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  • @llli*oloughlins's Avatar
    Today, 02:21 AM
    Hi I'm just wondering if anyone would have some advice for me. My son was born on 3rd November (he's 6 weeks old). I had a complete fear of breastfeeding so I started with formula straight away. However when he was 4 weeks old, I was doing skin to skin with him and he started rooting. I realised then that there was nothing to be scared of. And also the formula has being causing a lot of prom em for him (excess gas, reflux)My milk had nearly dried up (I managed to express one drop that night). I started researching relactation. I attended the post natal breastfeeding support group 2 weeks ago and they got him to latch on straight away! I was so delighted, especially as he's never latched on before. I rented the symphony madela hospital grade pump and bought the madela SNS also. The sns worked well for a few days but he kept getting his arms caught up in the tubes. For the past 2 weeks this has been my routine: Putting him to the breast before every feed. Pumping after every feed. (Every 3hrs during the day and once overnight) Taking Motillium and Fenugreek to boost supply. Skin to skin and baby wearing. I'm am now producing 5oz a day (that's an increase from about 20mls I got the first day I used the pump.
    0 replies | 9 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymoru's Avatar
    Today, 01:20 AM
    The lactation consultant only said 'good job' when we went in the other day. But that was so frustrating because I hadn't pumped in about five hours so they were engorged and I was told not to feed him while on the medicine I was given for my cold. So there were some issues there with amounts she saw me feed him at the time. Normally, I'll feed for 20-30 minutes, switching breasts when he lets go and if he still shows signs of hunger after a few minutes of being down, I would give him milk like they had me do in hospital. Usually that was between 40-50 ml per feed and was almost every feed. During the three days I was on medication, I strictly bottle fed formula and that was about 80ml per feed for three days. I got some advice from a close friend back home and she suggested pumping to see how much I'm actually producing per feed. I just did that and pumped out about 40ml/1.5 ounces. That's about half of what he should be getting per feed. I timed the pumping for 1.5 hours after his last feed on my breasts to get an estimate since newborns tend to eat 1.5-2 hours from what I've read/been told. If I wait three hours, I may have more milk, but I don't know if his tummy will last three hours to receive more or not. I just don't know how to produce more milk. And I'm just beyond frustrated with the supplementing formula problem. I specifically requested no formula to be used at the hospital and, granted the first feed had to be since I had a c-section, the rest of...
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*avabelle's Avatar
    Today, 12:31 AM
    I have an almost 11 week old who has struggled to breastfeed from the beginning. She had posterior tongue tie (divided at 3 weeks), a high spoon shaped palate, a more recessed than usual jaw and smaller than usual chin. I have inverted nipples but can easily pull them out (I am still nursing my 2.5 year old) Her suck was weak and dysfunctional. A slight heart murmur has been found and her paediatrician wonders if she has a narrower than usual airway related to the recessed jaw. She was an incredibly sleepy baby for the first 4 weeks - fell asleep after a few sucks each time I put her to the breast. For the first 3 weeks I essentially expressed into her mouth - she was unable to stimulate letdowns by herself except on 3 notable occasions. Her weight gain was slow. After her TT division she became much sleepier than usual; we tried to syringe/ cup/ sns/ bottlefeed her to get milk into her but she didn't wake. She was admitted to hospital eventually for poor intake and tube fed. We were discharged from hospital trying her on the breast and topping up by (a fast flow) bottle of EBM (she originally was unable to take the bottle as she had so little suck).
    0 replies | 16 view(s)
  • @llli*lauracooley's Avatar
    Today, 12:05 AM
    Wow. That's actually a great idea and I'm sure many people will find this very helpful. Such contribution will lessen the burden of some people. In an economy like this, a lot of people have their expenses budgeted to the penny making it really difficult when prices start to increase. Sometimes, you still need a payday loan cash loan so you can pay for the food bill this month. It is very important to have the quick cash since food expenses are growing a ton, particularly on things such as milk and cheese. With the milk that you're going to donate, it will help a family for a day or two. But I sure hope that prices will go down so people will not be so stressed when it comes to budgeting for food.
    5 replies | 1194 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:41 PM
    'reflux' (painful burps, pain laying down, lots of spit up) with two kids, medicated one and not the other. What helped most in both cases was: held baby more or less upright more or less most of the time, but ALWAYS after nursing for at least 30-60 minutes. frequent nursing sessions
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:13 PM
    Mommal is right, the official line is milk that has defrosted milk should be used asap and should not be refrozen. However, several years ago a study was done where they looked specifically at what happens if frozen milk defrosts (for just such a situation as a power outage) and refreezes and the results are less clear that discarding the milk is always needed assuming milk stayed reasonably cold. See this article: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/milkstorage/frozen-milk-power-outage/ Here is what she says in the linked article:" However, there is some information on refreezing human milk. A 2006 study looked at the effects of refreezing previously frozen milk (Rechtman, Lee, & Berg, 2006). The researchers used donor milk that had been expressed by mothers without following any special sanitary guidelines. The frozen milk was thawed overnight at refrigerator temperature, separated into batches, then refrozen in separate batches and thawed for a second time to room temperature. At this point, different batches were (1) kept at 46°F/8°C for 8 or 24 hours; (2) kept at 73°F/23°C for 4 or 8 hours; (3) exposed to multiple freeze-thaw cycles of various lengths; and (control) kept at -4°F/-20°C. Vitamin content was adequate for all the refrozen samples, and none of the sample batches that had been refrozen had unsafe levels of bacteria." Can you call the power company and find out how long power was actually out? What else was in the freezer? are you worried about those...
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:49 PM
    Human breastmilk is the biologically normal food for the human infant, including the infant digestive system. Frequent pooping, as is common with breastfed babies is thus biologically normal. It is well known that formula fed babies have less frequent poops generally speaking. This is not a plus for formula. Spitting up is normal in infants both formula fed and breastfed. Yes it has actually been studied. if 400 grams is roughly 14 ounces as my online converter tells me, and baby gained that in 7 days, then your baby is gaining well above average and probably does not require supplements. What did the doctor say about that very rapid gain? And how much formula was baby getting? This is absolutely terrible advice. A baby who is gaining twice the average is not hungry. But babies nurse for many reasons aside from hunger and it is important that they do so. Formula supplements, given when not needed, cause many breastfeeding problems. If this is the typical advice moms are getting where you live, it is a wonder anyone breastfeeds.
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:42 PM
    Have you tried adjusting her and your positions? While this behavior does not sound particularly alarming, I think whenever nursing hurts consistently it is a problem.
    5 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*sweetbabyjames's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:24 PM
    Dh and I live 1700 miles away from family. We are very limited on babysitters. Last weekend we just took baby along. Lol, went out around 6, nursed him and solids at 6:30 at the restaurant, long car ride (he fell asleep), went and walked around our local downtown, dessert and home all while he slept. It was great. Then home for bath and bedtime nursing. Then sexy time for dh and I.
    12 replies | 604 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:27 PM
    "making biscuits " is what we call it around here. She does actually do that, that I've noticed and have no problems with.. but after a while she will start thrashing. least that's what it's coming across as. with her unlatching and relatching and pulling, it gets pretty painful. if I take her away to give myself a breather, she'll cry. Most of the time I just endure because I figure she's doing what she needs to do. But it got me wondering enough to ask about it here.
    5 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:22 PM
    Definitely drink more water. All that liquid in the milk has to come from somewhere. I go through at least 5 litres of water a day. It helps to always have water nearby. Buy a giant water bottle, keep it filled, and close by.
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*hayashi's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:18 PM
    What if no one was home when that happened, then electricity came back before anyone got home. How do you know if frozen milk is still good? Anyone got experience like that?
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:14 PM
    Have you ever seen a puppy or kitten nurse? At a certain point, they will start kneading the mother's udder with their paws. This apparently stimulates better milk flow. Baby humans often do the same thing, but because baby humans are so uncoordinated it often comes across as thrashing or hitting. I don't think you need to "fix" this unless is it uncomfortable for you. If it is, you might want to explore using different nursing positions, particularly reclined ones, which use gravity to hold the baby on the breast.
    5 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*cutiemark85's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    yes i have. doesn't seem to do much tho :(
    5 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:43 PM
    :ita There is nothing that strikes me as inherently wrong with or abnormal about this situation with the possible exception of the tenderness you're experiencing. When a baby is properly latched, he should be able to feed literally nonstop and not cause any soreness. Soreness plus milk transfer which seems to be on the low end suggests the possibility of a latch issue. So it's definitely a good idea to see the LC!
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:40 PM
    :lol I have to be right. Crows aren't kosher.
    21 replies | 455 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:40 PM
    Of course it is good for you to keep yourself adequately hydrated, but I don't think, unless you are very dehydrated, that this would impact your pump output greatly. Because it could only have neutral or positive impacts (even if just on your own health), there is no reason not to be more cognizant of drinking enough water for yourself, though. But if you are exclusively pumping, and pumping is not going how you'd like it to go, this change alone, I think is unlikely to effect a big change in how pumping is going. You say you have just started pumping; was baby exclusively nursing at the breast before this, or were there supplemental bottles as well? When did baby stop nursing, and was there anything that precipitated that change (that occurred at around the same time, that could have caused baby to stop nursing)? How many times are you pumping per day? Are you offering to nurse at those times too? Some more background on what your current routine is, as well as babe's nursing history, I think, would help folk come up with ideas to help you troubleshoot the situation to help you reach your goals, whether with getting baby back to the breast, or exclusively pumping.
    4 replies | 109 view(s)
  • @llli*browncow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:30 PM
    My little man is 6 weeks old and has some symptoms of reflux. I'm trying to decide if we should try some meds for him or just wait it out. He's not a huge spitter but it does seem to bother him and I often hear milk come back up that he doesn't necessarily spit out. He will gulp and cough quite a lot between feedings and in his sleep. his nose sounds congested though there's no snot or anything and he constantly rubs his face. My pedi said meds were up to me. How did you manage a baby with reflux?
    1 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:29 PM
    Have you tried breast compressions when she starts her fussiness?
    5 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:27 PM
    Pump output is a imperfect indicator of supply, unfortunately. Pumps extract milk with very different mechanics than babies nurse with, and an efficiently nursing baby will almost always be more 'effective' than even a really good pump. If you are pumping to replace a nursing session, I would say that it is equally about signaling to your body that 'hey, there's still a baby here, there is still a need for this milk,' than simply getting the milk to put in the bottle. That said, and I hear that there are some other pieces to this puzzle, if you are wanting to move toward exclusively nursing, at the breast, if you can nurse with a latch that is comfortable, and you are around, it might be best to just nurse, nurse, nurse, as much as baby wants to and is willing to nurse. Here is my favorite quote about spit-up, from Dr. Jack Newman: https://www.facebook.com/DrJackNewman/posts/263523610465359 There are more parts to your post, but I'll have to return.
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:14 PM
    Mama, you are doing so well already- I hope you can 'hear' that, and take it to heart a little, and I hope that there are people in real life too who are telling you that. Having a newborn baby is incredibly challenging-- rewarding in many ways too (but maybe many of those ways are rewarding in retrospect) but it can be hard to feel that when you're in the thick of it, sleeping in very choppy, short stretches, with new-mama ears hearing every little peep and startling you awake, recovering from a BIG physical event, learning about this brand new family member, etc... It is so hard! But you are doing great, you really are. I will try to respond to some more, if someone doesn't address it before I can, but I wanted to make sure I covered this little part at least.
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymoru's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:03 PM
    I try pumping but last night I tried and got very little pumped out. I was full this morning when I woke up and baby drank a lot but he also spit up which he hasn't done before until today, at least with breast milk. At the doctor the other day he had gained about 400 grams in a week, but we have also been using formula as a supplement because that's what the hospital staff told us to do if he was still hungry after breast feeding, which he almost always seems to be hungry after a feeding. It's worse at night because my breasts feel so empty and he is on so long that he doesn't get full and doesn't fall asleep except for like ten minutes and then is awake and hungry again...so I end up with sore breasts from the constant feedings, he is still hungry, and the only supplement we have is formula. I want to get away from formula use if at all possible but I can't seem to get a break to get ahead of his constant feeding to pump a reserve or even get him full enough to sleep ._. And with the formula, he only pooped like once a day and with breast milk, he seems to be having two-three a day...sometimes it's very little others it's like Mount Rushmore exploded. He's also showing signs of distress now at the breast and becomes fussy or scrunches his face when feeding and fidgets, wails his arms and arches his back during a feed. And because of that, if he has a good latch, he loses it and I have to relatch him and it causes him to be more distraught. I feel like I really can't...
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    A baby this age nursing very often is normal. In fact many babies seem to "wake up" somewhere around 1-3 weeks of age and want to nurse way more than they did before. If a baby is nursing very often and able to normally transfer milk, then it makes sense breasts would feel soft as they do not have time to 'fill up.' This is actually a good thing, as long as baby is getting enough milk. Because 1) breast being empty tells body to make more milk and 2) breast being full tells body to make less milk and if mom gets very full (engorged) it leads to many breastfeeding issues. How do you tell a baby is getting enough? Weight gain. Not behavior, or at least, not only behavior. Weight gain measured accurately on the same scale will tell you what you need to know most accurately. And between weight checks, normal amount of poop output is a good indicator baby is getting enough in most cases. So how is baby's weight gain and poop output? Also, when baby is supplemented, are you pumping? Every time baby is supplemented, that is one (or more) less times baby will nurse. Since milk production depends on frequency of milk removal, it is important to pump whenever baby gets supplements.
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:42 PM
    Hi. Is baby gaining normally? I do not think you are doing anything wrong. There are some simple things to try to help baby get more each time baby nurses, namely, breast compressions and switching sides once or more often every feeding. I assume the weighted feeds were done by a board certified lactation consultant? (If not, how were they done?) Did she talk to you about the possibility baby is having some specific issue with latch or sucking, and or, if there is some reason to suspect milk production is the issue? If you have not seen an IBCLC, it may help to get latch checked, because feeling tender should not typically happen simply because baby is nursing a lot. Also sore nipples plus not great milk transfer may together indicate there is some problem. I think there is an incorrect assumption out there that a baby 'should' always take in some certain amount per feeding or 'should' go a certain amount of time between nursing sessions or 'should' start taking longer stretches 'by' some certain age. And in fact this is not how it works at all. Some (few) babies at this age nurse 6 times a day and some nurse 16 times, and every thing in between. There are many reasons for this. Assuming baby is gaining normally and breastfeeding is comfortable for mom, one is not better than the other, the moms whose babies nurse less often are not doing anything better or more right than moms whose babies nurse more often. One reason some babies nurse more often than others...
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mamaleftcoast's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:23 PM
    Hi there, I'm at bit of a loss. I have an 8 week old and he's always seemed to eat every 1 to 2 hours. I thought this was fine and would begin to space out the older he got but he still continues to want to eat every 1.5 to 2 hours. I try to calm him down but he is raging pretty hard. I feel like he has plenty of time on the breast but maybe he wasn't drinking a ton. So we did a weigh in a few times and each time he is only taking about one to 1.5 ounces. Also, I had to leave a couple of bottles with DH over the weekend and the same went for him. He wouldn't take more than that. Im getting tired of nursing so frequently and him not seeming to get much. Or has he been snacking for the past several weeks? Is there something I'm doing wrong? Or is this normal eating behavior for some? My nipples are getting a bit tender from so many feedings. Thank you!
    2 replies | 57 view(s)
  • @llli*mommymoru's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:49 PM
    Well the latching is getting better since yesterday, however, I feel like now I have a new problem. My breasts are always soft, never firm and full like they should be unless I don't pump/nurse for like 4-6 hours. And my LO was on my breast like all day yesterday almost and never seemed full. My nipples were so sore by the end of the night, I couldn't even feed during the night and had to supplement formula just because every time I tried feeding during the evening/night I got pain shooting through my breast. I really just don't think I"m making enough milk for him even though he nurses almost all the time and the latching is getting better. I'm really in over my head here with not knowing what to do or if I'm doing something wrong.
    10 replies | 156 view(s)
  • @llli*greatestjoy's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:16 PM
    As special as nursing is to you, I can promise you it is just as special to your toddler, and I promise it will not end even if (not saying this will happen to you) your milk were to dry up. I have been nursing my son for 4 years, and am currently nursing a 38 day old girl. The first time I nursed my son after giving birth to my daughter, I saw the biggest look of surprise in his eyes. He made a very curious and confused face when he tasted the milk. It was very obvious that this milk thing was "new" to him. Here I was, all this time, thinking that I was still making milk for my 4 year old, when it was clear that I wasn't. I knew I wasn't making tons, but I thought he must be getting at least half an ounce. Since I had stopped pumping at 1.5 years of age, how was I supposed to know when I stopped producing? His nursing pattern was no different, and he still took enjoyment from it every nursing session. Who knows for how long I did not produce milk? The 9 months of pregnancy? 1 year? 2 years? Who knows... and who cares? There is so much more to nursing than just milk. All I know is that nursing has been the greatest joy for me and for him, when I had milk in abundance and when I had no milk. I know this will be the case for you too.
    21 replies | 455 view(s)
  • @llli*momager's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:57 PM
    Thank you both for responding! I am trying to get my confidence up, never nursed a baby this long so it's uncharted territory and I feel lost. I will accept her 4 feedings as normal and press on!
    3 replies | 162 view(s)
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