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  • @llli*jml's Avatar
    Today, 11:35 AM
    Hi ladies, I have a 14.5 month old son who is still nursing. My husband and I are starting to try for another baby (my cycle returned 3 days after our son's first birthday), but there's a caveat. Our son was conceived via IVF and I have diminished ovarian reserve and based on family history (mom, grandmother and great-grandmother all started menopause by 38), I can probably count on one hand the number of "fertile" years I have left. We worked with a wonderful Reproductive Endocrinologist last time but we cannot afford to do IVF again (and are unfortunately not in a mandated state) for our second so we have to conceive naturally. Initially, prior to doing IVF, my RE put me on a strict holistic regimen (organic low GI diet, no alcohol, no sugar, no caffeine, acupuncture, light exercise and a series of supplements to improve egg quality (DHEA, L. Arginine, Inositol, CoQ10)) to try to help us conceive naturally. Obviously, we didn't; however, it did help me get good mature eggs for IVF. I'd like to get back into doing that holistic regimen because I know it will improve our chances of conceiving, and frankly, with only a handful of years left, I don't have time to waste. I don't want to wean until my son's ready, but I don't know if any of those supplements are off-limits while breastfeeding. I recall from the breastfeeding class my husband and I took at our hospital while I was pregnant that there is a handbook where you can check if medications/supplements are...
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 11:28 AM
    You might give the pumped milk at the breast using the lactation aid. Does it feel like she would be able to nurse well if she wasn't sleepy? Or does it feel like she may be jaundice because of poor milk transfer due to latch or other suck difficulty?
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*zaynethepain's Avatar
    Today, 10:34 AM
    http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/ http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/exclusive-pumping/ The first link contains tips for getting baby to nurse. Expressing a bit of milk first for an instant reward is very helpful add is offering when baby is sleeping or first waking up. If he falls asleep with a bottle or pacifier in his mouth, you may be able to switch it with the breast to sneak a session in. The second link had pumping guidelines and tips. Watch the videos for breast compression and use warmth before/during pumping to stimulate a let down. Prolactin, the milk making hormone, is highest at night so definitely encourage nursing when you feel that ' heavy ' feeling. Most babies will happily latch on and nurse without waking up fully. If baby refuses, try pumping. There are many types of Galactagogues that might help you somewhat. Fenugreek is the most popular. Mother love has milk supply packs and there are various mothers milk teas. Also search for a lactation cookie recipe. No herb or pill is going to bring in your milk supply though if you don't remove milk.
    6 replies | 271 view(s)
  • @llli*liamsmommy11's Avatar
    Today, 08:03 AM
    My daughter is 7 days old and not nursing particularly well due to jaundice, which is in the process of clearing up but still affecting her feeding. She is getting enough to eat, but only by nursing often and using breast compression, etc. (also by using me all night for a pacifier!) My question is, if I feed on demand and don't do any pumping but she is not emptying the breast well...won't this adversely affect my supply? I have had supply issues in the past and so my instinct is to do some pumping, but then that would worsen the engorgement right? The other problem with pumping is that it seems as soon as I do then she winds up wanting to nurse again. It's been fairly unpredictable. If I have already pumped but then she seems hungry, sometimes I give her the pumped milk with a finger feeding. Any advice is appreciated!! Thank you!
    1 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 07:35 AM
    search here for an IBCLC in your area http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3901
    2 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 07:21 AM
    here are some links that might help in figuring out supplementation. http://www.lowmilksupply.org/supplementing-howmuch.shtml http://www.lowmilksupply.org/abs.shtml http://www.lowmilksupply.org/finishatthebreast.shtml
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:40 AM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! During the time you fed baby with formula, were you pumping at all? If not, what might have happened is this: when milk is not being removed from the breast very frequently or not at all, it will get pretty salty and a lot of babies will reject it due to the taste. Continuing to pump should restore the normal sweet taste of the milk. If your baby continues to not like the taste of breastmilk, you are going to have to start mixing it with his formula. Start by making a small bottle that is 2/3 formula and 1/3 breastmilk, and gradually reduce the proportion of formula and increase the a out of breastmilk in the bottle until the bottles are all breastmilk. Will your baby latch on at this point? If so, I strongly encourage you to nurse him directly at least once or twice a day. That will keep your options open for the future. Most breastfeeding problems- even the horrible, painful ones such as you experienced- are temporary and will go away in time. If your baby remembers how to nurse, it will be a lot easier for you to transition him back to the breast. I also encourage you to seek professional, hands-on help from a lactation consultant, preferably an IBCLC. First, she may be able to help you get baby to the breast in a way that does not cause pain and trauma to the nipple. Second, if you are going to be an exclusively pumping mom, you need help with pumping. You want to be sure you have the right...
    2 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:28 AM
    Have you tried vibration? Use the handle from an electric toothbrush or other vibrating tool on the breast- it may bust up any plugs. Have you tried picking at the area with a sterile needle? That can be the fix when there is a plugged duct behind the bleb.
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:26 AM
    Yeah, the supplemental system can hold breastmilk or formula. The advantage is that the baby gets all his nutrition at the breast, reducing the risk that he'll start rejecting the breast in order to get an easy bottle. I'm really glad you have that scale. I would keep on using it, because it's providing you with valuable information. First, if your baby is consistently taking less than 2 oz at the breast, you know that supplementing probably has to be part of your life right now. Second, the scale will help you know when you can start weaning off the supplements. Your baby's intake at the breast should creep up, and then you can reduce/eliminate bottles. Third, the scale is going to tell you how much to supplement with. If baby took 1.3 oz at the breast, a 1-2 oz supplement is probably sufficient. Fourth and finally, the scale will help you identify a good nursing session- eventually you'll get a feel for what nursing should feel/look/sound like when your baby is getting sufficient milk. I have to take back everything I said earlier about pumping. What are you doing with the pump at this point?
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    Good suggestions, above. Have you had your health thoroughly checked out? My guess is that the issue here is pump frequency and the fact that you are relying on a pump rather than the baby. But it might also be a good idea to make sure your body is functioning the way it should. Get an iron level, thyroid levels, maybe tests for PCOS...
    6 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:14 AM
    Technically, if you are going to introduce a supplemental "milk", it's supposed to be formula until 12 months. I agree that there may not be a big difference... But I'm also in favor of erring on the side of caution. Dom't be too surprised if your baby turns down cow's milk. A lot of kids don't like it. if that happens, you can meet all your LO's "dairy" needs with whole-milk cheese and yogurt, which a lot of kids prefer to plain milk.
    4 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 03:52 AM
    If you feel that he might get more with the shield but if he is latching without, it is probably best to continue what nursing you do without the shield. the SNS (supplemental nursing system) can be filled with expressed breastmilk if you have it or formula. I used one for supplementing my LO for the past 4 1/2 months. With Formula at first and then with expressed milk as I was able to pump enough. Yesterday is the first day since he was 5 days old that I haven't supplemented and he is over 5 months now but we have only been supplementing in the afternoons most of that time. Hang in there.
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*mylittleson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:34 PM
    Okay, here is the next weigh-feed-weigh measurement. It was 3 hours after the last feeding. He really didn't want to latch onto my right nipple but I used a nipple assist device ("nipple everter") that someone on this forum recommended and I bought on Amazon, and then he was a little more cooperative. He nursed for 20 minutes on the right breast (pretty actively, although whenever he got off he didn't really want to get back on and I would use the latch assist device again) and only got .3 oz!!! :-/ He was 9 lb 2.4 oz before I nursed and 9 lb 2.7 oz afterwards. (He is exactly 3 weeks old today and weighed 8 lb 11 oz at birth). He didn't seem completely "finished" on the right breast but he had started to fuss and I wanted to get a comparison with the left breast versus right because he really seems to dislike that right breast. So then I put him on the left breast and he was more cooperative. He nursed for 10 more minutes on the left breast and part of the time he was falling asleep but I kept waking him back up. Finally he got off and fell asleep and wouldn't take my breast again. So I weighed him again and he was at 9 oz 3.8 oz so he had gotten 1.1 oz out of the left breast. So 1.4 oz total during a total of 30 minutes of nursing. He was asleep for a bit but now, about 10 minutes later, he is awake and crying a lot as if very hungry. This really seems to be our pattern and I'm glad he is nursing some and not using the nipple shield but I'm frustrated that he's...
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*megger112's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:49 PM
    it is only one breast... Thanks for you help. I feel like I have tried all the suggestions!
    3 replies | 143 view(s)
  • @llli*ebonienicole's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:29 PM
    My son is one week old. I breastfed during my first week in the hospital and although I had a lactation nurse to assist me during my stay, I suffered from extremely tender, cracked, swollen breast and bleeding nipples. I would literally be in tears feeding my son. After a couple more days of excruciating pain, I decided to pump instead. While my breast were healing (about 3 days) I fed him Enfamil Newborn formula :cry Now after pumping for the first time tonight (managed to get out one ounce between both breast) my son did not want my milk. I had to mix my milk in with a bottle of Enfamil I had on hand for him to drink it. How can I get him to drink my milk again? I'm devastated! I feel so selfish but the pain was literally unbearable!
    2 replies | 102 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:43 PM
    Oh, and your mother is probably right that your supply will likely be plenty for her once she is able to nurse frequently, most mom's don't respond to the pump nearly as well as they do for an actually nursing baby. What I can get out using a pump is half of what my baby can get out.
    6 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Sticking with a specific every x many hours schedule may not help you so much and since you are also power pumping (if you mean pump for ten min then rest for ten min then pump for ten min for an hour) several times a day and getting a total of 8 pumping sessions in per day, that may be about all you can ask of yourself. Now if you feel you can slip it in, instead of trying to pump to empty your breasts for the additional pump sessions, maybe you just pump for 15 minutes since in some cases increasing frequency can be more important than necessarily always pumping 5 minutes beyond emptying breasts. Also, do you use any hand expression after you pump? Doing breast compressions/massage before/during pumping sessions and hand expression after can help increase yield.
    6 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*rainbowgoblin's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:21 PM
    Thanks, that's helpful. I'll try to boost his tahini intake for the calcium. I might start introducing some cow's milk now, too: it*sounds like there's nothing "magic" about the 1 year mark, it's just that it's important for babies not to get too much cow's milk protein and sodium, and to get enough iron. He eats meat and lentils for the iron, and I'll still be giving him as much breastmilk as I can, so I'm guessing that at this stage, a little cow's milk should be ok. He eats cheese and yogurt already (and has for ages), so it does seem silly to try to get him used to formula, only to have to get him used to cow's milk in a month.
    4 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*liz.g.autry's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:19 PM
    I use the Medela Symphony pump. I'm able to pump next to her isolette, and usually will after I finish holding her. The issue is I hold her while she is being gavage fed over an hour. I cannot put her back until about 10-15 minutes after her feed is finished, and I don't want to. This my one time to hold her each day, so I usually try to maximize my time, not putting her back till 10 minutes before I need to pump, so I get to hold her for almost 2 hours. I'm toying with this schedule for 10 pumps. 3, 6, 8, 10, Kangaroo at 11 for 1.25 hours, 12:30, 2, 4, 6, visit again at 8, 9, 11 But I worry that this will just leave me stressed and sleep deprived. Planning my day around 8 pumps is stressful enough. Plus I've already missed a pump a few times when I slept straight through my alarm.
    6 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 PM
    1/2 an oz is a small amount to get while nursing. Can you do several more weigh-feed-weigh measurements and report back? Has anyone suggested that you try an at-the-breast supplementer, e.g. Lact-Aid or Supplemental Nursing System?
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:04 PM
    Honestly, it sounds more like a game he is playing with you... Not a bad game, just a quirky toddler game!
    1 replies | 129 view(s)
  • @llli*mylittleson's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    Hello again everyone. I haven't introduced the pacifier; thanks for the resources on that. I did get the scale I ordered and today I weighed him before and after nursing just now. He nursed for 20 minutes on one side but some of the time he was just kind of laying there not really sucking or he would get off the breast and just look around. This wasn't as bad as it sometimes is, so for *most* of the time he was pretty actively nursing, until at the end he dislodged from the breast and wouldn't take it back. Anyway during that time he took in half an ounce. That seems like such a little amount of milk for the amount of time he was nursing. I saw milk coming from my nipple and I saw him swallowing so I know that for at least some of the time he was actively getting milk. He was soon fussy again but would not latch onto my right nipple after several attempts (he seems to much prefer the left nipple, and it actually hurts a lot when he first latches onto it-- like he's biting it-- and not nearly as bad on the right nipple, although often he won't latch onto the right nipple). So I gave him bottled breastmilk and he drank 2.5 ounces before falling asleep, for a total of 3 ounces. So this is where I get confused and wonder if I'm supposed to try to keep nursing him for another hour and a half or so, so that he can get the additional milk (2.5 ounces) from my breast and not the bottle (at the rate of half an ounce in twenty minutes-- if he continues to cooperate, which...
    20 replies | 570 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    If your supply has decreased due to pregnancy, there's nothing you can do to change it. When pregnancy hormones face off against breastfeeding hormones, pregnancy hormones win. Given that your baby is nearly 12 months and is eating plenty of solids and is still nursing, I don't see a need to introduce formula. Maybe make extra sure that he eats plenty of calcium and fat-rich solids, but other than that... Just keep doing what you're doing!
    4 replies | 164 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:59 PM
    I think it's too early to be worrying. If your period isn't back by 14-16 months, then I think it might be time to consider accelerating your baby's weaning. But a 10 month-old should still be receiving most of her calories from breastmilk, and if you were to wean at this point you'd likely need to wean to formula, not solids. Also, there does seem to be an optimal gap between pregnancies- give your body a normal amount of time before you try to conceive again. Better for you, and better for your next baby. I totally get the feeling of the ticking clock and the fear that you might give up your next baby because of nursing your current baby... But it's just a few months. Probably not enough to make or break you, right?
    2 replies | 114 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:53 PM
    Okay, so it sounds like weight gain may be a bit slow. Check my math on the timeline here, but it sounds like baby regained her birthweight by 1 week, but in the past 3 weeks has gained just 12 oz. Am I right? If so, that's on the slow end of the spectrum- after regaining birth weight, you're looking for a baby to gain 5-7 oz a week for the first 4 months. Considering that baby isn't gaining super-fast, I would absolutely ignore the pediatrician's stupid advice about limiting the baby's time at the breast and giving a paci- you want this baby to be eating as much as possible! You mentioned long feedings. How long does baby feed, how often does she feed, and how does nursing feel? I think it's a good idea for you to get a second opinion from a different doctor, and if possible also an IBCLC. The things you are seeing are suggestive of reflux, but I wouldn't settle on that diagnosis at this point because this could be nothing more than normal infant fussiness, it could be colic, it could be an undiagnosed tongue or lip tie... It could be a lot of things!
    3 replies | 175 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:26 PM
    Just want to remind that any time supplements are given in any amount it is very important mom pumps with a well working and fitted pump and/or hand expresses so that milk removal continues at the normal high frequency. No matter why a baby is being supplemented, a supplemented baby is likely to nurse less than they would otherwise. These early weeks milk production is being established and frequent milk removal is vital for that and for preventing mom getting engorged or worse. "Switching" to formula instead of breastfeeding, even as a temporary measure, is potentially very dangerous at this point for these reasons. IN the rare cases it is required, it is very important mom is supported in frequent and effective milk removal during the time baby is given bottles.
    10 replies | 261 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:23 PM
    What sort of pump are you using?
    6 replies | 119 view(s)
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