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  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 11:17 AM
    In Medications and Mothers' Milk, Dr. Hale says In the LactMed database entry on alcohol, it says that beer may increase serum prolactin levels during nursing because of polysaccharides from barley and hops. And in one study, a woman drinking nonalcoholic beer had the same prolactin response as those who drank regular beer. If the barley and hops are what stimulates higher prolactin levels, but alcohol inhibits the letdown reflex, then nonalcoholic beer should actually work better, right? Hmm...
    3 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 11:01 AM
    I am confused. Is baby 5 weeks old? Or over two months? I agree with both pp. Lochia can certainly last 4 to 6 weeks. It can also stop and start again. but if the bleeding you are experiencing is heavy or bright red or for any other reason feels wrong to you, see your doctor immediately. If you are truly ovulating again, then that may effect your milk production but only very slightly and temporarily. If you indeed are having menstrual cycles this early, I would be more concerned that perhaps your baby is nursing too infrequently-this would lead to low production AND early return of fertility. Is baby nursing at least 8 to 10 times in 24 hours and gaining normally? Many moms incorrectly think they have low production based on perfectly normal differences in how the breasts feel and how baby behaves as time goes on. For example, breasts feeling softer than before and baby wishing to nurse more than before are NOT reliable signs of low milk production. Supplementing when it is not necessary or supplementing more than is necessary is going to harm milk production. Please see this article for more, read the first part carefully. http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/low-supply/
    3 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*nweaver82's Avatar
    Today, 10:15 AM
    Will this affect me breastfeeding my baby?
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 10:07 AM
    I agree with the above reply- what you shared in your most recent reply sounds promising! There are many first-person narratives that I've seen detailing different mamas' successful transition from the SNS to SNS-free. When you get the system, I think it would be a fair expectation of your consultant to assist with positioning/easing-the-learning curve if that is something that would be helpful for you.
    9 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 09:57 AM
    If your baby is nursing at the breast AT ALL, (indicating baby is capable of nursing,) AND you think you have normal milk production, don't you think your chances are very good for getting baby back to the breast? I sure do. You are more than half way there, and baby is still very young. I have seen MUCH oder babies who NEVER nursed brought to the breast. I understand your IBCLC does not want to create false hope, and every situation is unique. But really I think your chances are quite good. I assume you are familiar with the kellymom article "help my baby won't nurse" excellent suggestions there. I fail to see how an SNS would make matters worse. It may not work for you at all, some moms find it too fiddly and some babies object. There is a learning curve. but if it does work, and that means baby nurses for all her feedings and no longer needs bottles when you are there to nurse, that already is going to cut down on the time you spend feeding your baby and of course, encourage baby to see the breast as THE place for dealing with hunger, thirst, needing comfort, everything good. Of course, if your baby is capable of transferring enough milk when nursing, and you make enough milk, there is no need for supplementing via any method or to do any pumping AT ALL. I think in the fog of pumping and supplementing, sometimes it is forgotten what the goal looks like- NO pumping or bottles, except for when there are separations. If you make enough milk for your baby, and your...
    9 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 09:52 AM
    Bleeding (lochia) after child birth is really normal. I know there's a specific date range that bleeding is understood as not necessarily a sign of returned menses/fertility, that I've read about when researching lactational Amenorrhea, but I'm not able to recall with certainty (does this ring a bell to anyone else? Is it 60 days pp?). Are you sure this has been the return of your period? Have you been to your postpartum OB visit yet, and if so, did you discuss it with them? I would say, bleeding is not something to mess around with, and if it were me, I'd rather risk hearing them so, "I've checked you out, and you're doing fine!" than risk having something super serious unaddressed. If indeed something is going on that is causing abnormal bleeding, I would think that same something could also impact milk supply. However, not feeling full or engorged, and not leaking anymore, is in itself not something that indicates insufficient supply. When your milk supply is established, your body gets really good at making just the right amount for your wee one. You say that you've been supplementing; for how long have you been and how much supplement? What were the things you observed in baby that caused you to believe baby wasn't getting enough from you?
    3 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:21 AM
    Thrush doesn't necessarily have to be obvious in baby for it to be causing you issues. I might also be vasospam which cold can bring on/exasperate. http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/nipple-blanching/ other resources http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/sorenipples-older/
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:18 AM
    I don't think so. See the Dr. Did you start any hormonal birth control at 6 weeks pp? Make sure there isn't any retained placenta?
    3 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:15 AM
    Yea I believe it is the barley that may be beneficial. Some women with a severe problem with their let down reflex might maybe find a beer helps but if the idea makes you uncomfortable then it would defeat the purpose since you wouldn't relax.
    3 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:11 AM
    spit up is generally considered a laundry issue provided weight gain is fine and baby not in pain.
    4 replies | 93 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 09:00 AM
    a good double electric hospital grade pump will likely make a huge difference for you since I think the swing is a single electric using the freestyle motor. If baby can latch and nurse effectively, then nursing is always better than pumping. But if you can pump for 5-10 minutes after as many nursing sessions as possible, you will do your supply more good.
    8 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*shantalakid's Avatar
    Today, 07:08 AM
    Hi Need advice regarding milk becoming hard in breast and area around the nipples . I have tried putting warm water and squeezing out the milk but the area around my nipple doesnt seem to soften. I am having inverted nipples and my baby is 1 month old , it took a long time for me to make him successfully suck on right breast .He has not sucked on the left breast ever since. Please help . TIA Shantala
    0 replies | 0 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 06:59 AM
    If milk transfer is still a problem, or there is any pain still with latching, see if your IBCLC can give you excersizes or find a speech therapist with experience with babies and breastfeeding issues. Oral motor therapy can help if there is a latch problem that isn't related to positioning. My LO got his tongue/lip ties corrected at 8 weeks but we still had problems and I found a therapist who helped and we went to her from about 12 weeks till just past 4 months. My supply still had issues because I didn't get good advice about pumping at first and fenugreek didn't seem to work for me so I'm on Domperidone now, which has worked and we haven't needed any formula since about 4 months and I haven't given any Expressed Breast Milk at all since 6 months and we were using very little since about 5 1/2 months. We used the Lactation aid or SNS for supplementing from the beginning but did wind up using some bottles as well. The Breastflow and Lanisinoh mOmma nipples seemed to be the best ones for us to avoid making his latch worse. It was a bit challenging when he had gotten used to always having bottles or the SNS and was unwilling to work a little bit to get a let down but doing weighted feedings I discovered that the more I supplemented the less he took from me so that encouraged me to wean down to as little supplement as possible. He is now able to nurse quickly though he still nurses very often. Pumping, instead of doing it at a set schedule of 3 hrs or...
    9 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*ayanchus44's Avatar
    Today, 06:49 AM
    Hi All, I have had a pretty easy time breastfeeding with really little to no complications up until these past 3 days. Every time I breastfeed and afterwards I get a burning pain which sometimes can be sharp. I noticed that my nipples are always hard and it feels worse when its cold. I have tried to pump more than breastfeed because that seems to hurt less. My daughter is 10 months old and is starting to get her top teeth. One thing I have tried is to apply some dry heat before and that seems to make the actual pumping a little easier, but the after pain is a killer. I am in such pain as I sit here and write this, which makes me dread pumping/breastfeeding next. There doesn't seem to be any infection. My daughter doesn't have any white spots in her mouth so I do not think it is thrush b.c she hasn't been on any medications both over the counter or prescribed... I do not have a fever, I don't feel any real "bumps" in my boobs. Any tips or advice on how to stop/sooth the pain would be greatly appreciated. I obviously want to continue to breastfeed my daughter, but after 3 days of this pain I do not know how much longer I can take it! Thank you for your help in advance!
    1 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*ramom's Avatar
    Today, 06:34 AM
    Thanks for your responses, everyone. I was a bit unclear -- we started the bottle because the latch was very painful and because she was dehydrated/jaundiced and losing too much weight by the 5th day. But we don't believe she needs supplements anymore because the latch is less painful and at some weighed feedings she did ok (1 - 2 oz in 10-30 min). It's just that she now prefers the bottle over the breast, even though we usually do paced bottle feeding. Sometimes she completely refuses the breast, or will take it but then will pop off at some point and cry for a bottle. We tried to "force" her to use the breast when she refuses it but she screams. Also, if I have recently pumped before her feeding (say, she was asleep and just woke up during the pump), it doesn't make sense for me to refuse to give her the bottle, since my breasts are then mostly empty. The only feedings where she does breast *only* are sometimes when we are in bed at night, and she is very sleeping and not very hungry. We are working with an IBCLC. I asked her if there was any chance of getting her only breast only. She said she didn't know, but would "never say never". I asked if an SNS would be useful for this. She said it could be but she didn't know for sure. We have ordered one but I'm worried it could make things worse if she decides to start refusing the breast without the SNS. Should we expect more help from the IBCLC?
    9 replies | 185 view(s)
  • @llli*jabeena's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 AM
    I am breastfeeding my son who is 1month5weeks old. I am experiencing a sudden decrease in supply. My breast are not full anymore. After delivery i had bleeding for 21days and in the next 12days my mensus returned. I started bleeding again after 10days,bleeding is very minimal though. The second time when my mensus started, from the same day iam experiencing drastically reduced milk supply. Earlier i was so full that i used small towels to sock the milk that would leak during feeds. Now i have to give my son formula as he is feeling hungry even after feeding. Is it normal to bleed like this? Y is milk reduced? What are the reasons for this?
    3 replies | 48 view(s)
  • @llli*ccb52914's Avatar
    Today, 04:49 AM
    Thanks for your response! The nanny is using paced feeding - we shared that same video with her before she started, and my husband works from home so has worked with her to make sure it's being done properly. I'll suggest your ideas of cold bottle, location change, etc. Though baby is not on a schedule by any means, up until I went back to work (and on weekends now), she feeds every 2 hours during the day, almost like clockwork. She was also following this pattern with the nanny up until she started the midday bottle refusal. When you say that it's not really cue feeding if she's waiting for hunger cues - do you mean that the nanny could be missing early cues and feeding her too late (and therefore she should offer the bottle earlier)? When she does offer the bottle, if the baby fusses, should she stop and try again after some time has passed, rather than trying to calm her and encourage her to eat then? I worry about too much time passing and my daughter becoming frantically hungry.
    4 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*oncemorewith's Avatar
    Today, 03:50 AM
    Hi Mommal and tclynx I use a medela swing to pump. The most I've ever got at one session is about 20mls. If I pump more than 10 times i.e. straight after feeds and half way between feeds, I might get 50-70mls that day. I've been given some info on combining hand expressing with breast compressions and pumping so I'll try that too. I've thought about renting a hospital grade one but I'm not sure how much difference it will make. I'm not sure what you mean by how does pumping feel. I don't get a let-down which I do when I feed him. I've swapped quite a few of the pumping sessions to give him a snack instead. I figure that's as good if not better. His weight gain is good now I'm supplementing - over 200g last week and he gets around 300ml of supplement a day. I managed to track down a good LC at a local support group and I taer amounts, keep checking whether he's till hungry after each bit and stop when he's full (rather than the recommended 60mls every 3 hours). He has a big feed every 3-4 hours and a snack in between. I pump when I can and try to do at least 2 or 3 a day. This may not be strictly enough but it has made a huge improvement in my mental health as I can leave the house :)
    8 replies | 208 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:08 AM
    This is a myth that has a little fact in it. The grains that some beer is derived from act as galactagogues in some women. But alcohol dehydrates so that will tend to lower production. Of course, on the other hand, one (real) beer is perfectly safe, probably won't dehydrate you, and some moms find it relaxing and that never hurts. Rather than non-alcoholic beer, which I have never understood the point of, I would suggest, Look into eating oatmeal: http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/oatmeal/ Other grains that have reported galactgogue properties: Barley and brown rice. Lately I have heard of many moms taking brewers yeast. Good resources in low milk production generally: The book Making More Milk and http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/low-supply/
    3 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:55 AM
    Have you seen this article on reoccurring mastitis? http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mother/recurrent-mastitis/
    3 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:51 AM
    If baby is truly being cue fed, she may want to eat twice some days and 5 times other days. I would suggest, discuss with nanny if she is using paced bottle feeding techniques. Also, cue feeding does not necessarily mean it is always best to 'wait for hunger cues." Depending on baby and time of day, that may mean too much time has gone by baby is now very hungry and upset. This can particularly happen if the feeding is right after nap or after a period of activity or distraction. Just as it is ok to offer the breast, it is ok to offer a bottle, assuming the bottle is given correctly, and only in the amount baby wants, including, no amount. Also, maybe at that particular time, baby wants something different than the other times. Nanny can try cold milk, different room, go outside, etc. paced bottle feeding: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/22_bfabreastfedbaby.pdf and video: http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=youtube+paced+bottle&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E7AC2C9FD00534CAAC56E
    4 replies | 171 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 AM
    I agree with mommal. Breastfeeding does get easier. But pumping every three hours will pretty much be just as hard on day 100 as it was on day one! This is why rigid pumping schedules like this often do not work. They drive moms crazy so it is unsustainable. WHY are you being told to pump every three hours? That is NINE times a 24 hour day. That is more than many moms who are exclusively pumping-no nursing- would be pumping! Also, there is no need to pump every such & such hours. This makes something that is already hard basically impossible. Say a moms goal is to pump 8 times a day (just as a for instance.) Such a mom could pump like this on Monday: 8 am, 10 am, 2 pm, 5 pm, 7 pm, 8:30 pm, 10 pm & 4 am. This would give her time to sleep on either side of the one overnight pump. Of course on Tuesday, she could pump at entirely different times, just keeping in mind her goal of trying for 8 times. Babies do not nurse on set schedules, so there is no need to pump on them either. If on Tuesday she can only pump 6 times, that is not the end of the world. She just resets her goal and tries again for 8 on Wed. I have no idea how often you actually 'need" to pump. But if you could set your own flexible schedule, would that make it more doable for you? When pumping due to supplementing, generally a person will want to aim to pump to counteract how much baby is being supplemented. This does not necessarily mean you will express that exact amount, usually this will...
    9 replies | 185 view(s)
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