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  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 07:13 AM
    Here are a couple of links on iron and breastfed babies: http://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron/ http://scienceofmom.com/2011/10/12/why-is-breast-milk-so-low-in-iron/ Info on baby led weaning: http://www.babyledweaning.com http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/baby-led-weaning.html
    18 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 06:16 AM
    Silly question as it's usually Mommal who asks this, but has your thyroid been checked? My thyroid gives me low libido and vaginal dryness and that was before DD! And Postpartum thyroiditis is common I think :s Of course it is probably all normal - this is more of a 'just in case'
    9 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*bsua65's Avatar
    Today, 06:10 AM
    My DD wasn't using her tongue correctly post TT division, tongue walk and suck training along with some sacro cranial osteopathy helped :) After a couple of days of exercises and1 osteo appointment we managed to ditch nipple shields and she was feeding mostly correctly. So I agree withPP about finding some oral therapy!
    3 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:45 AM
    Yes, the pumping and feeding/supplementing/pumping is a hard treadmill for 4 months! I didn't have a premie and would never have been able to exclusively pump because I didn't respond well enough to the pump and the herbs were not that effective for me and my supply didn't come up enough to Exclusively breastfeed until I was on the Domperidone for several weeks. I've started to slowly wean down the dose but I'm still taking 7 tablets a day. DS is now 7 months.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:35 AM
    I agree with filmmommy. Additional question- is baby either bed-sharing or room-sharing at night, or is baby in a separate room where it might be more difficult to notice and react to any potential night-stirring/waking? This is something I really had no idea about before starting my own breastfeeding journey, but it is also totally okay to offer to nurse whenever YOU want, or whenever it seems like your body is indicating it would be helpful (through engorgement, for example). This can even be done with a baby who is sleeping ("dream-feed"). If pumping at night is a pain, you may consider a dream feed before going to bed yourself?
    2 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Today, 05:33 AM
    Right, as baby learns to nurse properly (and baby needs to nurse more and depend on bottles less for that to happen) baby will become better at getting milk out of the breast and eventually baby will work better than the pump at extracting milk. Many mom's don't respond all that well to the pumps. Keep up the good work, sounds like a definite step in the right direction. Don't get too upset by some rough nursing sessions or even whole rough days, they happen even when things are "perfect". And yes, nibbly feeding sessions happen, ya know nursing is about far more than just food, sometimes baby just wants to comfort suck, or sometimes baby wants to play chomp, stretch,lick, slurp, rasberry and tweek nipples (I have a 7 month old now who is showing horrible signs of being a twiddler, even when he was small there were times he would start slurping the nipple in/out of his mouth or start doing the latch on/latch off.)
    10 replies | 207 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 05:27 AM
    I think the little guy is overeating. I've been told from this forum and I believe Kellymom that 1 to 1.5 oz per hour away from baby is a good range, although some babies need a little more or less than that. I am away from my LO about 9.5-10 hours, and he has about 12 oz on average (four 3 oz bottles, about every 2 hours while I'm gone). Often when someone is new to bottle-feeding breastfed babies, they do the old-school formula method of feeding baby until they're full. But with breastfed babies it's more about mimicking breastfeeding. Don't worry -- I think a lot of us made that mistake at some point. We overfed my daughter for about a week, and she was refusing to breastfeed almost the entire night! Once we got it right, things got better. The small, frequent quantities is a difficult thing to get caregivers to understand, in my experience, because babies will often want more (whether it's milk or sucking) as soon as the bottle is empty. I always tell our caregivers to try a pacifier or distraction, and if baby still seems hungry after about 15 to 20 minutes, then he can have another ounce. Here's a link to help: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/feeding-tools/bottle-feeding/ Is baby just sleeping through the night? You could try to wake them up once to feed. Otherwise, you may way want to keep one pump in just to be safe. Once you start feeding baby a smaller amount through the day, he may actually wake up to eat at night.
    2 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 05:19 AM
    I think the poster who shared the book quote initially offered to provide you with the full section (I think perhaps via a phone call? I can't recall without going back). I definitely wouldn't want you or anyone to purchase a $75 book for one article, but was suggesting that you might be able to find a copy to reference, perhaps through your local la leche group, through your library, or through interlibrary loan. I don't want to put too fine of a point on it, because I also really, really believe that we all have an important political/philosophical/etc right to make decisions for our own bodies-- so more than anything, I want you to know that I believe that you are the one in the best position to make the best decisions for your own body, as well as your babe's. I think what was being suggested was that extreme elimination diets are very rarely necessary, because frequently there are lower-intervention (or no intervention) methods that are likely to work just as well, without the costs of stress on mom that an extreme elimination diet requires. But I hear you! You believe that it was worth a try, and that is totally okay. But if proved/proves not to solve the issue, or the issue is solved but other variables were also changed, then its worth thinking about phasing things back in, right? You're right that to the doctor, your baby is a patient, and to you, your baby is the most important being in the world. I totally get that! I also think that just because a doctor...
    18 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*filmmommy's Avatar
    Today, 05:18 AM
    With baby #1 my drive returned after my period returned, so you may see a change, ruchiccio, fairly soon. With baby #2, we've been so busy and exhausted -- especially with my return to full-time work. When I get home, all I want is my kids, because I miss them so much during the day. I miss hubby, too, but he feels the same way toward the kids, so we're in harmony there. Also, we have a toddler who is going through terrible 3s (whoever said it was terrible 2s?!). So the fact that it bothers you means you're willing to work at it -- whereas for us it is the last thing on either of our minds, as far as I can tell. And if it wasn't, it would be impossible to find time, with our kids on different bedtime schedules and baby co-sleeping with me. I feel like working together to raise our kids has been a much more important part of our relationship than the sex aspect ever was, so even though you're in a hurry for it to come back, please look at all the other growing you've done as a couple raising a child. That will go farther in the long run!
    9 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*erin.in.middletown's Avatar
    Today, 04:01 AM
    Have you read this article? http://www.lalecheleague.org/nb/law45com.html I have to run, so can't post with more thoughts or ideas now, but thought it might help in the meantime before getting more input.
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*lmctavish's Avatar
    Today, 03:22 AM
    Hi everyone! Really hope someone can help me. My daughter was born 10 weeks ago, and for the first 3 weeks was bfing roughly every 2-3hrs during the day, then usually every 3hrs at night. However, as soon as she turned 3 weeks old, she started feeding every hour, and cluster feeding from 6pm til 11/12pm. Usually after the cluster feed she would sleep for 6hrs, then have a quick feed then back to sleep for 2hrs. But since she turned 8 weeks old, she has started feeding every 45mins during the day, having a cluster feed in the evening, the feeding every hour at night, all adding up to about 30-35 feeds in 24hrs. Feeds have always lasted 30 mins since she was born. It's making it impossible to do anything, as even having lunch takes hours as I have to feed her, cook something, feed her, reheat it then eat! I've looked up what it could be and everything says growth spurt but 7 weeks is a long time to have a growth spurt! I've tried delaying for a bit but whenever I try and change her nappy/rock her etc she starts screaming at the top of her lungs and desperately trying to get to the breast. She used to take ebm or very occassionally formula but she now refuses the bottle completely. I even tried a dummy but to no avail. She had a check-up yesterday and her weight is perfect and she has plenty wet and dirty nappies! Really hope someone can help as I am at my whits end with this- I have no life outside of feeding. If she didn't refuse the bottle I would be so tempted...
    1 replies | 34 view(s)
  • @llli*h26's Avatar
    Today, 02:35 AM
    When I brought my baby home from the hospital, I was dismayed to find that I couldn't sleep as long as him; I would wake up with uncomfortable breasts and often had to pump in the middle of the night for relief. Since I had way too much milk, I tried to only pump a little bit for comfort and not to drain my breasts. I often spent much of the night uncomfortable. Eventually, as my milk supply settled and wasn't so excessive, I got into the pattern of just pumping before bed, right after the baby's last feeding, so I could sleep longer. I did drain my breasts. Lately, as I returned to work two weeks ago, I've found that time is a commodity in short supply. So I've been trying to do without the bedtime pumping, and more often than not I manage to make it through the night without pumping. Supply was never a concern when I was at home and exclusively breastfeeding. My child ate often (averaging closer to 1.5 hours than the typical 2-3 in the literature), but he seemed satiated, and I never had to supplement. However, my 11-wk old child seems to be eating copiously from a bottle. Yesterday, my husband (who is taking two weeks off from work), fed him 20 oz. from a bottle. In the same day, I pumped only 10.5 oz. In a usual day of work, I think I pump about 12-15 oz., but he eats as much as 18. At this rate, I'll burn through my freezer stash in less than a month.
    2 replies | 44 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:23 AM
    I'm sorry, I must have missed that baby was (briefly?) formula fed previously. My post was not directed at that but rather at the suggestion from the doctor that baby might need to stop being breastfed now (or in three weeks) and to instead be on a hypoallergenic formula due to blood in stool. I am not a doctor, but nothing in my research indicates that such a protocol is appropriate for the issue of blood in stool generally. Since your baby WAS on formula, has anyone discussed the possibility that that (the formula use) caused or exacerbated gut issues? This has not been studied adequately, but we know for sure than newborns who are formula fed can have intestinal issues that continue even after the formula is stopped. Continued exclusive breastfeeding heals these issues over time. And I wonder- if this was conventional dairy or soy based formula, and baby IS sensitive to dairy or soy, then might that increase the possibility that formula caused issues for baby? fyi it is possible baby might have sensitivity to an allergen he eats himself (in formula) but not to the allergen via breastmilk. The 4 month shots are often the worst. I don't know why. But due to my oldest having a similar reaction to the 4 month shots, (Such prolonged crying he momentarily fainted!) we chose for our subsequent children the 'alternative' vaccination schedule detailed in the book The Vaccine Book by Dr. Robert Sears. Also just in case it comes up again, mom taking antibiotics are...
    18 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 01:01 AM
    Wow, no. In my personal experience, a stronger desire for sex tends to return during baby's second year, even though my kids still nursed very often during that time and nursed for several years afterwards. But of course, even not having much desire for sex does not (or in any case, need not) mean that one eschews all intimacy...that one has no ability to have or indeed, to enjoy sex! It just means it might take a little more mind over matter to get things going. And yes, perhaps a good lubricant. There is nothing shameful or bad about needing a lubricant. Lots of things can cause vaginal dryness and it can happen to women of any age, mothers or not. For anyone who does not like the lubricant they are using, I would suggest maybe finding something that is more natural feeling to you, there are many newer products and even 'homemade' lubricants that may feel more natural than others. You can find reviews online and of course even purchase online. There is no doubt the hormonal changes that occur with breastfeeding tend to suppress sex drive more or less, BUT this issue is certainly not limited to mothers who breastfeed! Pregnancy & birth, as well as the responsibilities and emotions of parenthood, and yes, the lack of sleep, freedom and even privacy that comes with parenthood, changes our bodies, changes our minds, changes our relationship with our bodies, and our relationships to our partners. And age has little to do with sexual desire... It is not 'old'...
    9 replies | 144 view(s)
  • @llli*vf's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:33 PM
    To Karen: Thanks for separating it into a new thread! -- Apparently, I am not the only one who has this problem due to the vaccine: http://community.babycenter.com/post/a24726875/rotovirus_vaccine_and_blood_in_stool. Our babies are like guinea pigs, all sorts of vaccines are being tested on them. It breaks my heart seeing him how he is suffering because of this vaccine :cry I know that diseases that these vaccines are against are much more scary and dangerous. But, as it was with polio -- they only replaced the live oral vaccine with an injectable one after so many children got paralysis because of it (I have a good friend whose daughter has hemiparesis of one leg because of the live polio vaccine). They already cancelled one type of rotavirus vaccine because of the intussusception it was causing. Today, I saw the infectionist again, because of the blood in the stool. She kept insisting that this is not caused by the vaccine and that it is something in my food. The way doctors are ignoring things like these is appalling! My baby cried a lot yesterday and today, had only really green stool, consisting of mucus and blood spots only, and very small quantities (a spoonful every time). He had fever (38.5) in the rectum for which was prescribed Tempra. The infectionist was searching for an year infection and while trying to scrub something out from my baby's ear she made him crying inconsolably from pain for about 2 hours :cry :mad:. Why would she "do her job" when it...
    18 replies | 77 view(s)
  • @llli*liz.g.autry's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:08 PM
    Out of curiosity how long did it take for your supply to match up with what your LO would drink in a day? Right now my daughter is taking 350mL expressed breastmilk via bottle in addition to attempts at breastfeeding with every feed. I pump after almost every feed, I skip every once in awhile to catch some sleep. I'm getting about 300mL. Thankfully while she was in the NICU I was able to build up a freezer stash, but that stash is being depleted. I fell behind what she was getting daily about a month ago. I've managed to increase my daily production a bit, but its hard to say how much since I've gone from almost exclusively pumping to breastfeeding and pumping. What that long explanation was leading up to was how long did it take for you to match what your little one drank? I'm doing everything I can to increase supply; oatmeal, More Milk Special Blend, pumping round the clock, drinking constantly. I'm getting my prolactin and thyroid levels checked tomorrow. If my prolactin is low will look into domperidone. I'm just impatient, its been a long four months.
    1 replies | 47 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:46 PM
    Well this sounds like a big improvement to me as far as feeding-by improvement I mean, in the sense that baby is moving toward more nursing and less bottles... Does it feel that way to you? It is certainly normal for some feedings to be shorter and more nibbly than others...by that I mean, in many cases, even babies who are getting all their milk at the breast also will nurse that way. The IBCLC might suggest a weighted feed. These can be helpful in figuring out milk transfer, just remember they only indicate what happens at the one nursing session. In pump output, vs. what your baby took in a bottle, you are perhaps behind. That does NOT necessarily mean you actually are 'behind' in milk production.
    10 replies | 207 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:38 PM
    What kind of positioning have you tried? Is baby nursing frequently? Are you leaking or feeling more full than previously? Are you engorged at all, or pumping a lot? Full breasts are sometimes harder to latch onto, and if the areola is swollen due to engorgement or pumping, that can sometimes cause latch issues also, when milk drips, some babies try to lick rather than latch....
    3 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:28 PM
    Hi. So, the quick answer is no, it is certainly NOT too late to breastfeed. It is also not too late to increase milk production. In fact, milk production normally increases for the first several weeks anyway, even when there are no breastfeeding problems, mom is making 'enough' milk, and baby is not being supplemented. "Full" milk production is typically reached around 4-6 weeks. Of course, milk production can still be increased after that point, but the earlier attempts to increase milk production occur, the better. Also, even in the rare case a mother never makes enough milk to exclusively breastfeed her baby, she can still breastfeed while also supplementing. When you say you are supplementing with formula now, what do you mean? Is baby nursing at all? (if so, how many times a day?) Are you pumping at all? (if so, how many times a day?) How much "supplement' is baby getting each day and how much is formula and how much (if any) your own milk in a bottle? can you give us your baby's complete weight check history including the date when formula was introduced? Did anyone every try to help you figure out why baby was not gaining normally (if baby is not getting enough milk, this has many possible causes) Have you seen or are you able to see a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) or other breastfeeding helper for a breastfeeding assessment? If you have seen someone, are you following any particular plan for increasing milk production or helping baby...
    1 replies | 112 view(s)
  • @llli*usafreat's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:13 PM
    Today my hubs took the baby in for a check up to our original ped who has been absent for months and for once a doctor said the same thing I think...since she's bf no need for dairy. That was nice to hear. I think I may start a cup so she can understand it with a meal but I'm still concerned about reducing her desire to nurse after her meals. We'll see....
    8 replies | 737 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:06 PM
    Are bottles being given with paced bottle feeding techniques? If bottles are made too easy it can be hard to get baby back to the breast. Is baby also using paci?
    3 replies | 111 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 07:02 PM
    Start your own thread since there are many here that have been in a similar boat and answering might be more appropriate in a different thread. If your LO has always been below the 15th percentile then I doubt there would be much comment, If she has been dropping percentiles then the Docs will likely comment and you might want to figure out why.
    13 replies | 493 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:56 PM
    Ah who needs pants when they are 4 months old? Of course I live in FL so an infant can live kinda clothing optional much of the time here.
    13 replies | 493 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:50 PM
    You might want to look into some physical therapy with that tongue, see if your LC can teach you the tongue walk and see if she knows any other suck training exercises or if she can refer you to someone who does oral motor therapy with infants. (Some speech pathologists or occupational therapists do this kind of therapy.) You might try finger feeding and then when he has the suck down right, switch to breast.
    3 replies | 95 view(s)
  • @llli*tclynx's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:44 PM
    Are there ever nights when it isn't happening so much? You might want to keep a food diary since gassy isn't necessarily related to an "allergy" in mom's diet but still possibly to something you eat. I know of moms who say their babies have issues when they eat tomato or broccoli or something else. How is the gas during the day? How does nursing feel? Does baby have issues with maintaining suction or swallowing or choking while nursing? Sometimes babies with tongue or lip ties get a lot of air while nursing but if mom has oversupply and OALD the tongue or lip ties might not be diagnosed early because baby may be getting plenty of milk and not hurting mom while getting it.
    2 replies | 102 view(s)
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