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  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Today, 02:50 PM
    There won't be any milk in the very beginning - you'll have colostrum, a thick substance that gives baby all he needs at first. Your milk should, with adequate stimulation, come in between 3-5 days. Until then, it is 100% normal for baby to feed very often - this is what in fact gives the message to your body to produce milk. They have extremely tiny tummies, and colostrum and breastmilk are both digested very quickly. A common thing that's tossed around is 'my milk didn't come in so they made me give my baby formula right away,' but that's something that just sets you up for failure. Newborn babies should not need to be 'settled down with formula' unless mom is choosing not to breastfeed or mom/baby has medical issues that preclude them from nursing (in which case pumping as you're planning is often a do-able alternative).
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 12:38 PM
    I have one other question. Once the baby is born. When I try to breastfeed and there is little or no milk? And the baby is crying because he is hungry. Would it be ok to give formula to settle the baby down? This happened to my friend. So I would like to know.
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 12:31 PM
    Thanks for your fast reply. Doctor said he could do it even before we leave the hospital or it can even wait a month or so. Once the baby is born we will know. Say once the milk come in on 3rd day. Do you want me to pump all the milk every two hours? 10minutes both breasts every two hours should be good or no? I would like to be prepared. That's why I ask these questions. As far as I know there is no reason for immediate separation from baby once he is born. He may go for scans now and then, I think that is doable. I am just worried only about the surgery.if it's possible I will ask them to hold it until at least a month. Or 10days. About feeding with a open cup that's what I was thinking too. I will make sure that he is not given any bottle.
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:08 PM
    If there is no compelling medical reason for the surgery to happen in the days immediately following birth then I would strongly suggest wait as long as you possibly can medically speaking. The minutes hours days and weeks immediately following birth are vitally important for getting breast-feeding off to a good start any separation of mother and baby can throw a wrench into things. Not to mention the stress on both of you of surgery happening directly after birth. But sometimes life doesn't go as planned and it always helps to have a back up plan. If you and your baby are separated for any more than two hours then you should pump or hand express. In the early days when milk production is normally low and the breasts soft, many moms find hand expression more effective than pumping. You would want to pump or hand express at least as often as baby would nurse and that would be at least every two hours, or at least 10 times in 24 hours it does not always have to be every two hours exactly for example you can pump more frequently for a while and then take a four hour break to sleep. Talk to the doctor and make sure they understand you want as little separation from your baby as possible and also that you want your baby fed your expressed breastmilk should baby need to be fed not at the breast at anytime around the surgery. As long as you're able to express enough breastmilk that is all baby should need. Line up a hospital grade pump for pumping.
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 10:59 AM
    He assured us that he is going to be ok once he's born and no one would know that he has an issue inside. Without these ultrasounds we wouldn't even know about this issue at all . I really want to exclusively breastfeed him. Please help me out.
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*nivilovely's Avatar
    Today, 10:57 AM
    I am due in 5 weeks. My baby boy has a small issue in one of his kidney. He might need a procedure for that. But it's not emergency. The urologist from the hospital said he could do the procedure even before we leave the hospital or it can even wait for a month or so. What I am worried is if we go for the surgery before we leave the hospital , it would affect my milk supply while he is gone right? Say the surgery is for 2 hours or so. And then even after surgery he could be drowsy. So I am scared that it would affect my milk supply initially. Or if I pump every 2 hours should it be ok?. If suppose we decide to go on a procedure and. Says it's the 3rd day after he is born. How many minutes should I pump every 2 hours? Please help. Any advice is appreciated.
    5 replies | 45 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 10:40 AM
    Aside from the lowered pump output, how else are you quantifying that your production is low? I understand you think baby needs more than you can provide at night, but how do you really know? Many moms suspect poor production when in fact things are normal or only slightly low. Not being able to pump enough at work is not always the same thing as overall low milk production, many moms with normal production are not able to pump enough at work. Many babies of this age are fussy and 'act hungry" when in fact they are just needing to comfort longer, either by nursing or some other way. Kellymom has some good suggestions both for low production and low pump output in these articles. Read the low milk supply one carefully as it talks about the situation of mom thinking her supply is insufficient when in fact it is ok. http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/low-supply/ and http://kellymom.com/hot-topics/pumping_decrease/ Be very sure that your pump is in perfect working condition and that the flanges fit properly. You may need a different pump all together. Pump malfunction or just the pump not being (or no longer being) the right pump for mom is a common cause of poor pump output (and also will cause low production if mom is relying on her pump parts of the day.) To increase overall production the vital keys are frequent and effective milk removal throughout the 24 hour day and mom maintaining good hydration at all times. Some moms find herbal galactagogues helpful, as with...
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*juniper's Avatar
    Today, 10:15 AM
    Thanks a lot, I get your point about the importance of feeding more frequently. I'll do my best! This suggestion however brings me to mention another (big..?) issue: my little one actually feeds for at least an hour at a time! That is, at least 30 min per breast. Hence, you see that there is a limit to how much more frequently she could feed. Of course I'd like our nursing sessions to be shorter and more efficient.. but I don't know how to do that. I thought that the reason is that I had a very slow let down. I never "leak", and when I hand express or pump (vigorously), it takes at least 30 min for me to produce ca 100 ml. However lately I'm not so sure any more about the slow let down hypothesis... actually, at times it seems that it is too fast - she pulls off and gets angry. So, I'm confused. Another hypothesis is that maybe she's laying to comfortably on the pillow, and therefore she takes it too easy and does not suck at "full speed"? I just got a ring-sling, to try to keep her more alert (i.e. a bit more uncomfortable) while eating - hoping to speed up the process. Let's see if that works. Well... suggestions are welcome, again! Thanks once more!
    4 replies | 122 view(s)
  • @llli*sebsmama's Avatar
    Today, 09:03 AM
    First time mom here, In the past month, I've had to have gallbladder surgery, quickly followed by a return to work. After surgery, I wasn't able to nurse for a few days due to the medications I was on, and instead pumped and dumped. That was quickly followed by a return to work, where I went from nursing several times a day to pumping exclusively during the day (every 2-3 hours) and then nursing at night. I've noticed a dramatic decrease in supply. I am lucky if I get 4-5 oz total from my daytime pumping, and my 4-month old son now needs a formula supplement after nursing at night, as I cannot satisfy him with nursing alone. We are relying increasingly on formula and I really want to avoid that. I've tried power pumping and hand expression. Any other thoughts or tips?
    1 replies | 28 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    Today, 08:44 AM
    @llli*jabez replied to a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Thank you, maddieb, for replying. When she was still newborn, she once cried inconsolably. And this is after how many hours that she is on my breast. :( She does that a lot lately! Well, I have long accepted the fact that my milk is not enough that's why I am thinking to try the SNS. I think she is most satisfied when I have lumps in my breast which only she can suck out. There are times that my breast will be hard as a rock, I cannot hand express nor use pump to suck the milk out. But once she nurses, even it's painful at times, I feel happy that she seems satisfied. :)
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*carm3's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:09 PM
    I second the idea of finding out more about the antibiotics from infantrisk. And as for her being old enough to wean...the World Health Organization recommends nursing for a minimum of 2 years ;)
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:43 PM
    Isn't it possible your child is just ill? It's been known to happen. I would suggest call infant risk http://www.infantrisk.com/ (call today, it can take time to get someone) and also you can look up your abs here. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/news/lactmed_announce_06.html I have no idea why you are on abs, or what you are on, or what dose. but here is the way I look at it. Sorry if this offends anti- ab people. There are very good reasons to keep taking abs for the required course if needed. 14 days seems a tad long, maybe discuss your physician whether it is really needed in your case to take them that long. What if they were making you feel sick? If your child were given an antibiotic directly for an infection or to avoid infection, as of course, toddlers routinely are, and had mild adverse reactions like occasional vomiting and 'sick looking' poop and as a result are not feeling awesome, would the abs be discontinued? I think that is a question to research, or ask yourself, or ask your child's pediatrician. Because I am not at all sure the answer would be "yes." Some adverse reaction like this to abs is normal and basically the recommendation for mild reactions is to live with it. In your case, you know that the very low exposure to the abs you are taking that your baby has had or will continue to have, may have caused this mild sounding reaction. Maybe. So, you may want to be extra careful if baby is ever directly given abs. But I am not sure it means all...
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:19 PM
    @llli*maddieb replied to a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Hi jabezz! So, I have seen lactation aids used fine for babies this age and even much older. toddlers even. However, that is no guarantee it will work well for you and your child. It is simply too individual a thing to predict. But I am confused about something. In my experience, babies do not "throw tantrums"/ When a baby cannot get enough to eat at the breast, baby may get frustrated, push on the breast, knead the breast, pop on and off, cry, etc. Is that what you mean? Those things can all be caused by other things, or just be normal fussy baby behavior. Or they can be due to a slow flow/not enough milk. But the best way to tell if a baby is really getting enough at the breast is by weight gain. Especially at this age, many babies seem distracted or not entirely happy nursing. It is kind of a thing. LLL calls it the "four month fussies" of course it can happen anytime, usually between 2 and 6 months.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*mackeroo2013's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:47 AM
    I'm on antibiotics that have been prescribed to prevent infection. After 8 days of the 14 day rx, my 17 month old vomited once and has had several sick poops. She is acting a little under the weather. Dr. Thinks it may be from the antibiotics and she's exposed from nursing. I nurse my daughter about 6-7 times a day. Dr. Wants me to quit nursing and just pump. Daughter has never taken cow's milk, but also she nurses more for comfort. I am considering going off the antibiotics and sticking to my probiotics because I can't fathom keeping her from nursing for 5 days. I can't handle the thought of being abruptly taken from nursing. Any thoughts on this. People keep telling me "she's old enough to wean", but that's not the point. I want her to decide that. Help I'm so discouraged.
    2 replies | 69 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:57 AM
    Also, from when to when are you at work?
    12 replies | 517 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:45 AM
    Ok well that is infuriating. My husband works for the government of our state and I know how regimented everything can be. But sometimes it just takes getting to the right person with a perfectly reasonable request, and gradually reducing frequency and length of pump sessions so your body can adjust is reasonable. I do not know if you are union or have a HR person you could talk to or what but just a thought. Frankly in my opinion what they are doing with holding the key hostage is already inappropriate as it invades your privacy as well as obviously not aligning with the spirit of the law once again. Also, gotta say as a taxpayer it would bother me if my tax dollars are going to micromanaging of a mother's pumping schedule! Nutty. Anyway, if you cannot pump at work anymore (or soon) I suggest have a plan in place to deal with any discomfort at work, and that would probably mean hand expressing in the bathroom, hopefully no need for a key in that case. Even if you were not able to save that milk, this would help protect your health as well as protect you milk production going forward. Yes of course it is true that your milk production is long established, and as long as baby is nursing with high frequency your production is likely to continue to meet baby's needs. But there is no way removing 3 milk expressions a day from your routine is not going to reduce production somewhat. How much and how much it matters depends on the individual situation. But reducing the number...
    5 replies | 138 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:25 AM
    I should have added, if the shield helps baby get a better latch. Sometimes the issue is something a shield is not going to help, but often they can help with baby not being able to latch effectively.
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:25 AM
    I'll come back and address the schedule later but in terms of teeth-teething is pain for babies and it's pain they aren't accustomed to. They absolutely comfort nurse more when they are teething because they get pain relief from the ocytocin in your milk. And whenever the night nursing increase to the point that the mother is resentful it usually IS teeth. Now, it's still totally normal for a baby to feed every 3-2 hours at night. But in terms of being able to tell or figure it out? Dose her at bedtime with Motrin. Right now it looks like she is sleeping a 4hour stretch between 6 and 10pm.Any 4-5hour stretch of uninterrupted sleep in a baby this young IS considered STTN. So if that is true? That she sleeps straight thru from 6-10 every night, She may not be in pain. If what's really happening is you just don't feed her until 10, what you are looking for with pain meds is longer actual sleep times. Because she would be getting the pain relief from the motrin rather than waking up and looking to you for pain relief.
    12 replies | 517 view(s)
  • @llli*jabez's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:39 AM
    @llli*jabez started a thread SNS in Increasing Your Milk
    Hello, My baby is almost 5 months and still supplementing. I never got my milk to be sufficient. I work during weekdays and spent my weekends breastfeeding my baby. I pump in the office every 3 hours and breastfeed my baby throughout the night. Although my baby doesn't throw tantrums for being hungry, I always feel that the milk she's getting is not enough. The only time I feel she's happy with the milk quantity she's getting is when I have mild cases of clogged ducts or I was not able to pump for like 4 to 5 hours. So, I want to address the weekend breastfeeding effort by buying SNS. Do you think it will still work now that she's 5 months old - she's so active and can now 'manipulate' my (.)(.). Like she can hold it and put in her mouth, etc. Recently, she will latch and use her hands to push herself away - end result is that she's on my nipple rather than my whole (.)(.). I would take her back from time to time and hold her hand instead so that it cannot move.. Thanks in advance for your inputs and insights.
    2 replies | 58 view(s)
  • @llli*ostowe's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:30 AM
    What happened after this - did you get your supply back? I stopped taking Reglan after just a week and now my supply is gone, will it come back, or is the only option to start the medicine again? It would absolutely break my heart to not be able to breastfeed anymore.
    1 replies | 1945 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:10 AM
    I agree with carm3. Just wanted to make a couple suggestions This is such a good question! Wouldn't it seem that if a mom makes enough milk, then baby should be able to get what they need at the breast? Yet so often moms pump and supplement with what they pump. Well, there is a case where a baby would need this even if mom makes enough, and that is if baby cannot (or for some reason cannot always) transfer milk very well, and the other is if baby does not nurse often enough. The milk transfer your LC measured was not terrible, but it was not quite the number that would be reassuring either. A baby who can transfer 1.5 ounces nursing 12 times a day is getting 18 ounces total, while a baby who is transferring 2 ounces nursing 12 times a day is getting 24 ounces. That is enough of a daily difference to make an impact on weight gain. So it would be nice to know how much baby is capable of transferring now and if there would be some way to increase that, if needed. Unfortunately how a latch looks is simply not definitive, also there is more to effective milk transfer than latch. The problem with not fantastic milk transfer aside slow gain is that over time, the not fantastic milk transfer causes milk production to reduce, obviously this would compound the initial problem. But of course if baby would nurse more often, then maybe baby would be able to get more milk that way and mom not have to pump. Yes at this age, many babies can nurse less than 12 times a day and get...
    4 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    June 21st, 2017, 05:59 PM
    Hi. Sorry I do not have time to respond longer but actually I do not have much to add. If you are managing to pump 8 times in 24 hours and feeding baby primarily your milk, then you are on track. All the other things you are doing are great. You and baby now need hands on help, so it is good you are going to get it soon. I would suggest ask the LC about tubing. No need to wait for the consult to ask a simple question. You could also try contacting jack newman via facebook or e-mail. You might not be able to find the tube you need locally but it should be available online. I think a lactation aid is a good idea however obviously if you can get baby nursing with out it and not needing supplements then you will not need it. Nipple shield might also help, obviously there are drawbacks but if you cannot get baby to latch and nurse effectively that would at least improve that situation and a nipple shield is far cheaper than a lactation aid. Kellymom has a good article. http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/wean-shield/ Hang in there! it is early days and you have every reason to think this situation can get turned around. You have done amazing getting your production up with the issues you were/are having with letdown and engorgement. You are on the right track. the ideas here esp. for instant reward might help http://kellymom.com/ages/newborn/nb-challenges/back-to-breast/
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*carmenoct24's Avatar
    June 21st, 2017, 05:09 PM
    Hi DJs mom, I modified my schedule after maddieb indicated that I could have problems with supply with so many hours without feeding or pumping. A typical day looks like this (at night I don´t try to manage the time of feedings, I just think "ok, she just ate, she cannot be hungry or wow it´s been awhile she probably really is hungry)": 8am breastfeed 11am solids (if she doesn´t want it, then formula or expressed breastmilk) 2pm espressed breastmilk or formula. If I am able to come home I breastfeed. If not, I pump. 4:00pm snack 5:00pm breastfeed 6:00pm breastfeed/sleep 10pm breastfeed
    12 replies | 517 view(s)
  • @llli*deja's Avatar
    June 21st, 2017, 03:02 PM
    Hello everyone DD was born 10 days ago and we've been having breastfeeding problems from the start. After a horrible experience we both suffered through during birth, she latched and nursed, not a great latch but not as bad as it was with DS. After that it went downhill. The latch was bad no matter what I tried, she was hungry, nervous, I was in really bad shape and to fast forward a few days, she was being bottle fed formula with nursing in between. My breasts got engorged on the third day but no milk was coming out, no more than drops at a time. I massaged, jot showers, expressing, hand pump...no use. The were painful and firm but no milk was coming out. That day we were being released from hospital and because of other complications I won't get into after the morning I wasn't able to do anything about my breasts until evening, aside from some brief nursing sessions. When we got home I hooked up my electric pump and started pumping and massaging. Next day it was a better, the second day they were soft and pain free again. But through all that, no milk, still drops. So the next few days I concentrated on getting my breasts up and running and slowly, bit by bit was able to eliminate the formula and am now bottle feeding expressed milk. Supply is still not where I want it to be, but I"m getting there.
    2 replies | 96 view(s)
  • @llli*julienne02's Avatar
    June 21st, 2017, 12:36 PM
    Thanks for the replies. I work for the government, and they are very much about the letter of the law, so I do not see them being accommodating at all, unless I were to get a doctor's note demanding they let me...when I was pumping for my second child I was able to use a room for which I had a key, and I pumped for 14 months though I was given pressure from the management to pretty much quit as soon as possible after a year. He was also slow to eat solids. Now, with my third son, the designated room has its own special key that is kept in the supervisor's office and I have to get it every time I need to use the room and then return it. So they basically know every single time I pump. I don't think it is coincidence, either...it seems they think that pumping after a year is unnecessary and taking advantage, of what I do not know. All the supervisors are either older unmarried women, or men, so I wouldn't expect to garner much sympathy from any of them. I don't think it is a fight I want to pick with them. It is so ridiculous that it is amusing to me, but anyone who uses the "lactation room" has to keep an Excel spreadsheet log of what time of every day we use the room, and send this spreadsheet every quarter to one of the human resource people. My little one sits with us at every meal, I give him one or two things that he can eat, and he is willing to put his tongue on lots of things to taste them (while I hold it for him) but hasn't shown any interest in eating...
    5 replies | 138 view(s)
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