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  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:48 AM
    I have no idea which bottle is best- I think it varies a lot from baby to baby. What can make a big difference is whether or not paced feeding is being used- that is, baby sitting very upright, bottle held horizontal rather than vertical, feeding being paused at appropriate intervals.
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 07:45 AM
    A daily multivitamin is generally a better way to give an older baby- who isn't eating much or any solids- iron and other micronutrients. Just give it in the tub, as vitamin drops tend to stain clothing. Why vitamin drops and not formula? First, because it's usually easier to give a baby a vitamin drop, since most babies who are breastfed are reluctant to chug a bottle of formula. Vitamin drops don't taste super great, but neither does formula, and the amount of vitamins in a dropper is just a few cc's. Second, if you give formula and the baby takes it, that is cutting down on her intake of breastmilk. That's a high price to pay for a little extra iron. Remember that when you're talking about micronutrients, you're playing a statistics game. The reason additional iron from solids or vitamins is recommended for ALL breastfed infants >6 months is not because ALL breastfed infants >6 months will become iron deficient if not supplemented. Only SOME of them will, and that fraction is great enough and the effects are potentially severe enough to justify the blanket recommendation, especially considering that a baby with normal iron status will not be injured by getting a little additional iron. So if you have a baby who won't eat solids or take vitamins, you probably do not need to worry that much. You want to try to give the baby some additional iron via solids or vitamins, but you don't need to freak out if it isn't working that well.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*novila's Avatar
    Today, 01:29 AM
    I just started domperidone on the recommended dosage of 3 tabs 3x daily, and woke up in the middle of the night all of a sudden with a huge plug in one breast! Of course it is the breast that produces the most normally, and the milk there just gathered in this plugged area that I am desperately and v painfully trying to pump out now. It's like when I lay down, gravity has forced all the milk in the left breast to stop up at the very top of the breast near the collar bone. So is this because of the domP? I haven't actually noticed any increase in my supply yet, being on it for only a few days. I really don't want to stop taking it yet but wonder if something is wrong, since this specific problem has never happened where the milk gets plugged at the very TOP OF THE BREAST! Are domP users more prone to clogging, even when supply has not changed??
    0 replies | 25 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:28 PM
    What makes you concerned you do not make enough milk? Is your baby gaining weight normally, or not? If you did not make enough milk, or if your baby needed something that was only available in solids, wouldn't your baby be hungry and consequently eating more solids? If you think your baby is lacking in appetite, that is one thing. Poor appetite is potentially caused by anemia. So if your baby were not gaining and not nursing or eating much, that would be a sign something was wrong. But if baby is gaining normally, then there is probably not anything wrong. As far as whether all babies need additional nutrition aside what is in breastmilk after 6 or 8 months, I am going to again refer to the book My Child Won't Eat. This is a book that was originally published by LLL and was often recommended by LLL Leaders, at least back when I was one. In other words, as far as I know it is an approved source of information according to LLL. The concerns about whether or not breastmilk alone is adequate nutritionally after 6 months is addressed on pages 106 and 107 and 117-119 of the current edition of this book. I cannot quote it all but basically he is saying that it is NOT universally true that breastfed babies need additional sources of any nutrients in the first year. He makes the case that it depends on the baby. He is not advocating for withholding solids, he says it makes sense to introduce them at 6 months. He is just saying it can be normal and usually entirely fine if...
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:59 PM
    Yes, I'm concerned about volume and adequacy, both.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:53 PM
    Well I am going to have to research what Karen said. That is not my understanding but I certainly could be wrong. Mackeroo, if your baby is low in any nutrient, or you fear they are, baby can be given a vitamin/iron supplement. Your breastfed baby would not need formula unless baby is not getting enough milk to gain and grow normally. Such supplements are added to formula so formula fed babies get them, but can be given to a breastfed baby directly if needed. As far as baby seeming fussy at the breast and content after a bottle, that could be any number of things. Babies get fussy and refuse to nurse all the time. This does not mean they need to be fed with a bottle, and satiation after a bottle is also not necessarily meaningful. Is it possible baby simply would have nursed a bit later and been content? Are you concerned you are not making enough milk for your baby? That is a different concern than whether your milk is nutritionally adequate.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:30 PM
    Hi venerye. I think it is important to know why we look at poops, and that is because it is a more immediate daily sign a newborn is getting enough to eat without weighing baby constantly. If a baby is gaining normally, than a day or two without poops may not be a problem at all. Here is what I see in weight check history: Baby born a healthy weight Baby lost very little weight after being born, less than might be expected. So in fact my guess is that it is very possible baby lost more weight in there between checks and was back on the upward trend by the weight check on the 19th when baby was 7 days old. By the 26th, when baby was 16 days old, baby had surpassed birth weight by more than 2 ounces. So, all that points to entirely normal gain. Back to birth weight by 2 weeks. But since we do not know for sure what was happening due to different scales and not knowing for sure what happened between checks, and since baby has not pooped in a couple days, I think it makes sense to look further. Let's look at the two most relevant numbers for now. Those are the last two checks, done on the same scale. So we can assume the most accuracy from those.
    1 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:45 PM
    actually as long as you and your LO are nursing 3-5 times in a 24hour period you don't need to replace anything. That's still enough breastmilk-which is higher and fat and calorie content than cows milk that it doesn't need to be replaced.
    7 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    I need a bottle that I could use with my son occasionally that is best for switching breast and bottle. Ideally a bottle that he has to work really hard at getting the milk, and it won't flow into his mouth. I've tried several and spent upwards of $100, and all these bottles stink. Any advice is appreciated!
    1 replies | 56 view(s)
  • @llli*mobaby's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:49 PM
    This is kind of long and I am sorry!! My DS was born via c section at 36 weeks on aug 3rd. He had some breathing issues which landed him into the NICU for 8 days. Meanwhile he had cpap, oxygen, a feeding tube and IV. Slowly weaned off everything and I was providing expressed milk (pumping 10 x in 24 hours). He finally started taking all by bottle and not spitting up. I expressed a desire to breastfeed several times but the response I got was you can do it 1-2 feeding per day only but he has to get the bottle afterwards so we can know how much he is getting. I was extremely frustrated because once he was discharged we had no breastfeeding established, only bottle. No one even to help me figure things out. I know he can drink from the bottle well and he actually has always latches very well. (which I am sick of the bottle because others think it is a game to see who can feed the fastest and they don't understand the faster he takes the bottle the more of a hinderance it is for me to BF). He is not an efficient eater yet and is still very lazy and it takes a long time to feed. And I am still having to pump after every feeding and supplement with expressed milk. We saw lactation consultant (not sure is IBCLC) a few days after discharge and basically I was told when he was closer to his full term age he would be able to do better and I could go "cold turkey." I wasn't comfortable with that so yesterday I went to IBCLC appt (90 minutes) and he nursed, 15 mins per side, and...
    0 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*venerye's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:41 PM
    My baby is 2 weeks old today. He passed his meconium pretty quickly and has been having yellow, seedy stools since day 4/5. He was having 3-4 quarter-size stools a day, then he had one day of a quarter size stool and one enormous blowout, and now it has been nearly 48 hours with no bowel movement at all. Plenty of wet diapers throughout all that time. I took him in for a weight check today to make sure he is gaining. 8/12 birth weight 8lb 2 oz 8/13 discharged 8lb 1 oz 8/15 ped office #1 8lb 0 oz 8/19 ped office #2 (different scale) 8lb 0 oz 8/26 ped office #1 (same scale as 8/15) 8lb 4.5 oz Two peds have seen him and commented that he has slight jaundice but not enough to warrant testing. All of my kids have had jaundice.
    1 replies | 82 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:28 PM
    Thanks for the reply. I'm just a tad confused. So, my daughter is 8 months old and not eating solids because she refuses, so if she needs more iron, should I be giving her some formula?
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 AM
    A creased nipple is a pretty good indication that the problem is something that's going on in the baby's mouth. :huh Latching/positioning help from an IBCLC would be a good place to start.
    5 replies | 240 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:40 AM
    A bit of a clarification -- while a mom's milk supply won't necessarily decrease as baby gets older and is still nursing consistently, and milk continues to be an excellent source of nutrition throughout the second year and beyond, milk alone can not provide all the nutrition a toddler needs. After 6-8 months, babies do need additional sources of iron and zinc, at least.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*zambomommy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:13 AM
    I agree with PP. If you have a 30 oz freezer supply, I would send him with the 6 oz you pump the previous day +2 oz from freezer stash. Assuming he is at daycare 5 days a week, that 30 oz should last you 3 weeks. In addition maybe you can pump once on saturday and sunday and freeze it. This will definitely take you through one month. I plan on doing this starting next week, DD will be 11 months in 9 days! We still nurse 5 times a day (she night weaned a week ago, on her own, and I miss it terribly!) Once your son hits 11 months, you can send him with 6 oz and maybe 2-3 oz of yogurt to satiate his dairy demand. At 12 months, you can switch to cows milk and kiss that pump goodbye!
    7 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:37 AM
    I should add that she seems content now that she had that extra bottle of milk and the nipple on the bottle is still a stage 1.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:36 AM
    Thanks for the replies.. something just happened that I would love your feedback on. Again you know my daughter doesn't eat solids so I fed her at her normal time and she was pulling on my nipples and she started to cry like she seemed frustrated I didn't understand why I thought it could be that she was teething but then figured I could try giving her a bottle of my breast milk to see if maybe she was still hungry and was frustrated because she wasn't getting anything from me. So I warmed up a bottle of my breast milk and she drink it so fast within 2 minutes. So what does that mean? I'm trying not to get discouraged because I want to continue to exclusively nurse her way past a year.
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:05 AM
    If you only get 4-6oz you supplement with 2 oz from your freezer supply. When your freezer supply is exhausted you can tell them to try to up the solids and see if he is OK with only 6 oz, solids and water and if not have them supplement with 2 oz of formula. After 10 months my son wouldn't take pumped milk at all. So he would drink only water and eat solids while away from me and we nursed on demand while together. He never ended up needing any formula. It's only 8 more weeks! You are so close. And then you can pump wean all together!!!
    7 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 AM
    :ita with MaddieB. Any chance that you could pick up a better pump? I used the Ameda Purely Yours and while it's a fine pump for a mom who responds well to pumping and only relies on it part time, I don't think it's a good machine for a mom who is trying to maintain or increase supply by pumping. It just doesn't have enough power, in my experience. If you go and see an IBCLC, she may be able to set you up with a better machine. Any chance of seeing a different pediatrician? I don't like the dismissive treatment or the advice you received from yours.
    5 replies | 279 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:46 AM
    :ita When a mom nurses when her baby asks and there are no external reasons for a decline in milk production (e.g., pregnancy, use of a medication which decreases supply), she will continue to make enough milk to supply her all baby's needs until the first birthday and will likely have enough well into the second year. There are a lot of breastfed babies who do not become interested in eating larger quantities of solids until they are in the 14-18 month age range, yet still grow just fine. The reason this works is that growth slows down over time. Breastfed babies grow really fast when they are new, often doubling or tripling their birth weight by just a few months of age. All that growth takes a lot of milk! But as time goes on, growth slows, and as a result milk intake starts to slow down, too. Babies generally increase their milk intake until around 6 weeks, at which point they generally hold steady until 6-12 months. There may even be a slight decline in intake with older babies, which may be particularly noticeable as they start eating more solids. A lot of moms get thrown by 2 things: seeing how much formula-fed babies eat, and reading a sample "meal plan" for a baby their baby's age. So it's helpful to remember that formula-fed babies reverse the normal pattern of intake, eating less and growing more slowly than breastfed babies when they are young, and escalating their intake and growing more quickly as they get older. If you see a formula-fed...
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:24 AM
    I'm not sure what to do at this stage. I don't want to stop providing milk but the current situation is just not sustainable for another 2 months. I have no plans to reduce nursing, which DS is still totally into at least 5-8 times day/night in addition to bottles while I work, but is scalded breast milk so much more nutritious than formula to justify the sacrifices needed? I sound selfish commenting on MY missed time at work, but it bothered me the other day when I had to miss a farewell party for a good friend. My immediate work colleagues are 100% supportive, men and women, and always ask if I need to leave meetings etc. But sometimes sudden meetings pop up and I feel I cannot excuse myself all the time. DS was getting 8oz/day of pumped milk plus solids for lunch and 2 snacks of fruit in the mid-morning/afternoon. Recently I took advantage of summer holidays to spend an extra hour at home (leaving 30 minutes later in the morning and arriving 30 minutes earlier in the afternoon) to only leave 6oz and freeze the extra 2oz. This has given me a small freezer stash, maybe 30oz or so. But certainly not enough to get me through another 2 months. When he returns to daycare next week I am sure they will expect 8oz again, if not more, which I struggle to pump. I have found myself holding back on giving solids, which he loves and would eat all day, in case it would further impact my ability to pump. So when I am with him I nurse and give very little solids to protect my supply,...
    7 replies | 312 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:40 AM
    Hi Ladies, Just the other day we were browsing through old photographs taken in the early days when my son was a new born. Most of the photos were candid cell-phone clicks taken in spur of moment. There was photo of me snuggling him close on my chest for first time. Another one of me catching a much needed shut eye with him lying on top of me. Me attempting to nurse in laid back position. Our first latch, him taking a boob-nap, us nursing while side lying. First yummy-milky-booby-in the mouth smile. It was a real trip down memory lane, the best part was, when my sister in law in all the seriousness said that you should write a book based on your experience in nursing. All I did was grin and reply sure so day in future. But in my mind I knew that it was possible due to wealth of information that is present on site created by many untiring supporters.
    4 replies | 242 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 25th, 2016, 11:13 PM
    Hi tararg, sorry you are having such a rough time of it. How old is your baby and how often is baby eating? 4 ounces is a pretty large meal for a brand newborn, so I am wondering why baby is still not gaining normally if baby is taking almost that much in a bottle at every feeding. Sometimes gain issues are medical and not about how much baby is eating. A newborn of between 1 and 2 weeks old typically needs about 20-25 ounces total per day, which they get eating at least 10-12 times. So, typical meals are more like 1-3 ounces total. This daily intake increases a bit in later weeks for most babies but not by much. As far as not being able to produce milk, while a C-section is often the cause of delayed lactation, it is not likely to cause low milk production on it's own. Getting to the bottom of why you are not producing much milk may help you figure out how to proceed. Pumping should not hurt. If your pump is hurting you, there is something wrong- poor fit, too high a setting, something.
    1 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*tararg's Avatar
    August 25th, 2016, 08:49 PM
    Hi there So I've had a rough go of breastfeeding. I was induced followed by an emergency c section. I had no milk but tried. We were able to breastfeed but I've been having to supplement with formula. He was born at 8.1. Dropped to 7.1 after a week of mainly breastfeeding. Now with supplementing he is 7.13. We breast feed on each breast and we finish by offering formula as per our pediatrician a suggestion. Most often he's eating a full 4 oz of formula after breastfeeding. At this point I can't stop Supplanting as he still hasn't gained enough weight. But when he's feeding I don't hEar many swallows. He mainly Just sucks. I'm on motillium to help and when I squeeze to express there seems to be a lot (I've never felt a let down or Anything). I eat super well and drink tons of water. He hates pacifiers ironically considering he Would suck on the breast for hours if I would let him.
    1 replies | 113 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 25th, 2016, 07:44 PM
    Yes, in normal circumstances a woman can continue to make enough milk for her child to live on indefinitely, as the experiences mommal and I wrote about indicates. Of course many things might reduce milk production, but assuming a baby is nursing with high enough frequency and nothing is interfering with normal production I do not see why milk production would reduce, until baby begins to eat enough solids that baby actually starts taking in less milk, and then that is the next step in the long and gradual weaning process. Even a baby who eats solids with gusto at 6 months, like my first, is not really all that likely to significantly or at all replace breastmilk with solids for many months, (unless nursing is withheld or solids pushed) and breastmilk is ideally the primary source of nutrition for the first year at least. And breastmilk does not become less nutritious after 6 months or a year or any other time. This is a myth. This article may be helpful to you: http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starting-solids/toddler-foods/
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    August 25th, 2016, 07:22 PM
    Thanks to both of you for your replies. And a woman has enough milk quantity and quality to exclusively breastfeed until baby likes solids?
    13 replies | 376 view(s)
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