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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:19 AM
    Vasospasms would not cause a crack. Most likely, whatever caused the crack is also causing the vasospasm. When baby comes off the breast, does the nipple look ridged/wedged/creased/shaped like a new lipstick?
    6 replies | 237 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:14 AM
    Speaking as someone who has done the triple feeding routine- nurse, bottle-feed, and pump- it is REALLY hard. Don't beat yourself up if you cannot always achieve the "ideal" amount of pumping. Anything you do is better than nothing, so even if there's a day when you only pump once, give yourself a high five. I know you're wondering if this will ever get better, and we cannot promise you that it will. All we can say is that things do get better for most moms who have the determination to hang in there past these early struggles. I personally think you have a very good chance of being in that majority, because you have so much going for you. Your baby will nurse, and he can actually transfer a pretty good amount of milk when he nurses. 1.3 oz is a nice snack for a breastfed baby, and add up enough snacks and you're taking about significant intake! And you aren't using that much supplement, on a daily basis. you are doing an awesome job!
    25 replies | 1006 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:07 AM
    :cheer Yay for the stroller! So glad it worked. I remember doing it with my LOs every day, even in the dead of winter... It's a sweet memory- bundling my LOs up, going out in the snow, seeing the baby's eye's drift shut, and then going back to the house for hot cocoa with the bigger one! The amount your baby is nursing does sound adequate for a 6 month old- of course, take that with a huge grain of salt because some 6 month olds are going to nurse a lot more often than that and some less. It's just that if your baby is being nursed on demand, and you are nursing at night, most likely he is getting all he needs without you having to second guess his intake. I think that if you are concerned that he isn't nursing enough, just try offering more often. If he is hungry, he will nurse, and little snacks add up to big meals if there are enough of them.
    6 replies | 356 view(s)
  • @llli*raydians's Avatar
    Today, 01:05 AM
    Here is information and helpful hints from Dr. Jack Newman's website on dealing with vasospasms. http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-V-RP Take care! Anne Marie
    6 replies | 237 view(s)
  • @llli*raydians's Avatar
    Today, 01:00 AM
    Wow are you a dedicated nurser! Dr. Jack Newman has created a cream for sore, cracked, and damaged nipples. It includes a painkiller and a local antibiotic and a local anti-fungal. I don't know who would be able to prescribe that where you are, but for sure a doctor can. In Canada an IBCLC can also. Here is a link for the recipe and a bit about it so that you could give to your doctor in case s/he doesn't know about it. http://breastfeeding.about.com/od/nippleproblems/qt/triplenipple.htm Maybe that suggestion might help. Hope you find relief! Anne Marie
    6 replies | 237 view(s)
  • @llli*ubaz's Avatar
    Today, 12:16 AM
    Hi ladies. It has taken me long enough to join this wonderful forum, considering how many issues my beautiful boy and I have had breastfeeding since he was born! This latest one has been worrying me the most and keeping me up at night, so I'm hoping to get some advice here. My son is almost 5 months old and in the past few weeks, has become a very distractible nurser. I nurse in a quiet dark room, lying down on my side with him, and even then, he will gulp down the first letdown (which comes quickly) and then start getting distracted until he loses interest. He feeds for 3-5 minutes and won't take the other side. The only time I get a decent feed in is right before he falls asleep or in the middle of the night, or during a dream feed. So he's definitely capable of it. I think part of this is habit maybe. I had a huge oversupply and overactive letdown for the first few months. Constant engorgement, pumping 6-7oz from each breast between feeds, etc. I ended up doing 6 hourly block feeds to try and regulate and finally did around 3.5 months. This oversupply has meant that my son doubled his birth weight just before 3 months (born at 3.33kg) and currently weighs around 8.1kg. So he's thriving. I'm not sure if this is relevant but he had lip and tongue tie, which was revised at birth. It seems his lip tie has grown back a little bit but his latch seems ok (I am able to easily flip his lip out when he doesn't do it himself). Due to my oversupply, he's never...
    0 replies | 29 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:11 PM
    So many hugs to you! You are working so hard and I'm sure you will see payoff soon! I won't add to all the great info you've gotten here about supplements, weights etc However, I thought i'd share my experience with bottle refusal and going back to work. I really liked the idea of making the best of going back to work. When I was first going back to work my daughter wouldn't take bottles either. I was so stressed about it. We were still working on latch and my nipples were still healing. Man that seemed to last forever! In our case she ended up taking bottles when I was at work or she ate frozen milk from a spoon. She did come in to work at my lunch break which was really nice and she nursed a lot when I was home. I had been so worried about the bottle situation for nothing. I hope it turns out that way for you too. Also, I was so glad that I stuck it out through those tough days of nursing with pain and worry. Having a newborn is so unbelievably hard even when breastfeeding goes smoothly. Even with my second child I had a hard time believing things would get easier. I'm at a point now where I can look back on those first few months and see how far we've come. I'm currently tandem breastfeeding my 4 year old daughter and 11 month old son. I don't know why those first few months have to be so hard, but I do feel a sense of accomplishment from having made it through. From now on, the only newborns for me will be those I can hand back to their parents. ;) Good luck.
    25 replies | 1006 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:47 PM
    :ita There is no way that stopping solids entirely or switching to baby led solids will cause harm to your baby's digestion. It will either help, or be harmless. I agree with mommal the only possible issue is if baby has been getting lots of solids cutting back on them might reduce calories into baby. But this would be easily made up for by nursing more assuming your milk production is normal. Solids = more sleep in a baby is one of those unfortunate myths that will not die. I also agree, do not beat yourself up. Your baby's gut has been so wonderfully protected because baby is still nursing. Gassiness and constipation can occur when solids are introduced no matter what the age. It is a big change, which is why I like baby led solids as I think it makes solids a more gradual experience. But no matter what, how or when, things change when baby starts eating solids!
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:36 PM
    Ok, so while I do think there may be a milk transfer issue, the fact is a baby not wanting to be put down and sleeping better when held by mom or another trusted adult is one of the facts of early infancy. Not all babies and not all the time, but most babies most of the time sleep best when held, and sleep shorter or otherwise protest when put down. Humans developed as a species over hundreds of thousands of years in places and circumstances where a mother putting her infant down was likely and quickly fatal to the infant. So human infants developed behaviors to ensure this was unlikely to happen. A few thousand years of living in something like a house and far less time sleeping separately from mother has not changed humans in any significant way so this instinctual need remains intact. It may be hard, but there is nothing unusual about your baby sleeping best when snuggled on your chest or lying beside you. Some moms solve this issue by bedsharing, wearing baby in a sling, getting as much help with other duties as possible in the early months, handing baby off to someone else to be comforted after nursing, or (typically) some combination of those. If you would like more info on any of those strategies, please let us know. As far as baby sleeping better after being supplemented, this may be due to baby possibly being over fed. A baby might be overfed if they get too much supplement overall or too much supplement at once. To know if this is possibly happening, you...
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:24 PM
    I bought a scale from babies r us and read reviews that people have used it for before and after feeds. But it isn't that precise so I really can't use it for that. But i could still use it for general weighing when he lets me :) At this point I am continuing to feed andsupplement but I can't pump as much as I should. I do about 5-6 times a day in between feeding him about 10 times a day. It is really hard to do more. I don't know how people do it more often. I was prescribed Reglan to up my supply and took it for a day and ahalf but I'm going to stop. It is making me EXTREMELY tired to the point where I can't keep my eyes open. Baby weighed 8lbs1oz at our f/u lactation appointment. He was 7.10 a week prior on same scale so that was good. He gets usually anyahere from 5-8 oz of supplement a day, but one day took 10oz. I just want to be done with this and feed him normally. Sometimes we have good feeds and I can see he is drinking a lot but other times he just hangs out on the boob or falls asleep and doesn't drink. I don't really get it. At the LC appt he only got 1.3oz in about 20-25min. I hope things just improve from here. I see people say that it does get better but I am wondering if for some babies it never gets better. Will we always struggle with position, latch, transfer... I really hope not since I wanted to breastfeed until 1 year at least.
    25 replies | 1006 view(s)
  • @llli*namily's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:00 PM
    Mommal, the walk around the neighborhood in the stroller worked wonders! I can't believe I didn't think of this before! I was able to put ds to sleep and tire out dd so that when we come back from the walk, she falls asleep faster at nap time! My concerns and continuing issue (what's life with out problems after problems? !) is that ds is nursing less often. Less time is at the breast because of distractions from everywhere, everything, and anyone. I didn't like the idea of giving dd an ipad or electronic device for me to put ds asleep, but I tried, and it didn't work. Ds was interested in it as well, and dd would talk and cause ds to be distracted and not nurse. I can tell he's gotten skinnier, but he still is a happy healthy baby. I would say nursing has dropped to 5 times within a day, plus maybe 2-3 night feedings. Is this amount adequate for 6mo? There's times where he won't feed so I pump instead to try and maintain supply. I'll nurse after with varying responses from him. Sometimes he will nurse and a letdown will occur even after pumping and other times he won't nurse or seems upset because the flow is not efficient for him. The ebm is put into a sippy cup (1oz) for him to play and drink. Sometimes he will drink from it, sometimes he won't (trying to get him familiar with a nuk sippy cup spout to prepare when hiring a nanny). I'm just worried about his milk intake and my overall supply (just this week there had been changes that make me feel like I have a...
    6 replies | 356 view(s)
  • @llli*grantsmommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:41 PM
    I'm experiencing vasospasms, not sure if its because of crack, or crack because of vasospasm... it is slowly healing, for which I'm thankful.
    6 replies | 237 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:07 PM
    I thought this deserved its own thread. :gvibes Copied from: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?124708-Relactate-after-being-dried-up-for-2-1-2-months
    1 replies | 32 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:02 PM
    Thought this deserved its own thread. :gvibes Copied from: http://forums.llli.org/showthread.php?124708-Relactate-after-being-dried-up-for-2-1-2-months
    1 replies | 15 view(s)
  • @llli*newmama2015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:50 AM
    Thank you for your reply! Yes if I keep holding her after the feeding she will continue to sleep. Once I put her down, she will continue to sleep for 5 or 10 min and then wake up. It's hard to keep holding her because I would be with her 24/7. The point of using the pacifier is to soothe her after the long feeding session so she is hungry for thr next feed and hopefully put more effort at the breast. But that has not been working either.
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:41 AM
    sorry I posted before I saw your reply to mommal. Fall asleep where? If you keep holding baby after nursing, or someone else takes baby, and holds her snuggled on the chest or in a sling etc, will baby fall asleep and stay asleep longer?
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:35 AM
    I agree with mommal that the transfer amount seems normal and that this can be built on. What is possibly not normal is that it takes so long every time for baby to transfer that much. While of course it is fine to let a baby nurse for long periods, and they will, because they are also nursing for comfort, you would want to see a 5 week old capable of transferring milk a bit more quickly. I am wonder if the milk transfer is happening more at the beginning of the feeding, as would be typical...Have you ever weighed baby after 30 minutes of nursing, for example? Instead of topping off with bottle after a nursing session, what happens if you top off with more nursing? Babies often need additional sucking or other form of comfort to fall more deeply asleep. In other words, restlessness after nursing does not necessarily mean baby needs more (or much more) to eat. Here are some ideas as to why transfer might not be normal. Of course there may be combinations: *Low milk production, but you have ruled that out- good. *Baby is not interested in nursing vigorously because baby is getting so much in supplements (bottles, even of moms own milk) that baby is simply not hungry enough to nurse normally. -This is an often overlooked cause of sleepy baby and "lazy" nursing. *There is a physical barrier- sometimes tongue tie needs to be re-treated, for example.
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*newmama2015's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:32 AM
    Thank you so much for your reply. The problem with the the 1.5 hr feeding session is that she cannot sleep after and is unsettled because she didn't get enough. I either keep feeding and she does not get enough and it becomes a continuous feeding loop or I top her up with pumped milk and then she can fall asleep. One time I did not give her any top up and we continued to feed for 5 hours while she slept for 5 or 10 min increments in between. That's my main challenge.
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:52 AM
    Welcome to the forum! I'm so glad that someone directed you to Kellymom- it's so rare to find anyone getting directed to good information! So, as you've correctly figured out, nursing to 12 months is commonly seen as "the goal" of breastfeeding, but it's actually just a goal. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends 6 months of exclusive nursing, followed by complementary solids at 6 months with continued nursing to a minimum of 12 months, followed by nursing for as long thereafter as is mutually desirable by both mom and baby. It's that last bit- the "as long thereafter as mutually desirable" part- that typically gets left out of our conversations about breastfeeding, because people tend to be so focused on the preconception that breastfeeding is hard, that moms can't wait to be done and "have their body back", that it ties us down, that it makes the baby less independent, that it's bad for your sex life, etc. We tend to be so caught up in the assumption that breastfeeding is a negative, that we forget to think about all the positives that can come with toddler nursing. Some moms love toddler nursing (I sure did!). Nursing can be the most valuable parenting tool you have- it can soothe a sick, teething, hurt, sad, anxious, or angry toddler, it can feed a hungry toddler who refuses to eat her solids. It provides continued immune support to a child who is eating solids and encountering all sorts of new pathogens. And it's good for YOUR health as well: longer...
    1 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:08 AM
    Welcome to the forum! The best thing I can say about babies who have difficulty nursing in the beginning is that often they just suddenly figure it out. Something clicks in their little brains, and suddenly you have the nursing relationship you dreamed of. I know what you are doing is incredibly challenging, but I would suggest staying focused on the positive: your baby can transfer milk at the breast, and it's actually pretty close to being a normal amount. 65 ml is a full feeding for a 5 week-old baby, and 45 ml is a nice snack- she's going to compensate for the small size of the average feeding by nursing a lot. 10-12 times a day, or even >12, is normal for a 5 week old. (Non-metric mamas, this baby is transferring 1.5-2 oz in 1.5 hours.) I think that if you can just hang in there, eventually she's going to be getting 65 ml at every feeding, and the feedings will get faster.
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:02 AM
    :ita That is why I love this site so much. People actually cite peer-reviewed literature, have an understanding of what a pre-digested media report is vs. what actual research is...
    4 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*ilovebaking's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:10 AM
    Background info: My daughter turns 1 on Feb 11th. She’s consistently around the 10th percentile and has zero teeth. I nurse her in the morning, at her bedtime, and my bedtime. She sleeps through the night. At dinner time, she does BLW and then Gerber oatmeal mixed with breastmilk. She’s been going to daycare since she was 3.5 months old. She drinks 16 oz of breastmilk on average in 8 hours. At lunchtime she eats what the other kids have and some homemade purees that I provide. I pump 3 times at work and once at home.
    1 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*kpfc3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:03 AM
    Hi I am an undergraduate at the Georgia Institute of Technology and doing a Biomedical Engineering Project on Breast Pumps. My group is being assigned to get user reviews for manual breast pumps. If you have used a manual breast pump and willing to participate in my survey, please comment on this post and I will send you the survey. I would really appreciate it!
    0 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    February 4th, 2016, 09:43 PM
    Parenting.com and baby center have become my least favorite sites that seem to pop up first when I do a search. I try to find articles from Google to site because people often dislike reading the actual research or literature reviews. However, it is often disheartening to me when I realize that these biased articles are what many people base their parenting decisions on. Or maybe they just use these to validate what they have already decided. Quote the WHO and people retort, "well so what random baby/parenting site says. . ."
    4 replies | 206 view(s)
  • @llli*lightheartedmom's Avatar
    February 4th, 2016, 09:26 PM
    Poor mama - I've dealt with ongoing nipple injury, a difficult-to-feed baby, lots of latch issues, etc. I haven't heard of a baby who refused to nurse except when drowsy or asleep for a long period of time. Mine have done that for maybe a few days or up to a week or two (my oldest was especially challenging, I had OALD, oversupply, you name it). I found it did work itself out eventually. My super practical for moms with busy lives advice (<--sarcasm ;)) is try skin on skin. Strip down to your undies (or just take off your top), get him in diapers and get yourselves in bed. Nurse sidelying or laid back (I have a 5mo who hates cradle hold and refuses pacifiers too). Take a whole day of this, maybe two if you can. As far as possible OALD goes - I didn't see you mention it in your post, but have you tried hand expressing (use a cloth diaper or something) before letting him latch on? I find that helps a lot when I have OALD issues (I'm breastfeeding my fourth...have had some degree of OALD with each one, some kids kept up better than others). If you suspect there might be ongoing latch issues, definitely get yourself a second opinion from someone who is experienced diagnosing and treating the condition. It will at least rule something out for you if the issue persists. Much sympathy/empathy/feeling your pain over here. Good luck! <3
    2 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*newmama2015's Avatar
    February 4th, 2016, 04:57 PM
    Hello everyone, My daughter is 5 weeks now and we have been experiencing many breastfeeding challenges. She had a lip tie and a tongue tie that was discovered 3 days after she was born. At that point she had jaundice and was losing a lot of weight. The nurse recommended I put her on the breast for 5-10 min on each side so she does not forget and pump and feed in the bottle so she can regain weight until we can get the ties released. After one week we were able to see a doctor and get the ties clipped. After the procedure we have not noticed much improvement and continued to top up with expressed milk in bottle so she can get full. We have been following up with lactation consultants weekly to check progress since the procedure. She can transfer only very small amounts from the breast. Her latch is perfect and I have lots of milk, the let down is good and her suck is good too. I rented a baby weigh scale and started doing measurements. In one hour of feeding or sometimes in 1.5 hrs she can transfer 45-65 ml of milk. Also, baby is unsettled and cannot sleep if she has no top up after. We tried a pacifier and that isn't helping too much either. The lactations consultants were not really sure what is going on and suggested I can keep trying to breastfeed and supplement or switch to exclusively pumping. They also think baby is very slow in feeding and lazy (sleeps too much during feeds). It is very difficult for me to breastfeed for an hour or 1.5 hrs, supplement and pump,...
    6 replies | 229 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 4th, 2016, 04:02 PM
    :ita with MaddieB! When your baby comes off the breast, what shape is the nipple? Symmetrical, like a pencil eraser, or ridged/wedged/creased/shaped like a new lipstick?
    2 replies | 182 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    February 4th, 2016, 04:00 PM
    If you feel like your child isn't having a good time with purées and you'd like to switch to baby-led solids, go for it! There is no reason to think that it would be harmful, and every reason to think that it would be beneficial. If you'd like to pause solids altogether, that's also fine- you just want to offer to nurse very frequently, so that you can ensure that she is getting enough milk to replace whatever calories she was getting from solids. (This would be necessary primarily in a situation in which you were offering a lot of solids- say, several jars per day. If you're just doing teaspoon-file here and there, you can probably just nurse as you have been.) I'm really sorry you felt pressured into early solids! It can be really hard to trust your own instincts, especially when you aren't sleeping well and someone you trust is 100% sure that they know how to fix the situation. Please don't beat yourself up for not sticking with your gut- there are way worse mistakes to make than starting solids a bit early. :)
    2 replies | 117 view(s)
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