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  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Today, 01:06 PM
    Yes, I have an appointment on Friday with the LC. We just had our first successful breastfeeding session, I think. She finally seemed content after, so I am hopeful! One breast produces MUCH more milk than the other, and she is much more interested in nursing on that side only. What do I do about this? She seems to get frustrated when I put her to the other side, can I just nurse from one side? Thank you so much for all your help!
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 12:51 PM
    Hello ladies. I am again dealing with an issue that I don't know how to resolve. My little guy will be 6 weeks on friday. Gained nice and is about 11lb13oz (weighed today). I wrote here before because I always think I don't have enough supply but it becomes evident that it is because bebe is on the boob constantly. He obviously takes it for feeding, for comfort, going to sleep. It is all good but that creates a vicious cycle. He will feed then 1/2 hr later he wants to put himself to sleep so boob he gets and it does trickle down his throat and he won't let go of the nipple either. then 1/2 later he wakes up, burps all uncomfortable, may even spit semi digested milk and of course wants a boob again. Then he expects a full meal but how can I produce 3 oz or so when he just sat on it for 30 minutes suckling (and drinking because I definitely feel let down and him swallowing). At this point LC recommended we extend feedings every 2 hrs and I offer him paci and have him fuss. Pediatrician thinks he is crying because he is hungry because I cannot ever provide "full meal" since he is at the breast constantly. LC said he will become gassy and uncomfortable since he doesn't fully digest food before new food is introduced. The thing is he won't take any pacifier!!! I even tried a bottle with like an ounce of my milk between the feedings so that he can fall asleep and I can have around 2 hr break to "collect" more of a fuller meal for him and sure he'll take a bottle with liquid as...
    0 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    I am not saying there is not a problem. Since you have latch pain, that indicates there IS a problem. But the fact remains babies only need supplements if they cannot gain normally nursing a normal amount of times. The behavior you describe could mean many things. Again I suggest seeing an IBCLC and working on latch. Nursing should not hurt and latch pain may indeed indicate baby is having difficulty transferring enough milk. They can also do a before and after nursing weight check to see if baby is actually unable to transfer milk normally. These tests are hard to do and are not conclusive and it is best if more than one can be done over a few visits, however, if baby is able to transfer 2 ounces in a "normal" nursing session (both sides, baby nursing 20-30 minutes total) then that would be a good indicator baby is capable of transferring milk normally. Meanwhile, I suggest keep offering, do not wait until baby is hungry to encourage baby to nurse. A calm baby almost always nurses better than one who is frantic. If some nursing sessions are not all that productive that is ok, that is entirely normal. Sometimes babies get very little and other times they get more. But at this age, a baby has no ability to wait, they get upset very shortly after they first cue and when they are upset they are less organized and latch poorly. Also baby will often have a little more patience to work on different latch techniques if not too hungry. If baby has become frantic, I suggest...
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*maggiechicago's Avatar
    Today, 03:19 AM
    aww mama hugs! ladies here are wonderful and hopefully your issues will soon resolve. Now I wil tell you my son does a lot of what you say. That is why I "always" feel he is hungry. That paired with one slacker boob and me not being able to pump anything after the feeding always makes me nervous. He DOES gain very well though so objectively I know he is fed well and ladies here have been so reassuring. He has gone from 7lb14oz lowest weight to 11lb12oz at 5weeks3days. Everone who is smart (I asked here, my local LLL leaders, Dr.Jack newman, Cheryl Taylor from Dr Jay Gordon's office- my lll leaders sent me an article re growth and she is their lactation consultant) tells me not to supplement (except my pedi who somehow thinks his length has to match his weight). But he does a lot of fussying and "seems" hungry after he is done. i do pump my milk at night once when he skips feeding and give it to him in those situations. Sometimes he settles and sometimes he doesn't. My local LLL leader asked if I had fast let down (I do) and if I pace feed because he may be one of these kids who finishes meal fast and doesn't register in his brain he is full yet (I started doing pace feedings when I do give him my milk and he is much better). Also I know when the flow is slower he gets fussy but now I don't make it so easy for him with the bottle and he has to work at the bottle same way he has to at the breast. He likes it fast... You seem to have milk even after feeding her so I am certain...
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:57 PM
    I would assume she was satisfied if she was not crying after the breast and rooting and putting hands in mouth, etc. All of these things are indicating to me that she is still hungry. She does not typically behave this way after a couple ounces in the bottle. I I have been trying everything today, first I tried to feed when I knew she was not very hungry and she didn't have much interest in it. Then I tried waiting until she was very hungry but she just got frustrated at that point. Then she started latching and unlatching repeatedly and flailing her arms after I tried to put her back to the breast after the bottle. Nothing has seemed to work. We both end up crying at the end of every attempt. :(
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:45 PM
    If a baby is getting a significant amount of nutrition from solids, the formula would no longer apply. As I posted above, that formula (which is actually 1 to 1.5 ounces per hour) is based on the idea that an exclusively breastfed baby needs about 25-35 ounces of breastmilk per 24 hours. We know that this is the average intake for an exclusively nursing baby who gains normally. If a baby is old enough and is getting enough ounces of solids, then they would not need as much breastmilk. This is never a problem when a baby is nursed, because it is not as if more milk at the breast than baby strictly needs is in any way a problem. It isn't. But when a baby is partly bottle fed, there are many reasons to avoid overfeeding with bottles. Also what caloric intake is actually required for a one year old is unclear, and of course will also vary child to child. But it is certainly not more than a younger baby because a one year old is not gaining nearly as quickly.
    10 replies | 324 view(s)
  • @llli*livingtemple's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:17 PM
    Is the 1-1.25oz per hour of separation for EXCLUSIVELY BF'd babies, or does this formula apply for babies who take solids? Mine usually eats 2-3 solid food meals per day, mostly BLW-style (with occasional spoon feedings of things like yogurt, soup, etc.).
    10 replies | 324 view(s)
  • @llli*mrsgraham's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    I am currently nursing my 2 year old to sleep. She continues to share a room wit us with her toddler bed on the floor in our room. What worked for us at that age was for me to GET IN the crib and nurse her to sleep. We always started her in her own bed then move her to our bed at first wake. Another idea would be what other posters said: cot on the floor next to your bed or bedsharing. When my daughter was 1 1/2, we invested in a king size mattress and put it on the floor of our bedroom without the box spring, so it's the perfect height. There is PLENTY of room for the 3 of us.
    4 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:13 PM
    Newborn babies spend their days either nursing or sleeping. There is no evidence that babies should have some length of awake time when they are not nursing. Some babies have this, some do not, and most come to something like that some of the time when they are 1-2 months old but not before. If a baby is nursing 10-12 times or more per 24 hours and not gaining normally, it is possible there is some issue with baby not being able to get enough at the breast. It is all about weight gain! Because behavior is rarely a good indication of whether a baby is getting enough, partly because there are many different variations of normal infant behavior, and mostly because our expectations of how a newborn "should" behave are based on decades of babies being grossly overfed with large scheduled bottles rather than based on the biologically normal behavior of baby nursing and getting a very high frequency of very small meals.
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*christine.coff's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:59 AM
    I wonder the same with ,y four week old. I have another post asking for advice on triple feeding, as I am in that hell right now, and am afraid I've pumped myself into oversupply, as with pumping seven times a day after feeds only for 15 min, I am pumping 30-35 oz a day on top of nursing exclusively and topping off baby with six oz extra expressed BM. I started this regimen after her weight remained steady at seven lbs for seven days, no gain, she started gaining appropriately on eight oz additional, so we have cut down to only six extra. She does the same though at times, will nurse, fall asleep after only a few minutes, then as soon as she wakes again, she's rooting like she's starving? Rooting, fussing, eating her hands. I nurse again, same thing over and over. She always sucks down the supplemental bottle readily. I have noticed her seeming to actively nurse better as she has gotten a little older (she was also a 37 weeker). Today is actually the first day she nursed well this morning, and had a significant (45 m or so) awake time withOUT rooting and fussing!! So that behavior is what I am considering to mean "satisfied," the constant rooting and eating hands is what I also consider or fear to be hunger, hunger that isn't being satisfied at the Breast. We have a weigh in Thursday and I fully plan on decreasing my pumping regimen at that time if her weight is going good. I cannot maintain this pumping schedule, it's killing me.
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:46 AM
    Ok, nursing pain is a real problem. It is also a very common and usually solvable problem. That is something that your best bet is to see an IBCLC who is able to take the time to work on latch and positioning with you. They can also possibly examine baby to see if there is some physical barrier to a comfortable latch. I will link some good articles below, but latch issues are basically why the profession of the IBCLC was invented in the first place. A LLL Leader is a volunteer who also may help a great deal with latch and positioning. Just having someone experienced to eyeball the issue usually leads to a solution. It is way premature to suggest exclusive pumping, which in the longer run is far harder and also you lose many of the benefits of nursing baby at the breast. I am sure DH is trying to be supportive. I suggest, ask him to take over taking care of you and the house, washing bottle and pump parts, holding baby skin to skin when you need a break, etc. so you can concentrate on figuring out latch and learning your baby's rhythms. Skin to skin contact can be very helpful at this stage because it is calming to baby and increases gain simply because it reduces stress on baby. And this can be done by mom or dad or grandma etc. Basically all it means is snuggling baby on the adults bare chest with baby in a diaper only. If this is not comfortable, just holding baby this way while clothed is also helpful. Newborn babies need to nurse a minimum of 8 times in 24...
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:05 AM
    Exhausted and frustrated is definitely what I am feeling. Although she always has a mouthful of milk when she comes off the breast, she has never seemed to have gotten satisfied from just breastfeeding, and she seems to get just as frustrated as I do with it. It feels like such a waste of time as I still have to pump afterward, and sometimes give the bottle as well. We left the hospital on Tuesday, she weighed 6 lb 10 oz. Thursday was her next doctor’s appt where she weighed 6 lb 13 oz. At that time, she was content with just the breast and pumped milk, but since Saturday she seems insatiable, and that’s when we started adding in formula as well. Poopy diapers are about 2-3 a day and probably about 8+ wet. She is definitely eating plenty with the pumping and formula. I’m never offering her the bottle until after she is showing many hunger signs and is crying/screaming, and she always does this even after 30-45 minutes at the breast. She falls asleep at the breast, and I continually wake her up, switch sides, etc. and after she falls asleep and it seems I can’t wake her back up and I finally take her off, within 5 minutes she starts opening her mouth, sticking hands in mouth, going back to my breast, etc, along with crying. Like I said, exhausted and frustrated are definitely how I’m feeling. My husband suggests I just go to strictly pumping because it’s taking such a toll on me, but i really want to be able to breastfeed her. I’m just at a loss. :(
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*kaylaq52's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:13 AM
    Nursing is uncomfortable. It was painful due to very sore nipples, but has gotten better. On one side it feels alright, but the other is often painful. Even when the lactation consultants say everything is correct with her latch, it has never been comfortable on that side. She will nurse about 8 times in a 24 hour period. That was the only weighed feed we did, my next appointment is Friday. I give her, on average, 1.5 oz pumped milk per feeding, and often times she is still hungry (looking for breast, hands in mouth, screaming/crying, sucking very hard on my finger and seeming to be frustrated she is not getting any milk) so I give her about 1 oz of formula after that about 3-4 times a day. I have not tried putting her back to the breast after the bottle, but will!
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 09:05 PM
    I agree with mommal. Babies nurse lots because nursing feels so good. Also it is very possible baby is not getting 4 ounces when baby nurses but more like 2-3, all normal intake. To combat the possibility of breast refusal, being very careful about how bottles are given (we can provide info if you like) and encouraging lots of nursing when you are with baby, usually helps.
    2 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 08:57 PM
    I agree with mommal. We need more information, because from what I can tell so far person you saw in the hospital made you feel like there was a problem when there possibly was none, and instructed you to do interventions that may have been unneeded, needlessly exhausting and frustrating you. It would also help to know if more weight checks have been done (how much has baby gained since lowest known weight in what time frame) and How poop output is looking (how many per day, look, size) Newborns nurse a lot and they prefer to be held the vast majority of the time. It is also normal (and healthy) for a baby to kind of "wake up" after a week or so and want to nurse even more than before! They often do not seem 'satisfied' because it is normal for them to want to nurse lots and never be put down. Also, it pretty much means nothing that baby will take more in a bottle, because the newborn infant is internally programmed to suck when something to suck on is offered to them. Breastfed babies require supplements if they are not gaining weight appropriately despite nursing 10-12 times in 24 hours, and not for any other reason.
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 07:44 PM
    I'm no one special but I read your post and figured I could chime in for a second. My baby did the exact same thing as yours (gaging, pushing it out with his tongue, chomping down, etc).. and I did exactly what you did (buying numerous types of bottles). None worked. The ONLY ONE that worked was Medela's bottle top called Calma. Maybe try that one out? I used that, pushed it to the roof of his mouth and he took it. Occasionally he will "forget", but for the most part.. he takes it no problem!! Good luck.. I think it's just a trial and error thing. I went through a TON of bottles just like you, so just keep trying until you find ONE he likes! :thumbsup Also, who said he didn't have a tongue tie? I saw numerous LC's, his PED's doctor and an ENT doctor tell me my son didn't have a lip tie and just recently found out he has a VERY tight lip tie :mad:... SO just be careful.
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 07:39 PM
    "Chomping" is often a way for a baby to control a rapid flow of milk. Do you ever see any of the following: - Frequent feelings of fullness or engorgement - Mom experiencing strong letdown sensations, frequent and/or abundant leaking - Mom being able to pump lots of milk in a relatively short amount of time - Baby gagging or coughing, making a clicking or clucking noise while nursing - Baby acting fussy at the breast, perhaps pulling off the breast while nursing - If the baby pulls off the breast, mom may notice milk squirting or streaming from the breast - Baby gaining weight at a faster than average rate - Baby's poops consistently or frequently green or greenish
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 07:30 PM
    Frequent feeding in the evening, a.k.a. cluster feeding, is completely normal. Often it's a baby's way of reconnecting with mom after she comes home from work. It's also a great way for the baby to tank up on calories before a long stretch of sleep, and 6 hours at 3 months is quite a long stretch. As long as you Re not having trouble pumping enough milk when you're at work, I wouldn't see the cluster feeding as a sign as anything, or worry about the long stretch of sleep. However, if you are experiencing difficulty pumong enough at work, it might be a good idea to not let the baby sleep quite so long at night. More nursing at night = better supply by day and less need for calories delivered by bottle.
    2 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 07:23 PM
    Welcome to the forum! So if I did my math right, by day 4 your baby lost not quite 10% of birthweight, which is within the normal range. Some questions for you: - How does nursing feel? - How many times in a 24 hour period does the baby nurse? - Have you done any weighed feeds aside from the one at the LC's office? - How much supplement are you giving per feeding, and what is the total amount are you giving in a 24 hour period? - After giving the bottle, do you ever put the baby back to the breast? (Concluding all feedings at the breast is a great way to deal with baby acting "unsatisfied" after adequate feedings, because it trains the baby to associate the feelings of satiation and relaxation with being at the breast, rather than associating those feelings from the bottle.)
    11 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*trentsmom's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 07:17 PM
    Helpppp! Im at the end of my rope here... My son Is 10 weeks old and EBF, however...shortly after a bought of bilateral mastitis and Keflex antibiotics his latch declined and his sucking turned into chomping down. He will gag on a finger test and will not take a dummy, nipple shield, or bottle. I'm looking to get him on Bottles so I can pump and go out once in awhile but all he does is push it out with his tounge, gag, cry, and occasionally chomp down. I've tried spectra bottles, Avent natural, tommee tippee, mimijumi, dr browns, playtex, nubi, and munchkin latch to no avail...anyone else had this issue and figured it out? He's seeing an occupational therapist but not seeing any progress. Edit: my son has also been diagnosed with severe acid reflux and is on nexium twice a day. He does not have a tounge tie or pyloric stenosis (sp?)
    2 replies | 110 view(s)
  • @llli*boholectra's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 06:37 PM
    lo is 3 months old and has a mild tongue tie. I have been nursing her with a nipple shield but now that I am at work, I nurse her in the morning and she takes 4 to 4.5 oz bottles every 3 to 3.5 hours while I am away. I have noticed that once I am back, she gets hungry every 1.5 to 2 hours even after nursing for 30-40 minutes. She is a good sleeper and sleeps for at least 6 hour stretches at night. My question is why is there such a big difference in frequency? I am concerned that it may be because of low milk supply during evenings combined with poor milk transfer. I don't want her to start rejecting nursing because bottles give her more milk for less work.
    2 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    September 26th, 2016, 06:23 PM
    :ita Sounds like it's time to go back to the LC, and see if your current plan can be adjusted. One thing that often happens with weighed feeds is that the baby feeds differently at the LC's office compared to what she does at home. Maybe the baby is a bit distracted and out of her usual routine, so she feeds less well than she does at home. Or the LC has helped mom with her positioning, and as a result the baby feeds better than she does at home. That's why I am a big believer in moms taking home a scale- if possible!- and doing their own before-and-after weights for a while. That can give you a far more accurate picture of milk transfer than a single weighed feed at the LC's office.
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
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