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  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Today, 02:12 PM
    Thanks for your reply! Do you think in our case with my baby's weight numbers it would indicate fast let down/oversupply. I'm concerned with the clicking/clucking part.
    6 replies | 318 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Today, 02:01 PM
    I was going to say pregnancy, but you already thought of that. Could it be that you need more water or food? I find that I notice my hunger more when I sit down to nurse so any low blood sugar symptoms become apparent then. Another thought is stress or anxiety. Again, it may be that sitting down to nurse is the only time you pay attention to yourself and how you are feeling.
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*mehouseholder2's Avatar
    Today, 01:47 PM
    Hello! Last week, I had an amazing week of pumping, was getting 17+ oz a day pumping which is about what my baby boy eats at daycare. He sometimes eats up to 20, but not more than that. Since pumping this week (on day 2 of pumping) I'm barely producing. What was about 4-5oz per pumping is now only 3 ounces. He is 3 months old... The only thing different in my routine that I could figure was starting a birth control (Nuva Ring). Called the OB and he said to go off of it right away-that might be the reason for the drop in supply. Any thoughts for conserving breast milk at daycare? Or being able to pump more? I've been pumping every 2 hours...and I'm taking fenugreek, lactation cookies (with brewers yeast, almond, and fennel). I'm also drinking coconut water and carrot juice to try and jumpstart my supply again. When I'm at home, nursing in the evenings it appears that he is completely satisfied. I just would prefer not to have the stress of pumping enough for him to have a daycare the next day.
    5 replies | 232 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:40 PM
    Welcome to the forum! It's impossible to say how much milk your nursing toddler will get from you if/when you become pregnant. Some mom/baby pairs nurse without issue throughout pregnancy, and the older child continues to receive plenty of milk. But most moms lose some supply during pregnancy, and others lose it all. Many babies self-wean during pregnancy due to decreased supply, or taste changes, or simply loss of interest as they enter the toddler years. If you are one of those moms who loses a lot of supply or all supply during pregnancy, the you will have to fill that gap in your toddler's diet somehow. Whole animal milk (cow or goat) is often the easiest way to do this, but you can also give your child whole milk yogurt and cheese, or a careful selection of non-dairy foods that meet his fat and calcium requirements. I wouldn't worry too much! If you are committed to nursing through pregnancy, most likely that will happen and it won't matter how much milk is there. Many toddlers are totally happy to nurse for comfort alone. And if weaning is part of pregnancy for you, then I would just trust nature; she has a funny way of changing our minds during pregnancy, and allowing us to wean without regret.
    1 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 01:30 PM
    In order to compute growth, you need to get the baby weighed. Proper weighing procedure is for the baby to be weighed in the nude, using the same scale every time. A bathroom scale is not the right scale for this purpose, because bathroom scales are not reliable enough and because will likely give you a very different result from the doctor's scale. Just for example, my home scale is 5 lbs off from the one at the doctor's office. Other good indicators of growth are things like baby outgrowing her outfits and diapers. From 0-4 months, babies gain an average of 5-7 oz per week. Some babies will gain significantly more than average. My second child is a good example: she gained close to a pound per week for the first couple of months. You can expect weight gain to vary from week to week, with baby gaining faster or slower than average during some weeks. Having a baby who gains faster than average during early infancy does not mean that you will end up with a fat kid. Weight gain slows down as time goes on, and the baby becomes increasingly mobile. Most chubby babies start to "lean out" around 4-6 months.
    6 replies | 318 view(s)
  • @llli*maizerae's Avatar
    Today, 01:16 PM
    My husband and I want to start trying for our second when our first is 15+ months. I'm experiencing mixed emotions about my excitement of having another baby and me losing my milk. I'm also confused if my son will receive any milk from me and if I will have to replace my breastmilk with cows milk. At 13 months, he isn't a huge eater and nurses like a newborn and I'm scared to take away his main source of nutrition. I'm just really emotional thinking about how our relationship will evolve and mourning the relationship that we will change once I become pregnant. I'd really appreciate any advise and experience!
    1 replies | 24 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Today, 10:31 AM
    Poop is better, but was wondering how you compute growth and if Babe is gaining at the right amount. Still wondering if I have oversupply/fast let down issues since she started a habit of "clicking/clucking" throughout the length of the feed at almost every feed. It doesn't hurt. This habit started last week. Doctor said she doesn't see any thrush on baby's mouth. Babe just had a doctors appt. yesterday and they weighed her and she is at 12 lbs 12 oz. Again, at birth she was 7 lb 13 oz. on 12/29/15. She's 6 weeks this Friday.
    6 replies | 318 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:04 AM
    :ita Here is something for dad: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf Un-needed supplements, even of moms own milk, harm breastfeeding in numerous ways. A baby only needs a milk in a bottle (or cup or whatever) if they are separated from mom for several hours or cannot gain normally without them. If your baby really needs supplements to gain normally, that is not normal and it is important to have breastfeeding assessed right away to find out why that is.
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*kevins-mom's Avatar
    Today, 10:01 AM
    OK thanks! I'll probably end up pumping into bags. Yesterday this seemed like so much of a bigger deal than it will actually be! LOL
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:58 AM
    I got it. It is hard to move out of the comfort zone- I nursed my oldest child in the football hold for at least 4-5 months and took a nursing pillow to the mall. etc. because I was convinced I needed to! Maybe I did not, but that is what worked for me at the time! It is very early weeks. Do what works best for you. If the breast sandwich helped, it may be baby really does need this help right now to latch well enough to maintain a deep latch while nursing. The good news about OP/fast letdown is it is something that lessens over time, typically on its own. I had op with all my kids. Nursing very frequently helped the most, followed by laidback, but exactly how you "do" laid back will vary depending on what works best for you and your baby. When you are ready, Play around with it. If it has been a while since you nursed and you are very full, that might be making it harder for baby to latch. Reverse Pressure Softening may help in that case. Clicking is a sign of fast flow but also a sign of tongue tie. If all is going well there may be no need for treatment, but just putting it out there. My middle child clicked like crazy but gained great and nursing felt fine so I chalked it up to fast letdown. So I am not at all saying this is definitely tongue tie.
    3 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:07 AM
    :ita with Dormir41. Totally normal for a baby to want to nurse again very soon after she last nursed. It's great that you are watching your baby for signs that she is done eating. Just keep in mind that sometimes what mom read as the baby being "done" is actually the baby taking a little break. Like someone who pushes their dinner plate away, and 5 minutes later realizes that they do, in fact, have room for dessert. :) Instead of allowing your husband to step in with the bottle, how about just putting her back to the breast? And is there any particular need for you to be using bottles at this point? What I mean is, can you spend some time just nursing, no bottles, no pumping? That is often the best way to eliminate bottle issues from your nursing relationship. You can always reintroduce a bottle at a later date!
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 09:00 AM
    I'm sorry your encounter with HR was so negative! If the HR lady is any good at her job, though, she isn't going around telling everyone that you are disgusting. I mean, when you work in HR you are being paid to work with people's very personal issues. Not just the mom who has to pump, but the guy who has to take breaks to check his blood sugar and inject insulin, and the lady who needs to empty her ostomy bag, and the person who needs to take time off to see their psychiatrist, and the person who is being sexually harassed by a co-worker, and the person who is doing the sexual harassing. If you work in HR and you can't handle these sorts of private issues with sensitivity and discretion even when you are disgusted by them, you are no good at your job. Hopefully the lady was simply surprised, and didn't know how to go about answering your questions. And I hope you can take some pride in the fact that you raised the issue- the next mom who comes in with a question about pumping may not get the same look of shock, simply because the HR rep will have heard the question before.
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*michl's Avatar
    Today, 08:53 AM
    Hi everyone, just wondering if anyone has experienced this. In the last week or so my 15 month old is feeding I've started feeling quite nauseous and occasionally getting a slight headache...up until now I've never experienced this. I did two pregnancy tests, just in case (!) but both were negative. Any suggestions as to why this might be the case? Many thanks :)
    1 replies | 38 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Today, 07:51 AM
    When my husband said things like that I wanted to throw things at him. Happily, I didn't, and we both survived the newborn stage. Here's what I think (and others will chime in with more info I'm sure): 1. Newborns are almost always hungry. They have tiny stomachs and have to double their weight by 6 months. So, they eat. All. The. Time. It sounds like baby could be cluster feeding. Unless there are weight or other concerns, and others can help you problem solve if there are, you can give her everything she needs at the breast. 2. It is easy to overfeed baby at the bottle vs. the breast, and baby downing a bottle of breastmilk after a nursing session could mean baby is hungry, but it also could mean something else, including that baby is being fed the bottle in a non breastfeeding way. Paced feeding can help with this. If you are a reader, kellymom has great articles on frequent nursing and the newborn stage: http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/frequent-nursing/ and http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/newborn-nursing/ Hang in there. The newborn stage is tough!
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*podutti's Avatar
    Today, 06:20 AM
    So the meeting with HR was a disaster. The initial response from the lady I met with was a look of both shock and disgust! Afterwards she kept glancing at my breasts, maybe afraid milk would start squirting at her, I don't know what she was thinking. I felt very uncomfortable. She said that she has no idea as she has never heard of such a thing. She said all the women she knows who took maternity leave never asked this question and never, to her knowledge I presume, pumped milk. She agreed, only at my insistence, to try and find out some information. This is a very large organisation so I am sure this issue has come up before. I don't actually expect to hear from her again. She is probably at this moment telling my future work colleagues how disgusting I am!
    6 replies | 148 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 04:08 AM
    It almost depends on how soon you use it. If you(new mom) are planning to use it with in a day its better to use refrigerating. Keep in mind that fresh milk is best. If you have stored milk at room temperature and are going to miss a breastfeeding session with your baby, give the milk stored at room temperature first. If you are planning to use your milk within 8 days, you can keep it in the fridge. Orelse plan to freeze it in the coldest part of the freezer. Every new mom has to keep in mind that you need to avoid storing your milk in the door. Check this here about how to store breast milk http://www.momjunction.com/articles/store-use-breast-milk-baby_0022563/
    8 replies | 2767 view(s)
  • @llli*deenamathew's Avatar
    Today, 03:52 AM
    There are many things that can do to increase your breast-milk supply but the best thing is to be sure that baby is sucking at the breast often. . Eat a healthy anti-inflammatory diet . Aim for about 2,500 calories per day.
 Need to have plenty of water. Check this about how to increase the breast milk http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/ss/slideshow-increase-milk-supply
    5 replies | 886 view(s)
  • @llli*jrm1204's Avatar
    Today, 01:38 AM
    My LO is 5 weeks old. I am breastfeeding exclusively. She will feed anywhere from 10-30 minutes. I always let her tell me when she is done. Lately, she will unlatch and 15 minutes later she will cry and act like she is hungry. My husband will give her a bottle of breastmilk and she will down it like I never fed her! My husband keeps telling me I must not be giving her as much as I think when she breastfeed a. It's very frustrating!!
    3 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:50 PM
    I agree about the spectra. Take the pump that you know works, PLUS maybe have a back up plan like hand expression or a cheap manual pump just in case. My only thought about the flask is that it is not something one would typically transport breastmilk in and that might cause issues at security. IIRC, personal water bottles are not allowed past security (unless they are empty.)
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*cspencer86's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 PM
    Thank you Maddie - this has been suggested before and makes perfect sense. If I haven't fed for a while LO jerks his head away and milk fires out halfway across the room. So I think I have a pretty powerful letdown! However even if I feed him twice in an hour he does this. I think maybe it started with overactive letdown and now it's just become sloppiness/habit...I had some success just now with maintaining a very firm boob sandwich about an inch from areola throughout the feed - he was still clicking and taking in air but had no choice other than maintaining the latch! Not exactly comfortable but an improvement though he didn't stay on long. I need to be more proactive with adopting leaning back positions. Because the first couple of weeks were so traumatic I've got cross-cradle and football hold that I'm comfortable with and any deviation from that seems really scary. Also nees to have some pillows ready to stick under my knees! I'll persevere and will update this with any progress.
    3 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:46 PM
    Some questions for you: - Any changes in the skin of the nipple or areola? For example, skin appearing red, flaky, dry, shiny, or cracked? - Have you or baby had a recent course of antibiotics? - Have you or baby had a recent yeast infection- this would be a vaginal yeast infection for mom, diaper area yeast infection or oral thrush for the baby. - After nursing, do you ever see the tips of your nipples blanch (turn white), or perhaps blanch and then turn purplish-blue before returning to a normal color?
    2 replies | 99 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:40 PM
    So glad to hear that things worked out to everyone's satisfaction! That is a great end to the story. Or maybe a beginning, since your LO is still nursing his stuffies?!
    4 replies | 877 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    I can't offer any insight on the flask idea, but it seems to me that it would be a good idea to take your spectra on the trip. If you don't generally use a handheld pump, you don't know if it will work for you. Wouldn't it stink to be on the trip and suddenly discover that you can't get much milk with the handheld pump? Or to end up engorged and in discomfort because the handheld won't do the job?
    3 replies | 84 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:34 PM
    Since the 11 and 13 week weights were done on different scales, you can't compare them. Proper weigh-in procedure calls for a baby to always be weighed on the same scale, and that scale should be a high-quality scale at the doctor's office. Home scales are too often poorly calibrated, or are simply off from the scale at the doctor's office- which explains why I am 5 lbs lighter at home than I am at my gyn's office and 10 lbs lighter than I am on the one at the GP's office. :lol If you're worried about your baby's weight, I would do the following: - Stop by the doctor's office and have the baby weighed on the usual scale. Just keep in mind that there is a very good reason that we usually weigh babies only every couple of months, and that is that when you zoom in too close on weight, you can get thrown by normal fluctuations and miss the over-all trend. Growth isn't always smooth or constant, the way the charts make it appear. Some weeks the baby may gain a lot of weight while pausing in height, or grow taller but not put on much weight. - Nurse the baby more often, or at least offer the breast more often. 8 nursing sessions per day is on the lower end for a 3 month old. More nursing = more calories. - Try adding in a "dream feed" during that long sleep stretch. I know, everyone says that you should "let a sleeping baby sleep"! But long sleep stretches can be a missed opportunity for baby to take in more calories.
    1 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:18 PM
    Welcome! To my knowledge, there is no truth to the doctor's assertion that healing takes longer when you are breastfeeding. The statement about menopause is also a little bit dodgy. When you are breastfeeding, you are likely to experience temporarily lower estrogen levels than when you are not breastfeeding, and that can cause some things that are similar to menopause. You may not ovulate or menstruate for a while (anywhere from a few weeks to a couple of years is normal), and lower estrogen may cause some dryness and more fragile skin in the vaginal area. The only way I can make sense of the doctor's statement about healing is if you had surgery in your genital area, in which case lower estrogen related to breastfeeding could hypothetically cause slower healing, due to the skin being more fragile and thin.
    1 replies | 74 view(s)
  • @llli*ashkar's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:21 PM
    Hi My son was 8lbs 12oz when he was born. at 6 weeks- 11lbs 11 weeks- 12lbs 9oz at 13 weeks- 12lbs 11-14oz. He is ebf. The 6 weeks n 11 weeks weight are at dr's office and the 13 weeks is at my home. He feeds close to 8 times during the day. He has started to sttn for the past 3 weeks from 8:30pm to 3am. feeds again at 3am and then at 6am. He is hitting all milestones and seems content inbetween feedings. His weight gain seems to have plateaued (??) over the last couple of weeks. is this normal? he has 7-8 wet diapers and he has been pooping 2-3 times a week from birth.
    1 replies | 67 view(s)
  • @llli*stw's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:01 PM
    I am not sure if this thread is still active, or if the response will find its way back to you, but thank you both very much for your thoughtful responses and words of encouragement! I was able to work through the tough time of toddler nursing, and we weaned naturally around 32 months, to everyone's satisfaction! My now 3-year-old son has fond memories of nursing, and continues to play-act nursing his stuffed animals! I am so glad I was able to work through the hard times and keep it a positive experience for him. Thanks again!
    4 replies | 877 view(s)
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