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  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Today, 02:13 PM
    Just wanted to pop by and update. Jess has had a reasonably sized bowel movement, with some harder and some looser stool, and seems much more comfortable since. Will give her a little more time before contacting her doctor. I feel that breastfeeding only really helped, but the poor little mite looked so forlorn whilst I ate my lunch today that I put out a (small) stewed P-fruit salad for her at dinner and she thoroughly enjoyed herself. Since the constipation began she had been showing little to no interest in solids, so her interest today after her dirty diaper was lovely to see. She must really have seen the look on my face when I caught a whiff of her bottom because she started laughing and clapping :D
    5 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Today, 02:03 PM
    I'm so glad you're feeling better about this. Pre-formula breastfeeding was how all babies were fed, but with the rise of formula breastfeeding has become taboo and unfortunately society makes women feel like they have to hide. Don't knock yourself down, feeding even in the car is a huge achievement. You put tourself on the situation where someone might see, but hey, you darn well fed the baby anyway. That's massive. Believe it or not, people usually can't tell you're feeding and may think you're just having a cuddle. And those that do know are usually those who have been there themselves. Occasionally a little old man will nod to himself thinking "That baby is getting the best." He may even say it. Your targets sound brilliant. There's nothing more frightening than holding a new baby and thinking "Just six months/ a year/ two years to go". If you're finding things tough it can make things easier to look only into the immediate future rather than a distant one as you've seen. Who knows, maybe you will make it through this tough time (and you sure seem like you're a strong enough person to do so), come to enjoy it, and perhaps even look back one day and MISS it. Now wouldn't that be something :) One other piece of advice you may find useful with regards to public feeding. If you can get to a sling library and try a few different carriers you may find one you can comfortably feed in. This is something I've had success with recently, I use an Ergobaby. I can feed...
    7 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Today, 01:13 PM
    Unfortunately I can't afford to buy a scale like that but there is a children centre nearby which has a digital baby scale for self-weighing. I wonder if it is the same sort of scale.
    10 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Today, 12:32 PM
    Well, I already had LO's tongue tie lasered by a pediatric dentist, who also recommended we laser the lip tie. It's only been one day and I haven't noticed a big difference yet - although once yesterday he got milk out of my right breast without my having to compress it. I feel somewhat guilty for having the procedures done because he seems to still be in a bit of pain and it wasn't an instant improvement in latch. (Nipples still come out lipstick shaped with a crease.) I'm getting treated for my PPD but it's making the situation incredibly difficult. I am completely obsessing over the idea that I've mutilated my child, and that I've unnecessarily messed with his upper lip and tongue. Perhaps the only good thing to come out of this so far is that my maternal instinct definitely kicked into high gear - I felt distant and detached from LO before and now I don't want to put him down for even a second, and I can't stop kissing him and talking to him. But I'm literally having nightmares that I've damaged his smile/mouth/tongue in some permanent way. I'm hoping that things improve in the next week or two and I won't feel such immense guilt for getting the ties removed. I mean, part of me is worried it's all BS and that the IBCLC and dentist are wrong. The upper lip tie is especially bothering me because my daughter has one and I've never had issues with her latch or later her teeth (no gap, no decay). I'm worried I made the wrong decision out of desperation :(
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    Hi. First I would suggest, try to help baby deal with fast slow using laid back or "uphill' positioning and by taking baby off when baby objects to extreme flow, letting milk flow into a cloth, then trying again. The longer milk sits in the breasts, the more milk builds up and the faster the flow will be. This makes block feeding tricky but you can help by encouraging baby to nurse frequency on the non-blocked side. Eating every 3-4 hours is pretty infrequent. Encouraging very frequent nursing is usually very helpful when there is OP and FFLD. With more frequent sessions, baby should be able to nurse comfortably until you need to switch her to the other side in order to change what breast is being "blocked." for that first feeding on the side that is very full, try hand expression or even a little pumping before putting baby on. When a mom has OP, baby is NOT going to "drain" her breast and is often not going to take more than one side at a time. This is entirely normal. You do not really want baby to drain the breast, as draining will act to increase milk production. As long as baby gets enough milk at the breast overall, nursing with normal to high frequency of a minimum of 10-12 times a day, then baby is getting what they need. The sooner you can eliminate bottles the better, as of course if baby is bottle fed that is more time before baby nurses again. And of course once baby is nursing often enough, you want to eliminate all pumping except what is absolutely...
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:29 AM
    OK tracking gain sounds like a good idea. Be very careful that the same scale is used as previous check(s) and that baby is naked or in a dry diaper. Watch to be sure scale is properly set up, and that math is checked and rechecked, especially if any conversions are done. If you have any doubt, request baby be weighed twice, maybe at the start and again at the end of the appt. in fact, I would suggest this as a matter of course. Make sure gain is measured from lowest known weight, (or previous check weight) and not birth weight. If baby had a big poop or large wet diaper right before weight check note that. I think that whenever there are breastfeeding issues severe enough that baby require supplements, it is vital both mom and baby see an IBCLC for a complete private consult. (With follow-up as needed) IBCLCs are the only professionals who are trained specifically to help mothers and babies with breastfeeding issues. Because they have to look at so many things- history, baby, mom, and a nursing session, and even examine the pump if mom is pumping and how baby is being supplemented if baby is being supplemented, these sessions take time. At LEAST 90 minutes in a case like this, typically. here is more info- http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html Watson Genna's might also be a good website to look at further. It sounds like baby may have sucking or swallowing issues and she literally wrote the book in that area. I would add you do not know if you need to make double...
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*niklas.sarah's Avatar
    Today, 10:16 AM
    The baby is 17 days old. Weight gain did not start until supplement started. She gets 1 ounce in the bottle which she does not always finish. I have seen lactation, but not 1 on 1. On the breast milk is there, we are using a shield because of her size, but she only sucks intermittently. Sometimes she will suck but not swallow and the milk simply drips out of her mouth. No I do not feel that I am making enough for the long term. My understanding is I should be making double in order to meet baby's needs as she gets older. I do use breast compression when we nurse and I do switch sides, but one side is slow with flow and let down so many times she will sleep as soon as she gets to that side. Tried using a syringe to Jumpstart nursing but most of the time she will drink that and then stop. We go back to the pedi tomorrow, so we will see how much progress we made on gaining.
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:11 AM
    Baraboo, we have had moms on here who report great success after tt and lip tie release. We have had moms who report little or no difference, at least temporarily, and once or twice over the last 4-5 years or so I have seen parents report a negative outcome- meaning, feeding issues got worse, at least temporarily. I will say that from everything I have read and heard from moms, when TT treatment is indicated because TT has been visualized by someone who knows what to look for and there is nursing pain or poor gain it certainly makes sense to seriously consider frenotomy. I have seen babies treated for tt who were gaining fine and mom was not in any pain, but baby was "gassy" or colicky or having green poops and in my observation, those are the cases where moms felt the frenotomy did little. I think the evidence suggests your baby is having a difficult time latching because it hurts and injures you to nurse. But "falling off" the breast and clucking are not conclusively tongue tie related. Fast letdown that usually accompanies overproduction can also cause these. Of course plugs might indicate baby is incapable of normal transfer OR they might mean mom just makes more milk than baby needs. (OP.) This continues to be an area that is not properly studied but that does not mean there is not plenty of evidence and information you can use. This is a good, recent article that sheds light on what is known and what is not known about tongue tie and how to help a mom and...
    2 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:55 AM
    Of course you do not want to exclusively pump. Hopefully this is a temporary solution to a temporary problem! I have a few suggestions. First I am sorry but I am not seeing an age. How old is baby and when were the weighted feeds done? Depending on the age of baby .5 ounce might be close to norm for transfer. For example, in the first week of life. What I have seen as an estimated quantity that indicates normal transfer is 2 ounces AFTER 2 weeks of age. So did gain begin to occur with only nursing at the breast? Or only after supplements were started? When you did the weighted feeds, was that with a board certified LC? If you have not had a consult with an IBCLC I strongly suggest doing so. If you did but do not feel all that helped by her, maybe see someone else? If a baby cannot transfer milk normally, there is a reason. What reason was diagnosed in your baby? Is it just that she is little and getting worn out, or some other issue? If it is primarily tiredness, sometimes giving baby a small shot of milk in a syringe before nursing kind of wakes baby up and gets baby nursing more efficiently. Have you tried using breast compressions and/or switching sides to help baby get more at the breast? Are you continuing to use an SNS? A lactation aid can reduce the total time it takes to feed a baby when nursing/supplementing and pumping is needed. Here is an article about that: http://cwgenna.com/smartnothard.html So you think you ARE making enough when pumping or not...
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:20 AM
    Awesome! Now, tell us what present you're going to buy for yourself when you reach your first milestone. I love Jessiesmum's idea of buying a nice pair of shoes or a handbag or some swanky jewelry! You will have earned it. :cheer
    7 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 08:16 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby and on making it through the first 8 weeks of nursing! The first thing to know about spit up and mucousy poop is that both are generally completely normal. The way you know of spit up and mucous indicate a problem is by looking at the baby. If the baby is generally happy, healthy, gaining weight at a normal pace, developing normally, and has no additional symptoms, spit up and mucous can be ignored. If, on the other hand, the baby is generally miserable, does not seem well, is not gaining and developing normally, and has more symptoms (like bloody poop, evidence of pain, eczema), then mucous and spit-up could be indicators that there is some sort of issue that needs to be addressed. Since you describe your baby as generally happy and nursing well, my guess is that she's just a baby with some weird poop. And weird poop is kind of par for the course with babies! I see absolutely no reason why you should switch to a hypoallergenic formula. Hypoallergenic formulas are for babies who are clearly sick. Not just fussy or spit-uppy or producing funny-looking poops. We're talking babies who are failing to thrive, babies with erosive eczema, babies who are not growing normally despite eating sufficient quantities of breastmilk or conventional formula. If you're wondering how that could be the case when hypoallergenic formulas are marketed right alongside conventional ones, just look at the price differential. ...
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*iveehill's Avatar
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*milkncookies90's Avatar
    Today, 05:46 AM
    Omg THANK YOU! You have no idea how much you have all helped. I was having a really bad day and couldn't see the light at the end of the tunnel but your kind, non-judgemental advice was exactly what I needed to hear and I already feel a lot more positive. One day at a time is how I am taking things at the moment, current goal is 6 weeks, then when I get there I will move the goal up :) I also fed her in public this morning (granted I was in the car but it's a step in the right direction) and it wasn't nearly as terrifying as I thought. And I have looked up my local BF group so will be going to that next week. Things are definitely looking up so thank you again :)
    7 replies | 194 view(s)
  • @llli*ellie.smom43's Avatar
    Today, 04:48 AM
    I need some help. My 8 week old daughter has been having mucus in her poop for the last 3-4 weeks. It started around the time that I was taking an antibiotic for a UTI I had started taking a probiotic at that time as well due to the antibiotic. I wanted to give it time for the antibiotic to leave my system to rule out that being the culprit and then I stopped taking the probiotic as well to see if that would make a difference in her poop. I thought the poop was getting better after I stopped the probiotics, but I just changed her diaper and it was a large amount of mucousy poop again! The only sign of something being wrong is the mucus in her poop and she spits up a lot after eating. She's not fussy, she's actually a very good baby and only rarely gets agitated and cries. She nurses really well, and she doesn't seem to have any stomach discomfort when passing gas or pooping. I guess my next step is to cut dairy out of my diet and see if that will make a difference.how long after cutting dairy out of my diet will I see some improvement in her poop? Any feedback is greatly appreciated. I planned to EBF until I go back to work at 5 months, but now I'm feeling so discouraged. I'm feeling like I'm doing more harm than good at this point and I'm being pressured by people to put her on a hypoallergenic formula.
    1 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:33 PM
    How old is your child and how many times in 24 hours does she nurse? How much does she eat in solids? How long were you hoping to nurse your child? The most reliable way to increase milk production is to increase the frequency that milk is removed from the breasts. I am not sure what you mean by a "strict schedule" but if you have had your child on a feeding or sleeping schedule that has limited the frequency that baby nursed, that is something that is likely to cause an "unnatural" or rapid drop in milk production. If course weaning is a process, and part of that process is the slow and gradual reduction of mom's milk production as the child gradually nurses less and less. So I am wondering if you are simply experiencing that. Of course if you are dehydrated, it is important that you rectify that. But there is no need to overly hydrate to produce milk. Diet is unlikely to affect milk production unless we are talking an extremely calorie-limited diet. Some moms find that eating foods or herbs with galactagogue properties helps give milk production a little boost.
    1 replies | 97 view(s)
  • @llli*angelpoo11's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:57 PM
    My DD is a preemie and I was pumping for her when she was in the NICU for a month and another 3 weeks at home so I can bottle feed her and add her fortifier. I used to bottle feed 50ml every 3 hours and nurse at night and between her bottles when she wants it. Now I want to exclusively breastfeed but all this pumping and nursing has caused a horrible horrible over supply. I had oversupply with my first who was EBF from the get go and block feeding worked well to calm it down. But this time, I am doing 3 hour blocks and my breasts are painfully engorged at 2 hours. DD eats every 3-4 hours. I try to hand express a little out but I start to feel pain again very soon after. I would pump about 50oz a day when she was in the nicu and my freezer is filled with frozen milk. I am donating most of it because there's no way my DD can drink it all. Because she was premature and small for her gestational age, she's 6weeks now but still only drinking 50ml when I bottle feed her. She was never able to drain my breast completely and she only takes one side per feed. I used to pump before her feed but. It's making the OS worst so I stopped. She's now miserable and choking and crying at the breast. And I'm miserable because I'm leaking everywhere and spraying and in pain. Any advice on how to fix a severe OS with a very small baby? (She's only 6 pounds)
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:28 PM
    Welcome to the forum! If baby is generally happy with 11 oz, I would probably try to send 11 oz per day, but give the daycare some extra frozen milk to put in their freezer in case of emergencies. Maybe a few 1-3 oz bottles that they can break out if needed- like if you get stuck in traffic while commuting, or if the baby has a day when she is going through a growth spurt and is ravenous. I would send the extra in frozen form so that it won't be too easy for the daycare workers to give extra milk. On average, breastfed babies take about 1.5 oz per hour of separation from mom, with some babies taking less (1-1.5 oz) and some taking more 1.5-2 oz). For an 8.5 hour separation, sticking to the 1.5 oz per hour standard means you'd want to leave 12.75 oz. it's fine if you're leaving 11, as long as the baby is happy. But don't be too shocked if the baby starts wanting more than you are currently providing. I know what you are doing entails a huge amount of work, so please pat yourself on the back for those hard-wom bottles of milk!
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:21 PM
    Welcome to the forum! Can you give us some more information about your situation? It would be helpful to know the following: - Is baby mostly nursing, mostly getting bottles but nursing sometimes, or is he only being fed via bottles? - How does nursing feel? - How do you know your baby needs 5 oz at a time? - How do you know you are only producing 1 oz at a time? - How often do you pump, what sort of pump are you using, and how does pumping feel? - What led you to supplement- that is, did you supplement due to low weight gain, due to the baby acting fussy after feedings, due to low pump output, or something else? - How has baby's weight gain been? -
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:17 PM
    Would you be open to getting a professional baby scale for home use? With one of those, you can do weigh-feed-weigh measurements to determine pretty much exactly how much baby takes at the breast, allowing you to know whether or not you need to supplement, and how much supplement you need to give. Doing frequent weighed feeds is time consuming, and is definitely not something that the average mom needs to be doing. But in special circumstances, like yours, I think a scale can be a very useful tool.
    10 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*boogabbalucky's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:00 PM
    How do you do it, if you do it? I have a Medela Freestyle and want to do this hands free if possible. I have two different hands free bustiers, but I don't think that they would facilitate a baby nursing on one side (I think the baby would end up with fabric in the face). I was thinking maybe I would cut holes in a sports bra, with one side being small for the pump and the other side being large for the baby to nurse from. I could do it with two sports bras to facilitate switching sides each day. My baby isn't born yet, but this is my fourth, so I'm not new to breastfeeding or pumping, but I haven't ever tried this. I would like to pump one side while nursing on the other side in the morning when I tend to be most full to help facilitate the pumped side letting down. I have a long history with the pump, and getting my body to let down with the pump takes time (and a lot of deep breathing and peaceful thoughts!). So, I thought I could save myself some time and pumping misery and do it all at once. I work out of the home full-time, so having a freezer stash when I go back to work is really important to me.
    0 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*niklas.sarah's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:29 PM
    So this is my 3rd child, and I breast fed the other two very successfully for over a year. My newest little one was born at 37 weeks due to iugr. In the hospital she was on a feeding tube for 24 hours and then I was allowed to nurse her using SNS. Once my milk came on I was allowed to nurse with the shield. She had lost 9 ounces by the time we were discharged and a total of 11 lost by our first dr appointment 2 days later. 2 days after that weight was steady and by that friday, she had gained an ounce. I have done 3 feed and weighs, and bott line is she only transfers about 1/2 an ounce per feeding. Therefore the pedi has asked us to give bottles and enhance with neosure to give it more calories. I am pumping 6 times a day and nursing 3 times or more overnight. On average I pump about 10 ounces a day maybe 11.5 if you count the nursing overnight. Bottom line is I do not want to be an exclusive pumper. I hate it to the very core of my being and right now I am making enough for her because she is only taking 1 to 1.5 ounces a feed. Not that I am lazy bUT I am having trouble feeling connected to my new little friend when all I can do is listen to her scream while I pump. I hate it! This is souch harder than nursing.
    3 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*kvaughn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:02 PM
    Does anybody have any recommendation on how to increase their breast milk production? My baby is 4 months old and takes about 5oz per feeding and I'm only making 1oz per feeding. I've had to substitute with formula for over a month while trying to increase my output with no luck. I've tried fenugreek supplements, lactation cookies, drinking tons of water, pumping to stimulate more production. Nothing seems to be helping.
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:45 PM
    The LC did not do before and after weight check. She tried a simple SNS with him (a syringe and tube) but he could not get anything as he could not suck, she said it might not work in our case. I suppose it depends on the system? I heard that they are time consuming and fiddly which put me off a bit. Baby is taking 30 ounces a day and I am pumping 20 ounces. I sometimes pump slightly less depending on our day. My night time pumping sessions are usually higher output than day time: 3.5 ounces or more, if I pump just after baby nurses then around 2 ounces. When he was ebf, he was feeding all the time. Because he was jaundiced as well as tongue tied, it was very difficult to keep him awake. He was falling asleep within minutes of feeding on breast. According to LC, he still has poor suction and is not well coordinated. Switching to bottles and pumping was a time management issue. I stuck to syringe and cup feeding as long as I could but couldn't cope in the end. I can try nursing and then pumping as much as I can. The only issue is that I would like to increase my supply and I will not be able to tell how much he is getting and how much to supplement. Also I have kind of lost hope that he would ever be able to transfer milk efficiently. He is now 13 weeks.
    10 replies | 254 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:18 PM
    Maddieb and Mommal thank you both for your input on this. I've been struggling with a massive fear of choking as far as BLW is concerned, involving full on panic attacks.. I have very little support with this as my family are no longer a part of my life and DH has a dislike of mess and is more concerned with actually getting food into her mouth to make sure she eats 'enough'. Two of the three small meals have been by spoonfeeding until very recently. Fingers of foods she was jamming in whole and didn't seem to figure out how to eject them with her tongue. I've started to find it easier to give her food to play with, particularly now she's getting a pincer grip and I can give her smaller pieces. When she has more liquid foods she now spoonfeeds herself which means she takes in less and the process is slower. I will be the first to admit this is likely the primary cause and am determined to conquer my fear for my daughter's sake. Vitamin drops have been part of her diet, though these don't contain iron. It was a vit D supplement, as she and I are both very fair and burn easily in warmer weather, not that we've seen much sun where we are in the last few months.
    5 replies | 140 view(s)
  • @llli*iveehill's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:43 PM
    I have been back to work now for 5 weeks. My baby is 18 weeks old and weighs 12lbs 11oz. She went to the pediatrician two days ago and is growing well along her growth curve. I am away from my baby for 8.5 hours a day. I have been providing 11 ounces of expressed milk. I have been pumping anywhere from 11 to 13 ounces each day. It is very difficult for me to pump. To get 11 to 13 ounces, I pump 4 times each work day and 1 time in the evening after the baby is asleep. My question is, should I give my baby everything I pump from the previous day (anywhere from 11 to 13 ounces) even though it will vary, or would it be better to provide a consistent 11 ounces each day. Any advice will be greatly appreciate. Thanks!
    2 replies | 88 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:21 AM
    I notice that when I don't compress my breasts while he nurses, he stops after the letdown and slips off, even if I press him to the breast. The other thing that happens is he drains a small portion of the breast and my clogs get worse - I tried not compressing for a day and by the end I had rock hard wedges on both sides and LO was acting less satisfied.
    5 replies | 221 view(s)
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