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  • @llli*seattlemama's Avatar
    Today, 10:05 AM
    This is a call for desperate help to all you Moms that have or are still breastfeeding their toddlers. Im sorry its a very long post, details are important. I'd like to know from you how your kid was nursing around 7-8-9-10mo age (the time when they start crawling, standing walking etc that gets them distracted even from nursing.) Did your LO start nursing less and less/more and more during this time frame? How often were they nursing everyday, and how long did each nursing session last, nursing single side/both sides? How much solids were you giving to them and how did that impact their nursing habits? What did you do to make sure you were able to nurse your LO for a longer period of time? My now 9.5mo boy has been ebf and started solids since 5.5mo. I've had this passionate desire to nurse my LO for a long duration (at least up to 18 months.) He was doing fine first few months (although due to sore nipples I had to use a nipple shield for 4months.). LO has been very distractible since around 4-5 mo and that's when he started a latch on latch off game that Id hoped would improve with time. Things have been very hard since then. Around 6-7 months time frame he changed a lot - from having a regular 3hourly nursing he went to nursing only while naps and MOTN. I realized that that's how its gonna be and accepted it because at least he was nursing. He was on solids only once a day until around a month ago when he started solids twice a day. This past month and a half he...
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    35 times a day? For half an hour to 45 minutes each time? I am not sure that is even possible, mathematically. Are you saying baby is basically never not nursing? Nursing that much for FOOD at almost 3 months of age indicates either low milk production or poor milk transfer, IMO. If baby is nursing so often for comfort (does not like being put down) then I agree a carrier (Sling, wrap, etc) should help. But if baby literally needs to nurse that much to get enough calories, that would indicate a breastfeeding issue. Is baby gaining normally? Have you started any meds that might impact milk production? Any other reason to be concerned about your milk production or babies ability to nurse effectively? Is baby actively sucking that whole time, or just hanging out? If baby is just hanging out, what happens if you take baby off the breast and go do something else WHILE HOLDING baby (not putting baby down?) Sometimes in a situation like this, breast compressions are helpful. Switching sides at least once or more often during a feeding may help as well. http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/content.php?pagename=doc-BC
    4 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:52 AM
    Agree that baby may be getting overfed during the day. On the other hand, it depends how often baby is able to nurse while you are home. If baby is allowed to take a very long sleep stretch (More than 4-6 hours) every night, and this leads to less nursing when home, this may mean baby does need more milk during the day. This (regular long stretches of not nursing) is also not usually a good scenario for continued normal milk production especially after the return to work. So my first suggestion is to encourage baby to nurse more overnight or at least during your own waking hours. If baby is being swaddled or using a pacifier or sleeping in a separate room from you, those practices can lead to longer sleep stretches so sometimes just changing those habits lead to baby waking with more typical frequency to nurse. Of course, if baby is being overfed during the day, that might well lower nursing frequency at night...so it's a chicken or the egg thing. This article explains not only paced bottle feeding technique, but also cue feeding with bottles and tips for helping baby be eager to nurse when mom is home: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf Video demonstration of paced feeding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs
    4 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*bkmama11231's Avatar
    Today, 09:50 AM
    Hello all, thanks for any words of wisdom. As many others say - I can't believe i've made it this far when I never thought I'd make it beyond 4 weeks! I have a few things I'd love some advice on, the biggest topic is when/how to give up some or all of the nursings when baby shows no signs of self-weaning. I nurse 3 times a day - first thing in the morning, right before bed and once after her morning nap (around 1). I have started feeling that it is the right time to give up the daytime nursing because I have been working a lot and having to pump in public stall bathrooms (i freelance, it's complicated) and am only eeking out about 2 ounces at those times anyway and am frankly kind of over it. Though I do feel conflicted since it's not like i have to do that every day. But then that leads me to think about the other nursings. I know I don't have to make a decision imminently, but boy would i love to be able to be the one who gets to sleep in one morning, or not have to always be responsible for the bedtime routine. Of course, all that said, I love nursing and am sure I would be sad when it was over. I don't know how to make the decision to end it if it doesn't come naturally. Part of me wants more freedom and part of me doesn't want anything to change. Plus I like all the benefits of continuing breastfeeding (both for me and for my LO). Another thing I'd like advice on that never really occurred to me before - I don't really nurse on demand, we're...
    0 replies | 1 view(s)
  • @llli*jessica.holiga's Avatar
    Today, 08:46 AM
    Hello - So I have posted a few other times on the forums to try to troubleshoot my low milk supply and trying to increase. I have tried pretty much everything and the hospital grade pump is my last attempt. But as I've been looking to try to find information on why the hospital grade pump is more effective, the only information I have really found is in regards to the fact that the hospital grade pumps are just multi-user. Before I go through the trouble time wise and financially of obtaining a hospital grade pump - I was just wondering if someone could educate me on why the hospital grade pumps are better? I currently am using a Medela PISA if anyone is wondering. Thanks in advance for any help!
    0 replies | 10 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:32 AM
    Any estrogen-containing medication, even if only topical, has the potential to effect supply. But I wouldn't worry too much about it at this point, because your LO is over a year. Any drop in supply should be made up for by increased solids intake, which is going to be happening regardless of whether or not you try to increase his solids. With your family history, a TSH level is a VERY good idea!!! I personally would want it as part of my routine yearly bloodwork.
    12 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:31 AM
    Have you tried any carriers? As baby gets older nursing in a carrier gets easier and ma make it easier to get some stuff done (probably one handed) even when nursing. Is baby transferring milk ok? Does nursing feel ok? Is baby comfort nursing/sleeping on the breast a lot?
    4 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*ruchiccio's Avatar
    Today, 08:29 AM
    My baby goes to sleep at about 8pm and sleeps solidly until about 12-1, when he wakes up for the first feeding, so time isn't an issue. We basically have a few hours to ourselves and since he does not sleep in our room, we really have privacy and no distraction. So that's not the issue either. Bsua65, you bring up an interesting point. I have not had any thryroid bloodwork done, but maybe I should? I just had my yearly well woman's exam this week so maybe I can call the dr and have her give me a prescription for such a bloodtest. My older sister got Hashimoto's after giving birth to twins. My father had to have his parathyroid removed because of a polyp, and my younger sister has borderline thyroid issues. So this may very well be the case. I definitely will another cycle and see how things turn out, but if not will get my thyroid checked. I don't really exhibit any other symptoms of postpartum thyroiditis, though. I got a cream from my gyn called Femarin which is supposed to provide estrogen to the vaginal area and help with the dryness. She said to try it and see what it does for me. Does anyone know if it can affect milk supply even though it's only topical (applied 2x a week)?
    12 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:27 AM
    Excellent advice above!!!
    2 replies | 127 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:27 AM
    Those "how long" questions are so tough to answer! The answer is going to be different for everyone. For me, it took about 3-4 weeks to phase out formula supplements, and supplement with breastmilk only. But I had a full-term if lip-tied baby, a hospital-grade pump, and no issues aside from those given by my daughter's poor latch.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 08:24 AM
    Agree totally that you and hubby and any caregivers need to learn about paced bottle feeding and giving smaller bottles and then giving a break before giving more by bottle since if baby is almost prone and a bottle is tipped up into them, they just swallow and can drain the bottle before they realize they are full and then the tummy being stretched out they may get used to really big meals which isn't necessarily good for breastfeeding and if baby is being overfed during the day it may be harder for mom to get baby to nurse at night which can really hurt mom's supply since pumping is always harder and less effective than a baby with a good latch. Sleeping through the night is also not always desirable for milk production, especially if mom doesn't have a huge storage capacity. Night nursing is good for supply and easier/more pleasurable than pumping.
    4 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:24 AM
    Ha ha! Bsua beat me to it! I personally think all women should have a test for thyroid function during the postpartum year. My guess is that this is normal- just give yourself a few months of having your cycle back!
    12 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:22 AM
    I won't say we've all been there, but what you're seeing is very common and a lot of us have shared this experience. It does get better! Can you tell us some more about nursing, for example, how does nursing feel? Does the baby often fall asleep while nursing?
    4 replies | 63 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:13 AM
    Are you in the US? I'm guessing not, because you used the term "infectionist" which is not commonly used here in the US, and because you paid just $15 for the Rotavirus shot. So I'm thinking that maybe the advice where you are is different from what I hear. Anyway, here's why I think the advice you were given was wrong: 1. Many nursing moms will tell you that their babies were not particularly interested in solids until over a year and yet did just fine. My kids barely ate anything until around 14-15 months, and yet grew and developed completely normally. If breastmilk "isn't enough", how did that happen? 2. This is the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/115/2/496.full. It's the 2005 version rather than the 2012 version; I personally think the 2005 version is better!!! The section that covers the introduction of solids recommends starting at 6 months, and says that solids should "complement" breastmilk in the baby's diet. "Complement" is very different from "replace"! 3. The advice you were given assumes that all women are eager to wean, and want to transition the baby onto solid foods as fast as possible. If a mom is happy to continue to nurse on demand, and is comfortable with nursing to a year or beyond, there's no reason to assume that she won't be nursing enough to meet her baby's needs. 4. The advice you were given assumes that solids are as nutritious, of...
    19 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 07:36 AM
    We use an open cup called a doidy and my DD loves spitting water out! No worries about it reducing her nursing here -she only manages to swallow small amounts :)
    9 replies | 752 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 07:13 AM
    Here are a couple of links on iron and breastfed babies: http://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron/ http://scienceofmom.com/2011/10/12/why-is-breast-milk-so-low-in-iron/ Info on baby led weaning: http://www.babyledweaning.com http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/baby-led-weaning.html
    19 replies | 115 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 06:16 AM
    Silly question as it's usually Mommal who asks this, but has your thyroid been checked? My thyroid gives me low libido and vaginal dryness and that was before DD! And Postpartum thyroiditis is common I think :s Of course it is probably all normal - this is more of a 'just in case'
    12 replies | 169 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 06:10 AM
    My DD wasn't using her tongue correctly post TT division, tongue walk and suck training along with some sacro cranial osteopathy helped :) After a couple of days of exercises and1 osteo appointment we managed to ditch nipple shields and she was feeding mostly correctly. So I agree withPP about finding some oral therapy!
    3 replies | 103 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:45 AM
    Yes, the pumping and feeding/supplementing/pumping is a hard treadmill for 4 months! I didn't have a premie and would never have been able to exclusively pump because I didn't respond well enough to the pump and the herbs were not that effective for me and my supply didn't come up enough to Exclusively breastfeed until I was on the Domperidone for several weeks. I've started to slowly wean down the dose but I'm still taking 7 tablets a day. DS is now 7 months.
    2 replies | 60 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 AM
    I agree with filmmommy. Additional question- is baby either bed-sharing or room-sharing at night, or is baby in a separate room where it might be more difficult to notice and react to any potential night-stirring/waking? This is something I really had no idea about before starting my own breastfeeding journey, but it is also totally okay to offer to nurse whenever YOU want, or whenever it seems like your body is indicating it would be helpful (through engorgement, for example). This can even be done with a baby who is sleeping ("dream-feed"). If pumping at night is a pain, you may consider a dream feed before going to bed yourself?
    4 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:33 AM
    Right, as baby learns to nurse properly (and baby needs to nurse more and depend on bottles less for that to happen) baby will become better at getting milk out of the breast and eventually baby will work better than the pump at extracting milk. Many mom's don't respond all that well to the pumps. Keep up the good work, sounds like a definite step in the right direction. Don't get too upset by some rough nursing sessions or even whole rough days, they happen even when things are "perfect". And yes, nibbly feeding sessions happen, ya know nursing is about far more than just food, sometimes baby just wants to comfort suck, or sometimes baby wants to play chomp, stretch,lick, slurp, rasberry and tweek nipples (I have a 7 month old now who is showing horrible signs of being a twiddler, even when he was small there were times he would start slurping the nipple in/out of his mouth or start doing the latch on/latch off.)
    10 replies | 213 view(s)
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