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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:34 PM
    Hi and welcome! Is your baby gaining weight normally? Since nursing behavior can normally vary a great deal, the most accurate measure of whether or not baby is getting enough to eat is weight gain. When you say baby is eating every hour, do you mean day and night? Or is there a longer stretch of time that she sleeps here and there? How many times total in 24 hours would you say baby nurses? How many times a day do you pump and about how much do you get each time you pump? What kind of a pump is it? If baby is not able to get enough milk, one reason might be low production, but another is that baby is not nursing efficiently. Have you ever had breastfeeding assessed by a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC)? Thanks
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*macymichelle's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:27 PM
    My 3 month old has been a good nurser from the start. Typically she has always eaten every 2-2.5 hours. For the last month, she has been wanting to nurse every hour, and never really seems satisfied. I have been pumping in between feedings, taking supplements. I feel like I am trying everything, but she just seems fussy and agitated a lot of the time. I am worried that I am having a hard time keeping up with her. I would just like some advice on how to proceed from here, just power through or supplement?
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*tasha's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:33 PM
    Thanks.* I'll try anything and yes I give ejr vitamin d during the winter.* We just got back from the dentists and we're told that this "spoilt" nursing must stop immediately and that we should be giving her cows milk. Then according the dentist she'll need fluoride varnish and eventually one of her front teeth pulled under a general anastheic.* I'm devestated, it went much worse than I expected.* I thought she may need a cap and to stop night nursing.* On top of this my husband and his family who have never supported me nursing for so long finally have their opportunity to critisize.** I would do anything for my little girl and this is awful.
    9 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:28 AM
    Glad to hear it's normal...I'm constantly worried she's not getting enough milk. We had seen a lactation consultant early on (week 2) but I think another visit will be helpful. Thanks again for your quick and helpful responses!
    7 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:10 AM
    Great news!
    9 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:07 AM
    Great news doctor is happy with your baby's gain. This indicates as well that doctor is seeing an overall healthy baby he or she is not too worried about, and that is important too! So 2/16 baby weighed 8 lbs 15 and 5 days later on 2/21 baby had gained 5 ounces? So that would certainly indicate normal gain of an average 1 ounce a day over the last 5 days. I am a little concerned because getting an accurate picture from gain measured over a few days is hard. Overall gain is still slightly on the slow side. But your baby's behavior at the breast sounds entirely normal for this age. I am not sure why your baby is tugging, there are a few things you could try for this, including positioning changes and breast compressions. But fussing, long nursing sessions, frequent nursing sessions, wanting to nurse less than an hour after nursing really are all entirely normal and occur in fast gaining babies as well as slower gaining babies. Babies nurse for many reasons, hunger is only one reason. Nursing for comfort is just as important- in fact they are the same thing to an infant. Additionally of course a baby this age really is frequently very hungry and wants to nurse a great deal because baby is still gaining as rapidly as baby did the last several weeks in the womb when baby was fed constantly. I did not realize you are already under the care of an IBCLC. If you like her and think she is helpful, I do think it makes sense to see your IBCLC again, more for the gain...
    7 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*laylas.momma's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:54 AM
    Thank you for all of this! Not currently on birth control. We had a doc appt yesterday and she's up to 9lbs 4oz and doc feels this is good gain and doesn't think we need to supplement yet. However, I'm still concerned with the frequency of feeding and the tugging indication something is wrong. For example, this morning she was on the breast from 6:30-8:00. She ate well on the both breasts for about 15 mins and three fussed when I took her off, crying and acting as if she was still hungry (sucking in hands) put her back on and she got some milk and then resorted to the tugging and fussing. By 8:00 I was able to take her off and she moderately content until 8:40 and then wanted to eat again. It feels like the only time she's calm is on the breast or if she falls asleep on the breast and I'm able to break her off without waking her. This behavior had been going on for about two weeks. The weight gain is a relief but it seems problematic to me that she has to be in the breast this often to get there. I'm going to make another appt with our lactation consultant but would love any other thoughts you might have.
    7 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:24 AM
    Babies under a year typically drink about 1.5 oz per hour of separation from mom. Daily total intake is typically around 20-30 oz. With an older baby who is eating solids, this amount often decreases a bit. But in your shoes, I think I would want to aim to have about 20-25 oz per day of separation. It's a lot of milk to produce and store by mid-May, especially if you're going to be using some of your expressed milk to train baby to take a bottle. Any chance of bringing baby and a caregiver with you on your trip? How about shipping milk back home- is that a possibility for you? Thank you for your service!
    3 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 AM
    Thanks for the book recommendations! I will definitely be checking both books out! Yesterday went better for both eating and sleeping! She ate 2oz from the bottle in one sitting and had 1oz of milk in her cereal and puree and had another whole oz from the bottle so she definitely got more milk than she has been getting during the day and not completely refusing the bottle like she has done most recently. She slept for 4 hours, woke to eat, and went right back to sleep for another 4 hours! Hopefully this is a start to better eating and sleeping! Thank you for all of your help! :)
    9 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:18 AM
    What sort of scale are you using? And can you describe your baby-weighing procedure? Is baby always weighed in the nude?
    2 replies | 146 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:15 AM
    Nothing to add to MaddieB's excellent advice, but I do have a question: what sort of birth control are you using? Sometimes hormonal contraception, even the "safe for breastfeeding" formulations, can interfere with milk supply. If you are trying to eliminate variables that might explain supply issues, it might make sense to temporarily switch to a barrier contraceptive if you are currently using a hormonal one.
    7 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*tralala.pom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:03 AM
    Hi tasha, You may find this an interesting read: http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/lisa_reagan.html and another story without cesation of breastfeeding: http://www.lalecheleague.org/nb/nbiss1-10p20.html Do you live in a sunny warm place and does your child spend enough time outdoors? Otherwise, do you supplement with vitamin D?
    9 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 09:13 PM
    Of course it is hard to leave baby and it makes sense this situation is worrying you. Try not to worry too much though! This is actually not a super unusual situation and in my experience these babies who do not eat all that much while mom is away seem to do just fine. It is the tired, worried mom who pays the price. Hopefully baby will start sleeping a bit longer soon so you can get more rest. Another book that may by helpful is called My Child Won't Eat by pediatrician Carlos Gonzalez. It is not really about getting a child to eat more, it is about why most situations where a healthy baby or young child seems to eat too little are usually not any big deal.
    9 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 07:28 PM
    Thank you SO MUCH for all of this information! This makes me feel a little better about leaving. Although I still really don't want to... I'll definitely be watching those videos and having my husband watch them as well! Since she doesn't take a bottle I don't typically pump unless for some reason I'm super full. Is it true that when you pump more you respond to it better and will produce more? I always hand express while pumping to get the maximum milk I can get. But I typically get less than 2 ounces when I do pump. Because of that, I really have no way of knowing how much she eats in a sitting. Since she doesn't take a bottle. I guess my question in regards to that is how much milk will I need to store if I don't know how much she drinks in a day? Is there a typical amount 8 month olds drink? Thanks again!!
    3 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 06:04 PM
    Hi and welcome! First if you do not know about it already, there is a website and book especially for breastfeeding moms in the military. You can find that here: http://breastfeedingincombatboots.com/ So when there are separations of several days or weeks of mom from a breastfeeding baby, there are two primary concerns from a breastfeeding standpoint. One is that the separation will adversely impact mom's milk production. The other is that the separation will lead to baby going on a nursing "strike" and refusing to nurse when the separation is over. This is sometimes called spontaneous or self weaning, but that is not really what it is. A nursing strike is a more accurate description for such a situation, because babies this age do not wean on their own. Also if you think of it as a nursing strike, you will approach it as a temporary problem that is likely to resolve with some effort, and that will decrease the chances that your baby never nurses again. These are both real concerns and there are ways to reduce the chance they will happen, but it is impossible to eliminate the risk entirely. First I am assuming your will be able to express your milk during the separation with reasonable frequency. If that is NOT the case, the following suggestions may not be appropriate for your situation. For milk production, there are two ways to reduce that problem. One is to make sure milk production is in great shape up to the point the separation happens, and the other...
    3 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*allirawlins's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 01:08 PM
    Thank you so much for the advice and suggestions! Makes me feel a little better. I will try not to get hung up on the numbers and will try having my caregiver offer a little more solids during the day. She is also mixing in milk so baby is getting some that way as well. It is hard to leave my baby during the day (wish I didn't have to!) and now that she is not eating much it has really been upsetting to me. I really appreciate you taking the time answering me! :)
    9 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*runnermom31's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 11:59 AM
    I was in a similar situation with my LO. there is an excellent facebook group for tt/lt and they also have links to resources posted there as well as a link too a preferred provider finder. goodluck
    2 replies | 186 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 11:31 AM
    I'm somewhat freaking out right now... first time Mom with a 5 month old. I'm currently in the reserves and I just got word that our two week training got moved up to mid May. That puts my daughter at 8 months. I had planned to nurse her at least a year (September 2017). Currently she doesn't take a bottle, but hopefully she will take a sippy cup (we're going to try that this week). My main question is, how detrimental (if at all) is it to breastfeeding if you're away from your baby for 2 weeks? Side note: I'll be half way across the country, so no quick evening trips. Will I have to cease breastfeeding after that since it's too large of a gap? I already don't want to leave her for that length of time which is hard enough. But being new to this, even if I were to pump while I'm gone, could that potentially screw her up? Any info is greatly appreciated!
    3 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 11:10 AM
    I get it. This has long been an opinion held by many dentists. But it is one that is not held up by the evidence, according to the Journal of the American Dental Association. Plenty of pediatricians also hold outdated, unproven, and disproven opinions about breastmilk and breastfeeding, and consequently do not follow infant feeding guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatricians when advising the parents of their patients. Breastfeeding erroneously being blamed for any number of health issues is nothing new. I am sorry I cannot offer more help as far as what to do about your child's teeth decay. Here is more info about xylitol and how to use it: Xylitol - Reducing Cavities The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recognizes the benefits of xylitol on the oral health of infants, children, adolescents, and persons with special health care needs. The use of XYLITOL GUM by mothers (2-3 times per day) starting 3 months after delivery and until the child was 2 years old, has proven to reduce cavities up to 70% by the time the child was 5 years old.
    9 replies | 197 view(s)
  • @llli*juleswc's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 10:59 AM
    Thank you for the input! I wouldn't say her latch is painful I guess maybe it's just different so I notice it...I will try some positioning adjustments.
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 10:52 AM
    Ok so typical intake for that period of time would be about 10-15 ounces. But not all babies take in the typical amount! My best suggestion is to try to increase what baby will eat during the day but try not to get too hung up on the numbers, if that makes sense. 6-8 hours is a long sleep stretch ("Sleeping through the night" is actually defined as 5 consecutive hours) and many babies do not start sleeping that long consistently until they are well over a year old. Again when a baby does sleep that long early on, whether they do so on their own or due to some other reason, they often change that sleep pattern a few months later. More food into baby during the day may help baby sleep a bit longer at night, but you also may be many months away from baby consistently sleeping long stretches again. Actually the most common issue is something called "excess lipase" and it can make expressed milk smell and taste a bit soapy, some people say the smell is "metallic." The milk is not bad, it is perfectly safe to drink, and many babies will drink it fine. But some babies react to the smell and will not. This issue appears after expressed milk has been stored, usually when it has been frozen, but in some cases even after refrigeration. If baby is reacting the same way to "fresh" milk and there is no soapy smell, you can probably rule out lipase. Yes actually spoiled milk would smell spoiled. It is quite simple and common sense, really. I will link a video....
    9 replies | 246 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    February 21st, 2017, 10:31 AM
    Actually this does seem to be fairly common. But the same 'rules' apply- nursing should not hurt, if it does, something may need to be adjusted. Latch changes might be brought on by teething, baby getting "lazy" (just not careful) about latch, baby getting acrobatic at the breast, or due to positioning. Or all of the above. As a baby gets older, it is usually needed to adjust positioning so that baby has room to tilt their head back a bit when latching and nursing, so that the chin does not tuck. Of course another reason nursing might hurt at this age has to do with hormonal changes mom may be going through. Pregnancy can make nursing painful, and simply the return of fertility (ovulation, menstruating) might cause temporary sensitivity. Thrush is also a small possibility when nursing starts to hurt at this age. The teeth scraping part of this article might be helpful. http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/
    2 replies | 85 view(s)
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