When I returned yesterday he refused to nurse- arched his back and screamed :cry Please tell me how I can get him back to the breast... I hate the inconvenience of having to make bottles. I know my milk supply has taken a dip as well-trying to get my toddler to nurse more in order to stimulate milk production. My heart breaks every time he refuses... I know I need to keep offering, it's just so hard!
    4 replies | 75 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:53 AM
    I would not suggest changing anything prior to the trip. If you encourage less nursing now, it is less likely your child will continue to nurse after the trips. If you or your husband are concerned that you continuing to nurse now will somehow make it harder to settle your child on the trip, I would suggest you guys rethink bringing such a young child on such long trips away from her mom. This is potentially a pretty stressful scenario, nursing or not. This sounds fine. If you find you are extracting very little milk, add another session for "safety" if you like. Some toddlers go right back to nursing after long separations, others not so much. If you find your child is refusing to nurse after a trip, I would suggest don't think of it as weaning until proven otherwise. Treat it instead like a nursing strike, and gently encourage nursing. See: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*bean161's Avatar
    Today, 10:51 AM
    I also had a ton of visitors beginning in the hospital (3 day stay for C-section recovery) and continuing at home for about a month! I do feel it impacted breastfeeding and bonding early on as I was not comfortable nursing around people at that point. And although I tried to be gracious, I did not particularly enjoy the visitors at our home. I put undue pressure on myself to visit and tend to "company" as I was taught to do, and I worried about being a good hostess. Ridiculous, I know! But, we've been sucessfully EBF for 15+ months, so I think the impact for me was minimal in the long run. :)
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 10:46 AM
    I know I regret my birth experience. I had back labor (DS had the back of his head against my spine instead of his nose) and after the birth my lower back was so painful but my in laws came by for like an hour and I didn't want to flash anyone while i got comfortable and they all demanded to hold him and they commented about his head not being round. Hello he was just born! They stayed for an hour and I missed my window to shower so I couldn't shower until I got home. Needless to say next time we won't have visitors until the 2nd day at least. i wanted nothing more than to just go home. My mom told me to stay in the hospital as long aa I could because I got fed and I could ask for help etc. The nurses told me not to let him use me as a pacifier and that I was nursing too often. Thankfully I had learned things on my own and I tossed their advice but I felt like if I asked about something I would get bad advice. I think our culture makes the birth experience about everyone except the mom. Family and friends get mad at false alarms. They get mad if they aren't invited to the birth room. The mother rarely gets asked how she's doing and what she needs. Before the baby is even a week old the mom is asked if she wants another. I felt like i had to entertain the company while I was healing. I felt pressured to let everyone hold him in the early days and was called selfish for slinking away into my room with the baby to avoid it. Idk. I think it would be very hard to...
    6 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:44 AM
    I am pretty sure Lactation is correct. NO evidence of need to pump and dump, unless someone pumps milk out of you while you are still under the affects of the anesthesia. Sounds like you have made the best of an incredibly difficult situation and have been a great advocate for yourself and your baby.
    6 replies | 187 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:33 AM
    Hi, sorry you are having such a hard time! Please let go of feeling guilty. You have not been starving your baby. Babies with jaundice are often sleepy and weak and do not eat quite enough due to that. The good news is, this was caught early - it sounds like, because YOU pushed for answers. There is not really much evidence one way or another, however, bottles have long been seen as problematic if given too early, usually because they result in over feeding/too fast flow. A recent study where syringes were used to supplement small amounts of formula found that breastfeeding rates were unchanged by that intervention. So, best evidence right now backs up syringes. If syringe proves to slow, I would suggest open cup feeding rather than bottles. Why is the time limited? Personally I would question this. Are you pumping? This is vital whenever baby is getting supplements. Ask where you can rent a hospital grade pump and aim for pumping after each nursing session or as close to it as you can manage. This will help you have normal milk production. Also, a newborn typically nurses at least 10 times a day. If your baby is being fed less often than that, I would suggest that might be a problem too.
    3 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*gakinok.miji's Avatar
    Today, 10:28 AM
    Hi, Our family-situation right now is allowing my husband and 16 month old daughter to go on multiple camping trips over the next couple of months which will each be about 2 weeks long. I won't be travelling with them, and as they'll be camping, they won't be able to take pumped breastmilk with them. I would like to continue our nursing relationship until she's at least 2, and I want to know how to facilitate this. Currently our daughter is nursing only twice a day - once when she wakes up and once or twice when she goes to bed. I'd like to hear people's thoughts/ideas/experiences on nursing pauses like this. - Is it best to go cold turkey? Keep up our normal nursings until they depart and then her and dad will have settled into a new routine? - Or is it best to reduce the nursing to once a day for a few days before? I'm pretty sure I could skip our morning nursings for 2-3 days before they head out.
    1 replies | 59 view(s)
  • @llli*azrael499's Avatar
    Today, 10:26 AM
    Was in the hospital for a few days last week and just got home. I had chest pain/tightness and they found that I need my gallbladder removed and I have pancreatitis. My enzyme levels were very high so they admitted me to the hospital. I did not have my baby with me the first night because I expected on coming home from the ER. My mom just kept giving the baby my milk from the fridge/freezer as a method to calm her which ended up with her spitting up the milk she didn't need. Every other night I had her in the hospital with me. I requested a baby cart from labor and delivery and they gave me a private room. So, we made it worked. And, I also kept pumping too. They gave me a ton of antibiotics and wanted me to have surgery on Thursday or Friday but the OR was booked. So, I requested to go home which is where I am now with surgery scheduled for Monday at 1pm. We are still battling thrush since I was lax on treatment while in the hospital and had a ton more antibiotics. However, baby does seem to be gaining weight now and is nursing well...or at least did last night. Even though with the thrush it still hurts terribly. So, I am working really hard to get rid of it now and also to restock my milk as best I can to prepare for surgery on Monday. I did weigh the baby before and after nursing this morning and did the conversion and she drank 2.116 ounces on me. I'll take it! Before she was barely nursing 1 ounce. I still offer more breast milk in a bottle for now until she sees...
    41 replies | 1696 view(s)
  • @llli*azrael499's Avatar
    Today, 10:17 AM
    They had me in the hospital for a few days with surgery scheduled for Thursday or Friday to remove my gallbladder. I guess I have gallstones and pancreatitis. I went 44 hours in the hospital without food and water waiting for surgery until they told me they do not have any openings until next week in the OR. So, I pushed to go home where I am now with surgery scheduled for Monday at 1pm. Lactation at the hospital said that as soon as I am up from surgery I can nurse. Anesthesiology said that they would instead recommend that I pump and dump only the first pump since meds will also be in my airways. As far as the milk I pumped after the CAT Scan...I put it in the freezer marked for now. Radiology gave me a paper that said that the contrast is not supposed to transfer to the milk but that there have been no further studies done. They said that if I want to be cautious I could pump and dump for 48 hours but even the guy who told me that made it sound like they were only trying to cover their butts just in case. I also read that if there was radiation in the milk that it would go away the longer it sits. So, it is sitting in the freezer. Lactation said it is fine to use. We still do have thrush but both my cream and her meds were delayed while I was in the hospital. But, I did tell them that my baby would stay with me while I was there and after the first night when my mom tried to watch her and all she did was scream, I had her with me every other night. The hospital...
    6 replies | 187 view(s)
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