Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Clear All
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    Today, 11:39 AM
    Hi Maddie, thanks so much for this response! I did see an LLLL a month ago and am seeing an IBCLC today. Regarding social circles, I guess I mean more the people who haven't heard my story but would see me with the bottle. I can't say to everyone I meet, "Let me tell you about my tuberous breasts and mastitis!" you know? I'm trying not to stress about it. Regarding the mastitis, I've gotten it once with each of my kids and never taken antibiotics. I take the baby to bed for three days and that's that. What happened this time is I broke my ankle, and had a day or two where I didn't eat. The mastitis started a few days after that. It cleared after three days as usual but the inflammation continued and migrated around my breast as I said. I massaged whatever area was inflamed in order to promote blood flow. It did hurt when I was massaging, but I didn't think I was doing damage. Aside from the duration of the inflammation, nothing seemed unusual at the time. The more I think about it, the more I think it may be hormonal related to PCOS. I do feel that my estrogen level is back up. I'm going to try low-carbing it. I don't even know who I would go to to get a pharmaceutical galactagogue.
    2 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:19 AM
    Ok thanks! Please keep us updated.
    10 replies | 218 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:24 AM
    deja I can tell you are very frustrated. Here are my thoughts. Moms are warned about nipple confusion because it is a real thing- bottles interfere with breastfeeding for several reasons. And some of these reasons are not about bottles at all but about the fact of baby getting supplements in any form. However, I think these warnings are causing you to think that because your baby got bottles, and baby is not nursing, this means bottles ruined everything and now your baby will never nurse. I would suggest there is no reason to think this. A baby this young who will not nurse has not forgotten how. Nursing- or at least the impulse to try to nurse, is instinctual, and your baby's instincts would not be erased this quickly. When a baby this young is not latching, or having an extremely hard time latching, or latches but will not nurse normally, while bottles/supplementing may be playing a part, most of the time the fact is baby CANNOT latch and nurse normally for some (usually entirely fixable) reason. In other words it is not that baby won't but that baby can't. This is consistent with the problem you were having in the first place, right? Baby could not latch normally so you had to start supplementing.
    4 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    Today, 08:26 AM
    At this point if she latches once a day after much struggle, it's a good day. It seems as if she's completely forgotten how to latch. She did root and open her mouth (not wide enough but still) and do the usual "steps", but now she doesn't do that anymore. She just opens her mouth a little bit and expects the bottle or something similarly firm and long without much effort on her part. Despite the preemie teat, the paced feeding, smaller portions and everything we've been doing, seems the bottle has done a lot of harm. As for nursing, most of the time she'll scream and complete refuse to even try, but on those times she is willing to give it a go, she'll try once or twice to latch and when it doesn't work, that's it. And on those rare occasions she will try and perhaps even catch the nipple, it'll be a struggle -my nipples are soft and just slip out of her mouth, she'll manage to suck in the nipple itself and not much more. I let down quite easily the first round now, so she'll suck something out that way too. And I let her, despite the bad latch, since that's the best I can get ATM. I tried a nipple shield but she can't even latch onto that. She doesn't know how to, what to do, the shield is quite large/wide, the "flaps" keep bending outward under the pressure of my breasts (not sure how to explain that) and it's just not going well. Trying a lactation aid is pretty much pointless at this point since she'll hardly latch at all, let alone getting a tube in through...
    4 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:10 PM
    Hi jhart, I am so sorry you are having this concern. Why do us women tend to feel shame over things we have no control over? Your friends surely understand that your baby needs nourishment and you are a wonderful mom for making sure your baby is nourished in a difficult and emotional situation. If they are shaming you, then perhaps you need a wider social circle. I suspect that most if not all of them may feel frustrated and unhappy FOR you because they know you would prefer to exclusively nurse your child, but are hopefully not judging of you. I am not sure if you can ever know exactly what happened to your "good breast," however, I think you may be able to get some answers if you read the book Making More Milk (if you have not already) and also I would suggest consulting with a board certified lactation consultant, if possible one who specializes in or is very experienced in low milk production. If you have already done so and not gotten the help or info you seek maybe you can see another. But here are some thoughts. When a mom gets mastitis, many times it indicates something was already not going quite right on the milk removal front. In other words the mastitis may not have been the origin of the problem that eventually caused low milk production, but instead a symptom of that problem. Mastitis itself is "just" an infection (albeit one that makes you feel like you have been hit by a truck) and is not likely to permanently damage a breast, anymore than a...
    2 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:43 PM
    Oh I am sorry. I understood what you meant. Yes English is not my first language. But you are very clear. Thanks for your concern.
    10 replies | 218 view(s)
  • @llli*jhart's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:36 PM
    Hi, I am a SAHM and have EBFed three children. I have tuberous breasts and PCOS, although I am of normal weight. One breast produces very little milk but the other one is a decent producer. Two months ago I got mastitis and breast inflammation in the good breast that lasted about two weeks. I EBFed through it and for two weeks after it had cleared up. At that point, my supply still hadn't come back (as indicated by diapers, no let-down, no leaking, unhappy baby). I weighed my son and he was down a pound. A three-month old shouldn't be losing weight, so I started pumping and supplementing with formula. I've been pumping 4-6 times a day with a Medela Symphony (in addition to nursing) and supplementing for about six weeks now and the supply in my good breast is still down. It is producing no more than the bad one and together it's not enough. I'm producing about 0.6 oz per hour. With my first child, when I pumped after three hours, I would get 1 oz out of the bad breast and 3 oz out of the good one. Now I'm getting 1 oz out of each. I'm taking the galactalogues that have worked for me in the past but no galactologue is going to double my production. I'm wondering what happened to my good breast. Was it damaged by the mastitis? Did clogged ducts cause pressure involution in some parts of it? Will my supply ever come back? Will it come back with another child? I remember the inflammation migrated around my breast. As soon as one area of tenderness cleared up, another...
    2 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:29 PM
    I think it is very smart to be prepared and I am happy to answer your questions, but I fear there may be a language barrier or something at work here because I keep getting the feeling my words are being misunderstood. I would never say be sure to not pump. If you need to pump you should, and even if you really want to pump, it is usually fine to do so. It is just not needed if all is going normally. If English is not your first language, the Womanly Art of Breastfeeding is published in many languages, and you may be able to find a Leader or LC who speaks a language you are more comfortable with. If the problem is that I am not being clear, I am sorry for that. I know I tend to write overly long and probably more detailed than needed explanations!
    10 replies | 218 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:06 PM
    Thanks a lot for your responses. I will make sure I don't pump and feed the baby on cue. Once the baby is born I will know about the surgery. I am just being prepared. Thank you
    10 replies | 218 view(s)
No More Results