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  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Today, 03:55 AM
    Yes. Possible, but not sure that its necessary. I, like you, am wondering what they are looking for. Localized area of infection or abscess can be seen on ultrasound, not so well on mammogram even without the patient lactating. Generalized breast pain can be very obscure as far as imaging goes. We scan a lot of patients with pain and I have yet to see a cause for it. Mind you, I am speaking specifically from an ultrasound standpoint. Obviously there are clinical explanations for pain. You may have something going on that doesnt present on imaging studies. My question would be, if you have a history of mastitis, would that not be an explanation for your pain? The only thing I can think of is if they are wondering if there is a mass blocking a duct, which I would think would be the least likely cause. Not to say that its not worth investigating, that's between you and your doctor. But given that you are breastfeeding and I think without a localized area, it may be difficult to find with either mammogram and/or ultrasound. Just throwing this out there, hormones are thought to cause breast pain in many women. I am not sure of the severity of your pain and if you have associated symptoms of infection such as redness, swelling, warmth, fever, elevated white blood cell count, etc. But occasional shooting pain MAY be associated with changes in hormones. Again, NOT a doctor.. just speaking from a little experience in an imaging clinical setting.
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 11:05 PM
    Thank you kmrs! I was wondering what else aside a mammogram could be done for breast imaging for a mom with a young baby who is making lots of milk. I mean, for one thing, ow. I have personally had 3 routine mammograms while lactating, but in every case my child was 24 months old or older so I was making much less milk than I would have been with a newborn. So it is possible to have a mammogram when nursing. I nursed child shortly before.
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*kmrs's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:47 PM
    I have 2 comments to add: I have sent a message to Jack Newman from their website. It tells you specific instructions on info to give and as long as you follow, they will reply. I got a detailed response very quickly. Id say within an hour. Second, I am not a doctor, but I am an ultrasound tech. When you go to have your ultrasound, my guess is the radiologist (Dr reading your ultrasound) would recommend you do ultrasound only since you are breastfeeding. If they want to follow it with a mammogram, I would question why. Not to say there is no possible reason and that there aren't circumstances that would warrant one, but I would question it. Ive been scanning 3 years and have never known a woman who was breastfeeding to have a mammogram. Do you have a targeted area of pain and/or redness, swelling, warmth (etc)? If your breast pain is generalized, you may want to look into a facility that does 'complete' breast ultrasounds. We don't do them at our facility but know where to direct people that are interested in that so you may have to look around, but I would personally do that before having a mammogram.
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:14 PM
    Well I can promise this is not a boy thing, not that that helps you any! Late onset nipple pain is sometimes thrush. Is that at all possibly going on? Some babies do seem to nurse more voraciously than others. We used to call these barracuda babies. And babies do get better at milk transfer as they get older, which sometimes results in shorter nursing sessions. But, it should not be painful or injurious to nurse, ever, at any age. This points to a latch issue. Can you go back to WIC for help? I am a little confused why they had an LLL Leader helping you at WIC- WIC programs usually have a peer counseling program (and those peer counselors may or may not be LLL Leaders.) Also, WIC programs without any lactation services commonly refer a mom in need to local LLL. But some WIC offices have full lactation services that allow mom and baby to have a professional consult with a professional lactation consultant (IBCLC) and this may be a good idea if possible, since it is a bit unusual for latch issues to arise at this stage. Your WIC program may be able to tell you about any low or no cost options in the area for seeing an IBCLC if they do not employ an IBCLC themselves. You can also work on correcting latch yourself using different positioning and latching techniques. Positioning that allows baby to have their head tilted back so they come to the breast more or less chin first- without a tucked chin, in oter words, is important for a comfortable latch and...
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*mom2jesserfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:15 PM
    I never went through this with my last baby. Is it a boy thing?
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*mom2jesserfly's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:14 PM
    I've been EBF my 5 month old son. We've worked on his latch with a LLL consultant at my local WIC department for a shallow latch. All was going well until he got a bit bigger. His suction is really strong and the bigger he gets, the stronger he's sucking. He's going through a growth spurt and it's killing me. He is cranky and wants to nurse all the time. He's waking 1-2 times at night now to nurse again. He has plenty of dirty and wet diapers along with weight gain, so I know he's getting enough. On top of that, he's been biting down on my nipples and thinks it's funny when I scream in pain. I dread when the tooth finally pokes through! What can I do? My nipples are so sore and I flinch when it's time for him to nurse again? :cry
    2 replies | 50 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:58 PM
    You do not know there are food intolerances. It is suspected by your baby's pediatrician but in no way proven that your baby is sensitive to anything you eat nor to dairy or soy specifically. Doctors leap to food eliminations because it is easy- for THEM. After all, it is not the doctor that needs to figure out how to take a major dietary component out of their diet just to test a theory. Also, testing if dairy or soy or anything else is a problem need not be a long process. If dairy is causing a problem, then eliminating all dairy for several days should show at least some improvement. In the rare case a baby is reacting to something in moms diet, Dairy is the most common culprit by far so it usually makes sense to start with dairy. If there is any noticeable improvement, you continue with the elimination and see what happens next. If there is no improvement at all, you put dairy back in and try eliminating soy. Some moms do both at once, and you can do that, but then you will not know which food caused the problems, assuming there is improvement indicating one of them is the cause. Then if there continues to be improvement off the dairy, after a few weeks of that, you can drink a big glass of milk and see if the symptoms resume. Because any improvement on the dairy free diet may very well have been coincidence. Reoccurring plugs and mastitis and now the blood in baby's stool are all indicative of over production. I forget if that is going on or not? Blood in...
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:38 PM
    It's me again. Alright so as y'all know I almost got mastitis AGAIN roughly 2.5 weeks ago. I had already been dealing with sharp pains throughout the breast, red nips, and tinder nips. Roughly a day or so after the mastitis issue, baby started to get the mucus poops.. and by mucus I mean REALLY mucusy. Also, they stink (compared to what they use to be) and are explosive (which they have always been I feel like). Several days later, my OB put me on Diflucan and we've been doing a treatment for thrush even though baby shows no signs we were both being treated. I was treated for about a week and a half before baby started, but now we have him on Nystatin (per his PED). I stopped Diflucan yesterday as my 14 day supply was up. About 2 days ago, the sharp pains came back. They aren't as bad but around day 4-5 of taking the Diflucan.. they had almost completely went away, but I still had the red and tender nips. But the pain has came back in the last 2 days. Fast forward. PEDS wanted to do a stool sample, and has done 2 so far. Both have blood in them, so she wants me off dairy and soy to test that. She also has referred me to a GI specialist. I saw my OB today and she did a culture of my milk for both bacteria and yeast/fungus. She also put in a referral to have an ultrasound done and said if that doesn't look ok, then she wants me to get a mammogram. She then prescribed me another 14 day round of Diflucan. My question is, I have read so many bad things about it.....
    4 replies | 81 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:32 AM
    Ok milk coming out of a wound on the breast is normal, plus one of the articles I came across trying to find more info for you said milk can come out of the Montgomery glands anyway. I am glad you are healing. If you continue to have any issues or concerns can you see an IBCLC?
    6 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*roschambon's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 10:09 PM
    Thank you maddieb and mommal for the advice and words of encouragement. After two days of just leaving it alone and rinsing it wit mild soap and water, that "thing" subsided. There is still something that comes out of it from time to time but it is not that swollen and painful anymore. I even tried to smell the discharge and examined it and pretty much it's like milk to me not pus. Ive also noticed that everytime I nurse or pump on the other side, that's the time the secretion comes out. And it does start to look like milk to me. Again, thanks for all your help.
    6 replies | 211 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:38 PM
    Here's what I think is important to keep in mind when contemplating night-weaning: - You can expect sleep to get worse before it gets better. A kid who is very attached to night nursing is unlikely to give it up without some level of increased sleep disruption. - You can expect some crying, because kids usually don't give up their favorite method of getting to sleep without being at least a little upset. Crying doesn't mean that you're "doing it wrong" or being a bad parent. Crying in the arms of a compassionate adult is not the same as a baby being forced to CIO all alone. - Sometimes night-waking toddlers are genuinely thirsty. A sippy cup or bottle of water is a great thing to have on hand. - The more dad or some other adult can handle the night-waking, the better. Babies don't expect to nurse when dad comes in the room, but they do expect it the moment they see mom. - It may he lot o avoid easy access pajamas. The more you can keep your baby's handstand mouth off your breasts, the less likely it is that she will end up nursing. - Communicate. Explain what is going to happen in simple language. "We are going to bed. (YOur nursing word) is going to bed. We will nurse in the morning, when the sun comes up." In the morning, reinforce the lesson. " You slept all night long! Now that the sun is up, it is time to nurse!" - If you decide to night wean, just do it. Vacillating, giving in one night but not the next- IMO that's likely to make night-weaning...
    3 replies | 424 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:29 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Nursing moms are exquisitely sensitive to their babies' presence in bed- their sounds, their breathing, their position... If a dad is worried about rolling on a baby, then it's the dad who should be moving out of the bed. Temporarily, anyways! The goal has to be to maximize sleep for mom. My kids were both evening screamers, and they could not be consoled by anything for more than 5 minutes, not even nursing. It sounds like you have a baby who can be quieted with the breast, so I encourage you to view that as an asset. Spend the evening just nursing and cuddling. Maybe catch up on a few podcasts or read a book. Let other evening activities go for now. Seriously, there are moms out there who would give their eyeteeth for some quiet evenings of endless nursing!
    4 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:17 PM
    :ita with MaddieB. Absolutely no danger to baby from ingesting some blood from mom- it happens all the time, with no harm resulting from it. Yellow milk may be a sign of lower production in one area of the breast. Lowered production can cause milk to appear more "creamy" than watery. And lowered production is very common after interruptions in breastfeeding, e.g., mom pumping exclusively for a few days, a case of mastitis that prevents one area of the breast from being drained, a mom being unable to remove milk for an extended period...
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 07:07 PM
    :hug Try to keep in mind that when you zoom in very close on a baby's weight gain, you start to see a lot of day-to-day fluctuation which makes it hard to derive useful information about broader trends. Some days a baby may gain twice the normal amount, some days he may not gain at all- and this is why we generally weigh babies only every month or so. A month's worth of faster-than-average gain and slower-than-average gain gets mushed together and you are left with an average that really tells you something. Right? Hang in there, you are doing an amazing job and even if you are headed toward 100% formula, that is okay. What is important is that you are and have been doing your best!
    41 replies | 1921 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 05:12 PM
    Ok sounds like things are going better, that is great. When a mom is having trouble with the laid back nursing position, it often is due to mom leaning back too much. There is no need to lean way back. You can be almost sitting up, just slightly reclined. Also, baby can be in any position at all, including cradle, and coming to the breast from any position. Yes usually the position is shown in pictures with mom leaned quite far back and baby in the same alignment as mom. But that is NOT the only way to do it. All laid back means is mom is not ramrod straight or hunched over baby. But again there is no need to master many positions at this point. If a traditional cradle hold works well for you, fine, as baby gets bigger and longer, you will both naturally find other positions that work as well.
    12 replies | 351 view(s)
  • @llli*end.dd's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 03:14 PM
    My baby girl s better in feeding now. But still I feel she feeds less and she s more distracted but I am finding ways to make her have her milk.i guess she s in a growth spurt which I am seeing visibly. Reg laid back position I am not getting hang of it. It's very difficult for me to get in to that position.i don know how to bring my baby or hold my baby or lift my baby to that position.but that's fine. She only fusses a lot to be in that position during night time before sleep. Slowly I guess she ll forget it and get used to the cradle hold.... Thank you so much for giving me advice on this and for ur help.. :)
    12 replies | 351 view(s)
  • @llli*end.dd's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 03:08 PM
    Thank you so much for clearing my doubt. Bcoz my baby girl loves to be held over my shoulder and see things.. :). Still I have not used carrier...
    12 replies | 351 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 12:26 PM
    There is no risk for baby ingesting small amounts of blood at the breast. This is a common occurrence for many reasons. Yellow is a normal variation in breast milk color. While this color change may be related to your surgery, I am not sure how, and in any case, that does not mean that milk is in any way unsafe for your baby to ingest. If you have seen your surgeon and he has ascertained there is nothing out of the ordinary going on with that breast, I am not sure what the concern is? Sorry no experience with other question.
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 12:19 PM
    Actually it is very unlikely a sober breastfeeding mother is going to roll onto her infant. There is a slight more risk of dad doing so (at this age- after 4 months research shows there is no difference.) Unfortunately the incorrect emphasis on overlying by nursing mom as being dangerous ignores the actual dangers of a baby sleeping in an adult bed, which are things that can avoided by preparing the bed properly. Again I suggest Sweet Sleep as a source of accurate information on the real science of infant sleep and how to bedshare most safely. This information may also be helpful to your husband.
    4 replies | 189 view(s)
  • @llli*jen.r24's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 09:49 AM
    Sounds like my 11 month old. So far, I'm just about coping with the bedsharing and sleep set up we have. However I'm also lucky as I have been able to take the year off work, so we'll see how I feel in a month's time once I am back to work during the day. Hubby and I are planning to use these resources for night weaning when the time comes. I'm willing to keep up the all night nursing at least until my lo is settled into daycare and more established on solids unless I hit sleep deprivation breaking point before that! Then I'd like to maybe put a boundary on it from 11pm-5am perhaps if I can. I've read that a lot of people have had success with Dr Jay Gordon's method. http://drjaygordon.com/attachment/sleeppattern.html http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/health-concerns/sleep-problems/night-weaning-12-alternatives-all-night-nurser Hope that helps a bit!
    3 replies | 424 view(s)
  • @llli*sweetbaby725's Avatar
    August 22nd, 2016, 05:57 AM
    Hello, I had 3 breast biopsies guided by MRI 3 weeks ago. My left breast had one, and my right breast had two. I'm still nursing my daughter and was told I could resume nursing within 48 hours after the biopsies. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to nurse at all on the right and had to wait 5 days for the left. The right still has brown blood, and one of the ducts is producing yellow milk. Only one stream is coming out my typical white breastmilk color I usually have on the right. I don't know what to do, and my breast surgeon has had me come in 5 times already with no help. I'm just weary about why one is yellow, and it's not blood tinged at all, just yellow milk. Thankfully everything was fine on the right breast, but I do have an intraductal papilloma on my left. Has anyone had that? They are telling me just to watch it instead of removing.
    2 replies | 98 view(s)
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