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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:18 AM
    You are right. It is unreal. As in, totally false. "Reflux" is spit up. Babies spit up. It is entirely normal. Painful reflux that requires intervention is a painful condition where partially regurgitated food and stomach acids irritate and eventually injures the esophagus. that is NOT solved with thickened feeds. Sometimes medication is needed. And a great helper for reflux is FREQUENT, SMALL FEEDINGS- just as a baby normally gets when they are nursed as much as they wish. Baby not spitting up does not mean painful reflux is not happening. Lots of people suffer from serious, painful reflux without ever vomiting. In how much time? Why shouldn't you believe her? It may be true. So what? This has nothing to do with you and your baby. There are many reasons some babies nurse less often than others. Here is the thing. What is our overarching, overall goal, when it comes to the health and happiness of our children? I think that most parents would say something like the goal is the best overall lifetime health outcomes possible- and we know breastfeeding promotes this-or, more to the point, we know that formula does NOT. Another goal is a child who is set up to have a happy and successful life. (A recent study showed that the latter is promoted if the child is cared for with lots of attention and respect for their feelings in early life so that they are capable of forming healthy attachments.) So, I would say the goal is not a baby who "goes" a certain length of time...
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:14 AM
    Can you call your local LLL for support? It sounds like you need to hear someone who is knowledgeable about breastfeeding tell you that you're doing a great job, which you are! I also think it might help to talk to your local LLL leader about what happened to you with the pediatrician- she might be able to tell you that this person is known for providing bad advice, or be able to suggest ways to effect positive change at the hospital. In this situation, I would want to send a letter of complaint, detailing your interaction with this pediatrician, to both the pediatrics and obstetrics departments, and also to the person who handles complaints for the hospital.
    3 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:11 AM
    Welcome to the forum! I am so sorry about the nursing strike. The best way to get a baby back to the breast is to do 2 things: 1. maintain milk supply via frequent pumping with a high-quality double electric oump with properly sized shields 2. patiently and persistently offer to nurse in all sorts of different situations- when the baby is wide awake and hungry, when she is tired and not very hungry at all, when she is asleep, in the bath, outside, in a sling, after an oz of milk from the bottle has taken the edge off her hunger, etc. This link gives good tips on dealing with strikes: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/. In addition to trying the above, I strongly suggest finding a different LC, and reaching out to your local LLL leaders. The advice you were given strikes me as extremely dodgy. Fussiness following the introduction of a bottle sounds much more like the common situation of a baby developing bottle preference rather than the rare conditions of dairy or gluten sensititivities. And pumping is in no way the proper treatment for a food sensitivity- in fact, it's not really recommended at all except in cases where severe engorgement makes it impossible for a baby to latch. And finally, when a baby does have a sensitivity, it is recommended that the mother continue to nurse while eliminating problem foods from her diet.
    1 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 11:02 AM
    Having baby nurse on only one side is only a problem if you feel that it's a problem. Some moms are perfectly content to nurse only or primarily on a single breast. The potential downsides of nursing on just one breast are lopsidedness- you might end up with noticeable size differences- and not having a "spare" should your left breast suddenly not be usable. Have you tried maintaining baby in the same position between breasts? That is, if you nurse him with his left ear facing up, switch him to the other side with that same ear facing up. Sometimes that tricks baby into thinking he's still on his favorite breast, because he hasn't changed position at all.
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 10:56 AM
    Memory fades with time. It's been, what, 20-30 years since your mom nursed her kids? She may remember you nursing only every 3 hours, forgetting that it was sometimes 3 hours and sometimes every hour, or twice in a single hour... Also, if she was using "a lot" of formula when she was at work, it may be that her kids got most of their calorie needs met during the workday and therefore didn't care to nurse much when she was home. I would simply ask her to stop saying "Didn't you JUST feed that baby?" Tell her that hearing that makes you feel undermined and insecure, and ask that she find a way to trust that you know when your child is hungry, which you do! You actually CAN thicken bottled breastmilk. It's usually not recommended because cereal stirred into milk can form clumps which can be a choking hazard, but my guess is that you could do it safely if you were very careful about mixing and informed about the proper amount of cereal to add. I would talk to the pediatrician about it. If your baby has reflux, are you using a reflux med?
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:55 AM
    Oh the first thing I thought of was teething! My baby got his first two teeth at 5 months so it's very possible yours is teething right now. My baby's top lip never curled outward until he was about a year old. The doctor wasn't concerned about his lip tie and it didn't bother us too much. We did have his tongue-tie snipped, though, at 5 months. I definitely found things got better with time. These days it's nothing like it was 5 months ago, and 5 months before that! Even though he's had the tongue-tie fixed a year ago!
    7 replies | 182 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 10:52 AM
    I agree with PP about using a log. My hospital supplied one. It had one day for each week of baby's first week of life. Each day it had all the 24 hours written out and you circle each time the baby eats. Near it, it says how many target feeds you should aim for (10-12, for example), and then underneath that it has the typical amounts of wet and soiled diapers and you circle each time baby has one. This is what kept me going because I was clueless and didn't get too much good advice either. I ended up making my own little clock to keep track and make sure I fed baby enough. After 2 weeks I felt confident that I could nurse whenever baby wanted and it was enough!
    3 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 10:14 AM
    Hi Yvonne, Congratulations on your wonderful second bundle of joy. Glad you came here to get it off your chest and look for answers. Things are going to be ok :) Just a couple days after birth your body is continuing the miracle and changing your hormones very rapidly, and as women we know that surging hormones can impact your emotions, so let's be gentle with ourselves :hug and BTW it's certainly ok with me, your language! :) I'm sorry that you ran into a negative experience on bfing. It sounds like she was not having her best day if she spoke condescendingly towards you, and maybe it might help your feelings toward the experience to look at her as a person who was potentially just having a bad day herself but struggling to get through it nonetheless. The good news is she is not around now, and you can use things like a log for how often you bf and baby's nappies to track how things are going on a level much more authoritatively than any one person's advice can show you. Your confidence can be built again, and even stronger than it was before :hug you can do this. Would you like some support on how your bfing is going? If so, would you like to look back and tell us how often LO is bfing, and what kind of nappy output is going on?
    3 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*rubyluv's Avatar
    Today, 10:09 AM
    It could definitely be the beginning of teething. She's quite drooly and chewing on her hands a ton. She's also constantly sucking on her hands and toys which makes me question if she's still hungry.. but who knows. mamma7008 it was the same thing after my daughters tongue/lip tie release. They said that it was successful but the latch didn't improve that much. They kept saying it would improve over time as she relearned how to use those muscles.
    7 replies | 182 view(s)
  • @llli*littlecavemomma's Avatar
    Today, 10:01 AM
    I am totally in agreement with Mommal here. You showed much more constraint than I could have - I would have knocked my mother into yester-year for that. As many have said, supplementing with formula is a MEDICAL INTERVENTION, not something that should be done for convenience's sake. If your doctor was concerned about weight to that degree, I assure you they would have strongly voiced their orders to supplement. Abcdmom - beautiful sentiment. Maybe the baby just needs more "hugs" than some. There's a reason it's called nursing...
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 09:54 AM
    Dormir41, Bfwmomof3 already gave you some great advice! Yup, it's stocking up for the first day that is really the most relevant. We were EBF and only on the first day back to work did I have four small bottles (not fully filled) in my stash. For the rest I had two or three partially filled small bottles; although I went back to work FT when DS was 4mos. It helped me to have a high quality dual electric pump (Medela Freestyle, NAYY) and I used the Kellymom advice to try to pump at approx the same time each day and bring a baby memento with me to cue my body to make lots of milk at that time. The hard thing was the double pump would cue so much prolactin that it took a while to get used to the huge fog of sleepiness that would come whilst pumping ! LOL. So it worked and pumped great. For peace of mind I kept a freezer bag with an ice cube in the freezer at the crèche just to check periodically that the freezer didn't have a power outage (the ice cube would have melted and lost its shape). It sounds logical to start using your freezer stash--you keep it fresher, and only need it as back-up to the fresh refrigerated milk that still has the live goodies in it. Do you think a stash inventory list would be helpful to keep on the freezer? It's really hard *hug* and the questions about how to organize your life and do your best balancing everything are going to be there. But you're a great mother and will do the best you can, which is all that anyone can ask of you...
    7 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*searsmami's Avatar
    Today, 09:50 AM
    I believe teething is a huge component in what wakes these under age-2 toddlers up in the night, seeking comfort. It comes and goes, and it's so wonderful if we can be there for them, even if it means some dreadful nights of fits and starts. Their brains are also still developing at an accelerated pace but are still not ready for the kind of long hours that older children and adults partake in. I have a 19-month-old and we've never CIOed and recently began bedsharing when I realized I wouldn't have to get out of bed to nurse if need be. Anyway, after much dedication and patience, he only wakes once in an 8+ hour period. I know some nights can be tough, but it does help to have a partner who can also help with soothing, like saying Sshh, and patting baby on the back.
    12 replies | 364 view(s)
  • @llli*midnightsangel's Avatar
    Today, 09:37 AM
    One breast can provide enough milk for the baby. This is how moms nurse multiples. I would pump your right side to keep supply up. Plus you'll have a nice stash if/when you need to leave baby for work or a spa day or whatever.
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    Today, 09:37 AM
    Could you make it a family road trip?
    17 replies | 289 view(s)
  • @llli*bxlgirl's Avatar
    Today, 08:34 AM
    Hi mama, congrats on successfully bfing to 8 weeks! Great! This info might help: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/lopsided/ Sorry NAK and can't type anymore...
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*babyemommy's Avatar
    Today, 08:32 AM
    There has to be a way to fix this my heart is breaking. My LO was a strong nurser the first 3 weeks of her life despite all our problems but now she won't take the breast at all. It started with cracked nipples leaving the hospital and then got a plugged duct and went on antibiotics in week 2. Then I think I had thrush entering week three but she kept powering through even though I was in so much pain. Starting week 4 we were instructed to introduce bottles to give me a break once in a while to heal. Then she started latching really well but would fuss at the breast. Local LC said it seemed like a dairy or gluten sensitivity and my milk was upsetting her so I should pump off foremilk and then offer breast and that worked for a couple days until she refused nipple completely. Screamed when placed near it. LC said to take a couple days off and pump only and clean up diet. Her mood is better and so are her poos but I don't know how to get her back to the breast. Now she roots and finds comfort in sleeping on my breast but won't open up at all to feed. Have tried nipple shield and lactation aid with no luck. Please help, I want this to work so bad, I don't know if I have the heart to Exclusively pump :(
    1 replies | 21 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    Today, 08:21 AM
    I have a theory that babies come from Heaven and sometimes they are really upset about making the transition to earth!
    8 replies | 327 view(s)
  • @llli*mydela's Avatar
    Today, 08:13 AM
    My son is 2 months old and has always nursed great. Now that he is no longer such a newborn, he's not as interested in eating every waking second of his day. That's fine, of course--I do mean EVERY WAKING SECOND!--but weirdly, he has decided that he will take only the left breast. The right breast is completely unacceptable to him unless he is a) super hungry, and b) side-lie nursing. My left breast--the one he likes--has always been a lower producer than my right. My question is, is this a problem? Will my left breast produce enough milk for him until such time as he decides the right side is acceptable again? If so, should I pump my right breast a few times a day, or just let the milk supply reduce in that side? Right now it is pretty engorged. He has at least 6-7 wet diapers every day and generally takes a huge poo once a day. (This has been his pattern for several weeks, not just lately.) Thanks!
    3 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*canadianemily's Avatar
    Today, 08:03 AM
    Just wanted to chime in to say you're not alone! I just posted a similar thread over on the sleep board. My LO is six months as well and rarely sleeps more than a one hour stretch during the night. As for naps, I always hold him through them so he can quickly nurse back to sleep and he manages to get 1-2 hour naps that way. It's very hard to tune out the doctors, friends, "experts", etc. who claim you're creating a bad sleep association. You're not. Whenever I start questioning myself I just think of how things would have naturally been done when we were cave people. Babies would have spent all their time either nursing, sleeping, or being carried, and we can be pretty sure they nursed to sleep! It's not a bad thing, just sometimes inconvenient in our modern society. We started cosleeping in order for me to get some sleep between his hourly wakings. Right now I'm in the process of trying different clothes, temperature and lighting to see if any of that makes a difference. Things will get better eventually!
    16 replies | 565 view(s)
  • @llli*abcdmom's Avatar
    Today, 07:54 AM
    "Didn't you JUST feed that baby??" Just to add something to consider. You know how sometimes you want a glass of water, sometimes you want a snack, sometimes you want Thanksgiving dinner, sometimes you want dessert and sometimes you just want the kind of sugar that comes in a hug. I think it can be the same for a baby. Your milk is all the above!
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*skyanne's Avatar
    Today, 07:19 AM
    Thanks yall. You have no idea how much that helped. I'm looking up those books now :) At her last checkup, her pediatrician said that she's happy with DDs weight gain as long as she stays in the 5%. If it drops, then we would talk about a supplement. In the meantime shes having us do weight checks every two weeks. DD has reflux, and sometimes has a hard time keeping breastmilk down. The formula we were using was one with added rice, and she kept it down beautifully. She also gained about a pound and a half. I wish there was some way to thicken my breastmilk for her, the rice formula helped so much with the reflux it's unreal. My mom breastfed all her kids, but we also got a lot of formula when she was at work. She claims that even on breastmilk alone, we had all spaced our feedings out to about 3 hours apart by this age. I kind of believe her, I get so tired of hearing "Didn't you JUST feed that baby??"
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*yvonne9's Avatar
    Today, 06:53 AM
    Hi everyone, Gave birth to my second child 2days ago and was full of confidence after the birth and with the amazing staff that I had with the midwife led unit(fantastic supportive women) until the paediatrician came around to discharge us and do final check over baby. To say I was fuming was an understatement but I kept quiet. I did not want a blazing row and just wanted to get home.basically a woman a little older than myself decided to educate me how to feed my baby never even thinking to ask do I have other kids? Have I breastfed before? Or anything. I did try and answer questions she asked but she was extremely condescending and corrected my every answer. That's when I said to myself she is full of ****, a text book expert but with absolutely no personal experience of having keep do or breastfeeding herself. From telling me to feed often to supplementing in the first fees days?? And then trying to tell me milk arrives in a few hrs after birth????(and she didn't mean colostrum) then telling me look he is starving, and the signs to look for He has never been parted from me since birth and was put on breast in a matter of minutes.my confidence has been shattered and now I'm terrified that I don't know what I'm doing anymore. I know it's still early days and my milk will probably arrive in the next day or two but the doc really pissed me off. Sorry for language
    3 replies | 46 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 05:52 AM
    I'm so sorry you are doubting yourself! It sounds like you are doing well with your baby and she's just fussy because . . . Well, she's a baby. I have an eleven week old and panicked myself when she fussed a lot and didn't sleep as much a few weeks after she got home. The ladies on here as well as a few books helped me realize this is what babies do. They sleep in maddeningly short bursts, they fuss, they sleep in your arms and wake up when they are put down, they feed what seems like CONSTANTLY. And they are all normal if they are gaining weight and have enough wet and poopy diapers. My doctor had advised supplementing my child, but she's gaining slower than dr would like. And I'm finding it to be more trouble than just breastfeeding more, even though I think breastfeeding is harder. She won't take the formula in a bottle from me and only from my husband when she's really hungry, and it's a pain to follow all the dos and don'ts of formula mixing, stirring, and feeding in addition to breastfeeding. But that's my situation, not yours. You aren't saying your daughter is gaining too slow or losing weight; unless she is, I wouldn't worry about formula. If there is an issue with breastfeeding, see a good LC. It doesn't sound like you are having issues though. If you think she needs formula, YOU, NOT your mom, check with the dr about it. You may not be a reader, but if you are, as already suggested, Sweet Sleep is a good book, as is the Happiest Baby on the...
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:11 AM
    In this situation, I think you need to wait a few more months and maybe get some better data. It's normal for the first few postpartum cycles to be wonky, so it's quite possible that your ovulation pattern will change if you give yourself a few more months. I also wonder if perhaps you are ovulating at a normal point in your cycle, and just not picking up a thermal shift until day 20? Late thermal shifts are, IIRC, pretty common and generally normal (?). I usually think that charting is sufficient for moms who want to know everything about their cycles, but if the late thermal shift hypothesis is correct, the way to pick up on that might be by using an ovulation prediction kit (OPK). Now might also be a great time to get some basic bloodwork done. I especially advocate getting a test for thyroid function if you have not had one in the last 6 months. Thyroid dysfunction is common in postpartum, often overlooked, and can cause menstrual irregularities.
    1 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:04 AM
    The crying stage is REALLY hard. But it also doesn't last. Young babies cry because it's the only way they can communicate. Older babies start to be able to communicate a desire to nurse or a disconfort without screaming their heads off. The reason crying hurts you so much is that it's designed to. Throughout human history, successful moms have been the ones who take their babies' cries seriously. A mom who wasn't bothered by her child's cries would be more likely to be neglectful, because the cries wouldn't motivate her to try to solve her baby's problem. Probiotic powder can be put into pumped milk, delivered by finger tip, or rubbed on the nipple before nursing.
    8 replies | 327 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:00 AM
    :ita This friend sounds like a keeper. Someone who is willing to flex a fair amount to have you at the wedding- that is someone whom prioritizes friendship over having everything her way. It's really special!
    17 replies | 289 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 04:56 AM
    I'm going to be a lot less tactful than the PPs. What your mom did was outrageous. First, she disobeyed your feeding instructions. That's completely disrespectful to YOU and I would fire a caregiver who did that. Second, she overfed your baby- 6 oz bottles? Really?!! That's not healthy, and of course your baby slept well afterwards- she was probably too full to move. Third, if your mom has "stuff to do" that is more important than taking good care of her grandchild, then she is not the right caregiver for your child. I would far rather see a baby fed breastmilk in appropriate amounts and be normally fussy- likely because she misses her mom- than to see her overfed formula just so that she'll go into a convenient "food coma". Fourth and finally, what your mom said planted a bunch of nasty seeds of self-doubt in you. Now you're worried that your milk isn't enough, that you should be using formula because your milk "goes right through" the baby... All because your mom talked down breastfeeding and talked up the benefits of overfeeding a baby formula.
    9 replies | 111 view(s)
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