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  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Today, 07:52 PM
    Also, even a striking baby can be EBF. You just feed them while sleeping or sleepy. Their instinct is to suck. And they will. So continue to pump some to stimulate production. But ALSO nurse the baby right before going down, or right after she falls alseep, in the middle of the night if possible and in the morning before she wakes. Also up and down for naps when together on the weekends.
    3 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 07:13 PM
    It is normal at this point for baby to only want one side at a time, either all the time or some of the time. If that is the case, you can simply offer the non-nursed from side the next time baby nurses, which at this age would be within just an hour or two usually. If you feel full after baby nurses, and baby will not nurse on the other side, you could hand express a little until you feel comfortable. You could also pump, but again, no need to do any more than just release enough you feel comfortable. Whether it makes sense to pump milk for storage at this point depends on what you need stored milk for. In other words the answer will be different for a mom who anticipates full time work away from baby within a couple weeks and one who is not anticipating any regular separations any time soon, and everything in between. The reason to hold off on pumping when possible and when there is no other need to pump (such as low milk production) is because too much pumping early on can lead to over production, which carries it's own issues. But even if that were not the case, pumping is additional and usually unnecessary effort and bother at a time mom is probably not wanting anything extra to do. It would probably be nicer to just snuggle your contended baby while baby sleeps than to have to go pump.
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*carlitomom's Avatar
    Today, 03:36 PM
    Thanks for the reply. Nursing is going well after a rough start (e.g. cracked nipples/mastitis)...actually enjoy it finally :). The baby sleeps in a halo bassinet but we are starting to work on transitioning to a crib because he is getting too tall. So far just doing naps in the crib to get him acclimated. We use the woombie to swaddle, which works really well. But since he recently started rolling over we've transitioned him to a convertible woombie, he sleeps 1 arm out at night and 2 arms out at nap time. I think once he is in the crib we can do 2 arms out at nighttime (too cramped in his bassinet). He isn't that into pacifiers...we use the wubbanub, which he is just starting to understand how to hold but I basically have to hold it in his mouth and he usually tries to spit it out after a few minutes. Previously he used a normal pacifier but now he just spits those out.
    2 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:28 PM
    What you're describing is a very normal pattern of fluctuation in weight gain. Many babies gain fastest in early infancy when mom's milk supply is super-abundant and the baby does nothing but lie around and turn calories into chub, often climbing high up the chart from the percentile at which they were born. Then around 4-6 months, weight gain often declines as mom's milk supply adjusts and the baby becomes more active and starts putting more calories into motion (reaching, rolling, kicking, etc.). The baby may slip back to the %ile at which she was born, or she may fall below that %ile. The bottom line is that a baby's weight gain pattern does not need to look exactly like the lines on the chart. As long as the baby is generally happy and healthy and growing, going up the chart or slipping down it is just an interesting fact to record for the baby book. It's just a sign to look more closely at the baby and see if something is off, not a sign that something is off. If this were my baby, I would take a decline to- what, around the 10th %ile at 4 months?- as a signal to nurse as often as possible and to have the baby checked out for thrush and reflux. The breast refusal you describe suggests that something *might* be going on which you might be able to improve. Does that make sense?
    7 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*tricia89's Avatar
    Today, 03:26 PM
    My baby girl is going to be 3 weeks at the end of this week. I wanted to know. When she feeds she sometimes seems content after one breast should I feed her the second or pump that milk and store it to begin a stock pile?
    1 replies | 42 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 03:18 PM
    :ita with MaddieB.
    3 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:47 AM
    Hi, I am sorry I do not have a lot of time to post, so I am going to skip much explanations and just give suggestions. No matter how much milk you are able to pump, you can give that to your baby in a cup or bottle. If baby will not take it that way, mix it with her food. Babies do not "wean themselves" to FORMULA. Because after all that is not really weaning. What is more likely is baby was eating so much in solids, baby lost interest in nursing. Also, the situation may or my not have included a nursing strike where babies suddenly start refusing to nurse. Neither is the same as natural or spontaneous weaning. Of course it is possible that at this point you baby will not nurse again, there is no way of knowing about that, but there is lots you can try to encourage nursing. Solids are not nearly as calorie rich as breastmilk, so solids replacing breastmilk in large amounts alone would have caused a weight plateau. Additionally, when a baby is eating lots of solids, baby is usually drinking lots of water. Water of course has no calories, while breastmilk, which is just as hydrating, does. So again, this would act to a slow down in gain, because baby is nether hungry nor thirsty enough to nurse normally. Of course, at the same time, baby reducing nursing would act to to reduce milk production. However, a gain plateau at this age is not necessarily a problem, especially since baby has been growing taller. I strongly suggest the book My Child Won't Eat. by...
    3 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*lf64's Avatar
    Today, 08:26 AM
    I'm so glad you asked me this question as it's just made me scrutinise her weight chart which I think has been confusing. When she was born she was on the 25th percentile but she unusually didn't loose the normal weight after birth and instead crept up to the 50th percentile which she continued to follow for her first weeks. At her 4th, 6th and 8th week weight checks she slowly declined to the 25th percentile (where she had started). On her 13th week weight check she had declined to between 25th percentile and 9th (I thought feeding had been fine in this period). Since then these feeding issues have arisen and when I weighed her this week she is now sitting on the 9th percentile. I think we've all (health care professionals included) seen the chart and assumed that she has declined 2 percentile, which she has when you work it out from the weight she gained after birth. But if your working it out from the percentile she as actually born on (25th) then she's only dropped 1 percentile since birth. Does that make sense? Sorry if this is a bit confusing, I hope it makes sense! You've just made me see the chart in a different way. What do you think? I'd love to know your opinion. Sorry if it's unclear.
    7 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*lraquel's Avatar
    Today, 07:31 AM
    Hi everyone, I posted this on Saturday morning and no answers yet :( --------------------- Hi all, I need some advice about my breastfeeding. My baby girl is 9 months old today. She was EBF until 6 months (I pumped when I was at work, and BF directly when I was at home). and then she started solids with a passion! She loves everything. Her favorites are yogurt, avocado and bread. From 6 to 9 mo. I was BF 4x per day (7am, 12pm, 4pm and 7pm). The first 6 months she gain weight steadily and was >80% at every visit. Here's my concern/dilemma. For the last few days she's on an nursing strike. She's been teething (top 4 teeth all at once!) and last week she bit me a couple of times and after that I stopped the BF session. But the next feeding she wouldn't want any. And now she cries when I offer my breast! I decided to pump until she wants to get back to BF, but it's been so sad to see my milk output! I pump between 10-15 oz TOTAL everyday! I know her BF sessions have been decreasing on time steadily since around 6 months. She used to nurse for 30 minutes, 15 minutes each side and lately sometimes she takes each side for 5 minutes and she's done. So I'm not surprised my output has decreased. But now I'm worried I have been undernourishing her. I haven't supplemented at all with formula. So, here's my question:
    3 replies | 116 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:30 AM
    Would bosses and co-workers be understanding if you had a health condition? For example, if you were diabetic and needed to take a break every couple of hours to check your blood sugar and maybe take some insulin, would an accommodation be found for you? Would they be understanding if you were a smoker, and needed to step outside the building every 2-3 hours for a cigarette? If they would accommodate those sorts of needs, it suggests that they would be able to make an accommodation for a mom who needs to pump- though they may not want to, or be legally required to do so! Obviously there are plenty of places all over the world where the attitude is "Hey, it was your choice to have a baby, if you want to breastfeed it you should choose to stay home like a traditional mother would. Your choices are not your employer's problem, and we don't have to accommodate them if we decide that they impact our business model." If you think your employer would be open to change, it might help to present them with the Business Case for Breastfeeding: http://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding/business-case-for-breastfeeding.html. It is a rundown of why providing moms with the ability to pump at work is good for employers. If your bosses and co-workers are truly unwilling to accommodate you, there may be some less-than-ideal workarounds you could choose that would allow you some more flexibility in terms of pumping. For example, lots of moms end up pumping in a bathroom- which is...
    3 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:11 AM
    When you say that your baby has dropped 2 percentile on the chart, do you mean: A) she has crossed two lines on the weight for age chart, e.g., declined from the 50th percentile to the 10th? B) she has dropped two points on a numerical scale, e.g., declined from the 50th percentile to the 48th? Option A is potentially of concern, option B is in no way worrisome.
    7 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*lf64's Avatar
    Today, 02:41 AM
    Thank you so much for your replies. It's so good to know I'm not alone in this. I've spoken to so many friends who just have no idea and have never heard of it so was beginning to feel a bit desperate. I've been trying to rack my brains for things that may have changed and I really can't think of much, the only thing is that we went on holiday to Devon for a week which may have disrupted things. She was nursing well however for a week after we returned before starting to refuse so it doesn't quite add up. But maybe there's something I'm still missing. I took her to the health visitor yesterday to weigh her and she's dropped two percentile which is really worrying, it's one thing dealing with all of this if she was gaining weight properly but the fact that she is not is really anxiety provoking. Her weight was gaining well up until about 8 weeks and then slowly crept down a percentile (no one was worried) but now the last two times I've had her weighed over the last eight weeks she's dropped another percentile. The strange thing is, when we were feeding really well before all of this happened she was still slipping so you can imagine that this now has made it a lot worse. I think they're going to make a referral to the paediatrician when we see the doctor tomorrow. I thought that OALD led to baby gaining more than average weight so I'm not sure why this is happening? Ordinarily she fed all the time. She's also a really happy baby, everybody always remarks on how how...
    7 replies | 283 view(s)
  • @llli*kelly.tan's Avatar
    Today, 12:50 AM
    I work in Asia so hours do tend to be longer. The 11 hrs separation from baby includes travel time. I can only pump in the meeting rooms which are usually heavily booked and bosses and coworkers may not be understanding about being away to pump frequently. If starting with one would you suggest to start with breast baby just fed on or the side that she didn't? How long would you suggest that I pump given my baby usually nurses no more than 10min?
    3 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:20 PM
    Simply based on the numbers you have posted, I'm pretty shocked that the doctor thought your baby needed to be supplemented, for two reasons. First, if you plot your baby's growth on this chart for breastfed babies, it seems 100% normal. There is a dip in percentile at 2 months, but when that happens it is generally entirely normal. Babies do not always stay on the same place on the charts. They wobble around, sometimes going above the curve, sometimes dropping below. If you go by the numbers alone, they do not present a picture of a baby who needs to be supplemented. The second reason I am surprised by the request that you begin to supplement the baby is that the dip in percentile was quite minor. That suggests that if there was a problem that needed to be fixed, you had some time to figure out what that was. You could have spent that time trying out approaches like pumping and supplementing baby with your own milk, and seeing if that led to a change in rate of weight gain. Maybe you did, I don't know! Please don't take this as a criticism of you- it is much more of a concern that you were not given sound medical advice. Of course, everything you were told might be spot-on- I haven't seen your baby and am just going off what you report! I do take you seriously when you say your baby looked skinny at 2 months. And of course when you are talking about a new baby, weight estimates aren't enough to make an informed decision about weight, because a...
    8 replies | 364 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:01 PM
    Cool or warm compresses, whichever feels better Avoid bras, especially under wires (unless wearing a bra actually improves comfort) Showers, baths, warm soaks of affected area Massage, using you hand or something that vibrates, e.g. the handle of an electric toothbrush, a personal massage toy Vary your nursing position to maximize drainage of all areas of the breast Above all, stay alert for symptoms of mastitis: fever, chills, aches and pains, malaise, red streaks/patches on the skin of the breast, increasing pain. If you experience those, call your doctor. Good luck, I hope this clears soon!
    1 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:52 PM
    Usually the way to get a stash started is to choose a single time of day and pump routinely at that time. After a few days to a week, you assess. If you are on track with getting the milk you need, you just keep on doing what you're doing. If not, you start adding in pump sessions until you are getting what you need. Most moms find that they have the most extra milk first thing in the morning. So a common time to start adding in the single pump session is right after baby nurses after waking up for the day. But you can add in sessions any time that is convenient for you. If you have found that emptying both breasts resulted in an unhappy baby, I would start by pumoing just one breast at a time. As you get more familiar with pumping and your baby's patterns start to become more predictable, you should be able to eventually pump both breasts at a time. But there's no harm in starting with one! What sort of job do you have? I am a little concerned about your feeling that you will be able to pump just. 1-2 times per day, considering that you are working 11 hours a day, 5 days a week. Infrequent pumping is a concern for 2 reasons. First, it means that you run a much greater risk of becoming uncomfortably full or engorged, and/or winding up with nasty things like plugged ducts and mastitis. Second, infrequent milk removal functions as a cue to the body to reduce supply.
    3 replies | 177 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:42 PM
    Welcome to the forum! My guess is that the problem is just that your baby is sleeping like a baby- that is, terribly! But let's go over the fundamentals and make sure we're not missing something. So: - How is nursing going? Is it comfortable for you? - Where does baby sleep? Have you tried swaddling him or giving him a pacifier at night?
    2 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:32 PM
    My mom once told me that she was really worried about sleep when she was pregnant with my sister, because my 2 year-old brother was still gettinv into bed with her every night. A week before my sister was born, my brother suddenly started sleeping through the night and never looked back! I know that's anecdote and not data, but I still hope it makes you feel less apprehensive about the future!
    4 replies | 222 view(s)
  • @llli*novila's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:09 PM
    Well I just replied and the page blanked, so let me try to recover the numbers. Birth - 6, 15 Day after - 6, 11 2 days later - 6, 9 2 week appt - 8 (doing great, doc said) 1 month appt - 9 2 month appt - 10 >>>started supplementing after this appt (25th percentile) 3 month appt - 12 4 month appt - 13
    8 replies | 364 view(s)
  • @llli*canadianemily's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:33 PM
    Thanks for your response. I guess it's best to just see how it goes, since I have no clue when or if I'll have another baby. But not trying out of fear is a bit silly, I guess. I chickened out this month, but hope to TTC next month. I'll gradually start the process of getting my son into his own room, then staying with him there as needed, and try to slowly transition to night weaning as he can understand more. Hopefully that plan will work.
    4 replies | 222 view(s)
  • @llli*jovadee's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:06 PM
    Usually I am real good about feeding on both sides. Well, last night being super tired I only fed my son on the left and woke up super engorged on the right breast. I've been switching sides all day and expressed some on the right which helped with the fullness but have breast pain on the underside of my right breast. Any suggestions to help relieve??
    1 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*bakyjjc's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:12 PM
    Thank you for sharing! Helps to know I'm not the only one!
    7 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*rogi2430's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:06 PM
    Thanks for the response! I just finished my second week back at work. Supply seems to be decent as I'm pumping enough for what I'm leaving in bottles. I do think I leave a little more then needed and it does get used. But I'd rather have everyone be comfortable. And we nurse on demand when I'm home. It's weird the first week back seemed easier than the second week. I do miss nursing and am not a huge fan of pumping but it all seems to be working out. Glad things worked out for you too! I'm proud of both of us!
    6 replies | 340 view(s)
  • @llli*carlitomom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:59 PM
    Hoping for some guidance for my almost 3 mo old baby boy who is EBF. He currently breastfeeds every hour during the day and then every 2 hours at night. He occasionally has had a week here and there where he has given me a 3-4 hour chunk during the night, but I can't seem to find a pattern on why it happens those rare days and not others. He is very well-nourished, currently about 13.5 lbs. He is also very active, loves to kick and move around, has already rolled over. Was hoping to get him to sleep some more during the night so I can stop being such a zombie during the day. He takes about 3 naps during the day (1.5 hrs after waking for about 30-40 min; 1.5 hrs after that 30-40 min; and 1.5 hrs after that for up to an hour) He also doesn't accept bottles :cry which I'm working on. I let him try on the bottle daily and he plays with the nipple but doesn't seem sure how to suck on it. I just switched to medium flow nipples which helps he get a little milk out but he doesn't actually latch on the bottle..? Just starting to go crazy from lack of sleep and constant feeding...
    2 replies | 163 view(s)
  • @llli*steveion321's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:54 PM
    I think you did avoid in start to nurse her. but anyhow its not bad I think. she feels comfort at that time.
    7 replies | 303 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:50 PM
    So baby is exclusively breastfed, basically? Only a couple bottles? IN that case I would agree it is unlikely this has anything to do with bottles. How is baby's weight gain? Poops? How many times in 24 hours does baby nurse (about)? Does baby usually take one side at a time, both, or switch off? Are you usually or mostly able to bring baby to the breast when baby is calm? Or is baby going from 0-60 so fast baby is upset before you can get baby to the breast? This can cause more issues with latch. How are you feeling? Do you ever feel full between feedings, and if you do, how full? Do you feel any 'softer' after baby has nursed? Is nursing comfortable for you? Who gave/sold you the nipple shield? Did they also suggest latch ideas for you? If baby is capable of latching and nursing without a shield, I would suggest try to avoid using it. Once in a while is fine, I am not saying go cold turkey if you are finding it helpful. But shields cause numerous issues and it is best to use them only if truly needed. I am sure we can offer latch and positioning ideas that may help.
    1 replies | 170 view(s)
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