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  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    Today, 04:35 PM
    HI Maddie, thanks for replying. Sorry, I know my message was a bit confused, and so am I. I actually met wit a lactation consultant twice since the birth. These were covered by the public insurance. The next meetings are going to cost quite a lot, and I cannot afford many, so I am trying to use them wisely. Of course I know that it would be the right thing to do. The consultant suggested in the first week that I weigh the baby before and after each feeding to know how much he takes. I am still doing it, so I know pretty well that my baby is drinking plenty of milk. What I am afraid of is that he is drinking so much because I have extra milk, and if I stopped pumping, he would not be able to get as much as he needs. I have no idea wether this makes sense or is just paranoia. But I kind of suspect that this was what happened in the second week when I first experimented with exclusive breastfeeding (but I had the shiekd back then). He gained a lot during the first four days and then lost a bit in the last three, damaging also my milk supply. Of course now he's much stronger, and we don't use the shields anymore, so it could be a very different situation. Does this make any sense?
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 02:45 PM
    Well if you want to breastfeed, please rest assured that no medical organization would say it is better to switch to formula- gas or no gas! Ok here are a few questions. I may have more later but we have to start somewhere. ;) Do you think you might be making more milk than baby needs, less then baby needs, or about what baby needs? One pretty reliable way to tell would be weight gain- is it fast, average or slow? Does baby seem to have any trouble handling milk flow when you nurse- gulping loud, gasping, coughing etc. About how many times in 24 hours does baby nurse, and does baby take one side at a time or two (or does it vary.)
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    Today, 01:50 PM
    I desperately want to nurse him for all the benefits for him that it gives. I successfully nursed my other 2 until a year old. Though they had periodic gas initially, it was nothing like his. I was proud to nurse and even manually pumped one side at a time for a year when I returned to work to keep nursing. I loved everything about it. I absolutely would love to get to the bottom of what is causing all this gas for my little guy.
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Today, 12:46 PM
    Hi jlr41709, welcome to the forum. And congratulatiuons! I am curious if you breastfed your older children, and if you did how that went, and if you did not, was it due to some particular issue. Any previous breastfeeding issues may not be relevant with subsequent babies but you never know. Of course only you can decide if formula is the right choice for your child. According to every medical source I know of, including the AAP, breastmilk is considered the most appropriate substance for infant feeding and consequently, assuming mom wishes to breastfeed, this is what is recommended. It is not recommended to switch to formula (or even, to switch formulas when a baby is already formula fed) due to gas. There is only one medically agreed upon reason to give a breastfed baby any formula and that is if mom does not make enough milk for baby to gain normally. And even then the recommendation is to continue to give baby as much breastmilk as is possibl while supplementing with formula. I realize you are seeing a difference with the formula, but this may or may not mean anything about your breastmilk. Even if it does mean something, it does not mean there is no way to make breastfeeding work for baby. Many moms who switch to formula decide later on that they wished they had continued to breastfeed, sometimes because of medical concerns in baby that only occur or become evident later. Unfortunately, once a mother stops nursing her child, it can be very hard to get...
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*jlr141709's Avatar
    Today, 12:22 PM
    Hi, I am brand new here. :) I have a seven week old little man. He is my third, though there is a 15 year age difference between him and my previous baby! Yep, my surprise baby! Anyhow, this poor little guy has been so gassy all day/night every day since he was born. But lately, it has been just relentless. The only place he is happy is at the nipple, yet it just seems to cause him more gas pain, more spitting up. I am pumping this poor guy with Mylicon and Gripe Water with little relief. The other night, out of desperation in trying to help him feel better, I took out some sample formula I was mailed before he was born and fed it to him. He ate 4 ounces and was so calm, so happy, slept a 6 hour stretch that night without all that pain and crying. It made me wonder if my want to bf him is worth what it seems to be putting him through. It breaks my heart.
    3 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 04:25 AM
    Thanks MaddieB, for your kind reply. Yes the problem is if I say I want to go to the toilet and leave, my son throws mini fit and becomes inconsolable (hopping this is terrible twos). Yes he stands outside bathroom door, waling and will not let anyone come near him. So this strategy is of no use. I will now give a shot at trying to give him more incentive to end nursing by offering more fun stuff like snacks, breakfast options. My husband is very less interest in taking over night time routine, so will convince him to partake some of my load. Will keep you posted on the progress
    2 replies | 160 view(s)
  • @llli*mum.mumbai's Avatar
    Today, 04:15 AM
    Thanks Mommal, yes my son is 2.5 years 31 months precisely. As your suggestions I will now apply your strategy of milk free bed time, by including my hubby's to do the last leg of bedtime routine like a nice cuddle, back rub, boring long story etc. Actually my partner uses this time for quality me time( catching up on chats, mobile games etc) so yes there will be some resistance but will get over it. I had read your reply long back about weaning morning feed by actually taking kids to your parents place and bringing them straight from bed to breakfast table. Well it worked brilliantly for 15 days I was at my parents place, but he slipped badly when I went to my place. I think I will now bring more enticing stuff interesting snacks and stuff, to make nursing seem boring. Hopefully some of this will work keep you posted on updates
    2 replies | 154 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:24 PM
    ;):thumbsup
    6 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*bfulmer's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:22 PM
    Sorry I just re-read this and realized you said smoothies, not cookies. Again it depends on what is in the smoothy and in what dose, but still I wanted to correct my mistake there. If your baby is regularly going about 3-4 hours between nursing sessions, truly the most effective and (usually, although every situation is different) easiest way to increase milk production, milk intake, and weight gain is to encourage baby to nurse more often. Of course some 6 month olds are fine on that frequency but on the other hand, it does not take much breastmilk to increase weight gain to closer to average when it is slightly below that. Just one or two additional nursing sessions a day can make a big difference. If doctor is concerned enough they want another weight check in 6 weeks, that is a good reason to try that. Even if solids are only during your work day, they can impact the whole day of nursing just as overfeeding with bottles can. Given the weight gain concern I am not going to suggest reduce solids, but again I would suggest encouraging baby to nurse more often when you are with baby. Pumping a little more when at work, if and when you can, is also a good idea if you have any concerns about milk production now or for the future. But the need to do this can be offset to some degree if baby nurses more often. The website and book Breastfeeding in Combat Boots is written for nursing moms in the military but has ideas for any pumping mom with a career that makes...
    6 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*karaeubanks's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:18 PM
    I weaned my 21-month-old 5 days ago. After 5 days of cabbage, peppermint tea, sudafed 12-hour in the mornings, ibuprofen, and hand expressing in the shower, I still have VERY lumpy clogged breasts. I'm hand expressing a few times a day, and I know you're supposed express as little as possible, but I think I would really need to empty out to get rid of these lumps. Any advice on what I should do about the plugs? Are breasts supposed to be lumpy while you dry up? It's painful.
    0 replies | 49 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:41 PM
    Hi asweetlull. I am so sorry you are having this concern. My best suggestion to you is to see an IBCLC for an in person appointment as soon as possible. Only IBCLCs are trained specifically to help with breastfeeding issues. Doctors are almost never able to help with these situations. As one example of questionalble advice doctors love to give, it is that they tell mom not to nurse so they can only supplement. Why? If baby is not gaining, the issue is not baby nursing but that baby is not getting enough milk when nursing. This can be solved by supplementing while continuing to nurse. Here is what to expect at an appt with an IBCLC: http://www.cwgenna.com/lconsult.html If you do not know how to find an IBCLC please let us know. What your expressed milk looks like in a bottle before or after being refrigerated is irrelevant, I promise you. Do not even think about that. All you want to worry about at this point is 1) pumping often enough with a good enough pump to make sure your milk production is ok going forward and 2) to get baby nursing again asap.
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 08:03 PM
    Hi, it sounds like you have had a rough time but are now seeing light at the end of the tunnel. Your concerns that baby is not stimulating your milk production are normal after an experience like yours, but it is also a concern many moms share, even when they have had no problems. So it might help to talk about milk production and what helps it and what hurts it. Of course exclusive breastfeeding (no pumping needed) is the norm. Assuming your baby is getting enough milk to gain normally, you can usually assume that your milk production is being stimulated appropriately, because it is not "stimulation" that makes milk production normal, but milk removal. There are two important components to milk production being normal. One is, effectiveness of milk removal. The other is, frequency of milk removal. Assuming a baby is nursing effectively enough and frequently enough to gain normally, usually you can assume that milk removal effectiveness and frequency are where they need to be for milk production to be normal. On the other hand if baby is NOT gaining normally, you can assume that there is a problem with milk removal effectiveness and/or frequency. What is normal nursing frequency? Most sources say 8-12 times a day. But I think 8 is very low. If there is a newborn who is nursing less than 10 times in 24 hours I have not met them. Some sources say 10-15 times a day and this is the one I think is much more realistic. So the question is, how often is your baby...
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*asweetlull's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:38 PM
    I have a 10 day old. I have been breastfeeding, but his weight continues to decrease. First I tried alternating every other feeding with breastfeeding on the breast and bottle feeding 2 oz. of my pumped milk. He didn't gain any weight. Today the doctor told me to stop breastfeeding and pump exclusively. After breastfeeding him and then weighing him he hadn't gained anything. She doesn't think he is sucking hard enough. He often falls asleep on the breast even after I unswaddle him, chicken arm him, blow on him, etc. My question is- When I put my pumped milk only the fridge there is no separation. Does this mean I am only pumping the foremilk? If so, how can I get the hindmilk out? I'm already doing breast compressions as I pump. Thank you.
    1 replies | 36 view(s)
  • @llli*margutte's Avatar
    Yesterday, 01:42 PM
    My baby was born on the 23rd of February, four and a half weeks ago, at 36 weeks of gestational age, so he reached his full term age during last week. He was 2.5 kg at birth, and about 3.3 kg now. 
 He spent two days in NICU and five total days at the hospital. During this time the nurses gave hime formula and later my milk from the bottles, when it came. I got some counselling with breastfeeding at the hospital, after he left the NICU. They basically told me that his mouth was too small and my nipple a bit flat, so I started using Medela nipple shields. By weighing him before and after the nursing, we saw that he was not taking in enough milk, so I had to keep pumping and giving him the bottle afterwards. I had enough milk to feed him by then, about 500 gr a day at least. Once we came home, I rented a pump and a scale and continued the same routine of nursing, double-weighing, supplementing my own milk with a bottle and pumping. About a week and a half after the birth, the midwife came for the routine check-up and, since he had gained weight, she suggested to stop the stressful routine and exclusively breastfeeding for four days, then she would come to weigh him again. After these four days, he had gained 180 gr., so I continued for three more days, after which the midwife weighed him again. It was shocking to find that he had lost 50 grams during this time! The midwife thought that he was understimulating me because of the nipple shields. So I started the old...
    2 replies | 71 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:42 AM
    The lactation textbook Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple has what looks to be like quite a comprehensive list of things to do to help prevent re-occurrence. If your LC has a copy she can just read that to you. Maybe something will jump out at you. I have not found a similar list searching online but you may have better luck. If I recall correctly it includes everything from how to basics of cleaning things that may harbor thrush to the suggestion to treat other families members and even family pets! I have known a couple moms who solved ongoing thrush issues (or anyway, something that appeared to be thrush) that did not respond to other treatment (or they could not get other treatment) using cocoanut oil on their nipples. I think one did vinegar washes as well, I forget. Here is a list of other treatment suggestions (aside Newman's) http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/thrush-resources/
    5 replies | 199 view(s)
  • @llli* noolie's Avatar
    Yesterday, 06:52 AM
    Hi.. thank you so much for your updates.. How are you going now? I have been going through something similar with my 2nd child. She is 7 months now and since Christmas I have had joint pain in my hands (fingers/wrists), ankles, toes, knees and occasional elbows. It started off mild then went from bad to worst. Tested negative for rheumatoid arthritis but i have really high levels of inflammation so they r saying it's arthritis but i really think it's related to breastfeeding and hormones. I am taking lots of fish oil, tumeric and on an anti inflammatory diet. I really hope it goes away soon... trying to wean our baby from the breast but no luck...
    19 replies | 46411 view(s)
  • @llli*maddieb's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 07:23 PM
    Yes the increase in nursing can be on evenings, over night and days off. Sorry if I was not clear about that. Many moms find that a "nursing vacation" where they hang out with baby for anywhere from several hours to a couple days doing not much except cuddling and relaxing and encouraging baby to nurse more will give production a nice jumpstart. If your job does not allow you time to pump during the day, you can even increase milk removal at work by learning hand expressing and doing that quickly during a break. No need to express much at all, no need to even save the milk. It is just about giving your body the message to increase production. But if you can get baby nursing more often at home that is likely to be enough to increase production enough that baby is happier when nursing.
    5 replies | 161 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 03:01 PM
    Even if more daytime nursing/pumping isn't possible, supply can be increased by nursing/pumping more during the hours when you are home with your baby. Aside from more frequent milk removal, galactogogues may help, but there is nothing that will be even 1/2 as effective as more nursing/pumping. I wish there were a different answer!
    5 replies | 161 view(s)
  • @llli*beautybecomes's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 01:41 PM
    Thanks for all the brilliant replies. I believe it's an issue of reoccurance. It comes and goes after she has received treatment. I even mentioned to the DOC about the treatment for me needs to be more than one dose and he just argued with me. (I live in Ireland- worst breastfeeding rates in the entire western world...I feel there is a huge lack of education re breastfeeding) I'm at the point I may book another consultant with a LC. I used one when she was only three months and tongue tie. Or perhaps a derm. I really don't want to wean her. I know in my heart she isn't ready and to be truly honest neither am I. As for the night feeds....yea I have faced a lot of judgement in that regard from her doc amount others. But it comforts her at night so I'll just keep doing what works.
    5 replies | 199 view(s)
  • @llli*djs.mom's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 09:38 AM
    Also a lot women pump wean at a year or right after and their supply doesn't suffer and they just continue to breastfeed while together. Without supplementing with cow's milk. I went back to work at the 14 month point after being home full time up until that point. There was no where to pump. And while my breasts were very very full I didn't lose my supply. We continued to nurse on demand while together and he wasn't interested in cow's milk. So he drank water while away from me and solids. He was an avid eater by the year point and I didn't need to supplement with cow's milk and I didn't lose my supply. He did eat cheese and would dip stuff in yogurt. So some dairy. But no milk.
    3 replies | 152 view(s)
  • @llli*kaitlynt's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 08:13 AM
    thanks for your replies! unfortunately, nursing and/or pumping during the day are just not possible...i work outside the home, and my employer doesn't really provide time to pump after 1 year. outside of more frequent milk removal, is anything else possible?
    5 replies | 161 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 06:04 AM
    Also, where is baby sleeping- in bed with you, in a cot in your room, or in his own room?
    2 replies | 170 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 06:03 AM
    :ita with all the above.
    6 replies | 168 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 06:00 AM
    :ita with the PP! I know this is exhausting, but I promise there is an end to it! I nursed and pumped with my firstborn and while it seemed like an eternity at the time, I look back and it was just 3 months. Pretty short in relation to my whole life.
    2 replies | 173 view(s)
  • @llli*mommal's Avatar
    March 25th, 2017, 05:57 AM
    :ita with the PP. I strongly second her suggestion to avoid the bottle as much as possible. If you sense a bottle dependency developing, now is the time to nip it in the bud!
    2 replies | 170 view(s)
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