Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies

Activity Stream

Filter
Sort By Time Show
Recent Recent Popular Popular Anytime Anytime Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 30 Days Last 30 Days All All Photos Photos Forum Forums
Filter by: Clear All
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:52 AM
    Well that is of course fine if that is the way you want to do it. Personally that sounds like a lot of extra work to me. I would suggest, from a milk production protection standpoint, be sure your pump is in excellent condition and fits you correctly. Few pumps are going to be as good at milk removal as a healthy 9 month old and milk production depends on regular and effective milk removal.
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*bkindnhappy's Avatar
    Today, 10:48 AM
    Thank you! I started pumping after his feedings and I give him that after he is finished eating. He loves drinking from a cup so it helps to practice and also get some extra milk. Not much since I pump for less than 5 minutes.
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*baraboo's Avatar
    Today, 09:45 AM
    I posted a few days ago about my breastfeeding problems (clogged ducts, pain, having to compress my breast while LO nurses or he doesn't get milk out). Breastfeeding the first week was insanely painful and my nipples were developing fissures at the base. LO had an obvious anterior tongue tie which was snipped by an ENT. The ENT doc said she wasn't sure what posterior tongue ties were and she doubted their existence. Right away you could see his tongue had greater mobility after the snip, and my nipples were no longer being torn to shreds when he nursed. However, I could tell there was still a problem: he falls off the breast, makes clucking sounds, my breasts still don't drain unless I'm massaging the crap out of them during nursing, and my nipples still come out looking lipstick-shaped. My nipples used to be flat but my daughter gradually everted them, and I remember the nipples looking elongated (but NOT pinched) when she unlatched. I don't feel that LO is drawing my nipples deep enough into his mouth - they come out looking short and pinched. You can still see and feel a frenulum at the base of the tongue, and LO appears to have an upper lip tie as well (he can't flange his lips while on the breast). I saw an IBCLC yesterday who confirmed his tongue and lip ties and recommended a pediatric dentist nearby who does releases with a laser. She said LO was clamping down on my breast and moving his jaw a lot while nursing which also indicates that his tongue's movement is...
    0 replies | 10 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Today, 05:43 AM
    Thank you for your support. Baby is 13 weeks now and he nurses sometimes (midnight and before he goes to bed) but he does not get much milk because I can express 20 or 40 ml (depending on time of day) after he nurses from both breasts combined. He seems still very hungry after nursing. During the day when he is very hungry, he gets frustrated with breast. Midnight is a bit better as I have more milk. Also, the amount I can express per session during day is 50 ml (sometimes 40, sometimes 60 ml). This is every two hours or so. He takes around 10 ounces of Formula a day which was less than that when we started but it went up. I would be very happy to breastfeed him and give him top ups 2-3 times a day but my pumping output per session shows that breasfeeding during day will provide so little to fill his tummy? Making more milk is a great book. I need to re-read it :) Should I be nursing more often even hough he can't get much?
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*american.honey's Avatar
    Today, 12:02 AM
    My baby girl and I, have been going strong with nursing since day 1. However, my situation has changed at home and I can't always nurse the same hours. I try to keep her on her schedule,but sometimes she does miss certain feedings now. Or, she won't ask or want her milky. However, her bedtime feeding is a must and nap time feeding. I've noticed she will tell me now, mama there's no more milky, and when I try to push milk out nine comes out or just a droplet. I'm very worried that my milk is dwindling and come to a stop. As soon as she latches on she will get her papa, and stay on 5-20 minutes depending on her mood. But sometimes she latches on and she will be on 2-3 minutes and she will say her milky is no more. ☹️ How do I increase my milk once again. Before, I was on a very strict diet and since about a year and half I became more lax. I'm eating stuff I completely did not since my baby girl was born. I've been eating a lot more sugar, which I know is bad and needs to stop like yesterday. I've been very stressed and overwhelmed with the new changes at home. My body has gone through a huge transition, I know this has played a huge part in here milky and I feel so guilty. I was always very strict and on schedule with her feedings always;Especially at night. I always made sure she nursed at 2am, because prolactin is at the highest for milk production. Needles to say, she does not nurse at night anymore; would this be another red flag? Should I be waking her up for that...
    0 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:53 PM
    Hope you don't mind me following this thread. I'm having same issue with my 8.5 month old and I'm at a loss :(
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:21 PM
    How old is baby, and is baby nursing at all at this point, and how many ounces per day does baby get in bottles? I look at your story and I think perhaps you were undermined. This sounds more like a story of unnecessary supplementation or over supplementation, rather than only a story of tongue tie. I think tongue tie may be involved, but I wonder if there is more to this. Unneeded supplementation or over supplementation reduces milk production, this has been known for decades. Also babies do not need more and more milk to gain normally. If you made enough milk at 5 weeks for baby to gain normally, that same amount should still be enough for baby to gain normally at 5 months. It is possible your milk production decreased after 6 weeks for some reason, and maybe that was related to the tongue tie, but that is different than saying your production could not "keep up." If you have not read the book Making More Milk, I strongly suggest reading it. It will help you with more than only ideas for increasing milk production. It may help you find some answers about what is going on or what happened. Sometimes what a mom needs is answers even if those answers do not really help improve the situations. This article is specifically about tongue tie and may help: http://pathwaystofamilywellness.org/pdf/Informed-Choice/modern-myths-about-tongue-tie.pdf
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:58 PM
    The typical suggestion with solid introduction is to nurse immediately before "solids" are offered. Of course in practice this is not always possible, but it is something to shoot for as much as possible. I found with my third child that there was almost never time to nurse right before meals. So I offered right AFTER meals, and did not give her any water (or other liquid) with meals. She would nurse because she was thirsty after eating. So maybe you can try offering to nurse both right before and right after baby eats solids? Since you are doing baby led solids, I do not think the possibility of overfeeding with solids leading to baby not getting enough breastmilk is as much of a concern as when a baby is being spoon fed purees. So I am not sure withholding solids is necessary. On the other hand, there is no rule that 9 month olds should be offered solids a minimum of 3 times a day. In other words offering solids less often is probably fine, although when a baby is a slow gainer it is a trickier call. I know you got some great suggestions on your other thread, I would also suggest the book My Child Won't Eat as an excellent source of info for parents who have a child that may be gaining 'slowly."
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*bkindnhappy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:23 PM
    I started blw at almost 7 months with my baby. He just played with his food for about a month before really starting to swallow some. Now at 9 months he eats almost everything I give him. The concern I am having is that he is starting to eat more quantities. I breastfeed 45 to 1 hour after breastfeeding. Today I change that time frame to 20 min after breastfeeding hoping he would eat less but it did not happen. Since he is a slow weight gainer I am concerned he will drop breastfeedings because he is eating more solids. Should I cut them down? Feed him only what I think is a good amount? He eats solids 3 times a day and nurses 8+ times.
    3 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*bkindnhappy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:15 PM
    Thank you.
    10 replies | 216 view(s)
  • @llli*crocusb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:03 PM
    The LC disagreed with the specialist dentist on that and clipped it. The tongue tie (according to LC) was a tick one and it definetely restricted the movement. We treated the tongue tie then. Now it is reformed, LC adviced that the tongue with reformed tie is not as bad as it was before. She was reluctant to resnip because the muscles in the neck are too tight and if she did resnip it might reform again. Therefore we are waiting to see an osteopath that specialises in tongue tie and babies. Regarding weight gain, we started ok, baby gained birth weight by day 7. Then continued gaining 1 ounce a day. He had breasfeeding jaundice as well so he was VERY sleepy upto about 2 months old when I started topping up with formula, following the advice of the GP and midwife. They kept telling me they would have liked him to put on more weight. Maybe I could not keep up with the increased demand as he got older although looking at the growth chart, he steadily gained weight, 1 ounce a day. He was on the 2nd percentile and has always been until recently- now he is 9th.
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:09 PM
    Hmm, I think I would want to have some more specialists take a look at that tongue tie. Maybe this is the sort of tie that does not benefit from being snipped- the fact that you do not feel pain when the baby nurses suggests that it is not the worst type of tie- but maybe it's not! Again, I don't see how anyone could know that for certain without actually clipping the tie. :scratch Being flat-chested has nothing to do with the amount of glandular tissue you have. Big breasts are not more full of glands. They are more full of fat! That is what most breast tissue is: fat. Also, the fact that your baby gained normally for the first 6 weeks indicates that you do have the capacity to make enough milk. If you had insufficient glandular tissue, poor gain would have been evident right from the start. How is your blood pressure now? Are you taking any medication for it?
    6 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:58 PM
    Vitamins won't hurt and might help. I would ask the pediatrician for a recommendation for baby vitamins- I just used the most widely available brand, the name of which I can't even remember. What I do remember is that the vitamins tend to stain, so give them to the baby in the bath!
    10 replies | 216 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:56 PM
    I think you're on the right track with taking the solids away, or at least really limiting them, for a while. A baby who is nursing on cue and with a good frequency can get her nutritional needs met at the breast, so taking solids off the table or limiting the amount she consumes will not harm her as long as you eventually let her have them again. In addition to what you are already planning to do, I suggest doing the following: - Nursing as much as possible. Breastmilk has a mild laxative effect. - Adding some ground flax seed to her solids, as that often allows an easier, softer bowel movement. - Giving her a probiotic (can't hurt, might help). - If you are thinking of introducing potty training soon, don't. Constipation often worsens around the time babies start using the potty. - Keeping a "poop journal", as after several days of no poop it can become very hard to remember when your baby last pooped, and what the consistency was when she did go. If you do need to see a pediatrician about this, a poop journal can help you figure out if the baby is really constipated and if constipation is becoming a chronic problem. - Remember that treating constipation can be a long-term project! The classic mistake parents make WRT chronic constipation is trying to keep the course of treatment as short as possible, and to use the minimum amount of stool softener necessary to produce a bowel movement. That approach tends to perpetuate the problem. If you do end up...
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:52 PM
    I think this is fine to be in this forum, and you are more likely to get more responses here. My oldest had constipation after starting solids. I do think it makes sense to back off solids for several days and see if that helps. A 9 month old who is nursing 8 times a day and gaining fine should do fine with absolutely no solids at all for several days. Not saying you must go that extreme, just saying, it is probably fine to do so. Because you have already eliminated all the typical problem areas as far as what solids, Another option is to consider HOW solids are given. If baby is primarily spoon fed, you might try reverting to a more "baby led" approach. It may be that the fun of being spoon fed is leading to baby eating more solids ounce per ounce then her system can handle easily. If everything is in a form that she can pick up herself, bring to her mouth, bite and chew, it might slow down meals, and she can learn to eat without the consequences of constipation. Is baby on vitamin drops, particularly Iron? that can cause constipation as well.
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:42 PM
    When it comes to building your stockpile, once again you have plenty of options! Good position to be in, right? Anyway, you could start by doing a single a.m. pump session, and see what you get. You could pump just one side or pump both. You could pump every day or every other day or every couple of days, depending on how much milk you get and how much your oversupply seems to be affected by the pumping. A conservative approach would be to pump one breast and to space out the morning pump sessions by a day or two. Alternately, you could choose to pump later in the day, when oversupply is less of an issue for you. In fact, pumping a single breast right after baby goes to bed might be the most conservative approach to pumping, since most moms find that milk supply is lowest in the evening. I doubt pumping in the evening would cause engirgement, and if it did, it would be relatively easy to treat it by waking the baby to nurse. Is the baby sleeping through the night? If so, waking him to nurse a few times overnight might really help with oversupply issues, because the breast would not get quite so full by morning. I personally would pump the unused breast, but not empty it all the way. I would try to stop after 2-3 oz. Leaving a fair amount of milk in the breast in between nursing/pumping sessions will eventually signal your body to throttle back on production.
    3 replies | 79 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    Get out of the house. This may be your biggest problem. Of course you feel like clawing your eyes out if you are imprisoning yourself in your own home. If you are not comfortable nursing in public, start with baby steps by going to places where there are nursing rooms or nursing nooks in the ladies room, and also go to LLL meetings and other breastfeeding supportive groups. You can bring your older child to these, usually. Certainly your 2 year old will be very welcome at LLL meetings. Practice in front of the mirror. Whatever. Now lots of moms find it hard to go out the first month or two. That is fine. But If you can not bring yourself to nurse in public very soon, you are going to go nuts! Most of the time, no one notices a nursing mom in public nor are they interested. There are plenty of very pretty nursing bras. If you do not want to spend that money or cannot afford them, start a pin fund for a fling at Victoria's Secret when you are able to wear regular bras again (and many moms are able to wear ordinary bras when nursing, just not usually in the early months.) Leaking is usually a temporary issue. As mommal says if you have op that is gping to make it worse, we can help with that. Even if you stop nursing baby tomorrow, you are still going to lactate for a while and consequently leak. Mommal gave some good tips for nights. During the day I brought a change of shirt and bra in my diaper bag, small leaks are camouflaged by a shirt with a pretty pattern....
    4 replies | 149 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:31 PM
    Hi all. My 9 month old is suffering with constipation at the moment and I'm at a loss as to what else to try, and unfortunately in my experience here in the UK, health professionals aren't always as knowledgeable when it comes to breastfeeding as I would like. I'm hoping that I might get some ideas here that I haven't considered. She has three small meals each day, well balanced with plenty of fibre. She nurses a minimum of 8 times per day including overnight, and is having plenty of good wet diapers. Weight gain is fine. She is not dehydrated and apart from being grumpy and uncomfortable when she can't/doesn’t go to the loo is generally well within herself. The longest between bowel movements has been 4.5 days, with the movements prior to constipation being a lovely consistency, but movements following these periods are definitely indicative of constipation, with stools being hard to pass and fairly solid in consistency when she does pass them. I'm giving her plenty of P-fruits, no BRAT foods, water with meals. Warm baths, tummy massage, lots of diaper free time, leg exercises, she crawls alot and stands if aided, I babywear. So far neither dietry changes or gravity are doing much good. If she does pass anything I give her lots of praise.
    3 replies | 90 view(s)
  • @llli*jessiesmum's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:48 PM
    I was pretty much in the same boat as you this early on; no support from family or friends, my husband slept whilst I was awake most of the night, abundant supply and lots of leakages, no public feeding, and yes I considered bottlefeeding too. PPs are bang on the money. This is the hardest time, you feel like it will never end. But it does. Bottlefeeding will by no means be easier. Imagine washing bottles, sterilising, heating water, mixing formula, and waiting for the bottle to cool to the right temperature at 3am with a screaming baby. But as Mommal has said, if you want to quit that much, if this is the end if breastfeeding for you that's fine. You've done an amazing 5 weeks. On the other hand, you've already done an amazing 5 weeks. If you think you want to carry on, arm yourself with as much knowledge and support as you can.
    4 replies | 149 view(s)
No More Results