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  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 08:26 PM
    Well, the idea that a baby sucking their hands is a hunger cue is something that has always bothered me. Sure, if baby is hungry, they might suck their hands. Of course. But since babies suck on fingers and fists and feet and toes in the womb, where a baby is presumably never hungry, it can not always mean this. My oldest two had not found their hands at this age. My youngest - I think she came out sucking on her pointer finger. And I mean, she sucked on it so hard and stuck it so far into her mouth she gagged on it sometimes. Sometimes she switched it up and ot would be a thumb or a fist or two fingers or whatever. Who knows why she did this, but it certainly was not because she was hungry. I had overproduction and she was gaining like mad, there was more milk than she could handle, really. That is the problem when there is too much, it's always something. Anyway, away she would suck, if she wasn't nursing, the fingers were in there. There is lots of information out there about tongue and lip tie. I wish I could point you to some definitive information source, but at this point there really is not much that is definitive. Breastfeeding experts in general agree that tongue tie can mean that the tongue is impeded in its movement, and that can in turn make breastfeeding either painful for mom or make it hard for baby to extract milk, or both. The problem is there are babies with fairly obvious tongue tie that seem to nurse problem free, and others with out anything...
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Today, 06:28 PM
    Yeah, but it's just the small little tip. It's most pronounced when he tries to stick his tongue out, only the little forked tip comes out... and his upper lip has a really obvious frenulum which what I have been reading said is common in conjunction with the tounge ones. Well what really freaks me out is when he frantically tries to eat his hands. We were told it was a "late hunger cue" and he looks so desperate when he does it. My husband thinks he acts hungry when he has wind though so that might explain it? Maybe he just registers it as digestive discomfort in either case?
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:29 PM
    Hi Nap. I think at this point, it is impossible to say what exactly is going on. It sounds like you have had many issues that might have led to not the best milk production outcome, no matter what the possibilities were for complete milk production in the beginning. Even now I am not sure you really have low milk production. Unfortunately, not being able to pump enough milk for baby to have over separations is a fairly common issue and occurs with moms whose milk production is entirely normal. If you saw a properly trained and educated LC, typically she would have examined your breasts to some degree, at least, looked at them, and also taken a history of your development, (when your breasts developed, when you started menstruating, did you have any fertility issues etc) because that information can sometimes provide insight into what might be going on with a mom's milk production. However, some moms with what might be called "classic" hypoplasia in appearance have normal milk production. This look is NOT always a barrier to producing enough milk. On the other hand, some moms with breasts that have an entirely normal appearance may not make enough milk. Low milk production is a difficult puzzle and often figuring out what is going on amounts to (hopefully educated) guesswork.
    1 replies | 61 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 05:02 PM
    Do you mean the tongue has a heart shape? With the "tip" of the tongue making the top indent of the heart? And all I can say is that a baby who has just had 4 ounces to eat is not starving or even hungry. Babies are compelled by instinct to seek to nurse pretty much constantly. There are theories as to why this is, and basically they boil down to the fact that for most of human history when we were nomadic hunter gatherers with little shelter and certainly nowhere an infant could be put down safely, a baby who was held and nursed most of the time lived, and babies who were put down and did not object did not. If you think about infant primates and their moms, they are never put down. So baby acting like they are starving (by which I assume you mean, crying to nurse (?) after nursing for some time or after a bottle or even if they have fallen asleep and you try to put baby down, that crying to nurse again is normal and not necessarily related to actually needing or wanting anything else to eat.
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Today, 04:04 PM
    The rest of the day wasn't great, even after the formula (120mls in one case!) he still acted like he was starving. I have no clue how he could be, he must have been stuffed! But I did start to question something. Everyone had said "well he's not tongue tied" at the hospital in the first couple of days when I had scabby nipples and I took that for granted, but I read sometimes its not so obvious. One thing that makes me wonder is he has a tiny fork in his tongue. It's just a small one, but it makes me wonder. I am going to ask the midwife if someone can check it more carefully tomorrow anyway. I really feel like he doesn't suck as well as he could even though he latches ok now.
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:41 PM
    It really sounds like you are on the right track. I agree about the lactation aid, no need at this point since you and baby are making good progress. It is nice that there are tools. When used appropriately they can make all the difference. As much as I hated using a nipple shield I have no doubt it saved breastfeeding for me and my baby.
    6 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*lllkaren's Avatar
    Today, 11:46 AM
    Choosing a Breastpump, by Robyn Roche-Paull at Breastfeeding in Combat Boots, is an excellent overview of the different types of pumps that are available. While it was written specifically for moms in the military, most of it is useful to anyone who is looking for a pump. I've also collected some comments from moms here on the Forums about what they like and don't like about different pumps: Breast Pump Reviews. HTH!
    1 replies | 86 view(s)
  • @llli*zachary.smommy's Avatar
    Today, 09:24 AM
    Good for you for sticking up for yourself! That is frustrating.
    10 replies | 262 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    Today, 06:04 AM
    Welcome to the forum! Let's start with the WHEN part of your question. Despite the doctor's "go ahead", the recommendation of the AAP and the WHO remains that a baby get breastmilk or formula only until 6 months, for 2 reasons. First, breastmilk provides ideal nutrition, and feeding a baby solids only reduces the baby's intake of breastmilk and replaces it with foods that lack the nutritional and immunological benefits of human milk. Second, delaying solids was thought to have a prescribe effect against allergy. Recently, new studies have emerged which suggest that introducing solids prior to 6 months may have a protective effect against a baby developing lifelong allergies. But those studies aren't yet considered convincing enough to change the recommendations, and they don't change the fact that breastmilk delivers ideal nutrition and immune system support, and solids don't. If you do decide to introduce solids at 4 months, then I think that the way you balance providing perfect nutrition against the possibility of improving the baby's chances of avoiding an allergy is that once a day or every few days you give the baby very small quantities of solids, perhaps enough to cover the tip of your finger. That way the baby receives almost all her nutrition from breastmilk, but still receives the putative benefits of consuming solids. WHAT is quite a bit easier to answer than WHEN. You can offer the baby fingertip tastes of soft, unsalted, puréed or mashed fruits,...
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*cjuch's Avatar
    Today, 04:02 AM
    Thanks so much! I will definitely check out the videos and I will keep doing what I'm doing and make sure I nurse her more even after she falls asleep. In the beginning I was getting so discouraged so I was close to giving up but I really don't want to exclusively pump unless i really have to. I never realized how hard nursing can be, I just thought you stick your boob in their mouth and that's it :) The consultant gave me the syringe-it does have a curved tip so I will try to use it when nursing- it's just a little tricky with everything else going on but if it helps her latch better and stay latched then I will try it. The 23 ounces is an estimate with bottles only, so that seems like I'm able to stay on track with milk production. I do have formula as back up but I really have only had to use it once in a while. I think she gained her birth weight back within a week. I'm glad the sleeping thing is typical nursing behavior and I will move away from bottle feeding her after she wakes from sleeping to nursing her again until she's satisfied. I am getting the hang of the nipple shield a little bit better but I still will look into the others that you suggested.
    6 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*yhebra's Avatar
    Today, 02:35 AM
    Thank you both for your replies! They are much appreciated (it is incredibly difficult for me to come to my laptop these days)
    5 replies | 266 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:55 PM
    It's normal. And there is nothing in any way wrong with breastfeeding, it is an entirely healthy activity. Just as there can not be too many hugs or too much healthy food, there cannot be too much nursing. That said, nursing is a two way street! If you are feeling like you need less nursing, then it is entirely appropriate to set limits as you wish. See to me, this is a great time for nursing. Because again, nursing is good for your daughter and candy is not, nor is jumping if it is in a dangerous place or way. It sounds like she is toughing it out, if toughing it out means learning to handle disappointment. She is not only not getting the candy but you, her mommy, giver of all goodness, are the one denying her the candy! Of course, kids need to hear and learn no, but they will have natural, normal feelings about being denied. Wanting to nurse and reconnect with you makes perfect sense in such a scenario. I would also suggest, maybe look at how you are saying no. I can get pretty impatient and sharp with my kids and have found my kids needing reassurance and comfort more due to how I say things than what I am actually saying, if that makes sense. The recommendation is that weaning happen gradually and with love. The gradually part is of course going to vary, but in my experience, the more gradual, the better.
    1 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:25 PM
    It really sounds like you have made progress. That is great. I know you have a long way to go, but it really sounds like you are doing excellent considering the challenges. I will try to offer some ideas for some things you mention in order. This is a lactation aid otherwise known as an at the breast supplementer. The most common brands (maybe only brands) are the Medela SNS and the LactAid. Some moms also home make a lactation aid. If you want to explore this idea further I can link several informative articles. But basically, a lactation aid is used when mom does not make enough milk so baby can be supplemented at the breast. Of course it may also be quite helpful keeping baby interested in sucking if baby is having difficulty extracting milk. The down side is they can be fiddly and there is certainly a learning curve. The upside, aside that they may help get baby nursing better, is that using a lactation aid can help with time management, as nursing and supplementing happen simultaneously. They can be used with a shield or not. When I was using shields with my eldest, my LC gave me a syringe with a skinny curved tip I could insert under the shield - so baby got instant reward. It was fiddly and the syringe or the milk might make the shield pop off and I had to start all over again, however this method really helped tremendously with keeping baby interested and trying to latch. That is excellent milk transfer! Really- 2 ounces for the entire feeding...
    6 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*vzijl01's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:21 PM
    Hi there moms. Lo will be 4 months old on wednesday and we got the go ahead from dr to start with solids. I was not fortunate enough to attend the "do this not that" classes before hand...time constraints. Iam a bit freaked out about WHAT to start with, WHEN to give it, and some rules that go with it. Internet searching isnt making the process any easier. Advice and guidence will be much appreciated.
    1 replies | 66 view(s)
  • @llli*thawingsnow's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:14 PM
    Thank you both!!! This is vastly reassuring!
    3 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*cjuch's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:37 PM
    Thank for your reply! I do agree with you about the assumptions. I was disappointed to hear that I would have a hard time nursing even before we go the tongue tie fixed especially since she didn't even work with me and my baby to see for sure. I have had some progress since I last posted but still struggling. I met with the lactation consultant again and we tried having my LO latch on without a nipple shield. It didn't go so well, unfortunately. But, we tried at the beginning of the consultation after talking for a bit and we kept trying after my LO was scream crying. The consultant used a syringe with some of the milk I brought and was shooting some in the corner of her mouth while I was trying to get her to latch on. She would suck for a few seconds but then push away and start crying. This went on for about 5 minutes or longer (or at least it seemed long) and I was getting so frustrated cause my baby was crying so hard, so we stopped. Seems like we need more time with the nipple shield before transitioning. The consultant recommended using something else (I forgot was it is called- but you would use tubing and milk while trying to breast feed) but we decided to wait on that. We were then able to get her latched on with the nipple shield- it took some time because the nipple on the shield is so big she was only sucking the nipple but eventually she did latch and seemed to take about 2 ounces on my right side- according to the weigh in. So I was happy...
    6 replies | 223 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:44 PM
    I am hoping you are perhaps turning a corner. Hang in there, I know it is so hard. I was a madwoman the first 4 weeks or so of my oldest baby's life. Getting those little stretches of sleep can be tremendously helpful!
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:39 PM
    Mastitis can be cleared up without abs in SOME cases. Since you have caught this early, especially, there is a chance. The cure is simple- empty breast, lots of rest. This means, encourage baby to nurse frequently, hand express or pump if needed- do what you can to keep milk flowing out of the breasts. Rest means get horizontal and stay that way. You are sick and need help, get whatever help you can. I never had mastitis with my first two, even though I had OP. With my third I had it three times and did have to take abs every time. I know it is frustrating. Oversupply usually fixes on its own, given enough time. If not pumping is leading to mastitis, then maybe you want to approach an op resolution and reduction in pumping in a much more gradual manner.
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:29 PM
    Hey again, and thanks for the recommendation and advice. Having had some sleep (sooooo much easier when I don't have to make a bottle every feed!) I feel a bit more confident again. The crying earlier was at it's height in the late afternoon/evening which I think is actually not so abnormal. Hoping that he will be more alert and also get some daytime sleep tomorrow. One thing that I think has played a part in all this is how well he sleeps at night. I read before he came that babies are born with reversed night/day cycles. My little boy has not been like that at all since he was born, he has consistently slept really well at night and been more awake and alert in the day. It's been hard to wake him for night feeds from the start. Tonight I did manage to wake him to feed at 11 and he came off on his own accord from the second breast after 20 min looking pretty satisfied in his sleep. I feel better seeing that - and sleeping myself, although I actually can't sleep now. It's been such a crazy week worrying about his weight. The first few days of his life I was still kind of processing the trauma of giving birth (I had 2 nights and 3 days of back to back labour followed by a 20 minute pushing stage one hour after the hospital told me to try staying home a bit longer because it sounds like latent phase, then because he came out really fast and sunny side up I had lots of tears which led to the blood loss I had, after he was born there were no beds on the maternity ward...
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*bhacket4's Avatar
    Yesterday, 03:49 PM
    Yet another post. So I was trying to control the oversupply, and stop pumping as much... and I woke up this morning with painful right breast. I took my temperature it was 99.1, so I fed baby as much as I could.. took him to bed with me and relaxed. I go to take temp again, it's 99.5. Also, as I squeeze my breast, I can feel a part that is more sore.. as I squeeze that part, the milk that is coming out is yellowish. If I squeeze any other part, it's the normal white. I have had mastitis in my left breast, and had it probably 4 weeks ago. Except that time I had the chills, I felt like a bus had ran me over. This time the only symptoms I am having is a slight temperature, and tender breasts... and the color, if that is a symptom? Oh, also.. it is red (the breast).. but that could be because I am trying to hand express. Does this sound like mastitis? I HATE antibiotics. Is there anyway I can fix this (if it is mastitis) without antibiotics? Breastfeeding is seriously the hardest thing, in the world. I feel so defeated EVERY time something else comes up. How do I fix my oversupply if I can't go without pumping and getting this? I just want to curl up and cry!!! Baby has really bad gas, and occasionally green diapers.. and I know my oversupply is causing him the gas pains.. which is also upsetting. I'm so frustrated and upset :(:(
    1 replies | 70 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 02:04 PM
    Baby is what- about 2 or three weeks old now? That is the age a baby typically kind of "wakes up" and starts nursing like mad, wants to nurse all the time, and cries if they are taken off the breast. I do not know what is going on with your child's milk intake, but I am just saying, what you are describing would describe many babies at this age, even those gaining very rapidly It does NOT mean your child is suffering. Let's imagine, for the sake of argument, that you never make enough milk, and baby continues to need supplements as a result. There is great value to breastfeeding no matter how much baby gets 'exclusively' at the breast. As long as baby is supplemented if and as needed, breastfeeding can continue with no harm, no suffering, and no starving, and only with benefit to your child. A good book that addresses the situation you are facing is Making More Milk. Yes it addresses in detail milk production issues, why they happen and what to do about it, but it also includes much insight, real world coping suggestions, (how to nurse, supplement and pump without losing what is left of your mind, etc.) and encouragement for the mother who is facing the difficult situation of a baby who is not gaining normally at the breast. I strongly recommended it.
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*saw30's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:12 PM
    So an update, they came and weighed him again today and he had gained about 160g in the past two (formula stuffing) days reaching 3340g. We discussed the ideas that the breastfeeding woman from the hospital said (2 full formula feeds, pump during them, breastfeed the rest of the time) and they said its ok to try it and we'll reweigh in two days. Since the midwife left I've been mostly keeping my son on my breast (we took a car ride to the shops when he was in his car seat but that was basically it). When he comes off he wails so pathetically and I am suddenly very unsure of myself and this idea. I feel like he is starving, I clearly can't satisfy him at all, my heart bleeds for my little boy. One part of me hopes he'll still gain, but he seems so hungry I am very pessimistic. I don't know what to do, I really want to keep breastfeeding but I don't want him to suffer or starve. When I was showing "look there is milk in there" I actually squirted it accidentally on the midwife (it tended to drip before) so I felt like, hey maybe it *is* getting better, now I am not so sure.
    22 replies | 459 view(s)
  • @llli*vzijl01's Avatar
    Yesterday, 12:40 PM
    Hi there moms. Lo will be 4 months old on wednesday and we got the go ahead from dr to start with solids. I was not fortunate enough to attend the "do this not that" classes before hand...time constraints. Iam a bit freaked out about WHAT to start with, WHEN to give it, and some rules that go with it. Internet searching isnt making the process any easier. Advice and guidence will be much appreciated.
    0 replies | 23 view(s)
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