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  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Today, 02:26 PM
    I don't use an contraceptive medicine so for me it wasn't that. I do think it was hormonally related.
    13 replies | 8300 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Today, 02:21 PM
    Thanks for your responses all! My reasons about the water thing-- I just don't see a need for it, however, I do think it'd be good to get her used to drinking out of something, but I think I will hold off for a bit. She just started self feeding :clap so I don't want to add another new thing right now. (My heartstrings pulled today at work--I went to the bathroom, left her playing with her container of cucumber sticks. When I came back my coworker had let her have one and she was just happily munching away on it. That was a proud yet 'aw man she likes food' moment). Selfishly, I am having difficulty adjusting to her beginnings of self weaning and don't want to add solids plus another liquid. I want to maintain current breastfeeding frequency til a year and then will be ok in decreasing amount. Seeing how much she eats now freaks me out. About the dairy-- I am really sensitive to dairy, and tend to avoid it esp bc in the beginning I think it was affecting her too so I prefer to hold off til her system has matured.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 02:01 PM
    Can you use a lactation aid to give the supplement right at the breast? Something like a Lactaid or Medela SNS can let you give the supplement through a tube right at the breast while baby nurses from you at the same time so it can save your the time step of nursing and then giving a bottle though you still have something to wash regularly. By supplementing right at the breast there is less need to pump in addition to feeding though pumping will help increase your supply more than not. I know for myself, I never responded well to the pump so If I were to have added up all I pumped with a hospital grade pump round the clock at 3 weeks I probably would have concluded that I was only producing 8 oz or less a day because I was never able to pump more than an ounce and generally much less. However, by doing weighted feeds around the clock a few times and subtracting the amount I was supplementing I was able to calculate my supply as being between 17 and 24 oz a day. I was able to get down to only supplementing about 4-5 oz a day but any less than that and weight gain was too slow even after getting the TT and LT fixed and doing physical therapy. My supply problems were due to poor milk transfer because of tongue/lip ties that were not diagnosed early. We supplemented using the Medela SNS mostly and I tried to pump after every feeding. Fenugreek didn't do much for me other than give me gas. I finally started taking Domperidone and haven't needed to supplement at all...
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Today, 01:51 PM
    Even though my child is younger than yours, recently my doctor basically told me the same thing and was absolutely shocked and made a huge deal that my baby eats twice or whatever times a night. She acted like I was the only woman in the world doing it, made me question myself, and I was so upset I came on here to vent. It was parenting advice, not medically based advice. I say- You do what you want, and no, you aren't doing anything wrong. I really appreciate ruchiccio's post. Although I only work three days a week, I wonder how full time moms working eight hours a day bf at night because for some time it was quite exhausting.
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*alphawoman's Avatar
    Today, 01:10 PM
    Your doctor might wish to avail himself of some evidence-based material before setting his mouth on "garbage vomit" mode. http://www.parentingscience.com/baby-sleep-tips.html http://www.parentingscience.com/Ferber-method.html This master article contains some great links, but I offer it with the caveat that I dislike the title. It implies that a range of developmentally normative behaviours, such as night waking at 1, are somehow disordered when they are not. http://www.parentingscience.com/sleep-tips.html
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 12:05 PM
    When my baby was that age I'd get soooo many plugged ducts. At least once a week. But they were mostly minor and cleared up within a few hours, max 24 hours. I learned to just ignore them because they were causing me so much stress, thinking that somethign was wrong. My baby's latch was fine (he had had a tongue tie but it was revised and he nursed well after that), I wasn't wearing anything that caused pressure anywhere near my boobs, I pumped and nursed very often, I took lecithin, I drank tons of water and took Vitamin C... and nothing helped. Just time :) Once my baby was about 8-9 months old, it stopped. But then it was replaced with another worry - occasional bouts of low supply. When I get a plugged duct I think yay it means I must have milk. What I found to help once you already have one is to press on the lump to see which duct on the nipple is blocked. Once you see a white area, prod it with a sterilized needle and once the skin is broken, the plug comes out and you can manually express tons of milk (usually it starts out clear, versus white, culminating with stringy fatty-looking milk). I decided it must have been caused by the actual consistency of my milk. Maybe it was just fattier than normal so it had a tendency to clog up.
    3 replies | 132 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:56 AM
    I've heard this before, that minipill and IUDs can impact supply. However, I never really took that as a good answer because I've been taking the minipill since my 6-week visit. OP has also been on the IUD since 6-week visit. So why would it suddenly decided 9 months later to affect supply?
    8 replies | 331 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:55 AM
    Sounds like a hormonal shift. Did you just get your period back? Or you could be getting it now. I have these sudden drops like you describe almost every month but no period actually comes. The skin changes you describe are also leading me to think it's hormonal. I also had different discharge when this happened. When this happened to me, nursing more frequently did not do a thing for me. It just naturally came back within a few days no matter what I did or didn't do. Could be something similar is happening to you. When it's hormonal (i.e. not a decrease in demand) all the tricks in the book don't seem to work.
    8 replies | 331 view(s)
  • @llli*applesister's Avatar
    Today, 11:52 AM
    I would really love some advice from women who've experienced IGT and what was possible with regard to breastfeeding. We've been supplement feeding our three-week-old son basically since birth, first because of jaundice, and then because my lactation consultant determined I had low milk supply, most likely because of IGT. (And looking at photos, my breasts look very similar to the classic cases.) But I am producing some milk. Following guidelines in the Nursing Mother's Companion, with a hospital-grade pump, I estimate I'm producing about 16 oz. a day. I of course have no idea how much he's getting. When he was weighed 5 days ago before and after a feeding, he'd taken in about 35 grams. He was not gaining enough weight so the lactation consultant recommended 2 to 2.5 oz of supplement per feeding. The consultant is very kind and supportive, but she didn't have any concrete advice about what might work to help increase supply. I've been trying to pump after some feedings (about 4-5x a day), but when I don't have my husband or another second pair of hands to give him his bottle, it's very hard for me to get to the pump right away. And to be honest, I hate pumping, I hate cleaning the parts, I hate all of it. I'm happy to keep breastfeeding plus supplementing but am on the fence about pumping. So I have two questions: 1) If I pump very rigorously, is there any chance I could increase my supply? 2) If I stop pumping, am I risking losing the milk I currently produce?
    1 replies | 20 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:47 AM
    oh, and I think we actually have a tooth coming through now. There is a sharp bit on the bottom gum though I haven't gotten him to give me a good look at it.
    18 replies | 835 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:46 AM
    This is an interesting thread. I wonder if it has anything to do with being on the minipill? I thought my joint pain was because of that.
    13 replies | 8300 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:31 AM
    My baby is also 11 months now and doing the same. Nursing less at each feed but I'm still feeding the same amount of times as I did the previous few months. We just cut out one night feed. Whenever my baby drastically reduces eating (nursing or solids) I have his ears checked - it was always an ear infection. By the way, he still nurses 6 times a day with 1 bottle of BM while I'm away (more feeds on weekends). My baby's been distracted for as long as I can remember! For sure since 3 months.
    3 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 11:19 AM
    I think you can interpret that as time to start a rotating/elimination diet to see if you can find which other food might be the culprit. Eggs (which contain soy due to large amounts of soy in their feed), wheat, nuts, and corn are next to try. There's research that found 20-30% more white brain matter at three months in breast fed babies than formula fed babies. This significant difference was continued in higher motor skills for those breast fed to a year. Plus, the immune system benefits that are completely missing in formula. I definitely understand the misery of having a constantly unhappy baby and the toils of elimination diets (dairy free for both my boys. I'd kill for some real cream right now!). However, there are plenty of reasons to continue tweaking your diet to find a cause.
    3 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:15 AM
    I think this is entirely your call. Personally I also avoided cups of water with my daughter at this age because when we introduced solids to her, my third, there was no way I had time to nurse her PRIOR to eating, as I was cooking/prepping food for 4-5 peoples before every meal, plus too hungry myself usually! Her not having something to drink with her 'meal' often meant she was thirsty and eager to nurse after eating. So I realized this worked well for us as it eliminated the chance solids were taking the place of nursing, which I did not want. On the other hand, I did not have a firm rule about it. My husband often gave her sips of water when she was eating. Water was the only 'other' liquid we gave any of our kids prior to about 18 months or 2 years since they were nursing. Personally I have found the least messy solution when offering something to drink to an older baby or young toddler is helping baby take sips from a regular open cup. Sippys are fun to shake and get water everywhere, and my daughter did not get the concept of a straw for a very long time. But of course when it is just water mess does not matter much.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:12 AM
    I give my baby a cup of water with a straw or without when he has a meal. The sippy cup is for when we're out of the house or when he's at the babysitter. I can't always give BM because I'm not interested in pumping when I'm home so I give water.
    5 replies | 133 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:10 AM
    We use one and it's a lifesaver. When I'm driving a car, for example, I cannot nurse my baby obviously. But what do I do if he cries? The paci works great for such occasions. Also it's recommended by one of the health organizations for babies to be put to sleep with one. My baby was introduced to a paci in the hospital because he had a problem with sucking and the nurses felt it would help him suck better, which he did. We used the kind that are most similar to a human nipple, the Avent Soothie or Gumdrop pacifiers. Our LC told us these were the best for him, not any of the supposedly orthodontic or flat-nippled ones. My baby likes to go to sleep sucking on something and I didn't want it to be only my breast in case I can't nurse him to sleep for whatever reason. To be honest, I'd rather he had a relatively clean paci in his mouth than his dirty hands from crawling on the floor.
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 11:04 AM
    It's different for every baby and every parent. Not everyone WANTS to wake up for their child a few times a night if they could help it, when it isn't really necessary. My baby would wake up 3 times a night and it was very straining on me because I have to be up early for work and I don't get to sleep before midnight, so I needed my unbroken sleep. At the 6 month visit my doctor said it's ok to cut out night feedings, but I ignored that because I needed it to keep up my supply. At 9-10 months the lack of sleep was really getting to me (and the co-sleeping option with nursing lying down was totally impossible for safety reasons and due to his latch) so we sleep trained. There was no need for him to eat every 2-3 hours at night, really. So we cut it down to 2 feeds a night, one still while I was awake and one would mean I had to wake up. So that's where we're at now and he's just about a year old, I wake up once for him. This helped me dramatically and I feel much better. When we cut down the feeds he would eat so much better at other times that it reassured me he was getting enough to eat. For a working mother who has to leave the house early and can't nap mid-day and can't co-sleep at night, there really wasn't much of a choice other than to limit some night feedings. For everyone who CAN do it, great. But it's really not realistic for lots of mothers. And there is nothing with letting a baby cry for very small amounts of time (I'm not talking about letting a child cry...
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*js's Avatar
    Today, 10:40 AM
    I would say this sounds normal. My dd reduced right around the 11 month mark. We did blw and she was eating really well and knocked off her mid-morning and mid-afertoon feed so we were down to 4 feeds during the day (first morning, 2 naps and last feed at night) and she continued to feed loads in the night. She actually started biting and pushing away on the extra 2 feeds she used to have in the day so I made sure I offered water and introduced a small mid-afternoon snack of maybe half a banana or a homemade sugar-free muffin or fruit.
    3 replies | 162 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:39 AM
    I second the suggestion of Kiss Me! A beautiful and affirming book for parents. Written by a pediatrician and father. Assuming there is not some medical concern you do not mention, I think the doctor gave you parenting advice, not medical advice. Consequently, you are free to ignore it if you chose. What the doctor is suggesting is sleep training. The evidence is clear that while sleep training MAY increase sleep duration in the short term, sleep training does nothing to promote healthy normal sleep patterns in children in the long term. Any differences in sleep pattern between children sleep trained and those who are not fade by about age 3 if I remember correctly. This is leaving aside the possible harm in sleep training. Even if one is unconvinced sleep training is harmful, the evidence is clear it is not only not needed, it is not even remotely helpful in promoting normal sleep patterns long term. For a personal story, I have 3 kids, 11, 8 and 2. All coslept with my husband and I (my two year old still does.) Despite bedsharing and nursing frequently at night as toddlers, my older kids transitioned easily to their own beds/room in the time between ages 3 and 4. (I am not saying transitioning at this age is needed, but it is what worked for us at the time. My daughter may well sleep with us longer as we are fresh out of bedrooms.) Both of my older sons sleep 10 hours straight at night and have since they were developmentally ready to. They also both napped...
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:57 AM
    Well had a diaper rash a while back that didn't go away right away with the Aquamphore the way it always used to. So went to the Dr (happened to be almost at his 6 month check so all that was taken care of at the same time) Anyway, I thought it was perhaps a yeast infection diaper rash so got nystatin but that didn't clear it up and Dr said to stop using that and try triple paste every diaper change and that seemed to mostly clear it up so it seems we have a contact dermatitis issue with something. We had been using some pampers, some huggies, and the g-pants diapers sometimes cloth sometimes the disposable inserts. The rash showed up sometime after we used the huggies for the first time. For several days I used nothing but the pampers baby dry and the rash seemed to almost totally go away. Last night I used G pants with the disposable inserts but then one diaper change in the early morning I pulled out the disposable insert and stuck in a cloth diaper. I can't be certain if the rash was back before the cloth or not since I did that change in the dark but anyway this morning when we got up the rash is back BAD so using the triple paste again and pampers till it calms down and I can be more careful trying to figure out if the issue is with the disposable inserts or the cloth (which might then be an issue of laundry products and not the cloth itself.)
    18 replies | 835 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:13 AM
    Read the book Kiss Me!: How to Raise Your Child with Love by Carlos Gonzalez He also wrote My Child Won't Eat which is also a great read I would ignore that advice and probably also look for another Dr personally but I'm all for attachment parenting. Babies are not calling you to them at night because they want to manipulate you, they are calling you at night because they need that security. They don't self sooth, when you leave them to cry they give up eventually and feel scared and alone when they learn that no one comes to help them. Sleeping away from mom and dad is not natural for babies and in the scheme of species development babies who woke up alone and didn't manage to call someone to help them were likely to die or be eaten. Nursing just seems like the best/quickest way to put baby back to sleep since as noted, night waking doesn't stop just because you night wean. Also, most working moms find that night nursing is a valuable way to keep supply up and baby fed with enough milk since pumping for daycare is hard. And extended nursing has many health benefits for BOTH MOM and BABY so I would resist the advice of any pediatrician that pushed weaning before 2 years.
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:55 AM
    Just because a bottle of formula means baby goes longer before needing to feed again isn't necessarily a good thing, Most formula are harder to digest so baby often needs more time to digest it. Anyway, I think Mommal's suggestions are good. Wheat and corn are both things that can be detrimental so worth cutting those out instead of milk/soy to see if that changes things. (I'm personally violently intolerant to high fructose corn syrup and my cousin has a son with cealiacs disease and he was near death as a baby till they figured out he was intolerant to gluten.)
    3 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:41 AM
    Mine would go 5-10 days normally between poops from about 4 weeks till we started solids. I've ready many places where even 2 weeks is considered normal and some rare babies even longer. Beware that when poop does come it may be massive!!!! When mine was on the weekly poop schedule, usually on the day he pooped it was more like 2-4 poops in quick succession and normally 2 of those would be diaper filling and often more poop would come out on the changing table if we were not careful. I've never been able to wait to let him finish before changing since he has always been very distressed by a poopy diaper. How are the wet diapers going? If there are not plenty of wet diapers one might be concerned about dehydration or insufficient milk intake causing the lack of poops. Anyway, if you get to 2 weeks and baby seems at all uncomfortable or you are at all concerned and Mommal's suggestion doesn't bring on the poop, it is probably time to check in with your Pediatrician about it.
    2 replies | 104 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:10 AM
    I'm a 1st time mom to a 6 1/2 month old. We had breastfeeding issues at the start so a paci probably wouldn't have been a good idea but the few times some one did try to give him a paci, he spit it out. Remember that many children don't need them and their fingers, thumbs or fists are enough and those can't be dropped (of course they can't be taken away later so could be a more of a problem to be weaned off of them later too.) My take is that they may be needed for bottle fed babies (since babies need to suck for comfort and that can't be done with a bottle) and should only be used occasionally if absolutely needed with breastfed babies. As in they may be an OK tool for use with breastfed babies who have an extreme need to comfort suck after breastfeeding is well established. As Mommal says, if you are getting sore you should probably get some hands on help from an LC to make sure there are no latch issues since even if baby is nursing all day it shouldn't be making you sore.
    4 replies | 124 view(s)
  • @llli*still-learning's Avatar
    Today, 07:25 AM
    If the waking up at night to nurse is ok with you then its fine. I think with doctors we sometimes have to separate medical advice from parenting advice, and the advice you got was parenting. I also feel incredibly blessed to have had the pediatrician we had when my first was little. At her 12 month checkup I was upset that I couldn't get her to sleep through the night, and had no idea how to wean her. He told me it was very normal for babies to want to wake up and nurse even throughout their second year, and if I was still able to function and find ways to rest that there was no issue with it. He also told me I would know when it was time to night wean/wean altogether. I guess I personally feel I've got 18yrs to teach my children to be independent people (and probably a little longer than that). Trying to cram it into the early years is silly to me. Oh, and just an fyi no night nursing does not mean no night waking. My five year old still wakes up in the middle of the night and needs a little help (back rubbed, snuggled..) to get back to sleep. I don’t mind. Mostly because I know this stage won’t last long. But my two year old sleeps through the night…
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 07:08 AM
    Ah, so many of us have been there with pediatricians. I was told this since my LO was 3 months old. Just ignored it! She started sleeping well (usually through the night or one or two wake ups, occasional bad nights) around 18 months to 2 years old. For some reasons pediatricians are taught this old-school way of thinking!
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*terriquitecontrary's Avatar
    Today, 06:58 AM
    So, I just took my 12 month old for her 1 year check up with a new doctor yesterday. He asked about her sleep habits and I said she wakes up 2 or 3 times a night to nurse. He said that we needed to stop doing that and that I needed to start teaching her to go back to sleep and self soothe. And he said at this age we are going to start reinforcing her behavior and she will learn that if she wakes up and cries, I will come and get her out of the crib. I told him that I don't like listening to my child cry and that there is research indicating that infants who are left to cry themselves to sleep have more problems with anxiety, etc in the long term. I honestly think I know my daughter best and that there is NOTHING in the world wrong with responding to her cries at this age. If she were 4 or 5 years old and waking up this often, I could understand the concern, but it seems like her sleep habits are within the range of normal. I'm just curious what others think. Obviously, I would eventually like her to start sleeping through the night, but it doesn't seem like it's time to start with the "tough love" yet.
    7 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:52 AM
    First of all, a big :hug to you. 6 months of unexplained crying is very stressful, and it's a real confidence shaker when formula seems to magically provide a solution to the problem. Put even in this circumstance, I don't think you want to switch to formula. The only way to make breastfeeding work is to continue to breastfeed. Your baby is gaining weight well and having plenty of wet/dirty diapers. That points to breastfeeding going well on the most basic level. We often say that "breastmilk is best", but making breastmilk into "best" means that we accept formula as the norm, which it isn't. I think it's better to say "breastmilk is the normal nutrition for the human infant", and if you want normal health outcomes for your child, feed her the normal food, right? After weeks of being dairy and soy-free and no changes to your child's behavior, maybe you need to conclude that if your diet is causing her a problem, the culprits are not soy or dairy. In fact, I would feel free to conduct an experiment- have a big glass of milk and see if your baby's behavior or stool changes over the next few days. If it doesn't, have some tofu and see if that changes anything. And if that doesn't change anything either, maybe it's time to eliminate something aside from dairy and soy. I would start with wheat, because that's the other top allergen, and then consider more exotic things like eggs and nuts. This is the gold standard for managing allergic proctocolitis in an...
    3 replies | 120 view(s)
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