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  • @llli*mama7008's Avatar
    Today, 08:44 AM
    So sorry for your rough start and the challenges you are still working through. One of the more experienced posters will likely have more to offer, but I just wanted to say I know how you feel in regards to the anxiety - we, too, had tongue/lip ties in the beginning, and I worry every day that DD is getting enough to eat (she's almost 8 months now; was revised at 6 weeks). I know I shouldn't worry, because she is a chunky, happy little thing, but I do, especially if we have the odd dry diaper or she's fussy at the breast. Could you perhaps see your IBCLC and do a weighted feed just to reassure you that your baby is transferring well? I have a VERY strong letdown sensation (quite painful), and my LLL leader has said she has the same with her babes, but it lessens as time goes on. Perhaps this is what you are feeling (or not feeling!).
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*reena's Avatar
    Today, 07:29 AM
    So, lately my letdowns have been more sluggish. It really seemed to happen a few weeks ago when I had diarrhea and my supply dropped really low. I posted here about it. I also called my LLL leader/IBCLC and she told me that it will take the same amount of days I was having symptoms to bounce back. I had symptoms for 3 days, and sure enough, 3 days later my supply bounced back PLUS some! But after a week of having a bit of 'extra' milk and particularly full breasts, I have been having some issues with letdown. My letdowns don't feel as strong. Before, even if my breasts felt pretty 'empty' I would get that tingly pressure and by breast, often both, would become somewhat firm while ejecting milk. This just seems lessened lately. I am on domperidone, so my cycle is suppressed. I could be having hormonal changes, but the dom keeps me from menstruating. My baby is 10 months old. This just puts me in such a worried state. We had a month of stuggles in the beginning (tongue tie, producing/transferring only 1 oz, etc). I realize now that after getting my supply back on track, I had a little bit of an over supply until DD was 7 months old. Also had an overactive letdown. I have PPA and I believe I have PTSD from our struggle those early weeks. I pretty much worry all the time that one day, my production will fail me and I wont know and baby will be hungry and I just wont realize (basically what happened to me in the beginning). I would say it is fairly pervasive...
    1 replies | 8 view(s)
  • @llli*deborah.barrientes's Avatar
    Today, 07:00 AM
    Yes, please be *very* cautious with EO use. Just because they are "natural" does not mean they are safe, particularly for babies & children. This is a great article about the safety of EOs. http://naturopathicpediatrics.com/2014/09/08/essential-oil-safety-danger-essential-oils-seizures-children/
    3 replies | 558 view(s)
  • @llli*nj908's Avatar
    Today, 06:51 AM
    My gut tells me it is oversupply.
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*nj908's Avatar
    Today, 06:50 AM
    Thanks! Weight gain has been good. She was born at 7.12 and is now 10.8. I will try block feeding starting today. My pedi is adamant that it is something I'm eating and has had me eliminate dairy, soy and now eggs. She is very supportive of breastfeeding and does not want me to switch to formula. My gut tells me it is
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*deborah.barrientes's Avatar
    Today, 06:39 AM
    I pump once a day in the morning after feeding LO. I generally get 1.5 - 2 oz. from the side I fed LO on & 2.5 - 3 oz. off the other side. From what I've read, it seems like that's much more than what most BFing moms get while pumping. So, could my significant pumping output be a sign of oversupply? I'm suspicious I have an oversupply/OALD due to my LO's green, mucousy diapers & gas but I've also given up dairy since a milk protein allergy is also suspect. I've been block feeding in 3 hour increments for a couple of weeks but am wondering if I should increase that to 4 or 5 hours. The reason I'm hesitant to do so is I'm afraid of affecting my supply too much since I had supply issues with my first. Any insight? TIA! Edited to add: Baby is 6 weeks old today.
    0 replies | 14 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 05:53 AM
    Without knowing how your baby's weight gain has been I feel a little uncomfortable suggesting block feeding. But assuming that your baby's weight gain is normal or high, it does seem that overproduction is a problem for you and therefore you could do some block feeding (i.e., using one breast for more than one feeding in a row, "blocking" the other breast from being used.). Just be cautious with block feeding; it's designed to reduce supply and it's possible to go too far with it. IMO, caution with block feeding means the following: - You don't get too hung up on time. If your blocks are sometimes shorter or longer than usual, it's not a big deal. - You watch your baby. Let's say you fed her twice on one breast and she still seems hungry after the second feeding- well, maybe it's time to swap in the second breast. Block feeding is an art, not a science, so don't be afraid to go by feel or to make a mistake. You're not aiming for perfection! - You remember that supply varies over the day, so many women need longer blocks when supply is at a high point and shorter blocks or no blocks at all when supply takes a natural dip. For example, I needed to block feed in the mornings, when my supply was really high, but by evening I was sometimes offering both breasts at a feeding! - Don't get so hung up on the idea of reducing supply via blocks that you are afraid to offer the breast. Oversupply and fast letdowns marry well with frequent feedings. Are you currently...
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*nj908's Avatar
    Today, 03:06 AM
    Thanks for the response! I have a very painful, overactive letdown. When I pump I get an ounce/minute and when I did a weighted feed at my LC she took in almost 4 Oz in under 8 minutes. I had an oversupply with my first but it was corrected by using one side/feeding. Interestingly I never feel engorged and rarely leak.
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:48 PM
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! The first thing to know about bloody poops is that in a baby who is generally healthy and growing at a normal pace, they are something to watch but not something to worry too much about. They can also be very persistent, so please release yourself of the feeling of frustration and discouragement if you cannot get this fixed ASAP. Can you tell us a bit more about what you're experiencing, with respect to supply? That is, what symptoms of oversupply are you currently experiencing aside from fast feedings, green and bloody poops, and needing to use just one breast per feeding? And how has your baby's weight gain been?
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:35 PM
    Great questions from MaddieB! I, too, am not overly concerned with flow sped. When the baby is gaining weight at a normal pace, it really doesn't matter if the milk is coming slow, fast, or in between. A lot of moms get trapped in the idea that if the baby is fussy, the mom must be doing something wrong and needs to adjust things so that everything is "just right" for her baby. If her flow is too fast, she needs to slow it down, if it's too slow she needs to speed it up... I personally hate when moms try to adjust their flow for their babies, because I think it short-circuits the baby's learning process. A baby is generally capable of learning to nurse in such a way that the baby controls the milk flow. If mom never allows that learning process to take place, mom can get caught in an endless cycle of trying to make her flow "just right" at all times!
    2 replies | 105 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:27 PM
    I also leaked a lot, and slept on towels with my first. With my second, I bought a waterproof pad. It's actually designed for adults who wet the bed. But it worked great for leaky breasts- it was less hot than a towel and washed really well. If you leak like crazy, you might want to buy two. But they're worth it, I swear- and you can use them in your kids' beds when they are getting out of diapers.
    5 replies | 120 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:23 PM
    Good a ice from the PPs. I also wonder why you feel the need to reduce feedings to 2 per day- are you perhaps worried about being able to pump at work?
    4 replies | 119 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:17 PM
    It is possible to get your milk back using the pump alone. It's perhaps not quite as easy as when you have an eagerly nursing baby, but definitely possible! When using a pump ago relactate, here's what you want: 1. A very good pump. A hospital-grade rental would be ideal. 2. Correctly sized shields. 3. Patience, persistence, and determination. Relactation doesn't happen overnight. Think of it as a long term project! 4. Willingness to pump frequently. 8-12 times a day is best, and more is always better. Some of the pump sessions should take place overnight. If you can't always get 8 sessions in per day, don't think that you must give up. Strive for the ideal, accept that some days you probably won't achieve it. Some pumping is always better than no pumping!
    1 replies | 94 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:35 PM
    My dd ate her frozen milk as a slushy so all of it just got scraped out of the bag with a spoon. You could try that. I am however starting to wonder if I just have a weird kid. I don't know if all babies would like milk slushies. :)
    6 replies | 253 view(s)
  • @llli*m11612's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:06 PM
    Bxlgirl- Pumping while biking! :D I would love to see that! :D If anyone could figure out how, that really would be the ultimate in making the most of a work commute. I'm envisioning a large poncho and some sort of stabilization device. LOL
    13 replies | 520 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:05 PM
    The first initial latch is the most painful part. But during which he's nursing sometimes there's a little bit of pinching. I look to see that his mouth is still covering most the areola and his bottom lip is still fanned out like a fish. There are no crack, bleeding, or scabs. I use some Medela nipple cream after he nurses. I've tried every position and found that I can get him a better latch in either the football or cross-cradle hold. We've tried the relaxed or reclining position couple times and still trying to perfect that one :) It is definitely getting better- just a week ago the pain was so bad I was on the verge of giving up but having read other mother's post on here and everyone's supporting advice/tips- I managed to use those suggestions to better my son's latch.
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*nj908's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:30 PM
    My daughter is 6 weeks old and EBF. Since the day we brought her home she's been gassy and fussy, grunting all night long, having explosive poops, etc. In the past few weeks her poop has changed from yellow to green with mucus and sometimes has flecks of blood in it. When I took her to the pediatrician, they looked at her diaper under the microscope and said it had a ton of microscopic blood. I've been dairy and soy free for almost three weeks and while I feel like she's grunting less and is more comfortable, her diapers are still the same, maybe getting worse. She is my second child and my first definitely did not have diapers like these. I'm suspecting that maybe it's not a food intolerance at all, but it's oversupply. She eats pretty much every three hours and I only feed her on one side during each feeding. She eats quickly, in under 10 minutes. When I took her to an IBCLC she ate almost 4 oz. in under 10 minutes. Since I'm already feeding on just one side, how else can I correct this? Should I stay on one side for every two feedings? I'm getting discouraged and frustrated and just want to fix this. Please help!
    5 replies | 72 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:29 PM
    They don't appear to be odd...their orange and a bit on the runny side and a little bit seedy...and it's a pretty massive amount. I assume upset tummy cause he's passing ridiculous amount of gas and when I'm holding him he's stretching out and arching his back like he's trying desperately to push something out. But I honestly have no idea Thank you for posting the link.
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:28 PM
    Can you describe the pain you are having and also what you are trying for it (Latch ideas, positioning?) Does your nipple have any signs of injury? Nursing commonly does hurt a bit in the early weeks, but it is a sign something may be not quite right and not something you want to ignore...if it is starting to get better steadily, great, but if not, perhaps we can offer some ideas.
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:23 PM
    Do the poops look odd? I am wondering why you think it is an upset tummy? So here I am again a contrarian, I do not believe in growth spurts, not because growth does not come in spurts- it does- but because an infant is growing so incredibly fast in the newborn period that the whole period is a growth spurt. In other words, every day could be like today and it would still be normal... Some babies start having colicky behavior around this age too. Meaning, difficult to console by any means. Usually, this is entirely normal and temporary. As long as baby is overall healthy and gaining I would not worry. If nursing calms baby best, nurse as much as you like. Nursing cannot possibly harm baby and will probably help. And figure out a way for you or someone else to comfortably hold baby most of the time. Being held by mom or another trusted adult is what babies this age need most of the time. More fussy baby ideas: http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/09_fussybabyideas.pdf and http://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000000001WAB/WAB_Tear_sheet_Toolkit/10_what_about_partners.pdf
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:15 PM
    You can know this is terrible advice because they are told to do it in the hospital. You would need a crystal ball to know a mother is going to have supply issues in the first couple of days after birth. To be fair to hospital staff, sometimes moms are told to pump in the moment (due to poor latch, poor gain, what have you) and then mom is never told to STOP pumping. This is because follow up care for lactation issues is even more abysmal than the care available in the hospital. I also think that hospitals care about statistics, and they want the stat of "This (high) percentage of mothers who came in wanting to nurse left the hospital nursing." So sometimes hospital based lactation support is under pressure to throw every idea imaginable at a mom, including some "just in case" pumping, because they see the mom only briefly and there is no follow up plan. The flip side of this situation is the mom who is getting no help with latch pain or her other concerns because baby is at least latching and the hospital can count her as a breastfeeding success, even if she stops nursing a week later with horrendously injured nipples. Fear of inadequate milk production is epidemic among breastfeeding mothers and has been for a very long time. I blame formula companies for this. And frankly, pump manufacturers could do a way better job of explaining to moms who and who does not need to pump.
    3 replies | 80 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:04 PM
    Thank you for clarifying the fore milk/hindmilk!! I feel MUCH better and more confident my baby is getting exactly what he needs from me :)
    11 replies | 313 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52 PM
    Sorry I keep asking so many questions- this is my first child and none of my family members have ever breast fed their babies so I can't really ask them questions...but today my LO turned one month and all day long he has been cluster feeding and HARDLY napping...when he does nap it's only about 30 minutes then we wakes up screaming bloody murder until I pick him up and I have to either walk/bounce him, or rock him in the glider, or nurse him so to calm him down...then MAYBE he'll fall back to sleep only to repeat the whole process over and over and over. He's had a wet diaper every nursing session and he's had 3 poopy diapers so far today. So is this a growth spurt or is he experiencing a very upset tummy? Thanks in advance!!!
    2 replies | 64 view(s)
  • @llli*jewell0405's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:15 PM
    Thank you so much for your reply! Yes the blue is very faint color and seems to only be in the corners of his mouth. Yes, he's definitely gaining weight and have normal outputs. Breastfeeding is getting better I think. Occasionally I will have some pain and I try to relatch- sometimes he won't latch back on- or if I think he's about finished nursing I'll endure the pain a little bit longer so I know he'll finish. He still has moments that he'll be latched and then he'll yank backwards with nipple still in his mouth and stretch out as far as he can without releasing the nipple, then he'll curl back towards my body and continue sucking. I've no idea what that's about. Again I appreciate your help you have provided!
    4 replies | 139 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 04:13 PM
    So glad to hear! Best wishes for his recovery.
    4 replies | 281 view(s)
  • @llli*dormir41's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:56 PM
    Interesting question! I wasn't told I had to pump, but I was told the every 2 hours crap as well. The every 2 hours is more what my daughter does now at 4 1/2 mths . . . .well, more or less. She changes things every time I think I've figured her out . . . .babies!:lol I started pumping maybe 2 or 3 days in bc baby refused the breast . . .my milk came in, she was fussy, who knows. I've since learned this is very common at that age. I continued pumping to build my stash once she was nursing again but mostly one breast while nursing the other, and usually only once a day. Now I pump at work to keep my supply and to ensure she has at least some milk while I'm away. I'm now wondering if I just need help with my pump since I get a lot at certain times but struggle at others. I'd love to see bf support that actually makes sense at the hospital. I have at least one friend who had an awful experience. She had inverted nipples and instead of working with her on it, they made her bottle feed formula and she lost weight until they switched her to special formula. I think it still haunts her today . . .her daughter is a fantastic 7 yr old that nonetheless has tons of health issues. It wasn't until I came on here and met with a good LC that I started figuring out what I really needed to do . . . and almost none of it coincided well with what I was told in the hospital.
    3 replies | 80 view(s)
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